A sudden, temporary sensation of heat predominantly experienced by some women during MENOPAUSE. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The last menstrual period. Permanent cessation of menses (MENSTRUATION) is usually defined after 6 to 12 months of AMENORRHEA in a woman over 45 years of age. In the United States, menopause generally occurs in women between 48 and 55 years of age.
A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.
A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.
Physiologic period, characterized by endocrine, somatic, and psychic changes with the termination of ovarian function in the female. It may also accompany the normal diminution of sexual activity in the male.
A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE that contains triterpenoid saponins. Remifemin from C. racemosa is used to suppress LUTEINIZING HORMONE. It is reclassified by some to ACTAEA. The common name of black snakeroot is also used with ASARUM and SANICULA.
Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.
The process of exocrine secretion of the SWEAT GLANDS, including the aqueous sweat from the ECCRINE GLANDS and the complex viscous fluids of the APOCRINE GLANDS.
Monohydroxy derivatives of cyclohexanes that contain the general formula R-C6H11O. They have a camphorlike odor and are used in making soaps, insecticides, germicides, dry cleaning, and plasticizers.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.
The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.
Chemical bond cleavage reactions resulting from absorption of radiant energy.
A furancarbonitrile that is one of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS used as an antidepressant. The drug is also effective in reducing ethanol uptake in alcoholics and is used in depressed patients who also suffer from tardive dyskinesia in preference to tricyclic antidepressants, which aggravate this condition.
Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.
A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Material prepared from plants.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.
PLANT EXTRACTS and compounds, primarily ISOFLAVONES, that mimic or modulate endogenous estrogens, usually by binding to ESTROGEN RECEPTORS.
Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.
Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)
Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.
One of the SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS with tissue-specific activities. Tamoxifen acts as an anti-estrogen (inhibiting agent) in the mammary tissue, but as an estrogen (stimulating agent) in cholesterol metabolism, bone density, and cell proliferation in the ENDOMETRIUM.
Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.
Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.
Megestrol acetate is a progestogen with actions and uses similar to those of the progestogens in general. It also has anti-androgenic properties. It is given by mouth in the palliative treatment or as an adjunct to other therapy in endometrial carcinoma and in breast cancer. Megestrol acetate has been approved to treat anorexia and cachexia. (From Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)
Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.
The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.
Devices that help people with impaired sensory responses.
Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.
A cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of many drugs and environmental chemicals, such as DEBRISOQUINE; ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS; and TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS. This enzyme is deficient in up to 10 percent of the Caucasian population.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The immediate precursor in the biosynthesis of SEROTONIN from tryptophan. It is used as an antiepileptic and antidepressant.
The use of hormonal agents with estrogen-like activity in postmenopausal or other estrogen-deficient women to alleviate effects of hormone deficiency, such as vasomotor symptoms, DYSPAREUNIA, and progressive development of OSTEOPOROSIS. This may also include the use of progestational agents in combination therapy.
Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.
The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.
A structurally diverse group of compounds distinguished from ESTROGENS by their ability to bind and activate ESTROGEN RECEPTORS but act as either an agonist or antagonist depending on the tissue type and hormonal milieu. They are classified as either first generation because they demonstrate estrogen agonist properties in the ENDOMETRIUM or second generation based on their patterns of tissue specificity. (Horm Res 1997;48:155-63)
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of androgens.
Compounds that inhibit AROMATASE in order to reduce production of estrogenic steroid hormones.
17-Hydroxy-6-methylpregna-3,6-diene-3,20-dione. A progestational hormone used most commonly as the acetate ester. As the acetate, it is more potent than progesterone both as a progestagen and as an ovulation inhibitor. It has also been used in the palliative treatment of breast cancer.
Excessive sweating. In the localized type, the most frequent sites are the palms, soles, axillae, inguinal folds, and the perineal area. Its chief cause is thought to be emotional. Generalized hyperhidrosis may be induced by a hot, humid environment, by fever, or by vigorous exercise.
A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
A synthetic progestin that is derived from 17-hydroxyprogesterone. It is a long-acting contraceptive that is effective both orally or by intramuscular injection and has also been used to treat breast and endometrial neoplasms.
Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.
Non-steroidal compounds with estrogenic activity.
A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of depression.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Organic compounds containing the -CN radical. The concept is distinguished from CYANIDES, which denotes inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE.
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.
The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
The surgical removal of one or both testicles.
A selective aromatase inhibitor effective in the treatment of estrogen-dependent disease including breast cancer.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the action or biosynthesis of estrogenic compounds.
Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.
The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.
An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.
The physical condition of human reproductive systems.
Substances that possess antiestrogenic actions but can also produce estrogenic effects as well. They act as complete or partial agonist or as antagonist. They can be either steroidal or nonsteroidal in structure.
The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)
The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.
The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.
Steroid hormones produced by the GONADS. They stimulate reproductive organs, germ cell maturation, and the secondary sex characteristics in the males and the females. The major sex steroid hormones include ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; and TESTOSTERONE.
The fluid excreted by the SWEAT GLANDS. It consists of water containing sodium chloride, phosphate, urea, ammonia, and other waste products.
A class of dibenzylbutane derivatives which occurs in higher plants and in fluids (bile, serum, urine, etc.) in man and other animals. These compounds, which have a potential anti-cancer role, can be synthesized in vitro by human fecal flora. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.
Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.
Treatment to improve one's health condition by using techniques that can reduce PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS; or both.
A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Follicle-stimulating hormone stimulates GAMETOGENESIS and the supporting cells such as the ovarian GRANULOSA CELLS, the testicular SERTOLI CELLS, and LEYDIG CELLS. FSH consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.
Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.
Individual components of atoms, usually subatomic; subnuclear particles are usually detected only when the atomic nucleus decays and then only transiently, as most of them are unstable, often yielding pure energy without substance, i.e., radiation.
An illusion of vision usually affecting spatial relations.
The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.
An order of the Amphibia class which includes salamanders and newts. They are characterized by usually having slim bodies and tails, four limbs of about equal size (except in Sirenidae), and a reduction in skull bones.
The absence of light.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
A glycoprotein migrating as a beta-globulin. Its molecular weight, 52,000 or 95,000-115,000, indicates that it exists as a dimer. The protein binds testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol in the plasma. Sex hormone-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence as ANDROGEN-BINDING PROTEIN. They differ by their sites of synthesis and post-translational oligosaccharide modifications.
Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Proteins which are present in or isolated from SOYBEANS.
Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.
A state of consciousness in which the individual eliminates environmental stimuli from awareness so that the mind can focus on a single thing, producing a state of relaxation and relief from stress. A wide variety of techniques are used to clear the mind of stressful outside interferences. It includes meditation therapy. (Mosby's Medical, Nursing, and Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)
Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.
An aromatized C18 steroid with a 3-hydroxyl group and a 17-ketone, a major mammalian estrogen. It is converted from ANDROSTENEDIONE directly, or from TESTOSTERONE via ESTRADIOL. In humans, it is produced primarily by the cyclic ovaries, PLACENTA, and the ADIPOSE TISSUE of men and postmenopausal women.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.
The period before MENOPAUSE. In premenopausal women, the climacteric transition from full sexual maturity to cessation of ovarian cycle takes place between the age of late thirty and early fifty.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Drugs that block the transport of adrenergic transmitters into axon terminals or into storage vesicles within terminals. The tricyclic antidepressants (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) and amphetamines are among the therapeutically important drugs that may act via inhibition of adrenergic transport. Many of these drugs also block transport of serotonin.
An arthropod subclass (Xiphosura) comprising the North American (Limulus) and Asiatic (Tachypleus) genera of horseshoe crabs.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Carbon monoxide (CO). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Enzyme that catalyzes the movement of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionone to a catechol or a catecholamine.
The portion of a retinal rod cell situated between the ROD INNER SEGMENT and the RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM. It contains a stack of photosensitive disk membranes laden with RHODOPSIN.
An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.
The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.
A large group of cytochrome P-450 (heme-thiolate) monooxygenases that complex with NAD(P)H-FLAVIN OXIDOREDUCTASE in numerous mixed-function oxidations of aromatic compounds. They catalyze hydroxylation of a broad spectrum of substrates and are important in the metabolism of steroids, drugs, and toxins such as PHENOBARBITAL, carcinogens, and insecticides.
A species of the true toads, Bufonidae, becoming fairly common in the southern United States and almost pantropical. The secretions from the skin glands of this species are very toxic to animals.
Sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. These include flash floods, seasonal river floods, and coastal floods, associated with CYCLONIC STORMS; TIDALWAVES; and storm surges.
The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.
The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.
The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.
Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).
An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.
The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.
The point or frequency at which all flicker of an intermittent light stimulus disappears.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.
Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.
A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.
Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.
The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.
The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.
The branch of biology dealing with the effect of light on organisms.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Calcitonin gene-related peptide. A 37-amino acid peptide derived from the calcitonin gene. It occurs as a result of alternative processing of mRNA from the calcitonin gene. The neuropeptide is widely distributed in neural tissue of the brain, gut, perivascular nerves, and other tissue. The peptide produces multiple biological effects and has both circulatory and neurotransmitter modes of action. In particular, it is a potent endogenous vasodilator.
Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
Failure or imperfection of vision at night or in dim light, with good vision only on bright days. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A benzothaizole which is oxidized by LUCIFERASES, FIREFLY to cause emission of light (LUMINESCENCE).
Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.
The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
The middle layer of blood vessel walls, composed principally of thin, cylindrical, smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It accounts for the bulk of the wall of most arteries. The smooth muscle cells are arranged in circular layers around the vessel, and the thickness of the coat varies with the size of the vessel.
Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.
Rhodopsins found in the PURPLE MEMBRANE of halophilic archaea such as HALOBACTERIUM HALOBIUM. Bacteriorhodopsins function as an energy transducers, converting light energy into electrochemical energy via PROTON PUMPS.
Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.
Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.
The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)

Local tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and dynamics of ganirelix (Orgalutran) administration by Medi-Jector compared to conventional needle injections. (1/324)

The feasibility of administering a relatively high dose of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist ganirelix by means of a needle-free injection device, which could be useful in the long-term treatment of sex-steroid-dependent disorders, was evaluated in a randomized, crossover study in 16 healthy females. Local tolerance and pharmacokinetics of ganirelix administered by MediJector versus conventional needle injections were compared. Additionally, the pharmacodynamic effect was evaluated. Two milligrams of ganirelix was administered s.c. once daily for 7 days by Medi-Jector or conventional needle in a randomized sequence, without a washout period. No apparent differences in local tolerance were observed. Most injections (87.5%) gave either no or only a mild reaction. Of the moderate reactions, swelling and redness were reported most frequently (overall 4.9 and 8.5% per injection, respectively). Administration by Medi-Jector was bioequivalent to conventional needle injection with respect to the peak concentration and area under the curve. A profound suppression of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone was observed. Serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations were relatively low prior to treatment and remained low during the entire study period. In conclusion, administration of a relatively high dose of ganirelix by Medi-Jector might be useful for long-term treatment of sex-steroid dependent disorders.  (+info)

A pilot trial assessing the efficacy of paroxetine hydrochloride (Paxil) in controlling hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. (2/324)

BACKGROUND: Many breast cancer survivors suffer debilitating hot flashes. Estrogen, the drug of choice in perimenopausal women, is generally not recommenced to breast cancer survivors. Nonhormonal treatments are mostly disappointing. Anecdotal reports in our institution suggested that the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine hydrochloride, might be efficacious in alleviating hot flashes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty women with prior breast cancer who were suffering at least two hot flashes a day entered a single institution pilot trial to evaluate paroxetine's efficacy in reducing the frequency and severity of hot flashes. After completing daily diaries for one week on no therapy, the women received open-label paroxetine, 10 mg daily for one week, followed by four weeks of paroxetine, 20 mg daily. The women completed hot-flash daily diaries throughout the study period, and a health-related symptom-assessment questionnaire and a quality-of-life rating scale in the first and sixth week of the study. RESULTS: Twenty-seven women completed the six-week study period. The mean reduction of hot flash frequency was 67% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 56%-79%). The mean reduction in hot flash severity score was 75% (95% CI: 66%-85%). There was a statistically significant improvement in depression, sleep, anxiety, and quality of life scores. Furthermore, 25 (83%) of the study participants chose to continue paroxetine therapy at the end of study. The most common adverse effect was somnolence, resulting in drug discontinuation in two women, and dose reduction in two women. One woman discontinued drug due to anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Paroxetine hydrochloride is a promising new treatment for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and warrants further evaluation in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.  (+info)

Evaluation of soy phytoestrogens for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: A North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial. (3/324)

PURPOSE: Hot flashes represent a significant clinical problem for some breast cancer survivors. Safe, effective treatment is needed for this prominent clinical problem. Although it has been shown that estrogen or progesterone replacement therapy can alleviate this problem, there are continued safety concerns regarding the use of hormonal therapies in these women. Based on anecdotal information, we hypothesized that soy-derived phytoestrogens, weak estrogen-like substances in the soybean that demonstrate estrogen agonist and/or antagonist effects when they bind to estrogen receptors, could alleviate hot flashes. This current trial was designed to investigate this hypothesis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This double-blind clinical trial involved breast cancer survivors with substantial hot flashes. After randomization, patients underwent a 1-week baseline period with no therapy. This was followed by 4 weeks of either soy tablets or placebo. The patients then crossed over to the opposite arm in a double-blind manner for the last 4 weeks. Patients completed a daily questionnaire documenting hot flash frequency, intensity, and perceived side effects. RESULTS: Of the 177 women who were randomized and started the study substance, 155 (88%) provided useable data over the first 5 weeks; 149 provided usable data over the entire 9 weeks. There was no suggestion that the soy product was more effective in reducing hot flashes than the placebo. At study completion, patients preferred the soy product 33% of the time, the placebo 37% of the time, and neither substance 31% of the time. No toxicity was observed. CONCLUSION: The soy product did not alleviate hot flashes in breast cancer survivors.  (+info)

