Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.After-Hours Care: Medical care provided after the regular practice schedule of the physicians. Usually it is designed to deliver 24-hour-a-day and 365-day-a-year patient care coverage for emergencies, triage, pediatric care, or hospice care.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Night Care: Institutional night care of patients.Brain Edema: Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Mice, Inbred C57BLPregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Neuroprotective Agents: Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.CreatinineOrgan Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain: A disorder characterized by a reduction of oxygen in the blood combined with reduced blood flow (ISCHEMIA) to the brain from a localized obstruction of a cerebral artery or from systemic hypoperfusion. Prolonged hypoxia-ischemia is associated with ISCHEMIC ATTACK, TRANSIENT; BRAIN INFARCTION; BRAIN EDEMA; COMA; and other conditions.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Creatine Kinase: A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm: Dyssomnias associated with disruption of the normal 24 hour sleep wake cycle secondary to travel (e.g., JET LAG SYNDROME), shift work, or other causes.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Injections, Intraperitoneal: Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.In Situ Nick-End Labeling: An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.Interleukin-6: A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Dialysis Solutions: Solutions prepared for exchange across a semipermeable membrane of solutes below a molecular size determined by the cutoff threshold of the membrane material.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Dexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Gastric Acidity Determination: Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Ischemic Preconditioning: A technique in which tissue is rendered resistant to the deleterious effects of prolonged ISCHEMIA and REPERFUSION by prior exposure to brief, repeated periods of vascular occlusion. (Am J Physiol 1995 May;268(5 Pt 2):H2063-7, Abstract)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.United StatesEndotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Shock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Acetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Intracranial Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.Time Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.
Each workout session incorporates cardio and strength training. They offer one-hour, full-body workouts led by a personal ...
Combining dance cardio, strength, and flexibility, it provides an introduction to the AKTechnique. Happy Hour (60 minutes): As ... It's empowering." Classes run from an hour to seventy-five minutes and change content every two to four weeks in order to keep ... One Night Stand (60 minutes): This class is completely cardio-based, where clients learn past AKT choreography to prepare for S ... Founded in 2013, the AKT program consists of a mixture of circuit training, HIIT, strength, toning, dance cardio, Pilates and ...
When the competition season is on, he works out for about 4-5 hours. He combines strength and cardio exercise to build muscle ... When he wants to bulk up, he works out for three hours. ...
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The same study showed that injured squid begin escape responses earlier and continue these for longer for up to 48 hours after ... The physiological responses of cephalopods to noxious stimuli include cardio-respiratory changes, defecation and vomiting. Many ... These protective responses continue for at least 24 hours. In the long-term, they also show heightened sensitisation at the ... This persists for at least 48 hours after injury, indicating that behavioural responses to injury in cephalopods can be similar ...
The station has an exercise, weights, and cardio gym that is open 24 hours a day. Air Force Space Command units are under the ...
More than 150 pen heart operations done by cardio-vascular surgeons in the Ganja International Hospital. There is check-up ... The hospital features 24 hours emergency services, including 2 ambulances and 1 reanimobile ready for transporting of patients ... Affable and experienced security personal serves 24 hours. Water sprinkler fire suppression system, 8 emergency exit and ...
The school also has an on-site fitness suite/gym, including separate facilities for muscular and cardio workouts. It is open to ... the public outside of school hours. Since September 2013, the school have run a scholarship programme helping very bright ...
When the NCAA placed weekly hours limits on athletic training time, she quit the Stanford swim team to focus on training. She ... Evans was distinctive for her unorthodox "windmill" stroke and her apparently inexhaustible cardio-respiratory reserves. Slight ...
Most gyms are open 24 hours a day and offer cardio equipment, fixed and free weights, and exercise classes. There are no ...
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24 Hour Cardio Mix (most likely derived from 24 Hour Fitness). Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1999 (PDF). 1999. p. D-282. ...
A total of 266 credit hours are to be completed through ten semesters (5 years) before graduation and the study is in English ... Neurological and Cardio-respiratory care. Typical entry requirements for undergraduate degree courses are three academic GCE 'A ... Residencies for a Doctor of Physical Therapy are between 9 and 36 months and must be completed within a minimum of 1,500 hours ... Fellowships must be completed between 6 and 36 months and completed with a minimum of 1000 hours. Fellowships are offered in ...
