Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.
Living facilities for humans.
Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.
Specialized residences for persons who do not require full hospitalization, and are not well enough to function completely within the community without professional supervision, protection and support.
Antigens from the house dust mites (DERMATOPHAGOIDES), mainly D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. They are proteins, found in mite feces or mite extracts, that can cause ASTHMA and other allergic diseases such as perennial rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL) and atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC). More than 11 groups of Dermatophagoides ALLERGENS have been defined. Group I allergens, such as Der f I and Der p I from the above two species, are among the strongest mite immunogens in humans.
The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.
Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.
The family Passeridae comprised of small, mainly brown and grey seed-eating birds with conical bills.
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.
Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
Species of European house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE. It is the most commonly found house dust mite.
Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.
A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.
Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Species of American house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE.
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.
Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).
Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.
An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Several species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
The contamination of indoor air.
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
A family of RNA viruses infecting insects and fish. There are two genera: Alphanodavirus and Betanodavirus.
Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.
Articles of cloth, usually cotton or rayon and other synthetic or cotton-blend fabrics, used in households, hospitals, physicians' examining rooms, nursing homes, etc., for sheets, pillow cases, toweling, gowns, drapes, and the like.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.
The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.
The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
An amorphous region of electron dense material in the cytoplasm from which the MICROTUBULES polymerization is nucleated. The pericentriolar region of the CENTROSOME which surrounds the CENTRIOLES is an example.
Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.
Free-standing facilities that provide prenatal, childbirth, and postnatal care and usually incorporate family-centered maternity care concepts and practices.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.
The care and management of property.
Housing for groups of patients, children, or others who need or desire emotional or physical support. They are usually established as planned, single housekeeping units in residential dwellings that provide care and supervision for small groups of residents, who, although unrelated, live together as a family.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Rhodnius prolixus is a vector for TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.
Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
A pyrethroid insecticide commonly used in the treatment of LICE INFESTATIONS and SCABIES.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.
A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.
Supplies used in building.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.
Spherical phototrophic bacteria found in mud and stagnant water exposed to light.
The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.
Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.
Bites and stings inflicted by insects.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.
Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A family of the order Rodentia containing 250 genera including the two genera Mus (MICE) and Rattus (RATS), from which the laboratory inbred strains are developed. The fifteen subfamilies are SIGMODONTINAE (New World mice and rats), CRICETINAE, Spalacinae, Myospalacinae, Lophiomyinae, ARVICOLINAE, Platacanthomyinae, Nesomyinae, Otomyinae, Rhizomyinae, GERBILLINAE, Dendromurinae, Cricetomyinae, MURINAE (Old World mice and rats), and Hydromyinae.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Substances found in many plants, containing the 4-hydroxycoumarin radical. They interfere with vitamin K and the blood clotting mechanism, are tightly protein-bound, inhibit mitochondrial and microsomal enzymes, and are used as oral anticoagulants.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
An in vitro allergen radioimmunoassay in which allergens are coupled to an immunosorbent. The coupled allergens bind the IgE in the sera of patients which in turn binds radioisotope-labeled anti-IMMUNOGLOBULIN E antibodies.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.
A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)
Materials applied to fabrics, bedding, furniture, plastics, etc. to retard their burning; many may leach out and cause allergies or other harm.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.
Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.
The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.
Disposal, processing, controlling, recycling, and reusing the solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes of plants, animals, humans, and other organisms. It includes control within a closed ecological system to maintain a habitable environment.
Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.
The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.
The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
Size and composition of the family.
A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.
Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
An organothiophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide.
Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.
Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.
The family Hirundinidae, comprised of small BIRDS that hunt flying INSECTS while in sustained flight.
The family Gryllidae consists of the common house cricket, Acheta domesticus, which is used in neurological and physiological studies. Other genera include Gryllotalpa (mole cricket); Gryllus (field cricket); and Oecanthus (tree cricket).
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
The status of health in rural populations.
On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.
The status of health in urban populations.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
A plant genus of the family VERBENACEAE. Members contain lantadene and other TRITERPENES.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Application of allergens to the nasal mucosa. Interpretation includes observation of nasal symptoms, rhinoscopy, and rhinomanometry. Nasal provocation tests are used in the diagnosis of nasal hypersensitivity, including RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)
Unstable isotopes of lead that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Pb atoms with atomic weights 194-203, 205, and 209-214 are radioactive lead isotopes.
Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.
Terrorism on September 11, 2001 against targets in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia, and an aborted attack that ended in Pennsylvania.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
Small, hairy, moth-like flies which are of considerable public health importance as vectors of certain pathogenic organisms. Important disease-related genera are PHLEBOTOMUS, Lutzomyia, and Sergentomyia.
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... rescue and rehabilitation centre, the park is the largest zoological garden in India. The zoo houses 2,553 species of flora and ... Additionally the district administration has recently developed a botanical garden, Boat house, Cave house, New waterfalls ... The state houses a no. of heritage sites mainly composed of the ancient temples and deities of the Pallava and Chola empire ... The largest pilgrimage center in Tamil Nadu and the second largest in South India after Tirupati, Palani is the most famous of ...