Relation of demographic and lifestyle factors to symptoms in a multi-racial/ethnic population of women 40-55 years of age. (4/324)

A community-based survey was conducted during 1995-1997 of factors related to menopausal and other symptoms in a multi-racial/ethnic sample of 16,065 women aged 40-55 years. Each of seven sites comprising the Study of Women's Health across the Nation (SWAN) surveyed one of four minority populations and a Caucasian population. The largest adjusted prevalence odds ratios for all symptoms, particularly hot flashes or night sweats (odds ratios = 2.06-4.32), were for women who were peri- or postmenopausal. Most symptoms were reported least frequently by Japanese and Chinese (odds ratios = 0.47-0.67 compared with Caucasian) women. African-American women reported vasomotor symptoms and vaginal dryness more (odds ratios = 1.17-1.63) but urine leakage and difficulty sleeping less (odds ratios = 0.64-0.72) than Caucasians. Hispanic women reported urine leakage, vaginal dryness, heart pounding, and forgetfulness more (odds ratios = 1.22-1.85). Hot flashes or night sweats, urine leakage, and stiffness or soreness were associated with a high body mass index (odds ratios = 1.15-2.18 for women with a body mass index > or =27 vs. 19-26.9 kg/m2). Most symptoms were reported most frequently among women who had difficulty paying for basics (odds ratios = 1.15-2.05), who smoked (odds ratios = 1.21-1.78), and who rated themselves less physically active than other women their age (odds ratios = 1.24-2.33). These results suggest that lifestyle, menstrual status, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status affect symptoms in this age group.  (+info)

Soy product intake and hot flashes in Japanese women: results from a community-based prospective study. (5/324)

The association between soy product intake and the occurrence of hot flashes was examined in a cohort of 1,106 female residents of Takayama, Gifu, JAPAN: The women were aged 35-54 years and premenopausal at their entry into the study in 1992. Diet, including intake of soy products and isoflavones, was assessed by means of a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire at study entry. A follow-up mail questionnaire asking about experiences of hot flashes was sent in 1998. During the 6 years of the study period, 101 women had new moderate or severe hot flashes according to the Kupperman test of menopausal distress. After data were controlled for age, total energy intake, and menopausal status, hot flashes were significantly inversely associated with consumption of soy products in terms of both total amount (highest tertile of soy product intake (g/day) vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.79; p for trend = 0.005) and isoflavone intake (highest tertile of isoflavone intake (mg/day) vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 0.42; 95% confidence interval: 0.25, 0.72; p for trend = 0.002). These data suggest that consumption of soy products has a protective effect against hot flashes.  (+info)

Cognitive function in postmenopausal women treated with raloxifene. (6/324)

BACKGROUND: In postmenopausal women, estrogen may have a beneficial effect on cognition or reduce the risk of decline in cognitive function. Whether raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, might have similar actions is not known. METHODS: As part of the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation trial, we studied 7478 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age, 66 years), who were enrolled at 178 sites in 25 countries. The women were randomly assigned to receive raloxifene (60 mg or 120 mg) or placebo daily for three years. We compared the mean scores of the groups on six tests of cognitive function, which were administered at base line and at six months and one, two, and three years. Women were classified as having a decline in cognitive function if the change in their scores at three years was in the worst 10 percent. RESULTS: The mean cognitive scores in the three groups of women were similar at base line. The scores improved slightly in all three groups during the three-year study period, with no significant differences among the groups. The risk of decline in the cognitive function, as measured by four of the six tests, did not differ significantly between the two raloxifene groups combined and the placebo group, but there was a trend toward less decline in the combined raloxifene group on the two tests of verbal memory (relative risk, 0.77) and attention, (relative risk, 0.87). Newly reported or worsening hot flashes did not negatively influence test scores or the effect of treatment on test performance. CONCLUSIONS: Raloxifene treatment for three years does not affect overall cognitive scores in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.  (+info)

Randomized trial of black cohosh for the treatment of hot flashes among women with a history of breast cancer. (7/324)

PURPOSE: Most breast cancer survivors experience hot flashes; many use complementary or alternative remedies for these symptoms. We undertook a randomized clinical trial of black cohosh, a widely used herbal remedy for menopausal symptoms, among breast cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with breast cancer who had completed their primary treatment were randomly assigned to black cohosh or placebo, stratified on tamoxifen use. At enrollment, patients completed a questionnaire about demographic factors and menopausal symptoms. Before starting to take the pills and at 30 and 60 days, they completed a 4-day hot flash diary. At the final visit, they completed another menopausal symptom questionnaire. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured in a subset of patients at the first and final visits. RESULTS: Of 85 patients (59 on tamoxifen, 26 not on tamoxifen) enrolled in the study, 42 were assigned to treatment and 43 were assigned to placebo; 69 completed all three hot flash diaries. Both treatment and placebo groups reported declines in number and intensity of hot flashes; the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. Both groups also reported improvements in menopausal symptoms that were, for the most part, not significantly different. Changes in blood levels of FSH and LH also did not differ in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Black cohosh was not significantly more efficacious than placebo against most menopausal symptoms, including number and intensity of hot flashes. Our study illustrates the feasibility and value of standard clinical trial methodology in assessing the efficacy and safety of herbal agents.  (+info)

Selective estrogen receptor modulation and reduction in risk of breast cancer, osteoporosis, and coronary heart disease. (8/324)

The recognition of selective estrogen receptor modulation in the laboratory has resulted in the development of two selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), tamoxifen and raloxifene, for clinical application in healthy women. SERMs are antiestrogenic in the breast but estrogen-like in the bones and reduce circulating cholesterol levels. SERMs also have different degrees of estrogenicity in the uterus. Tamoxifen is used specifically to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in premenopausal and postmenopausal women at risk for the disease. In contrast, raloxifene is used specifically to reduce the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women at high risk for osteoporosis. The study of tamoxifen and raloxifene (STAR) trial is currently comparing the ability of these SERMs to reduce breast cancer incidence in high-risk postmenopausal women. There is intense interest in understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of action of SERMs at target sites in a woman's body. An understanding of the targeted actions of this novel drug group will potentially result in the introduction of new multifunctional medicines with applications as preventive agents or treatments of breast cancer and endometrial cancer, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis.  (+info)

Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of vario
The Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland CA was one of four centers to participate in the eight-week randomized, double-blind trial that enrolled 205 women between July 2009 and June 2010. Hormonal agents have been the predominant therapy for menopausal hot flashes, but their use decreased substantially following the shifts in risk-benefit ratios that were identified in the Womens Health Initiative Estrogen plus Progestin randomized controlled trial. However, no other treatments have U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for menopausal hot flashes, and the efficacy of alternative pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents is inconclusive, according to the study authors. Selective serotonin and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs) have been investigated previously for hot flash treatment with mixed results. In two pilot investigations, the SSRI escitalopram reduced hot flashes with minimal toxicities but conclusions were limited by the small samples ...
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, two often-prescribed treatments recommended in clinical guidelines for the management of hot flashes were found to be effective in managing hot flashes in patients with breast cancer. Patient-reported hot flash scores showed that venlafaxine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, induced a more immediate reduction of hot flashes, compared to clonidine, a centrally acting alpha-adrenergic agonist. At the end of the 12-week study, however, hot flash scores were lower in the women taking clonidine. The results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.. A total of 102 women were enrolled from three hospitals in the Netherlands and randomly assigned to daily venlafaxine, clonidine, or placebo. Patients were instructed to keep a diary, recording the frequency and severity of hot flashes every day for the 2 weeks before administration of the study medications and the 12 weeks of the study treatment period. Patients were also asked to record ...
Hot flash scores were lower in the clonidine group than the placebo group at week 12 ( p = .03), and lower in the venlaxafine group than placebo, though not statistically significant ( p = .07). Over the 12-week period, reduction in the venlaxafine group was 41% ( P,.001), 26% in the clonidine group ( p=.045), and 29% in the placebo group (p,.001). Those on venlaxafine tended to have some loss of appetite ( p = .003) as well as symptoms of nausea. Sleep and sexual function were not different between the two treatment groups. At week 12, anxiety and depression scores were higher in the venlafaxine than the clonidine group. (p = .03). Significantly lower hot flash scores began in the venlafaxine group compared to placebo in weeks 1-4 (p =.01), and in the clonidine group, lower scores began compared to placebo in weeks 5-8 ( p = .04). ...
Forty patients completed all treatments, 12 patients only one treatment, 8 patients neither. Dropout rates during venlafaxine were 15 out of 59, versus clonidine, 5 out of 53. Withdrawal rateswere not affected by sequence of treatment. Efficacy: After eight weeks, no difference was seen between the two drugs in reduction of hot flash scores: median 49% for venlafaxine and 55% for clonidine. The drug that the patient received first caused the greatest reduction in hot flash score. ...
Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when your body suddenly feels hot. In some cases, hot flashes can make you sweat. Night sweats are hot flashes with sweating at night. Hot flashes and night sweats are more common in women, but they can also occur in men. Some people continue to have these side effects after cancer treatment.. Hot flashes and night sweats can be unpleasant, but there are treatments that can help.. People who are treated for breast cancer or prostate cancer are likely to have hot flashes and night sweats during or after treatment ...
About 33 percent of the women reported having hot flashes, including 12.5 percent of the premenopausal women, 79 percent of perimenopausal women and 39.3 percent of postmenopausal women. Of those who had hot flashes, about half reported that they were typically mild, while about one-third had moderate and about 15 percent had severe hot flashes. More than 81 percent of women with regular severe hot flashes had symptoms of chronic insomnia. These women reported difficulty falling asleep, non-restful sleep and overall dissatisfaction with their sleep patterns on a regular basis (at least three nights a week for at least the past six months). Women with mild hot flashes did not report these problems any more frequently than did women with no hot flashes. Women were also more likely to have problems staying asleep as their hot flashes became more severe ...
A new study of menopausal women shows that hot flashes arent all bad. We found that women who experienced symptoms when they began menopause had fewer cardiovascular events than those who experienced hot flashes late in menopause or not at all, says endocrinologist Emily Szmuilowicz, lead author of a study that will be published in the June issue of Menopause magazine. (For some reason, unlike AARP, Menopause magazine doesnt automatically find you when youre at that age.) You can read an abstract of the paper, titled Vasomotor symptoms and cardiovascular events in postmenopausal women here. Or the Northwestern Memorial Hospital press release, which is easier to absorb, here ...
There is no mistaking the signs of a hot flash. Starting with your ears and neck, a hot, intense flush breaks out over your face and upper body. You may feel nauseated along with the hot flash and may also experience feelings of anxiety, dizziness, and weakness. You are left soaked with sweat and weakened.. Hot flashes are a sign of perimenopause and menopause. Over 90 percent of women suffer and have trouble controlling them. Typically, they last from two to four minutes and occur every three to five hours. Hot flashes are one of the first menopausal symptoms to appear and one of the last to leave.. ...
Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause Pipeline Insight, 2020 report by DelveInsight outlays comprehensive insights of present clinical development scenario and growth prospects across the Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause market. A detailed picture of the Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause pipeline landscape is provided, which includes the disease overview and Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause treatment guidelines.. The assessment part of the report embraces in-depth Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause commercial assessment and clinical assessment of the Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause pipeline products from the pre-clinical developmental phase to the marketed phase. In the report, a detailed description of the drug is proffered including mechanism of action of the drug, clinical studies, NDA approvals (if any), and product development activities comprising the technology, Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause collaborations, licensing, mergers and acquisition, funding, designations, and other product-related ...
Menopause: A Natural Progression. Menopause is part of the natural progression of a womans life. But for up to 8 out of 10 women, this time of transition-which can last anywhere from 2 to 10 years-can be fraught with an array of climacteric symptoms that can negatively affect their quality of life. Most bothersome of these complaints are hot flashes and night sweats, two vasomotor symptoms that can occur any time of the day. These symptoms can leave a woman feeling uncomfortable and embarrassed and cause her to awaken frequently at night, leading to exhaustion, mental fatigue, and depression. During the early stages of menopause, called perimenopause, these symptoms can be especially frequent and intense; some perimenopausal women experience 10 or more moderate to severe hot flashes in a single day.. Order Estrovera @ www.DrJeffreyTucker.meta-ehealth.com. More ...
Get an overview of pipeline landscape @ Vasomotor Symptoms Of Menopause Clinical Trials Analysis Vasomotor Symptoms (Vasomotor Symptoms) are one of the major symptoms of menopause that principally include hot flashes (HF) and night sweats (NS) during menopause and occurs in the majority of women across the globe. A woman with Vasomotor Symptoms experiences abundant heat accompanied by sweating and flushing, especially around the head, neck, chest, and upper back region. Vasomotor Symptoms result from temperature dysfunction that occurs due to changes in gonadal hormones.. Vasomotor Symptoms Of Menopause Pipeline Therapies along with Key Players:. ...
Published: May 26, 2010. In recent years, many women have chosen to avoid prescription medications all together to treat their hot flashes. In general, they work for many women but none work for all. Among the most commonly used and most studied OTC treatments for hot flashes is soy.. Soy is not only an excellent food high in protein, and rich in calcium and many important vitamins, but supplements of a major ingredient in soy, called isoflavones, have been well studied for reducing hot flashes. Usually dosages of 50 mg/day can be helpful. Women who take soy can expect a reduction in hot flash frequency and intensity of between 35 to 50% over a two to four week period. It may not be perfect, but can be enough to allow you to sleep the night. Not every study shows a strong benefit and If you have just come off estrogen, soy or no other supplement is going to be as effective.. While soy is not a replacement for prescription medication, fourteen clinical trials have shown that soy can help you ...
A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women.
to the editor: In the article Diagnosing Night Sweats,1 the authors overlooked the most prevalent and easy-to-diagnose type of night sweats: those occurring in women during perimenopause. Persons most likely to ask their family physician about night sweats are women in their late 30s to early 60s who are in the menopausal transition or the early years of menopause. This group of women is not even mentioned in the abstract of the article.1 When menopausal women are mentioned on the third page of the article,1 the description is inappropriately brief and somewhat inaccurate. Table 1 of the article1 should be revised to list perimenopausal women instead of ovarian failure. It also should include the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene.. Although hot flushes and night sweats (vasomotor symptoms) often are considered to be typical of menopause, there are good epidemiologic studies showing that many women experience them before they cease menstruation ...
Night sweats can go on for years and interrupted sleep can lead to a host of other health problems. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), night sweats and hot flashes are due to an imbalance in the yin and yang energies in the body. As we age, everyone, males and females become deficient in both yin and yang. Night time is yin time, and when a person is yin deficient, the symptoms tend to manifest at the height of yin (night) time. Night sweats are considered very debilitating in Chinese medicine because sweat is considered a fluid of the heart. Therefore, sweating at night while sleeping (not exercising) can also be accompanied by heart palpitations, insomnia, fatigue and paleness,. The appropriate treatment is to boost the yin and the yang with foods and Chinese herbs. Asian women experience much fewer hot flashes and night sweats and very few of them are ever put on hormone replacement therapy. Interestingly, only about 10% of Asian women experience noticeable menopausal symptoms, compared ...
OUTLINE: Patients wear an ambulatory sternal skin conductance hot flash device continuously for 5 weeks.. Patients complete hot flash diaries once daily for 5 weeks. Patients also complete the Comfort, Bother, and Weight Questionnaire at the end of week 5.. PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 25 patients will be accrued for this study. ...
Question - Recurring episodes of severe hot flashes, stomach pain below belly button, rectal bleeding. Diagnosed as UTI and prescribed Bacterium. Is the diagnosis right?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Pain in my stomach, Ask a Urologist
A team of investigators led by UC Davis found that eating soy products such as soy milk and tofu did not prevent the onset of hot flashes and night sweats as women entered menopause. [en español]
Discusses options for managing perimenopause- and menopause-related hot flashes. Explains what hot flashes are. Discusses lifestyle changes that may help hot flashes. Looks at hormone therapy (HT) and treatment with medicines and herbs.
Hot flashes: As many as 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms that cause a warm or hot flushed sensation that usually begins in the head and face and then radiates down the neck to other parts of the body. There may be red blotches on the skin. Each hot flash averages 2.7 minutes and is characterized by a sudden increase in heart rate, an increase in peripheral blood flow, which leads to a rise in skin temperature, and a sudden onset of sweating, particularly on the upper body. Hot flashes can occur before, during, or after menopause. Hot flashes can begin when a womans cycles are still regular or, more commonly, as menopause approaches and her cycles become irregular. They usually last for less than a year following the last menstrual period, although some women continue to experience hot flashes five to ten years after menopause. Hot flashes can occur once a month, once a week, or several times an hour. They can happen any time of day or ...
Hot flashes: As many as 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms that cause a warm or hot flushed sensation that usually begins in the head and face and then radiates down the neck to other parts of the body. There may be red blotches on the skin. Each hot flash averages 2.7 minutes and is characterized by a sudden increase in heart rate, an increase in peripheral blood flow, which leads to a rise in skin temperature, and a sudden onset of sweating, particularly on the upper body. Hot flashes can occur before, during, or after menopause. Hot flashes can begin when a womans cycles are still regular or, more commonly, as menopause approaches and her cycles become irregular. They usually last for less than a year following the last menstrual period, although some women continue to experience hot flashes five to ten years after menopause. Hot flashes can occur once a month, once a week, or several times an hour. They can happen any time of day or ...
Hot flashes: As many as 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms that cause a warm or hot flushed sensation that usually begins in the head and face and then radiates down the neck to other parts of the body. There may be red blotches on the skin. Each hot flash averages 2.7 minutes and is characterized by a sudden increase in heart rate, an increase in peripheral blood flow, which leads to a rise in skin temperature, and a sudden onset of sweating, particularly on the upper body. Hot flashes can occur before, during, or after menopause. Hot flashes can begin when a womans cycles are still regular or, more commonly, as menopause approaches and her cycles become irregular. They usually last for less than a year following the last menstrual period, although some women continue to experience hot flashes five to ten years after menopause. Hot flashes can occur once a month, once a week, or several times an hour. They can happen any time of day or ...
Hot flashes: As many as 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms that cause a warm or hot flushed sensation that usually begins in the head and face and then radiates down the neck to other parts of the body. There may be red blotches on the skin. Each hot flash averages 2.7 minutes and is characterized by a sudden increase in heart rate, an increase in peripheral blood flow, which leads to a rise in skin temperature, and a sudden onset of sweating, particularly on the upper body. Hot flashes can occur before, during, or after menopause. Hot flashes can begin when a womans cycles are still regular or, more commonly, as menopause approaches and her cycles become irregular. They usually last for less than a year following the last menstrual period, although some women continue to experience hot flashes five to ten years after menopause. Hot flashes can occur once a month, once a week, or several times an hour. They can happen any time of day or ...
Hot flashes: As many as 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause. Hot flashes are vasomotor symptoms that cause a warm or hot flushed sensation that usually begins in the head and face and then radiates down the neck to other parts of the body. There may be red blotches on the skin. Each hot flash averages 2.7 minutes and is characterized by a sudden increase in heart rate, an increase in peripheral blood flow, which leads to a rise in skin temperature, and a sudden onset of sweating, particularly on the upper body. Hot flashes can occur before, during, or after menopause. Hot flashes can begin when a womans cycles are still regular or, more commonly, as menopause approaches and her cycles become irregular. They usually last for less than a year following the last menstrual period, although some women continue to experience hot flashes five to ten years after menopause. Hot flashes can occur once a month, once a week, or several times an hour. They can happen any time of day or ...
Thе hot flashes symptoms felt аll оvеr thе bоdу аnd mоѕt оftеn оn thе face аnd neck region. Thiѕ lasts fоr a short duration оf time, аnd leaves thе face...
FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hot flashes may signal increased risk of vascular dysfunction that can lead to cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online April 12 in Menopause.. Researchers tracked the health of 272 nonsmoking women, aged 40 to 60. Among women between 40 and 53 years of age, frequent hot flashes were associated with poorer endothelial cell function.. The investigators found the association to be independent of other cardiovascular disease risk factors. The link appeared to be restricted to the younger women in the study -- there was no such relationship seen among women aged 54 to 60.. Hot flashes are not just a nuisance. They have been linked to cardiovascular, bone, and brain health, JoAnn Pinkerton, M.D., executive director of The North American Menopause Society, said in a society news release. In this study, physiologically measured hot flashes appear linked to cardiovascular changes occurring early during the menopause transition.. Press ...