The match had a duration of 120 hours, one minute and 7.8 seconds. The marathon was a fund raising event to provide housing in ... To build the players' endurance, the coaches introduced cardio workouts, plyometics, and physical conditioning exercises and ... The match tip off was scheduled at 07:00 PST but the game started at some hours later than initially planned at 09:00. Pasig ... No timeouts, no halftime break and fouls of each players will go back to zero every two hours". The Philippine Daily Inquirer. ...
... and the cardio/pulmonary system. Mission duration was 9 days, 19 hours, 23 minutes and 8 seconds, traveling 4.1 million miles ... Dunbar is a private pilot with over 200 hours in single engine land aircraft, has logged more than 700 hours flying time in T- ... A veteran of five space flights, Dunbar has logged more than 1,208 hours (50 days) in space. She served as a mission specialist ... Mission duration was 8 days, 19 hours and 47 seconds, traveling 3.6 million miles in 138 orbits of the Earth. Dunbar was the ...
... the irreversible neurodegenerative processes do not manifest for hours. Cryonicists[who?]state that rapid cooling and cardio- ... Even at room temperature, cells may take hours to die and days to decompose. Although neurological damage occurs within 4-6 ... People, particularly children, have survived up to an hour without heartbeat after submersion in ice water. In one case, full ... are available to wait by the bedside of patients who are to be cryopreserved to apply cooling and cardio-pulmonary support as ...
Researchers at Harvard have shown that human subjects can at least be entrained to a 23.5-hour cycle and a 24.65-hour cycle ( ... Shift-work also leads to increased metabolic risks for cardio-metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and inflammation. Due to the ... In diurnal animals (active during daylight hours), in general τ is slightly greater than 24 hours, whereas, in nocturnal ... entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These 24-hour rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and they have been widely ...
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On the day of his death, the country was celebrating the conquest of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, (Chico died around nine hours ... The medium died at the age of 92, due to a cardio respiratory arrest in 2002, According to friends and close relatives, Chico ... He was hired as a sales clerk working extended hours. Although his catholic devotion and uncountable penances, apart from all ... where he was submitted to rigorous discipline of extended working hours; which brought serious consequences that lasted for the ...
Apple claims 18 hours of battery life. The Apple Watch Series 3 ships with watchOS 4, it has an updated Heart Rate app ( ... as well as two-way data synchronization with GymKit-integrated cardio fitness equipment from companies such as Life Fitness, ...
Girona, cardio-protected territory' has already led to the deployment of a network of more than 747 automated defibrillators ( ... always within a maximum period of 24 hours. At the same time, Dipsalut provides training on how to use these devices correctly ... The aim of 'Girona, cardio-protected territory' is to facilitate a rapid response to sudden cardiac arrests in out-of-hospital ... The results of 'Girona, cardio-protected territory' are being collated and evaluated in order to draw conclusions about its ...
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More recently, 36-hour shifts were separated by 12 hours of rest, during 100+ hour weeks. The American public, and the medical ... Specialized fields such as neurosurgery or cardio-thoracic surgery require longer training. Through these years, consisting of ... the IOM report recommends that duty hours should not exceed 16 hours per shift, unless an uninterrupted five-hour break for ... History of long hoursEdit. See main article on Medical resident work hours ...
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Best weight loss exercise, this cardio activity can help burn 1000 calories in an hour. Best weight loss exercise: Toned ... skipping rope is a great way to include some cardio exercise in your routine. Its one of the best ways to lose weight and burn ...
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SecNav Questions Reports of 100-Hour Work Weeks for Sailors The account of 100-hour work weeks comes from a Government ... SecNav Questions Reports of 100-Hour Work Weeks for Sailors The account of 100-hour work weeks comes from a Government ...
How much cardio should I do each week?. A: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends at least 150 minutes ... The American College of Sports Medicine recommends doing resistance exercise two or three days per week with a 48-hour break ... moderate-intensity cardio exercise each week. Engaging in 75 minutes of... Full Answer , Filed Under: * Exercise ...
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When it comes to doing cardio for fat loss, its either slow and easy (walking) or fast and torrid (HIIT). The middle ground ... He ups his cardio to 2 hours, but now hes increased his metabolic rate while at the same time cutting calories. Hes ... Dont think of HIIT as calorie burning cardio, but rather muscle building cardio.. Whenever the topic of cardio comes up, it ... The most effective cardio for retaining muscle is the kind you dont need to recover from, which is walking.. When using cardio ...