It was also built to house local World War II veterans. The complex and its eponymous shopping center were among the first in ... "54 Blocks Bought for Home Centers: Gross-Morton Firm Announces Plans for 1,400 Houses on Queens Tracts". The New York Times. ... "New Shopping Area for Apartment Residents: 12-Acre Site Being Developed as Store Center Adjoining Fresh Meadows Housing". The ... The proposal was not approved, and a day-care center was opened instead. Huang attempted to evict the day-care center in 2009, ...
London: Wesleyan Mission-House. VIII: 102. June 1851. Retrieved 30 November 2015. "Juvenile Correctional Centres". The ... The Armadale Juvenile Correctional Centre for girls was located in Alexandria but on 22 May 2009 a fire went through the ... agriculture has been on the decline as farmland is being used for housing and other developments and the cultivated area has ... Steer Town Academy The Hill Top Juvenile Correctional Centre, operated by the Department of Correctional Services, Jamaica, is ...
The Engineer August 2016 "High Value Manufacturing Catapult". Companies House. Retrieved 26 August 2018. "HVM Catapult Centres ... It is a Private company limited by guarantee and its members are seven national centres: Advanced Forming Research Centre - at ... at 31 March 2017 there were 2,114 employees in total at the centres. In August 2018, each of the centres received allocations ... which forms part of the Catapult centres initiative. Catapult centres were set up by Swindon's Innovate UK (formerly the ...
Tinsley House, which opened in 1996 at Gatwick, was the first purpose built immigration detention centre. In 1998, the new ... The opening of Campsfield House Detention Centre in 1993 provided 200 extra spaces. The expansion led to a more centralised ... House of Lords. Historic Hansard. 16 February 2000. Retrieved 28 April 2020. "Afghan hijackers". House of Commons. Historic ... During the course of collating evidence for the enquiry the HAC visited the Red Cross centre at Sangatte near Calais and saw ...
The leisure centre and library are host to many in house and local activity groups. In 2018, as part of renovations reducing ... The Willow Brook Centre provides a summer beach in the town centre. Primarily aimed at young children and families, the Centre ... Baileys Court Activity Centre on Baileys Court Road and Brook Way Activity Centre on Brook Way. Each activity centre offers ... The Willow Brook Centre, Bradley Stoke's town centre and shopping hub, has more than six million visitors every year. The town ...
... storage and distribution centres; funeral directors; photography studios; and auction houses. Also excluded are restaurants ... enclosed shopping centres, restaurants with table service, bars, banks, building societies, post offices, community centres and ... Public houses were inadvertently omitted from this list, but were added by The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Wearing of Face ... SI 2020/1024 also added a requirement that customers wear face coverings in theatres, restaurants, bars, and public houses, and ...
"Shopping Centres Newly Opened". Hong Kong Housing Authority. 9 December 2016. "Tenants at Shui Chuen O Estate enjoy convenient ... The Shui Chuen O Shopping Centre has 59 shops. The Shui Chuen O Market is connected to the shopping centre. In order to ... Public Housing in the New Era: Shui Chuen O architectural Design Competition. Hong Kong: Hinge Publications. 2001. "Shuen Chuen ... Shui Chuen O Estate (Chinese: 水泉澳邨) is the largest public housing estate in Sha Tin, New Territories, Hong Kong. The estate ...
... housing and hostels for workers; canteens; laundries and medical centres. The UK's ROFs were set up and operated as production ... ROFs involved with explosive manufacture or filling needed, on safety grounds, to be located away from centres of population. ... and is now the Yarnfield Park Training and Conference Centre and run by Accenture. ROF Elstow was taken over by the CEGB and ...
Jaico Publishing House. ISBN 978-81-8495-024-3. Kuiper, Kathleen (15 August 2010). The Culture of India. The Rosen Publishing ... "World Heritage Centre (UNESCO) - 240 - Khajuraho Group of Monuments". UNESCO Organization. Retrieved 5 November 2013. Kramrisch ... ISBN 978-1-61530-149-2. Kumar, Brajesh (2003). Pilgrimage Centres of India. Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd. ISBN 978-81-7182-185- ...
publishing house "the Atheist" : book factory Center. publishing house of peoples S. S. R., 1928. - 39 p.: Il.; Kandidov, Boris ... publishing house "the Atheist", 1928 (type. "Peasant newspaper"publishing house). - 80 p.: Il., Fax.; Religion in the Imperial ... Moscow] : Center. the Council of the Union armies. atheists of the USSR, [1935] (typ. f-Ki 7 "Diafoto"). 3 PP.; Kandidov, Boris ... Boris Kandidov ; Center. the Council of the Union armies. atheists of the USSR. - Moscow : Gaiz, 1932 (type. Beep.) - Obl. 64 p ...