Many women who suffer from hot flashes are looking for a natural menopause treatment to help them combat the symptoms without having to turn to potentially dangerous treatments like HRT or other medications.. The good news is there are several natural actions you can take to try to keep your hot flashes or night sweats at bay.. Our bodies temperatures are regulated by a part of the brain that keeps us in a thermal neutral zone. That just means that no matter the fluctuations in the temperature around us, our bodies work to stay at the same internal temperature. During perimenopause and menopause, its thought that this regulator is affected by the hormonal and other changes occurring within the body, leading to hot flashes and night sweats.. One natural way to stave off those inconvenient and often embarrassing episodes is by sipping plenty of cold fluids to help keep your bodys temperature down.. While there is rather inconsistent research on whether or not exercise really makes a ...
A natural, or bioidentical, combined estradiol-progesterone capsule (TX-001HR) significantly decreases the frequency and severity of moderate to severe hot flashes in postmenopausal women, the Replenish study finds. Results of this phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial will be presented Monday at ENDO 2017, the Endocrine Societys 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
Hot flashes are one of the most definitive symptoms of menopause; however hot flashes causes are not something that is fully understood yet. The main
Hot flashes are the most common symptom of menopause. Learn about strategies for relief of hot flashes, including hormone therapy and natural remedies.
Menopause is the term that represents the end of menstruation. When a woman has had 12 consecutive months with no menstrual period, and no other biological or physiological cause has been identified, she is officially in menopause.. The timing of natural menopause is variable; it can occur as early as in a womans 30s (premature menopause) and as late as in her 60s. In the western world, the average age is now 51.. Most women approaching menopause will have hot flashes, a sudden feeling of warmth that spreads over the upper body, often with blushing and some sweating. The severity of hot flashes varies from mild in some women to severe in others. Some women only have occasional hot flashes, which dont really bother them at all, while others report 20 or more hot flashes a day, which are uncomfortable, disruptive and embarrassing.. Although hot flashes are a common bothersome symptom for which women are looking for some kind of relief, it is crucial to understand that menopause encompasses much ...
Hot flashes are frequent symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. While they do not pose a health risk, they can be uncomfortable embarrassing and interrupt sleep. This MNT Knowledge Center article looks at a variety of tips and alternative therapies that can help alleviate hot flashes,
Purpose Hot flashes are a common symptom and an important cause of decreased quality of life in women with breast cancer. Hot flashes involve vasodilatation and flushing, however, their complex etiolo
Is it hot in here, or am I just depressed? For many menopausal women, hot flashes are just depressing. And depression, which affects at least one in four women ages 40 to 59, can intensify the
Hormone therapy or antidepressants are options if hot flashes are getting in the way of your sleep, your sexual health or your quality of life.
Health, ...(SACRAMENTO Calif.) -- A secondary analysis of a large multicenter c...The results come on the heels of a report last year on the findings of... Women with early stage breast cancer who have hot flashes have better... Our interest in looking at this subgroup came because hot flashes are...,Diet,may,cut,risk,of,breast,cancer,recurrence,in,women,without,hot,flashes,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Every woman alive goes through the transition to menopause. It can take years. Hot flashes are just one of the many unpleasant symptoms.
On average, menopause-related hot flashes and night sweats plague women for seven or more years, taking a toll on a womans health and well-being.
Its hot out there ladies. The summer can be torturous enough without the added bonus of menopause (1). In addition to a slowed metabolism, skin changes, and sometimes, insomnia, hot flashes are a regular occurrence for women dealing with menopause. However ...
Since the 60s, smoking women has continued to grow: the proportion of smokers rose from 10 to 22% in 40 years on the 15 million smokers in USA. The women smoke more and more and earlier. The first cigarette is usually taken between 14 and 16 years. Cigarette smoke passes from the lungs to the brain within 10 seconds, carrying so much faster than would intravenous injection of illicit drugs. Smoking cigarettes send some 4,000 chemicals to the body.. Tobacco and gynecological disorders. Smoking decreases the secretion of estrogen. It may therefore be responsible for menstrual disorders with irregularities and pain. There is also often a change of tone of voice, which becomes hoarse, and an increase of hairs. Menopause occurs 1 to 2 years earlier than average among smokers. Hot flashes are more intense and the risk of osteoporosis is increased. Tobacco also promotes the development of precancerous lesions of the cervix.. Tobacco and skin. Due to a lack of oxygenation of the skin, smokers are more ...
Hello, I posted on this site and ordered the product and was very satisfied. I did not replenish my order once my 3 tubes ran out. My hot flashes are
While about 80% of peri- and postmenopausal women have vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as night sweats and hot flashes, it has been observed that higher body mass index (BMI) and body fat are associated with an increased risk of vasomotor symptoms. Thus, it is reasonable to speculate that weight loss may prevent VMS.. In a recent study, researchers analyzed data from 1,546 participants in the Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN). In this population, they found that women in early menopause who have a higher BMI and waist circumference were more likely to report VMS and to have more frequent VMS. In contrast, for women in late menopause, higher BMI and waist circumference were associated with fewer VMS. Furthermore, they observed that weight loss did not result in a reduction in VMS.. These findings differ from those reported from the dietary intervention trial of the Womens Health Initiative (WHI), where it was observed that in postmenopausal women, VMS were reduced or eliminated ...
THURSDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors have more frequent and severe menopausal hot flashes than other women, a new study reveals.. But the researchers also found that cancer survivors coped better with menopausal symptoms and reported a better quality of life than other women, and had similar levels of sexual activity and function.. The study included 934 female cancer survivors (about 90 percent survived breast cancer) and 155 cancer-free women in Australia who were assessed for hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms and sexual function.. Seventy-six percent of the cancer survivors reported having hot flashes in the past 24 hours, compared with 54 percent of the cancer-free women. Sixty percent of the cancer survivors said their hot flashes were severe or very severe, compared with 40 percent of the cancer-free women.. Menopausal symptoms also seemed to persist longer in the cancer survivors, according to the study published online July 17 in the journal ...
A small study found that 12 weeks of acupuncture provided the same relief from hot flashes related to breast cancer treatment as Effexor (chemical name: venlafaxine), an antidepressant medicine.. Hormonal therapy often is used after surgery and other treatments to lower the risk of hormone-receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer coming back (recurring) in post-menopausal women. Hormonal therapy works by lowering the amount of estrogen in the body or by blocking estrogens effect on cancer cells. Reducing the amount of estrogen or blocking its effects can cause hot flashes during treatment. Besides hot flashes, hormonal therapy also may cause sleeping problems, moodiness, and an overall lower quality of life. Doctors sometimes call hot flashes and related side effects vasomotor symptoms. Naturally-occurring menopause often is accompanied by these same troubling vasomotor symptoms.. Antidepressants such as Effexor are used sometimes to ease severe hot flashes.. In this study, 47 women ...
BACKGROUND: To assess the prevalence of menopausal symptoms among women prescribed hormone therapy (HT) using electronic medical record data from a regional healthcare organization. METHODS: Retrospective data from the Reliant Medical Group from 1/1/2006-12/31/2011 were assessed for 102 randomly-selected patients. Study eligibility criteria included: females aged 45 to 65; prescribed oral or transdermal HT; no history of breast cancer, venous thromboembolism, stroke, gynecological cancer, or hysterectomy; continuously enrolled in the health plan for 1 year before and after the first observed HT prescription. Prevalence of menopause-related symptoms was analyzed descriptively at both the patient and visit levels. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was 54 years. The most common menopausal symptoms were: hot flushes (40%), night sweats (17%), insomnia (16%), vaginal dryness (13%), mood disorders (12%), and weight gain (12%). Among the 102 patients, 163 individual visits listing menopausal symptoms were
Washington D.C. [USA], April 20 : Menopausal or pre- menopausal women, aged 40-65, who experience hot flashes or excessive sweating during sleep, are at increased risk of moderate and severe depression.. The results demonstrate that among a group of women ages 40-65, those with moderate-severe hot flashes were significantly more likely to have moderate-severe depression than women with no or mild vasomotor symptoms.. Roisin Worsley, Robin Bell, Pragya Gartoulla, Penelope Robinson and Susan Davis, Monash University in Melbourne, Australia examined hot flashes, depressive symptoms and use of antidepressant medication to be common in the age range of women. The findings, published in journal of Womens Health, indicated that more than 2,000 pre-menopausal and menopausal women showed moderate-severe vasomotor symptoms - hot flashes or night sweats -an independent and significant risk factor for moderate and severe depression.. The researchers explored the controversial link between hot flashes and ...
There are two major types of omega-3 fatty acids in our diets: One type is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is found in some vegetable oils, such as soybean, rapeseed (canola), and flaxseed, and in walnuts.
Menopause is a phase of life characterized by several physiological and psychological changes that have a major impact on a womans life. These changes are mainly a result of a dip in the levels of the hormones produced by the ovaries. The most common symptoms of menopause include hot flashes, headaches, vaginal dryness, depression, irritability, insomnia and mood swings. This can be a very trying period in a womans life and the use of some herbal remedies can help provide some relief from these symptoms.. Flaxseed. Linseed or flaxseed is a vital source of lignins - compounds that play a major role in the modulation of the female hormone levels. Besides, flaxseeds also contain omega-3 fatty acids that are required for the effective functioning of the reproductive system in women. No wonder then that several studies have found flaxseed beneficial against menopausal symptoms. (Read: Suffering from menopausal hot flashes? Eat flaxseeds). Soy-rich foods. Isoflavones are compounds made up of ...
The beginning stages of menopause often are accompanied by rapid bone loss, hot flashes, vaginal dryness and sleep disturbances among other symptoms. Estrogen therapy with or without progesterone prevents most of these changes. However, as a result of the Womens Health Initiative findings suggesting that the overall risks outweigh the benefits, most menopausal women now decline estrogen therapy, increasingly seeking other alternatives, noted lead researcher Silvina Levis. Soy-derived products have been proposed to provide comparable benefits to estrogen but without the risks.. Levis, who is associated with the Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, conducted a randomized controlled trial from July 2004 to March 2009 to determine the effectiveness of soy isoflavone tablets in preventing bone loss and other menopausal symptoms. Study participants received a soy isoflavone dose equivalent to approximately two times the highest intake ...
Menopausal hot flashes[edit]. On June 28, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved low-dose paroxetine for the ... There is also evidence that paroxetine may be effective in the treatment of compulsive gambling[106] and hot flashes.[107] ... Weitzner MA, Moncello J, Jacobsen PB, Minton S (April 2002). "A pilot trial of paroxetine for the treatment of hot flashes and ... It has also been used in the treatment of premature ejaculation and hot flashes due to menopause.[6][5] It is taken by mouth.[5 ...
"Hot Flashes". Bravewords.com. Retrieved 2008-03-14. Goldberg, Mark Leon (July 10, 2007). "Critic Watch: Megadeth Smackdown ...
"Hot Flashes". Bravewords. Retrieved July 30, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Lafon, Mitch. "Drummer MATT STARR ...
"Hot Flashes". Climbing: 36. "Hurrikan (9+)". frankenjura.com. "Rock News: Mt Stapylton, Mega-routes fall like plums". Rock (Jul ...
Hot Flashes. Playwrights Guild of Canada, 1998. ISBN 978-1-55173-615-0. Barker, Keith. The Hours That Remain. Playwrights ... The Play by Betty Jane Wylie Horseplay by Peter Anderson and Phil Savath Hosanna by Michel Tremblay Hot Flashes by Paul Ledoux ... It's Only Hot for Two Months in Kapuskasing. BLI, 1988. ISBN 0969363907. Cook, Michael. Jacob's Wake. Talonbooks, 1975. ISBN ... Island of Demons by George Woodcock Islands by Margaret Hollingsworth It Is Solved By Walking by Catherine Banks It's Only Hot ...
MacDonald, D (15 January 2009). "Haley Solos Fitz Roy's Supercanaleta". Climbing Hot Flashes. Climbing Magazine. Retrieved 15 ...
9. "Hot Flashes". The Journal. March 20, 1976. p. A-7. Retrieved April 5, 2021. Kiss to embark on its first European tour ... " "Hotter Than Hell" "Cold Gin" (Ace Frehley guitar solo) "Nothin' to Lose" "Shout It Out Loud" "Do You Love Me?" "God of ...
Brown, Scott (October 9, 1998). "Flashes: Hot Lunch". Entertainment Weekly. Krosoczka, Jarrett (2009). Lunch Lady and the ... can an Ottolenghi chef prove Jamie Oliver's revolution wasn't a flash in the pan?". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 April 2020. "The ...
She published No More Hot Flashes and Other Good News, Putnam (New York, NY), 1983, revised edition published as No More Hot ... No More Hot Flashes... And Even More Good News. 2017-06-27. "Penny Budoff Obituary - (2008) - New York, NY - Newsday". www. ... Flashes and Even More Good News, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1998. Contributor to books, including Women in Industry, edited ...
Climbing.com Hot Flashes. Climbing magazine. Archived from the original on 28 February 2009. Retrieved 1 Sep 2009. CS1 maint: ...
MacDonald, Dougald (9 April 2004). "North Twin Finally Climbed Again!". Climbing Magazine Hot Flashes. Archived from the ...
"National Lampoon's Hot Flashes". Ocala Star-Banner. June 12, 1984. Retrieved June 21, 2009. Gallagher, Brian (July 11, 2013). " ...
Climbing Magazine Hot Flashes. Skram Media LLC. Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved Sep 30, 2009. Kopold ...
"Hot Flashes - Vinegar Syndrome". Vinegar Syndrome. Retrieved January 18, 2020. "The Hearse (Limited Edition Slipcover) - ... "Hot and Saucy Pizza Girls - Vinegar Syndrome". Vinegar Syndrome. Retrieved January 9, 2020. "Red Heat / Hot Vampire / Peeping ... Hyde, Hotter Than Hell, Mania (all 1971), Come Deadly (1973), Rites of Uranus (1975), House of DeSade (1977), and more. Limited ... Includes the films Hot and Saucy Pizza Girls (1978), Prisoner of Paradise (1980), Dixie Ray Hollywood Star (1983), Too Naughty ...
Menopausal hot flashesEdit. On June 28, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved low-dose paroxetine for the ... There is also evidence that paroxetine may be effective in the treatment of compulsive gambling[87] and hot flashes.[88] ... It has also been used in the treatment of hot flashes and night sweats associated with menopause.[5] ... Weitzner MA, Moncello J, Jacobsen PB, Minton S (2002). "A pilot trial of paroxetine for the treatment of hot flashes and ...
Hot Flashes , Recipes Gardening and Hot Flashes". www.friendsdriftinn.com. Retrieved 2016-02-03. "Inside Chef Edward Lee's New ...
338-. ISBN 978-0-7020-4909-5. Kronenberg F (1990). "Hot flashes: epidemiology and physiology". Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 592 (1): ...
"Hot Flashes: Chick Chick Boom". Kotaku. Archived from the original on 2010-10-17. Retrieved 2010-09-04. CS1 maint: discouraged ... Balloon - A hot-air balloon appears on the opponent's field, and if a chick jumps into it, they will slowly drift into the sky ... Chick Chick Boom is an online Adobe Flash game created for Easter 2007 by German developer Extra Toxic and sponsored by ...
Schmidt, David (December 2005). "Hot Flashes: Rodden Redpoints Anaconda". Climbing. Primedia (224). Archived from the original ...
"Hot Flash". Strong Medicine. Season 2. Episode 14. "Shock". Strong Medicine. Season 2. Episode 18. "Risk". Strong Medicine. ...
Fahey, Mike (2008-01-10). "Hot Flashes: Fancy Pants Adventure 2". Kotaku. Retrieved 2009-02-28. CS1 maint: discouraged ... World 2 also won the 2008 Newgrounds Tank Award for Best Flash Game, and is the fifth most played Flash game of 2008 in the ... Before using Macromedia Flash, Borne had experimented with the TI-BASIC programming language on a TI-86 graphing calculator. ... World 4 was Super Fancy Pants Adventures, just ported to Adobe Flash. Right now, there are two parts of the game available on ...
Shanafelt TD, Barton DL, Adjei AA, Loprinzi CL (2002). "Pathophysiology and treatment of hot flashes". Mayo Clin. Proc. 77 (11 ... Reduces hot flashes via the hypothalamus Stimulates respiration via the hypothalamus and/or respiratory center Influences the ... Sassarini J, Lumsden MA (2010). "Hot flushes: are there effective alternatives to estrogen?". Menopause Int. 16 (2): 81-8. doi: ...