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Cardio. Improve your endurance and stamina with our fantastic range of cardio equipment from treadmills and rowers to spin ... You can park onsite for free for two hours. The nearest bus stop is seconds away on Southampton Road where theres a regular ...
  • In between boxing days, I have been trying different things like riding the stationary bike, hitting the heavy bag at home, jogging on the treadmill or at the local running track, and let me tell you, these all get so boring quick, I seriously have no idea how people stick with it week after week, and I understand all the social media memes about hating cardio . (healthtransformation.net)
  • i do cardio in between such as: circuit training, treadmill, outdoor running in the spring/summer/fall, spinning, rowing machine and more, and (depending on what my trainer has me doing at the time) i will throw in yoga once every couple weeks, and love goodlife fitness group classes like attack (aerobics), step, combat (kick boxing) and more. (3fatchicks.com)
  • lately it's been all cardio at the gym (elliptical, stationary bike, treadmill, or stair stepper), or a cardio video at home when I can't make it to the gym. (3fatchicks.com)
  • The king of cardio, running can be accomplished outdoors or on a treadmill. (sdentertainer.com)
  • Pitt was only doing two hours on a treadmill per week, but he made those two hours count by really pushing himself and working at 80-90 percent of his maximum heart rate. (highsnobiety.com)
  • To be clear, regular cardio has many benefits - just don't expect the treadmill to tighten muscle or absolve you of diet sins committed throughout the day. (edmontonjournal.com)
  • The series has five DVDs that each work a different part of your body, from core cardio to lower body intervals. (redbookmag.com)
  • While this might not be the most enjoyable method of cardio during the colder months of the year, there are plenty of gyms that offer indoor heated pools. (sdentertainer.com)
  • How Many Calories Do You Burn on the Gazelle Per Hour? (livestrong.com)
  • Doing some kind of cardio, such as jumping rope or jogging in place, burns about 10 calories a minute," says Marjorie Nolan, RD, CND, CPT and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (redbookmag.com)
  • If you watch an hour of TV a night and add cardio moves during the 10 commercial breaks that typically air, you could blast up to 300 extra calories without missing your favorite shows. (redbookmag.com)
  • I will typically see 800 calories or more after 1-1.5 hours , depending how hard I push etc. on my Garmin Vivosmart . (healthtransformation.net)
  • Cardio routines tend to burn more calories, but burning calories does not always translate to burning fat. (wikihow.com)
  • It has been proven that steady cycling burns approximately 300 calories per hour. (prweb.com)
  • Snowboarding or downhill skiing - Release a few endorphins, improve your flexibility and work on major muscle groups in your legs -- such as hamstrings, calves and quads -- as you burn at least 450 calories an hour snowboarding or skiing. (cnn.com)
  • Climbing to the top of a hill to sled back down is great for leg muscles and can burn up to 400 calories an hour. (cnn.com)
  • Elliptical trainers can be found at practically any gym, and are a perfect machine for those who want to get in some cardio at their own level of difficulty. (sdentertainer.com)
  • This is crucial to understand, because cardio from a conditioning and endurance standpoint is going to be very different from a physique and bodybuilding perspective. (anabolicminds.com)
  • Improve your endurance and stamina with our fantastic range of cardio equipment from treadmills and rowers to spin bikes and more! (puregym.com)
  • These intervals are repeated for 10-30 minutes and can result in a high number of burned in a relatively short amount of time when compares to other methods of cardio. (sdentertainer.com)
  • Overview Job Description Type of Opportunity: Full Time FTE: 0.900000 Exempt: No Work Schedule: Varied Days and Hours Summary:Performs diagnostic m. (careerbuilder.com)
  • Over time I got brave and started to add cardio back in. (myfitnesspal.com)
  • However, I'll argue (actually prove) that the best cardio to lose weight has nothing to do with spending time on cardio machines. (yurielkaim.com)
  • The worst part about this chart is that it's "danger zone" is actually the BEST place for you to spend more of your time when doing cardio. (yurielkaim.com)
  • What I've been doing lately (since my class/work/teaching schedule is crazy this semester) is working out 3 or 4 days a week, for 45 mins to an hour each time. (3fatchicks.com)
  • Then you feel guilty about not putting in your cardio time. (activeforever.com)
  • The five-time world champion, who is also an Olympic bronze medallist, had only about four hours to shed those extra kilos and instead of shying away from the challenge she chose to face it. (indianexpress.com)