Center; It houses the University of Louisville's basketball program.) The Memphis relocation effort was led by AutoZone founder ... Louis Blues and their home venue Kiel Center (now the Enterprise Center). St. Louis had not been the home of an NBA franchise ... Kiel Center had annual sell-out for 15 to 17 basketball games for the Saint Louis University Billikens. After the deal was ... The city had opened the US$114 million New Orleans Arena (now Smoothie King Center) in 1999, and offered it as a home to the ...
Galt House Hotel & Suites, Marriott and Hyatt Regency), and 2,300 hotel rooms. In 2010 it was extended from the Galt House to ... District (south of Market St., west of 2nd St., north of York St., and east of 5th St.) Civic Center (south of Market St., west ... The Brennan House at 631 S. Fifth, which is operated as a historic property with daily tours, shows a glimpse of Downtown ... Though these houses were built of brick and other longer-lasting materials, none remained single family homes by the 21st ...
"N8 Limied". Companies House. Retrieved 27 August 2016. Partnership, N8 Research. "About Us - N8 Research Partnership". Niven, ... Another development was the launch of the N8 High Performance Computing facility in March 2013 (now the N8 Centre of Excellence ... N8 website Leeds press release on the N8 Group N8 High Performance Computing capability regeNer8 - the N8 Centre for ... "Northern Intensive Computing Environment". N8 Centre of Excellence in Computationally Intensive Research. 17 February 2020. ...
The temple occupies an area of 5 acres (2.0 ha). The sanctum houses the image of Kamakshi in seated posture and is flanked by ... Sri Kamakshi is the mula devata of the Kamakoti pitha seated in the centre of the inner sanctorum of the shrine in Kanchipuram ... ISBN 81-7907-053-0. Diwakar, Macherla (2011). Temples of South India (1st ed.). Chennai: Techno Book House. p. 140. ISBN 978-93 ... is enshrined at the centre of the gayatri mandapam as Shri Kamakshi. She is seated on pancha brahmasana and sports in her four ...
ISBN 0-231-12543-7., p.246 "Centres of Civilization; On the Lower East Side of New York", New York Times, Jul 21, 1901. Excerpt ... Hewitt's, made not very long ago, touching the tenement house district, which was considerably commented on in the press. The ... Dunlap, David W. (2004). From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press ...
Hartley House: And Its Relations to the Social Reform Movement. New York: Hartley House, 1897. Public schools as social centres ... The Hartley House records, which include extensive correspondence with Graham Phelps Stokes, are housed at the University of ... Stokes' papers are housed at Columbia University in New York City. The collection includes more than 1600 cataloged letters. ... It was a world apart from the lower floors of the building, where the regular settlement house functions were carried out among ...
"About CAE". Centre for Adult Education. "Neighbourhood Houses Victoria". Association of Neighbourhood Houses and Learning ... "Neighbourhood Houses and Community Centres". City of Greater Geelong. "Sharing in Learning Funding". LaTrobe Valley Express. 17 ... In the 1970s and 1980s, neighbourhood houses and learning centres began to offer learning programs for their communities. The ... Many of these neighbourhood houses and community centres are now also Learn Local providers. Learn Local providers are funded ...
"BBC - Harpz Kaur and Joe Tasker are the new presenters of CBBC's Saturday Mash-Up! - Media Centre". BBC Media Centre. BBC. 20 ... However, due to the 2019-2020 Coronavirus pandemic, the show was presented from Tasker, Kaur, and Chapman's houses via video- ... "BBC - Asian Network's Harpz Kaur and YouTuber Joe Tasker are the new presenters of CBBC's Saturday Mash-Up! - Media Centre". ... "Live Saturday morning kids telly set to return to the BBC - Media Centre". BBC. " ...
The Chalbi Desert makes up much of the center region of the county. The county is made of an extensive plain lying 300m and ... "2019 Kenya Population and Housing Census Volume I: Population by County and Sub-County". Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. ... There are 277 ECD centres 209 primary schools and 31 secondary schools. The county has also 1 teachers training colleges, 4 ... Munene, Evans (4 November 2019). "2019 Kenya Population and Housing Census Results". Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. ...
Carnegie Center. - M .: Russian Political Encyclopedia (ROSSPEN), 2010. - 272 p. cf. N. A. Goreva calls the system of state ... Gennady Zyuganov - The Communists - 21; Algorithm Publishing House 2012; ISBN 5457273857, ISBN 9785457273856; "We are attacking ... Center for Strategic and International Studies, November 2000. What is 'Putinism'? Archived 5 February 2009 at the Wayback ... Smith Conflict Studies Research Centre Putinism: highest stage of robber capitalism, by Andrei Piontkovsky, The Russia Journal ...
The Silas Wright House at 3 East Main Street in Canton is now a museum and the home of the St. Lawrence County Historical ... "Martin Van Buren: Life Before the Presidency". Miller Center. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia. Retrieved June 19, ... In 1826, Wright was elected to the U.S. House as a Bucktail. In the two-member 20th District, Wright and his running mate ... In the House, Wright supported the protectionist Tariff of 1828 (the Tariff of Abominations), though he later changed his ...