Over 80% of women experience hot flashes, which may include excessive sweating, during menopause. Night sweats range from being ... ISBN 978-0-7021-7305-9. Bansal, Ramandeep; Aggarwal, Neelam (January-March 2019). "Menopausal Hot Flashes: A Concise Review". ... Night sweats may happen because the sleep environment is too warm, either because the bedroom is unusually hot or because there ... Deecher, D. C.; K. Dorries (2007). "Understanding the pathophysiology of vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats) that ...
At times one experiences hot flashes; then one is freezing cold." The hunger-strikes left Schulz weakened, and on account of ...
"Hot Flash kicks off 10th year with a nod to the next generation". Your #ProudQueer News Source CA+OR+WA. Retrieved 2017-06-28 ... Hot Flash Productions. Retrieved 4 April 2019. Segall, Eli (2009-12-21). "Trouble ahead for the Dirty Duck - Daily Journal of ... Inferno monthly dance parties hosted by Hot Flash Productions owner/operators DJ Wildfire (Jenn Davis) and Armida Hanlon that ...
Petridis, Alexis (15 December 2011). "Queen: Jazz; The Game; Flash Gordon; Hot Space - review". The Guardian. London. Retrieved ... 7. After the success of the song, Queen recorded Hot Space, which was a more disco album. It is credited as Queen's best ... The song was only performed live in North and South America, and in Japan, during The Game and Hot Space Tours respectively. " ... 1 in the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States for four consecutive weeks. "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" also peaked at No ...
Petridis, Alexis (15 December 2011). "Queen: Jazz; The Game; Flash Gordon; Hot Space - review". The Guardian. London. Retrieved ...
In women, hot flashes must be excluded. Excess thyroid hormone, which is called thyrotoxicosis (such as in cases of ... rather than the result of too much exercise or hot, humid weather. Feeling subjectively hot Sweating, which may be excessive In ... Typically, the person feels uncomfortably hot and sweats excessively. Compared to heat illnesses like heatstroke, heat ...
It has also been found to reduce the severity of 'hot flashes' in menopausal women and men on hormonal therapy for the ... ISBN 978-0-444-64168-7. Mayo Clinic staff (2005). "Beyond hormone therapy: Other medicines may help". Hot flashes: Ease the ... Schober CE, Ansani NT (2003). "Venlafaxine hydrochloride for the treatment of hot flashes". The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. 37 ( ...
CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Hot Flashes". Broadcasting. February 14, 1953. p. 34. Retrieved 11 February 2017. CS1 ...
"Proceedings of the 10th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks. doi:10.1145/2070562.2070568.. ... Hamming ECC is commonly used to correct NAND flash memory errors.[3] This provides single-bit error correction and 2-bit error ... "Hamming codes for NAND flash memory devices". EE Times-Asia. Apparently based on "Micron Technical Note TN-29-08: Hamming Codes ... "The Inconvenient Truths of NAND Flash Memory". 2007. p. 28. says "For SLC, a code with a correction threshold of 1 is ...
nalika wektu menopause, estrogen wiwit kurang saéngga bisa nyebapake pira-pira efek, ing antarané hot flash, kanti kringet ...
Elektrárne na horúcu vodu, nazývané aj „flash plants", ako názov naznačuje, vyťahujú horúcu vodu, obyčajne o teplotách okolo ... Geodynamics says it has the "hottest rocks on earth" *↑ Úrad pre reguláciu sieťových odvetví. ...
Hot springs and deserts may also be suitable locations for a tighter, faster-rotating steam devil to form. The phenomenon can ... "May 31-June 1, 2013 Tornado and Flash Flood Event: The May 31, 2013 El Reno, OK Tornado". National Weather Service Weather ... They form when a strong convective updraft is formed near the ground on a hot day. If there is enough low level wind shear, the ... and power flashes from broken lines, as internal sources are now uncommonly reported and are not known to ever have been ...
As Goku exits the stadium, he flashes back to many of the events that shaped his past, from his adoption by Grandpa Gohan to ... The sun seems unusually hot, and they discover that it is because of the four-star dragon, Nuova Shenron, who reveals that he ...
... hot flashes, sexual dysfunction (including loss of libido and erectile dysfunction), depression, fatigue, anemia, and decreased ... hot flashes, sexual dysfunction, infertility, and osteoporosis. In women, antiandrogens are much better tolerated, and ... antiandrogens that suppress androgen production can cause low estrogen levels and associated symptoms like hot flashes, ...
Flash & Dash • Dragon Booster • Go For Speed • Dragon League • XX Bom Swirl Fighter • Dash Yonkuro • Ayo Main Go For Speed • ... the Scorching-hot Invader • Hamtaro: Adventures in Ham-Ham Land • Ernest & Celestine • Crayon Shinchan: Bom Nakal • Digimon ...
News came in early September 2004 that Cinerama would be rebranded as The Wedding Present. The line-up was to be the same as the last line-up of Cinerama, which included Simon Cleave. The first new single, "Interstate 5", was issued on 15 November 2004, to lead off the new album, Take Fountain, which was released on 14 February 2005. A second single, "I'm From Further North Than You", was released on 11 April 2005. Third and final single "Ringway to SeaTac" was released on 24 October 2005.. All singles, their B-sides and acoustic versions from this period were compiled on the 2006 compilation Search for Paradise: Singles 2004-5. The release came with a bonus DVD compiling the videos for "Don't Touch That Dial" (a Cinerama single re-recorded for Take Fountain), "Interstate 5", "I'm From Further North Than You", "Ringway to SeaTac" and others.. The Wedding Present toured Europe and North America in the Spring of 2005 (with John Maiden on drums) and again in Europe towards the end of 2005 (this ...
41 sec.) (flash) (Television production). ABC.com. Retrieved July 7, 2011.. *^ Perez, Luis (7 July 2011). "Evidence 'wasn't ... "TV's hottest ticket Holy OJ! Viewers can't get enough Casey". New York Post. Retrieved July 6, 2011 ... Archived from the original (Flash video) on 2011-07-10.. *^ Pavuk, Amy; Colarossi, Anthony (July 7, 2011). "Casey Anthony ...
"Chart Moves: Katy Perry's 'Away' Rises on Hot 100, M83's New Album Makes Splashy Debut". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media ... "This Bright Flash". 2:23. 10.. "When Will You Come Home?". 1:23. ...
Queen · Queen II · Sheer Heart Attack · A Night at the Opera · A Day at the Races · News of the World · Jazz · The Game · Hot ... Flash Gordon · Bohemian Rhapsody: The Original Soundtrack. Livealbums:. Live Killers · Live Magic · Queen at the Beeb · Live at ... Flash (Vanguard Mix) · I'm in Love with My Car · Reaching Out/Tie Your Mother Down (Live at Sheffield) (met Paul Rodgers) · We ... Flash · Under Pressure (met David Bowie) · Body Language · Las Palabras de Amor (The Words of Love) · Calling All Girls · ...
He commented: "For me, it was like a flash. The first time I had acid, it just opened up something in my head that was inside ... and the combined sides topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States.[71] In the 1970s Frank Sinatra recorded " ... and became Harrison's second chart-topper when the sides were listed together at number one on the Hot 100.[75] His increased ...
... vapors tend to have low autoignition temperature and present a risk of a flash fire when the flux comes in contact with a hot ... Metal salts as flux in hot corrosion[edit]. Hot corrosion can affect gas turbines operating in high salt environments (e.g., ... In this regard, molten flux is similar to molten hot glue. Fluxless techniques[edit]. In some cases the presence of flux is ... A mass of hot sticky flux can transfer more heat to skin and cause more serious burns than a comparable particle of non- ...
Video Hot Tracks (1986-1994). *Video Snack Preview. Tingnan din[baguhin , baguhin ang batayan]. *Jeepney TV ... Flash Bomba (2009). *Mga Bayani sa Kalawakan (1962-1963). *Nasaan Ka Maruja? (2009) ...
All hot liquids must be disposed of. A final cabin check must then be completed prior to landing. It is vital that flight ... Prior to each flight a safety check is conducted to ensure all equipment such as life-vests, torches (flash lights) and ...
"Flash". He is later captured with Kiera by Liber8 and reveals the (potentially worse) future that Liber8 has created. Red Kiera ... Hot Set (2012). *Hunters (2016). *Incorporated (2016-17). *The Internet Ruined My Life (2016) ...
Flash point[edit]. A material's flash point is a metric of how easy it is to ignite the vapor of the material as it evaporates ... Combustible Dust: A Major Hot Work Hazard" Division of Occupational Safety and Health, N.C. Department of Labor ... A lower flash point indicates higher flammability. Materials with flash points below 100 °F (38 °C) are regulated in the United ... Vapor pressure is a major determinant of the flash point, with higher vapor pressures leading to lower flash points and higher ...
Side effects of the GnRH agonists are signs and symptoms of hypoestrogenism, including hot flashes, headaches, and osteoporosis ... related to sex hormone deficiency and include symptoms of low testosterone levels and low estrogen levels such as hot flashes, ...
Fuel droplets vaporize as they receive heat by mixing with the hot gases in the combustion chamber. Heat (energy) can also be ... Aerosol of microscopic water droplets suspended in the air above a cup of hot tea after the water vapor has sufficiently cooled ... In a clothes dryer, hot air is blown through the clothes, allowing water to evaporate very rapidly. ... Flash evaporation. *Heat of vaporization. *Hertz-Knudsen equation. *Hydrology (agriculture). *Latent heat ...
"Flash Point - Fuels". Retrieved January 4, 2014.. *^ "Toxic diesel particles penetrate right through to the heart, scientists ... A higher cetane number indicates that the fuel ignites more readily when sprayed into hot compressed air.[21] European (EN 590 ... Conventional diesel flash points vary between 52 and 96 °C, which makes it safer than petrol and unsuitable for spark-ignition ... engines.[56] Unlike petrol, the flash point of a diesel fuel has no relation to its performance in an engine nor to its auto ...
The flash point of biodiesel exceeds 130 °C (266 °F)[53], significantly higher than that of petroleum diesel which may be as ... Thermal efficiency of a fuel is based in part on fuel characteristics such as: viscosity, specific density, and flash point; ...
Londinium governor Suetonius Paulinus evacuated the city before the rebels sacked and burned it; the fire was so hot that a ten ... In spite of Edward's success, however, Winchelsea was only a flash in a conflict that raged between the English and the Spanish ...
A flash animation or flash cartoon is an animated film that is created with the Adobe Flash platform or similar animation ... Web Flash animations may be interactive and are often created in a series. A Flash animation is distinguished from a Webcomic, ... Simple animation in Flash MX: a square moving across the screen in a motion tween, one of the basic functions of Flash. Onion ... Flash is able to integrate bitmaps and other raster-based art, as well as video, though most Flash films are created using only ...
... including hot shoe-mounted flash units, battery grips for additional power and hand positions, external light meters, and ... and some even have hot shoes and the option to attach lens accessories such as filters and secondary converters. DSLRs ... control over all the important parameters of photography and have the option to attach additional accessories using the hot ...
The Flash cartoon Happy Tree Friends features an anteater named Sniffles.. In the Stephen King miniseries Kingdom Hospital, the ... possibly because forests are warmer than grasslands on cold days and cooler on hot days.[27] Giant anteaters can be either ...
A fill flash on the camera adds the required uniform illumination to the areas shaded from the sun. ... Using backlighting, this portrait is improved by not allowing the harsh sunlight to cast hot spots on the faces AND by ringing ... A fill flash used with a backlit subject yields more even lighting. ...
In a flash of intuition Cleveland remarks that they are not both Dinsmead's daughters by birth. Dinsmead admits that one is a ... Though the tea was hot, Mr Dinsmead emptied the cups saying it was cold. Cleveland recalls reading a paper about a whole family ...
... and a reverse baked alaska-hot inside, cold outside-cooked in a microwave oven.[19][20] Kurti was also an advocate of low ... Liquid nitrogen, for flash freezing and shattering. *Ice cream maker, often used to make unusual flavors, including savory ... where he demonstrated techniques such as using a syringe to inject hot mince pies with brandy in order to avoid disturbing the ...
The retrograde solubility of calcium sulfate is also responsible for its precipitation in the hottest zone of heating systems ... Flash point Non-flammable US health exposure limits (NIOSH): PEL (Permissible). TWA 15 mg/m3 (total) TWA 5 mg/m3 (resp) [for ... scale in boilers along with the precipitation of calcium carbonate whose solubility also decreases when CO2 degasses from hot ...
Queen · Queen II · Sheer Heart Attack · A Night at the Opera · A Day at the Races · News of the World · Jazz · The Game · Flash ... Singeln släpptes den 26 oktober 1981 och återfinns på Queens album Hot Space från 1982. B-sida är en låt som inte finns på ... "Flash" · "Under Pressure" · "Body Language" · "Las Palabras de Amor" · "Calling All Girls" · "Staying Power" · "Back Chat" · " ... Gordon · Hot Space · The Works · A Kind of Magic · The Miracle · Innuendo · Made in Heaven ...
Half of us get hot flashes already. At the moment were all doing fairly well. Although our nests have been depopulated, they ... We liked to visit hot countries and consort with men who wore white suits. Although terrified of customs officials, we tried to ... We played a lot of tennis in hot climates and went water-skiing, mountain climbing, trekking, jogging, body surfing, deep-sea ...
... hot flashes). Find out what else can trigger these sudden waves of heat as your body tries to cool down. ... may set off a hot flash in people who are prone to them. A hot drink can raise your body temperature and start one, too. ... home/ womens health center/ womens health a-z list/slideshows a-z list , what causes hot flashes article ... A hot flash is common with a serious reaction called anaphylaxis as your immune system releases cells to try to fight off ...
... is effective in reducing hot flashes and other menopause symptoms, but carries some risks of heart disease and cancer, a large ... mixed.A review of 17 studies on soy supplements has found that the pills can reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes, ... of the women had gone through menopause.Each year the researchers followed up with them to gather any reports of hot flashes or ... no consistent pattern between the amount of phytoestrogens eaten and how often or how severely women experienced hot flashes ...
... appears to give relief from the severity and frequency of hot flashes. ... may work on some system in the brain that controls hot flashes as well as depression. Little is known as to why and how hot ... Antidepressant May Also Ease Hot Flashes. From the WebMD Archives March 28, 2000 (Tampa, Fla.) -- A small study of breast ... To many women, hot flashes are an incredibly unpleasant symptom of menopause, but they are also encountered by over half of ...
Hot flashes and night sweats were associated with higher serum glucose levels and indicators of insulin resistance in newly ... Glucose levels were 33% higher in women who reported hot flashes 1 to 5 days per week than in those who reported no hot flashes ... Additionally, HOMA index scores were more than 2-fold higher in women who reported hot flashes 1 to 5 days per week (percent ... The 3075 participants in SWAN study were 42 to 52 years of age at study entry, and completed questionnaires about hot flashes ...
Low-Fat Diet, Hot Flash Relief Findings. In all, 26% of the women had hot flashes at the beginning of the study, with most ... Weight Loss & Hot Flash Relief. About 80% of women report hot flashes and night sweats as they progress through menopause, ... Weight Loss & Hot Flash Relief: Perspective. The new study takes what is known about weight and hot flashes, expands our ... Can Weight Loss Cool Hot Flashes?. Women Who Lost Weight on Low-Fat Diet Had Fewer or No Hot Flashes, Researchers Find ...
Hot flashes have a lot to do with the changing levels of estrogen in your body, but other factors can cause your temperature ... Being aware of and addressing these factors can help you beat your hot flashes naturally. It may be tempting to look to ... especially if hot flashes are severe - but try less drastic measures first. Severe symptoms should always be checked out to ... Exercise and Nutrition to Ease Hot Flashes *Relaxation and Stress Reduction to Reduce Hot Flashes ...
... used to treat hot flashes associated with menopause. Some side effects include nausea, vomiting, tremor, and dry mouth. Drug ... Hot Flashes (Causes, Symptoms & Medication Treatment in Men and Women). Hot flashes (or flushing) is the most common symptom ... Natural Remedies for Hot Flashes. Hot flashes are experienced by many women, especially at night. However, not all women ... How low doses of paroxetine help to treat hot flashes associated with menopause is not known. Brisdelle should not be used to ...
This MNT Knowledge Center article looks at a variety of tips and alternative therapies that can help alleviate hot flashes, ... Hot flashes are frequent symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. While they do not pose a health risk, they can be ... How common are hot flashes?. Vasomotor symptoms, or hot flashes and night sweats, are the most common symptoms of perimenopause ... Identifying situations that trigger hot flashes can help women avoid them.. Recommended lifestyle tips that may help reduce hot ...
But the main problem is im having hot flashes since february. Its like im overheating sometimes with sweat sometimes with no ...
You can read more about treatments to help ease hot flashes on the Breastcancer.org All About Hot Flashes page and you can ... Reducing the amount of estrogen or blocking its effects can cause hot flashes during treatment. Besides hot flashes, hormonal ... and Managing Hot Flashes. A small study found that 12 weeks of acupuncture provided the same relief from hot flashes related to ... Some of the women got Effexor for 12 weeks to ease the hot flashes. The other women got acupuncture twice a week for 4 weeks ...