  • The Hospice Nurse - Registered Nurse (RN) After Hours will provide nursing assessment, planning and care to maximize the comfort and health of patients and families in accordance with the interdisciplinary plan of care. (aftercollege.com)
  • Children who have received anticonvulsant treatment within 1 hour prior to assessment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • New years resolution was to change up my classes and increase my diet to 1500 cal with 2 days off a week to eat healthy-ish, now I do an hour weights class Monday, carido Tuesday, yoga Wednesday light weights/high rep Thursday cardio Friday and weights Saturday plus I will normall do a warm up walk for about 30mins before MWTF classes. (medhelp.org)
  • Cardio, weight training, yoga, Pilates, during all these physical activities we are instructed from the beginning to focus on our breathing. (activeforever.com)
  • How much cardio should I do each week? (reference.com)
  • I have been training for half marathons (I ran one in April 2006) so I have been keeping the cardio up with running 3-4 days during the week and then 5-10 miles on the weekends. (medhelp.org)
  • First 2 months I was not watching what I was eating and excercising 3 times a week and weighted 76.6kg / 168 pounds in June thats when I decided to start watching what I ate and upped my hour classes to 4-5 a week. (medhelp.org)
  • I took a week off and when I started back I cut out all cardio and I cut my weights back to 4 days/wk. (myfitnesspal.com)
  • Hi, I work 12 hour shifts, 3 days a week. (allnurses.com)
  • I try and go to the gym for at least an hour days a week, I usually do 1 hour and a half of cardio and some weights but this week ive only been twice! (3fatchicks.com)
  • I shoot for 10+ hours per week. (bikeforums.net)
  • Mondays were chest day, Tuesdays were all about back, Wednesdays were shoulders, Thursday was arms (biceps and triceps), and the rest of the week was dedicated to cardio and resting. (highsnobiety.com)
  • how are ya,I know nothing about the supplements you asked about,but i was curious about a few things since it s also my first show,do you take in complex carbs after every weight training session and why the fat intake after cardio? (bodybuilding.com)
  • I was going to a cardio-kickboxing class at the gym every Monday and Saturday for a while, but my schedule got in the way. (3fatchicks.com)
  • I think the most I have burned at the gym on the bike or jogging on one day is around 500 in just under an hour, and so that is an extra bonus if you are looking to burn fat . (healthtransformation.net)
  • Weight training will help develop those muscle groups, but only cardio - a significant amount - is going to burn enough fat to really make your muscles show. (highsnobiety.com)
  • I work out approx 1 hour, and then I sleep pretty darn good! (allnurses.com)
  • keep up the fabulous work - doing one hour a day keeps me motivated, stretched, helps me sleep, keeps my appetite in check and makes me feel like i've accomplished something! (3fatchicks.com)
  • The challenge for many is that their job responsibilities require them to be seated for most if not all of their work hours. (musc.edu)
  • If you're dieting for a show and your lifting volume goes down but your cardio goes up, what's the primary stimulus your body is going to need to adapt to? (anabolicminds.com)
  • The Cardio-Pulmonary Suite is here to help you with your heart and lung health, determine your body composition, and get you on the right track to train better and follow a more specific route to a healthy lifestyle. (concordia.ca)
  • There's plenty of parking available in the on-site ASDA pay and display car park where it's just £2 for a two-hour stay, or you can lock your bike to the racks next to the ASDA entrance to the club. (puregym.com)
  • I'm 60 and ride about 250-300 hours a year between the road and Fat Bike. (bikeforums.net)
  • An emerging field called cardio-oncology has developed to protect the hearts of cancer patients both during and after treatment. (news9.com)
  • What we should not be telling our patients is, don't get the very treatments that make you beat the cancer in the first place," said Dr. Javid Moslehi, who directs the cardio-oncology program at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee. (news9.com)
  • In the late '80s, I read about velo-cardio-facial syndrome and knew that my previous patients had this syndrome. (speechpathology.com)
  • The term VCFS was first used in 1978 by Dr. Robert Shprintzen and colleagues who observed similarities among a group of 12 patients who had severe hypernasality with cleft palate or cleft-palate-like speech (velo-), learning disabilities, cardiac features ranging in severity from as mild as a right sided aortic arch to disorders necessitating open-heart surgery (cardio-), and common facial features (facial). (speechpathology.com)
  • Cardiothoracic anesthesiologists specialize in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of adult and pediatric patients undergoing cardiothoracic ("cardio" meaning heart and "thoracic" meaning thorax or chest) surgery and related invasive procedures. (wakehealth.edu)