Hot Flashes Information Including Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Causes, Videos, Forums, and local community support. Find ... Hot flashes are short, sudden feelings of heat that can occur across the entire body or in parts of the body. Hot flashes may ... Hot flashes can also cause significant discomfort. Because hot flashes may sometimes be due to serious diseases, such as cancer ... Hot flashes are generally accompanied by flushing and sweating. They can be mild or intense, can occur at any time of the day, ...
Hypnosis can minimize hot flashes, which affect around 80% of women during menopause, by as much as 74%, according to a new ... Natural remedies for hot flashes. Hot flashes are frequent symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. While they do not pose a ... Acupuncture may reduce severity and frequency of menopausal hot flashes. Hot flashes are one of the most common symptoms during ... and how bad their hot flashes were. In addition, the women wore skin conductance monitors so that their hot flashes could be ...
... hot flashes are just depressing. And depression, which affects at least one in four women ages 40 to 59, can intensify the ... Is it hot in here, or am I just depressed? For many menopausal women, ... for women with moderate to severe hot flashes.. Brisdelle is the first nonhormonal treatment for the hot flashes of menopause ... Is it hot in here, or am I just depressed?. For many menopausal women, hot flashes are just depressing. And depression, which ...
Ask questions and get answers about Hot Flashes. Our support group helps people share their own experience. 437 questions, 306 ... I am afraid to take Tamoxifen, should I be? I am already moodhy and have hot flashes?. Posted 13 hours ago • 0 answers ... How bad is it to take gabapentin for hot flashes whatch has become unbearable since breast cancer?. Posted 8 Jan 2018 • 0 ... Mirtazapine - For hot flashes??? Any information will be helpful?. Posted 21 Dec 2017 • 1 answer ...
Here are some tips for avoiding and dealing with hot flashes. ... Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause, but sometimes ... Hot Flashes and Depression: Menopause. (2020). Monthly variation of hot flashes, night sweats, and trouble sleeping. journals ... Hypnosis and Hot Flashes: Menopause. (2017). Efficacy of a Biobehavioral Intervention for Hot Flashes: A Randomized Controlled ... could help ease hot flashes." The stress relief exercise offers may also reduce the number and intensity of hot flashes. ...
... By Red Hot Mamas November 1, 2011 - 7:15pm ... Only 55 of the women were completely free of hot flashes. Ninety of the women said they only had mild flashes, and the ... This Long Lasting Hot Flashes page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle ... So, more women suffer with hot flashes than is generally thought? I am among that majority, going on 13 years. Took HRT for 4 ...
Coach Slaughter also threatens Roy for allowing the Hot Flashes to get away with their dirty playing. The Hot flashes then Win ... The Hot Flashes (2013). "The Hot Flashes Movie Poster - Internet Movie Poster Awards Gallery". Impawards.com. Retrieved 2013-06 ... Official website The Hot Flashes at IMDb The Hot Flashes at Rotten Tomatoes v t e. ... As the Hot flashes leave, Millie lies by saying that Ginger tried to feel her up. As Kayla and Millie leave, Kayla gives Beth a ...
Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Hot Flashes From The latimes (Page 4 of 5) ... Women troubled with hot flashes and unwilling to take hormones may have an alternative in gabapentin, a drug used to treat ... Colleen Dawmen had been plagued for years by severe hot flashes that would wash over her dozens of times a day and awaken her, ... "I remember exactly where I was when I experienced my first hot flash," she recalls. "I was standing at the card catalog at the ...
Rapid Effects of Acupuncture on Hot Flashes, Some Other Symptoms Compared to the other women, after 5 weekly acupuncture ... The decrease in hot flashes, emotional symptoms, and skin and hair symptoms was rapid and was apparent after two acupuncture ... Notably, hot flashes affect 75% of women and are "very distressing" for 10% to 20% of women, Lund and colleagues write. ... Four women in the intervention group reported mild side effects of tiredness and headache, stress-related hot flashes, more ...
... via hot flashes) and to warm us when we are too cool (shiver)." Dysregulation causes hot flashes at a normal core body ... to treat hot flashes. SSRIs have traditionally been used to treat depression, but low doses effectively reduced hot flashes and ... resulting in hot flashes. The thermoregulator center sends signals to the rest of the body to cool us when we are too hot ( ... Newswise - As many as 75 percent of the women in North American experience hot flashes, and many of these women still look to ...
Learn about strategies for relief of hot flashes, including hormone therapy and natural remedies. ... Hot flashes are the most common symptom of menopause. ... Acupuncture for Hot Flashes * Hot flashes: Manage without ... If hot flashes dont interfere with your life, you probably dont need treatment. Hot flashes subside gradually for most women ... Dont smoke. Smoking is linked to increased hot flashes. By not smoking, you might reduce hot flashes, as well as your risk of ...
... hot flashes can be a sign of heart disease, so taking bio-identical hormones to help eliminate them may be wise, says Dr. Erika ... Thus hot flashes are not just a nuisance, and we are best advised to do something to get rid of them rather than grin and bear ... Hot flashes - which also can occur before your period, during pre-menopause, and after childbirth - are caused by pulses of ... Tags: Heart Disease , Menopause , hot flashes , menopause , heart disease risk , bio-identical hormones , Dr. Erika Schwartz ...
Women who believe they have a lot of hot flashes during the night may be more likely to experience mild depression during ... Hot Flashes, Mood Woes?. Print this page WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 -- Women who believe they have a lot of hot flashes during ... Daytime hot flashes had no effect on mood, according to the study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical ... Those who believed they had frequent nighttime hot flashes were more likely to develop mild symptoms of depression than those ...
Learn about strategies for relief of hot flashes, including hormone therapy and natural remedies. ... Hot flashes are the most common symptom of menopause. ... Acupuncture for Hot Flashes * Hot flashes: Manage without ... Hot flashes are reported least frequently in Asian women.. Complications. Hot flashes may impact your daily activities and ... How often hot flashes occur varies among women, but most women who report having hot flashes experience them daily. On average ...
Do any of you have hot flashes with PCOS? I swear a PCOS website I found the other night said Menopause-like symptoms were ... I get hot flashes, but thats because Im on clomid. Never got them before taking the meds though, so Im not sure ... im not really sure what a hot flash is like...so i have probably never had one... sorry i cant be more help. ... Do any of you have hot flashes with PCOS? I swear a PCOS website I found the other night said Menopause-like symptoms were ...
Especially the hot flashes, then I would get bad headaches. More than likely, its anxiety. It can tend to make you feel and ... and maybe take a luke warm shower for your hot flashes. I remember 1 specific night, it was like 40 degrees outside, I was in ... now two of my ears are hot dont know whats going on any advice? ...
... hot flashes are experienced by a large number of women worldwide before, during and after menopause. ... Accompanying Symptoms of Hot flashes. Hot flashes can be accompanied by feeling of nausea, weakness, headache, chills, feeling ... My worst hot flashes feel similar to a slight electrical shock, short-lived but very significant (as if I have stuck my finger ... Hot Flash - References:. *Avantina Sharma, Textbook of Food Science and Technology, International Book distributor (IBDC) ...
CAM For Hot Flashes Hot Flashes on Tamoxifen Safety of evening primrose oil for breast cancer patients Non-Hormonal Treatments ... Hot Flashes and Night Sweats (PDQ®) (Health professionals) Hot Flashes and Night Sweats (PDQ®) (Patients) Topics in Integrative ... We ran a clinical trial of black cohosh for hot flashes and found it did not help. These results were similar to a study done ... We are currently running a clincial trial on acupuncture for the treatment of hot flashes in women with breast cancer. If you ...
... many women experience hot flashes. They can come without warning or be triggered by a stress-related circumstance or food. No ... Hot coffee is the most problematic source of hot flashes because you are dealing with two triggers, a hot beverage and caffeine ... If you feel a hot flash coming on, stay calm. Take deep breaths and use a fan to cool your body before it gets out of control. ... No one knows for sure what happens physiologically when you get a hot flash, but some say it probably starts with increased ...
  • Hormone replacement therapy, based on estrogen among other hormones, is effective in reducing hot flashes and other menopause symptoms, but carries some risks of heart disease and cancer, a large federally funded study released a decade ago found. (reuters.com)
  • March 28, 2000 (Tampa, Fla.) -- A small study of breast cancer survivors with menopausal symptoms reported at an American Cancer Society conference here shows that Paxil (paroxetine), a popular antidepressant , appears to give relief from the severity and frequency of hot flashes . (webmd.com)
  • Vasomotor symptoms, or hot flashes and night sweats, are the most common symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are many ways that women experiencing hot flashes can get some relief from symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Smoking may speed up the onset of menopause and increase the severity of symptoms, especially hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The intensity of hot flashes can cause a sense of panic, intensifying symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A well-balanced diet can also reduce blood sugar changes that cause similar symptoms to hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Doctors sometimes call hot flashes and related side effects "vasomotor symptoms. (breastcancer.org)
  • In cases in which hot flashes are problematic, estrogen therapy, progesterone therapy, antidepressants, or anticonvulsant medications may be used to reduce symptoms. (healthgrades.com)
  • Seek immediate medical care (call 911) if you, or someone you are with, have hot flashes along with other serious symptoms, including excessive sweating or high fever (higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit), as these could be signs of a life-threatening condition. (healthgrades.com)
  • What other symptoms might occur with hot flashes? (healthgrades.com)
  • Hot flashes may accompany other symptoms, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disorder or condition. (healthgrades.com)
  • In some cases, hot flashes may occur with other symptoms that might indicate a serious condition that should be evaluated immediately in an emergency setting. (healthgrades.com)
  • Hot flashes are one of the most common symptoms during menopause. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hot flashes are frequent symptoms of perimenopause and menopause. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • No surprise, then, that a pharmaceutical company came up with the idea to market an antidepressant for treatment of vasomotor symptoms, a.k.a. hot flashes. (latimes.com)
  • A new Danish study tested acupuncture as a treatment for hot flashes, and while the study was small, it showed promise: Eighty percent of women who received one 15-minute session of acupuncture once a week for five weeks said that the sessions had improved their hot flash symptoms. (healthcentral.com)
  • The study differed from earlier research in several ways: It looked at whether soy intake prevented the onset of hot flashes in women who had not had the symptoms previously, it included a range of racial and ethnic groups, it included both premenopausal and perimenopausal women, and it focused on dietary soy rather than soy supplements. (medscape.com)
  • Newswise - As many as 75 percent of the women in North American experience hot flashes, and many of these women still look to hormone therapy to relieve the surge of hormones, otherwise known as vasomotor symptoms, or VMS. (newswise.com)
  • We're still looking at safety in the Phase 3 trials for the NKB antagonists (targeting the N in KNDy) but this treatment is up to 80 percent effective in amelioration of hot flashes, with improvement of other menopausal symptoms such as sleep and well-being. (newswise.com)
  • Your doctor can usually diagnose hot flashes based on a description of your symptoms. (mayoclinic.org)
  • It's your choice after all: Live in fear and discomfort, accepting hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, and other symptoms of menopause, or do something about it. (newsmax.com)
  • Those who believed they had frequent nighttime hot flashes were more likely to develop mild symptoms of depression than those who thought they had few or no nighttime hot flashes. (drugs.com)
  • Any treatment of mood symptoms in this population also should incorporate efforts to address sleep and nighttime hot flashes. (drugs.com)
  • On average, hot flash symptoms persist for more than seven years. (mayoclinic.org)
  • I swear a PCOS website I found the other night said Menopause-like symptoms were common for women with PCOS but when I told my gyno today about my hot flashes, the FIRST thing she says is "Do I have AIDS? (dailystrength.org)
  • Exercise has multi fold advantage in that it helps reduce hot flashes and also helps in the overall management of the peri and postmenopausal symptoms. (medindia.net)
  • You can deal with menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, weight gain and forgetfulness by making simple lifestyle changes. (medindia.net)
  • The study also indicated that the worse a woman's hot flash symptoms were, the lower her risk of developing breast cancer. (thedailybeast.com)
  • While Li said his data should not be misinterpreted to encourage more women to use HT to treat hot flashes or be lax about mammograms, he is hopeful that it might open up a new area of research to determine "what it is about these types of symptoms, the timing, the rate, the severity, that makes them protective against breast cancer. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Hot flashes lasting up to 15 minutes with symptoms such as perspiration, clammy skin, dry mouth, tense muscles, and rapid heartbeat were considered "moderate. (innovations-report.com)
  • Hot flashes lasting up to 20 minutes with symptoms such as "raging furnace" warmth, weakness, feeling faint, extreme perspiration, and heart irregularities were considered "severe. (innovations-report.com)
  • Hot flash symptoms are remarkably similar for different women. (harvard.edu)
  • Having reviewed this description, do you think your hot flash symptoms are typical? (harvard.edu)
  • New Rochelle, NY, April 19, 2017--A new study of more than 2,000 perimenopausal and menopausal women showed that moderate-severe vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes or night sweats) were an independent and significant risk factor for moderate-severe depression. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers explored the controversial link between hot flashes and depressive symptoms by focusing on more severe forms of both conditions and concluding that there is likely a common underlying cause, as reported in an article published in Journal of Women's Health , a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (eurekalert.org)
  • Data presented in the article entitled "Moderate-Severe Vasomotor Symptoms Are Associated with Moderate-Severe Depressive Symptoms," demonstrate that among a group of women ages 40-65, those with moderate-severe hot flashes were significantly more likely to have moderate-severe depression than women with no or mild vasomotor symptoms. (eurekalert.org)
  • Doctors had hoped flaxseed could be a safer alternative for hot flash relief for women than hormone-replacement therapy, which effectively eases menopausal symptoms but increases the risk of breast cancer and heart attack. (time.com)
  • Because flaxseed contains phytoestrogens, plant compounds that mimic the effect of estrogen in the body, the thinking was that it could compensate for the loss of the hormone during menopause - the change that triggers hot flashes and other symptoms. (time.com)
  • The antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) modestly turns down the frequency and severity of hot flash symptoms for menopausal women, according to results of a randomized clinical trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • There are a number of symptoms that are associated with a hot flash. (livestrong.com)
  • The symptoms of a hot flash can vary in intensity. (livestrong.com)
  • The authors also discussed why the thermoneutral zone is narrower in women with hot flashes and strategies for managing symptoms, including hormone therapy, medications that affect brain chemicals, and a method of breathing called paced respiration. (medindia.net)
  • Most women transitioning through menopause know what hot flashes are (sometimes referred to as night sweats or vasomotor symptoms). (menopause.org)
  • In addition to flash frequency, this study also looked at "treatment satisfaction" and interference of symptoms with daily life and found that treatment satisfaction was highest for estradiol, intermediate for venlafaxine, and lowest for placebo. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Hot flashes and night sweats known as vasomotor symptoms (VMS) affect up to 80 percent of women in midlife and are the primary menopause-related symptoms leading menopausal women to seek medical attention. (eurekalert.org)
  • Secondary outcomes were hot flash/night sweat severity and the interference of symptoms with daily life. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers also found that sleep quality improved with changes in hot flashes and night sweats, but Miller said it remains difficult to determine if the low sleep quality is caused by these symptoms or if they are a consequence of poor sleep. (psychcentral.com)
  • Preliminary research indicates that sage extract can improve menopausal symptoms, particularly hot flashes, according to WebMD. (reference.com)
  • Black cohosh is effective in reducing hot flashes and other symptoms related to menopause in some women but not in all, according to WebMD. (reference.com)
  • When isoflavones mimic estrogen, they might help reduce hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause. (healthline.com)
  • Dozens of small studies have looked at the effects of soy on menopause symptoms, especially hot flashes and night sweats. (healthline.com)
  • But a 2010 review of 10 studies on the subject found little evidence that soy from food sources reduced hot flashes, vaginal dryness, or other symptoms of menopause. (healthline.com)
  • But many others experience hot flashes and other symptoms that are so intense they can interfere with daily life for 15 years or longer. (aarp.org)
  • It's a cute little gimmick, but alcohol could actually worsen menopausal symptoms like hot flashes. (aarp.org)
  • Eventually, they'll stop on their own: Though some women experience hot flashes into their 60s, the symptoms usually go away after an average of seven years. (rush.edu)
  • Recognizing your own hot flash triggers (coffee, for example) can go a long way toward improving how you feel about your symptoms, even if you opt not to change those habits. (canyonranch.com)
  • Hot flashes drive thousands of women into taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) even when they have no other menopausal symptoms. (healthy.net)
  • Acupuncture also has been shown to significantly reduce both the number of hot flashes and psychological symptoms associated with menopause. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Another drug-free way to fight hot flashes and menopausal symptoms is cognitive behavioral therapy . (emaxhealth.com)
  • The exact cause and pathogenesis, or causes of vasomotor symptoms (VMS)-the clinical name for hot flashes-has not yet been fully studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vasomotor symptoms - the medical term for hot flashes - are among the most common menopause symptoms women experience. (staradvertiser.com)
  • The study, in which more than 25,000 women participated, sought to identify an association between vasomotor symptoms (VMS) - which includes symptoms such as hot flashes, and night sweats - and breast cancer. (siasat.com)
  • More than 81 percent of women with regular severe hot flashes had symptoms of chronic insomnia. (rxpgnews.com)
  • When progesterone levels drop to almost zero, you can experience a long list of unpleasant menopause symptoms like fatigue, allergies, arthritis, osteoporosis, hot flashes, night sweats menopause and many more. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • When the researchers focused on women with "severe" symptoms at the start of the study, the data indicated that hot flashes and sweating were reduced by 71% and 78%, respectively, after the initial 12 week double-blind intervention, compared with 24% for both measures with placebo. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • "Overall, the study confirms a modest, but still statistically significant and clinically important efficacy of soy germ extract against menopausal vasomotor symptoms, despite the fact that the study was underpowered due to lower than anticipated group size for hot flushes," ​ wrote the researchers. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Numerous reports in the medical literature and popular media have discussed the effectiveness of various nonhormonal agents in reducing menopausal hot flash symptoms. (aafp.org)
  • 1 Many women find the risks associated with hormone therapy to be unacceptable and are requesting non-hormonal therapies to manage their hot flash symptoms. (aafp.org)
  • There have been numerous reports in the medical literature and general media as to the effectiveness of various over-the-counter and prescription agents in reducing menopausal hot flash symptoms. (aafp.org)
  • Other symptoms such as nausea, irritability, anxiety and a faster heart rate may accompany hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • If you have a tumour of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, symptoms that mirror hot flushes can occur. (ehow.co.uk)
  • An aura may precede the flash, and usually a flush follows along with post-flash/flush symptoms. (estronaut.com)
  • It is excellent for modulation of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. (wellnessresources.com)
  • Among the most notorious symptoms of menopause, hot flashes can cause embarrassment during the day and restlessness at night. (everydayhealth.com)
  • We already know that women with high blood pressure during pregnancy or those who experience menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats have a higher risk of developing heart disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our research discovered that women who experienced high blood pressure during pregnancy were much more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes and night sweats during menopause," says Stephanie Faubion, M.D., the study's lead author. (eurekalert.org)
  • Vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes and night sweats) are the most commonly reported menopausal symptoms, occurring in 79 percent of perimenopausal women and 65 percent of postmenopausal women. (newswise.com)
  • Although it has long been believed that caffeine intake exacerbates menopausal vasomotor symptoms, research has challenged this assumption, as caffeine has been both positively and negatively linked to hot flashes. (newswise.com)
  • The researchers said their finding could lead to new treatments that might help ease symptoms of menopause, but more research is needed to understand how other rare gene variants could affect hot flashes. (healthywomen.org)
  • found that the group treated with black cohosh reported a decrease in hot flashes, black cohosh appeared to be most effective in a subset of women, those with recent onset of menopausal symptoms. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • The investigators found that E-EPA was more effective than placebo in reducing hot flashes, with a 55% average reduction in symptoms in the E-EPA group and a 25% average reduction in the placebo group. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • Results of a clinical trial titled 'A Phase 3 Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Bazedoxifene/Conjugated Estrogens for Treatment of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms,' which evaluated 332 symptomatic postmenopausal women who, at baseline, experienced seven or more moderate to severe hot flashes per day or 50 or more hot flashes per week were presented. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • As many as 50 percent to 90 percent of women going through menopause experience vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes, which can greatly impact a woman's life. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • By the end of the study, 36 percent of women in both groups had a 50 percent drop in their hot flash "scores", which rank symptoms and severity. (worldbulletin.net)
  • Women whose hot flashes or other menopausal symptoms interfere with daily life should definitely discuss the pros and cons of medical treatment with their doctors. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Many women effectively manage their hot-flash symptoms with lifestyle changes. (sutterhealth.org)
  • A review of 17 studies on soy supplements has found that the pills can reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes, while some individual trials on soy protein pills have found no benefits (see Reuters Health reports of April 27, 2012 reut.rs/K95gLr and August 8, 2011 reut.rs/prmTwt ). (reuters.com)
  • An average of 75% of the women reported a reduction in the severity of hot flashes, and 67% reported a reduction in frequency. (webmd.com)
  • The factors that increase the frequency and severity of hot flashes vary from woman to woman. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Relaxing activities may help reduce the severity and frequency of hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A 2012 study found that menopausal women who took 330 milligrams (mg) of licorice extract three times daily for 8 weeks reduced the severity and frequency of hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Only 2 weeks after they stopped taking Effexor, those women reported an increase in the number and severity of hot flashes. (breastcancer.org)
  • Women who got acupuncture didn't report an increase in the number and severity of hot flashes until 3 to 4 months after the acupuncture treatments were done. (breastcancer.org)
  • For most postmenopausal women, the duration, frequency and severity of hot flashes will decrease with time. (healthgrades.com)
  • The hypnosis group also reported an 80% decrease in frequency and severity of the hot flashes, while the control group only reported a 15% decrease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hypnosis has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes on par with the antidepressant Effexor XR (venlafaxine), per a 2017 study (though about 70 percent less than with estrogen therapy). (healthcentral.com)
  • The frequency and severity of hot flashes were reduced by 54% in the women taking gabapentin, compared with a 31% reduction in the women who took a placebo. (latimes.com)
  • Avoiding alcohol, spicy foods and caffeine help to reduce the severity of hot flashes. (reference.com)
  • New research out of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine suggests that women who take escitalopram (Lexapro) experience a reduction in both the frequency and severity of menopausal hot flashes compared to women who took placebo (a sugar pill). (psychcentral.com)
  • Ellen W. Freeman, Ph.D., and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of escitalopram vs. placebo to reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in healthy women, and examined whether race, menopausal status, depressed mood, and anxiety were important modifiers of any observed effect. (psychcentral.com)
  • The primary outcomes measured included frequency and severity of hot flashes assessed by prospective daily diaries at weeks 4 and 8. (psychcentral.com)
  • Also, use of escitalopram significantly reduced hot flash severity compared with placebo, adjusted for race, site, and baseline severity. (psychcentral.com)
  • The researchers note that although the decreases in hot flash frequency and severity appear modest, the study participants perceived these improvements as meaningful, as indicated by their reported satisfaction with treatment and desire to continue the treatment. (psychcentral.com)
  • Mayo Clinic researchers have found that the urinary incontinence medication oxybutynin (Oxytrol, Ditropan XL) can reduce the severity and frequency of hot flashes in menopausal women who aren't able to take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including women who've had breast cancer. (healthcentral.com)
  • Both groups of women kept diaries of the frequency and severity of their hot flashes from two weeks before the injection until six months afterward. (innovations-report.com)
  • In a 2012 analysis of 19 studies, soy isoflavone supplements reduced the severity of hot flashes by just over 26 percent, compared to a placebo. (healthline.com)
  • Although many studies show that soy and soy isoflavones can modestly reduce the number and severity of hot flashes, it doesn't seem to work as quickly as hormone replacement therapy. (healthline.com)
  • Because the frequency and severity of hot flashes vary a lot from woman to woman, there's no one-size-fits-all approach to relief. (canyonranch.com)
  • We are beginning to learn about factors, such as ambient temperature, that modulate the frequency of severity of hot flashes. (nih.gov)
  • All English-language, published, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of oral nonhormonal therapies for treating hot flashes in menopausal women measuring and reporting hot flash frequency or severity outcomes. (nih.gov)
  • The main efficacy outcomes are change in number of hot flashes per week and change in hot flash score (number of flashes x mean severity) from baseline to 3 and 6 weeks post-training, reported on the 7-day diary. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The efficacy of the intervention for reduction of number and severity of hot flashes will be summarized by the sample averages, with 95% confidence intervals. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A Chinese herbal formula called EXD (Er-xian decoction), which is composed of extracts from six different Chinese herbs, was shown to reduce the frequency of daily hot flashes by 62 percent compared with 52 percent among women who took a placebo, and severity of the hot flashes also improved. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Whether you're open to all your options, or opposed to estrogen therapies or antidepressants that can mitigate the frequency and severity of hot flashes, knowing your comfort zone can most efficiently steer the conversation. (empowher.com)
  • Acupuncture is one alternative to medication and might reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes. (staradvertiser.com)
  • The dramatic increase in insomnia in women with severe hot flashes indicates that severity of hot flashes should be routinely assessed in all studies of menopause. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Oct. 5 -- Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a division of Wyeth, presented new data today from two Phase 3 studies, which showed that bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens reduced the number and severity of hot flashes in symptomatic postmenopausal women by up to 80 percent, when compared with placebo. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • The study showed that, when compared with placebo, bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens significantly reduced the number and severity of hot flashes. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • Over six weeks, more than one-third of the women in each group had a 50 percent reduction in the frequency and severity of their hot flashes. (worldbulletin.net)
  • I use turmeric spice in my food about a teaspoon and it reduces the severity of the hot flashes. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The frequency and severity of hot flashes varies greatly from woman to woman. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Hot flashes have a lot to do with the changing levels of estrogen in your body, but other factors can cause your temperature control to go out of whack. (breastcancer.org)
  • Reducing the amount of estrogen or blocking its effects can cause hot flashes during treatment. (breastcancer.org)
  • Hot flashes arise from changes in the body's levels of estrogen and testosterone. (healthgrades.com)
  • Hot flashes are sparked by decreasing hormone levels-mostly estrogen, but also progesterone-which, in turn, impact the body's temperature-regulating mechanisms. (healthcentral.com)
  • During menopause, estrogen levels decrease, which causes these neurons to be hyperstimulated, thereby causing hot flashes. (newswise.com)
  • The most effective way to relieve the discomfort of hot flashes is to take estrogen, but taking this hormone carries risks. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Estrogen is the primary hormone used to reduce hot flashes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • It was only with the later generation (by that I mean women aged 40-plus) that hot flashes made their grand entrance into the common consciousness - despite the fact that the effects of menopause have been treated with estrogen since the late 1800s. (newsmax.com)
  • Hot flashes - which also can occur before your period, during pre-menopause, and after childbirth - are caused by pulses of hormones released by the pituitary gland as we age, asking our ovaries to produce the hormones of youth, which are estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. (newsmax.com)
  • When women were awake long enough to later recall nighttime hot flashes, that perception contributed to mood disturbance in women whose estrogen levels had fallen," said first author Dr. Hadine Joffe. (drugs.com)
  • But most research suggests that hot flashes occur when decreased estrogen levels cause your body's thermostat (hypothalamus) to become more sensitive to slight changes in body temperature. (mayoclinic.org)
  • While as a group, women who use a combination of estrogen and progesterone are known to be at greater risk of developing breast cancer, Li said that in his study, having a history of hot flashes reduced that risk by half, compared to women who use HT but never experienced this menopausal symptom. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Hormonal treatments had been the predominant therapy for menopausal hot flashes, but their use decreased substantially after the Women's Health Initiative Estrogen plus Progestin study found that the benefits did not necessarily outweight the risks associated with serious side effects. (psychcentral.com)
  • Hormone replacement therapy - which uses estrogen and progesterone to stabilize hormone levels - has been the mainstay for treating hot flashes. (healthline.com)
  • Hot flashes occur when estrogen hormone levels decrease. (harvard.edu)
  • The results of this study shed further light on therapeutic findings, with both anti-depressant medication and estrogen therapy having the potential to improve hot flashes and mood," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health , Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health. (eurekalert.org)
  • ROCHESTER, Minn. -- A daily dose of crushed flaxseed halved hot flashes in postmenopausal women who did not want to take estrogen, according to a pilot study. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Hot flashes are commonly caused as the result of lowered levels of estrogen. (livestrong.com)
  • Because hot flashes are a physiological response to changes in temperature, they are not only caused by the decrease in estrogen that commonly accompanies menopause. (livestrong.com)
  • Hormones levels of estrogen and progesterone declines and this may cause a variety of health problems like hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and end of having menstruation periods. (medindia.net)
  • The number one reason most women start systemic estrogen is to treat hot flashes once they realize that yoga, carrying a portable fan, and dressing in layers are not real solutions. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Estrogen therapy will eliminate or dramatically reduce flashes, but many women choose not to take estrogen, or have been advised by their doctors to steer clear. (everydayhealth.com)
  • In fact only 7 percent of women with hot flashes ultimately accept a prescription for estrogen . (everydayhealth.com)
  • As an estrogen alternative, menopause experts, including myself, often prescribe one of the antidepressants which years ago were serendipitiously found to reduce hot flashes in menopausal women. (everydayhealth.com)
  • While numerous scientific studies have shown that many antidepressants are effective at reducing hot flashes, no studies have compared antidepressants, estrogen and placebo in the same study. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Women that took the venlafaxine had a reduction in hot flashes that was essentially as good as women that took low dose estrogen. (everydayhealth.com)
  • But, be that as it may, this is still important information and confirms that venlafaxine, like other SSRI's and SNRI's, at least in the short term, not only reduces hot flashes, but does it almost as well as estrogen. (everydayhealth.com)
  • BOSTON, MA - A new research study from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) that compares low-dose oral estrogen and low-dose non-hormonal venlafaxine hydrochloride extended release (XR) to placebo were both found effective in reducing the number of hot flashes and night sweats reported by menopausal women. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study is the first clinical trial to simultaneously evaluate estrogen therapy (ET), known as the "gold standard" treatment for hot flashes and night sweats, and a non-hormonal treatment, venlafaxine, a first-line treatment in women who are unwilling or unable to use ET. (eurekalert.org)
  • Many women have taken hormones called estrogen (say: ES-tro-jen) and progesterone (say: pro-JES-ter-own) to help with hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • Although the exact cause of hot flashes is not fully understood, hot flashes are thought to be due to a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations brought on by declining estrogen levels. (empowher.com)
  • The most common treatment for hot flashes is combination hormone therapy using low doses of estrogen and progesterone to replace the ones your body is making less of now. (canyonranch.com)
  • In women, varying levels of estrogen can cause hot flashes. (howstuffworks.com)
  • In the past, doctors postulated that the onset of hot flashes had everything to do with the decrease in estrogen as a woman approached menopause. (sharecare.com)
  • What's more, researchers have found that the levels of estrogen do not differ substantially between women who have hot flashes and those who do not. (sharecare.com)
  • Although estrogen plays a role in the etiology of hot flashes, the mechanism by which its withdrawal precipitates hot flashes and its replacement relieves them is not understood. (nih.gov)
  • Alternatives to estrogen for treatment of hot flashes: are they effective and safe? (nih.gov)
  • As estrogen is typically lowest at night, some women get night sweats without having any hot flashes during the daytime. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hot flashes are associated with declining levels of estrogen (estrogen withdrawal) and other hormonal changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • It does not appear that low levels of estrogen are the primary cause of hot flashes, as women who experience hot flashes have around the same plasma estrogen levels as women who do not have them, and prepubertal girls do not have hot flashes despite low estrogen levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic estrogen therapy is the only FDA-approved medication for treating hot flashes, according to the North American Menopause Society. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Estrogen and sometimes progesterone, known as hormone therapy (HT) or menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) can be used to treat hot flashes, severe night sweats, mood issues, or vaginal dryness. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Help, I did not have any hot flashes while on the estrogen should I start taking it again? (progesteronetherapy.com)
  • The results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study 1 of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women, published in 2002, have prompted many women and primary care physicians to reconsider the use of estrogen and progesterone hormone therapy to alleviate hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • If after using natural progesterone cream for a few months, if you are still experiencing hot flashes and night sweats and the hot flash dance, you may want to add black cohosh which is an herbal phyto-estrogen and a very effective natural alternative for womens hot flashes and night sweats. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • Until recently, estrogen therapy was the treatment of choice for most women who sought treatment for hot flashes. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • Both estrogen and testosterone seem to protect against frequent hot flashes. (wdxcyber.com)
  • Supplementing with black cohosh, an herb that is nearly as effective as estrogen at treating hot flashes, and is also useful in managing the mood swings and irritability that may accompany menopause. (anh-usa.org)
  • When hot flashes happen probably has to do with the erratic rise and fall of estrogen levels that come with perimenopause. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • It may be tempting to look to medications right away - especially if hot flashes are severe - but try less drastic measures first. (breastcancer.org)
  • Brisdelle (paroxetine) is a prescription medicine used to treat moderate to severe hot flashes associated with menopause . (medicinenet.com)
  • While hormone replacement medications can help treat severe cases, natural remedies may lessen the intensity and frequency of hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Antidepressants such as Effexor are used sometimes to ease severe hot flashes. (breastcancer.org)
  • The agency gave its blessing to Noven, a subsidiary of the Japanese pharmaceutical company Hisamitsu, to market Brisdelle, a low-dose version of the antidepressant paroxetine, known commercially as Paxil, for women with moderate to severe hot flashes. (latimes.com)
  • Ninety of the women said they only had mild flashes, and the remaining 259 women reported moderate to severe hot flashes. (empowher.com)
  • Colleen Dawmen had been plagued for years by severe hot flashes that would wash over her dozens of times a day and awaken her, dripping with sweat, three or four times a night. (latimes.com)
  • These medications aren't as effective as hormone therapy for severe hot flashes, but they can be helpful to women who can't use hormones. (mayoclinic.org)
  • A procedure known as stellate ganglian block has shown promise for treating moderate to severe hot flashes, but more research is needed. (mayoclinic.org)
  • hot flashes and chills Last night while i was sleeping i woke up from severe chills. (medhelp.org)
  • Hot flashes can have a negative impact on a woman's quality of life and often are more severe in breast cancer survivors, especially those whose treated with chemotherapy and/or anti-estrogens like tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors. (healthcentral.com)
  • In this study from two Chicago medical schools, Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Chicago, 40 women who had moderate to severe hot flashes got either a stellate ganglion block-an injection of tiny amounts of anesthetic near a nerve bundle in the neck-or an injection of plain saline solution. (innovations-report.com)
  • On average, the women had 10 hot flashes a day, rating two-thirds of them moderate or severe. (innovations-report.com)
  • Four to six months after the injection, the total number of hot flashes wasn't significantly different between the real- and sham-treated groups, but the number of moderate to severe hot flashes was cut in half for women who got the real nerve block (52%) compared with just 4% for the women who got the sham injection. (innovations-report.com)
  • In the United States, African American women get the most severe and persistent hot flashes. (menopause.org)
  • But for many other women, having severe or frequent hot flashes really interferes with life. (menopause.org)
  • Women with hot flashes, particularly frequent or severe hot flashes, have poorer sleep quality and may be more likely to have depression or anxiety during the menopause transition. (menopause.org)
  • A severe flash can be pretty intense (I call it the furnace inside you) lasting between two and four minutes with profuse sweating, followed by chills and shivering. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Toughing it out works out for some women, but other's who have severe hot flashes though out the day and nights are totally blind sided by just how debilitating hot flashes can be. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Exercise can also help with weight control, which is especially important since a recent study linked a high body mass index (BMI) with more frequent and more severe hot flashes. (aarp.org)
  • a recent study found that moderate to severe hot flashes continue for an average of nearly five years after menopause, and some women will have them for another five years after that. (canyonranch.com)
  • A University of Pennsylvania study found that menopausal women who were given escitalopram for eight weeks experienced significantly fewer and less severe hot flashes than those on a placebo. (canyonranch.com)
  • Dr. James Liu, president of the North American Menopause Society and chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, said this is the first FDA approval of a combination hormone therapy "evaluated in a large, well-controlled, randomized clinical trial that has demonstrated both safety and efficacy for the treatment of moderate to severe hot flashes due to menopause. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Breast cancer survivors who struggle with hot flashes may find respite in an antidepressant, according to a new study that suggests the medication should be the go-to drug when the overheating is severe. (topix.com)
  • Three doctors and no answer for severe hot flashes/night sweats after C5-C7 ACDF. (healthboards.com)
  • In addition, hot flashes are often more frequent and more intense during hot weather or in an overheated room, the surrounding heat apparently making the hot flashes themselves both more likely to occur, and more severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe hot flashes can make it difficult to get a full night's sleep (often characterized as insomnia), which in turn can affect mood, impair concentration, and cause other physical problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • RxPG] Women who have severe hot flashes may have more chronic sleep problems than women who do not, according to a report in the June 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Hot flashes were defined as mild if they usually did not involve sweating, moderate if they mostly involved sweating but did not require a woman to stop the activity she was pursuing and severe if they typically involved sweating and did require a woman to stop an activity. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Of those who had hot flashes, about half reported that they were typically mild, while about one-third had moderate and about 15 percent had severe hot flashes. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Women were also more likely to have problems staying asleep as their hot flashes became more severe. (rxpgnews.com)
  • I've been on bio identical hormones for about a year and a half due to severe hot flashes. (progesteronetherapy.com)
  • For women who aren't bothered by moderate to severe hot flashes, this study indicates that hormone therapy will not improve their quality of life. (redorbit.com)
  • Seventy-two of them had seven or more moderate to severe hot flashes per day, whereas 78 had three or fewer mild hot flashes per day-or no hot flashes at all. (redorbit.com)
  • What are the causes of severe hot flashes in men? (ehow.co.uk)
  • More pertinent to the results of this study was the fact that women reporting severe hot flashes in midlife were at a higher risk for OSA--1.87 times higher than in women with mild or no hot flashes. (news-medical.net)
  • Women troubled with hot flashes and unwilling to take hormones may have an alternative in gabapentin, a drug used to treat seizures and shingles pain. (latimes.com)
  • Medications such as antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs also might help reduce hot flashes, although they're less effective than hormones. (mayoclinic.org)
  • At menopause and even before, the production of these much-needed hormones decreases, resulting in hot flashes. (newsmax.com)
  • Scientists speculate that hot flashes may also have a vascular component that affects the heart, while the very low levels of hormones that prompt hot flashes may protect against breast cancer. (thedailybeast.com)
  • The nerve blocks could prove very helpful for women with a history of breast cancer, as well as for women who prefer not to use hormones or other drugs for hot flashes," says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. (innovations-report.com)
  • Regardless of the delivery vehicle, the hormones significantly reduce the frequency of hot flashes for most women who take them. (rush.edu)
  • In the meanwhile, women are better informed on how to handle hot flashes without hormones. (menopause.org)
  • The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • For women who prefer not to take hormones or cannot hormones, nonhormone drugs approved to treat depression, called selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), have been found to be effective in treating hot flashes in women who don't have depression. (menopause.org)
  • Antidepressants, a blood pressure medication called clonidine, and a seizure medicine known as Gabapentin do not contain hormones have also been used to reduce hot flashes. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Hormones at menopause can help with sleep, memory, and more, but only when a woman also has hot flashes, find researchers at Helsinki University in Finland. (redorbit.com)
  • In the end, the study's findings point to the possible value of considering the role of hormones as well as hot flashes in cardiovascular health changes that take place early on during the menopause transition. (worldhealth.net)
  • These findings point to the potential value in considering the role of not only hormones, but also hot flashes, in the cardiovascular changes that occur early in the menopause transition, while also underscoring the potential role that the endothelium may play in the physiology of early hot flashes," stated Dr. Thurston and colleagues. (worldhealth.net)
  • While these hormones protect from frequent hot flashes, many other events and ingested substances can also cause the skin vessels to rapidly dilate and release heat. (wdxcyber.com)
  • The most effective treatment for hot flashes is hormone replacement therapy, but since hormones have been linked to increased risks of heart disease, blood clots and breast cancer, many women want alternate remedies. (worldbulletin.net)
  • Two approaches that did show promise in helping patients handle hot flashes without hormones were behavioral therapies (such as paced breathing) and clinical hypnosis. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Hot flashes generally arise from perimenopause or menopause as a result of age-related changes in hormone levels. (healthgrades.com)
  • Hormone imbalances due to polycystic ovarian syndrome, anorexia , even pregnancy can generate hot flashes. (healthgrades.com)
  • Prescription hormone therapy (HT) "remains the most effective treatment for [menopausal hot flashes],' says Stephanie S. Faubion, M.D., medical director of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) and a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. (healthcentral.com)
  • Hot flashes are most commonly caused by changing hormone levels before, during and after menopause. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Dr. Christopher Li, a breast cancer epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, said he became interested in a possible link between hot flashes and breast cancer because both are affected by a woman's declining hormone levels. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Hot flashes can be stopped through hormone therapy or can be prevented by avoiding the triggers, such as cigarette smoke, stress, alcohol, spicy foods, caffeine, tight clothing and heat. (reference.com)
  • Further studies are needed to directly compare the relative efficacy of SSRIs and SNRIs with hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related hot flashes. (psychcentral.com)
  • Hormone replacement therapy has long been considered to be the most effective way to manage hot flashes. (healthline.com)
  • New research suggests the drug oxybutynin effectively reduces the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who cannot take hormone replacement therapy, according to presenters at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium early December. (healthline.com)
  • So whether you chose to take hormone therapy or an alternative, if your flashes are getting in the way of your sleep, your sexual health or your quality of life, know that you have options. (everydayhealth.com)
  • The goal of the study was twofold: find out how two forms of hormone therapy affect sleep quality and assess the ties between hot flashes, sleep quality and hormone therapy. (psychcentral.com)
  • For many women, hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, is the most effective treatment for hot flashes. (rush.edu)
  • Hormone replacement therapy is incredibly effective for relieving hot flashes, night sweats and disrupted sleep, and it lowers the risk of osteoporosis," says Cindy Geyer, M.D., medical director at Canyon Ranch in Lenox, Mass. (canyonranch.com)
  • It's unclear why these types of antidepressants, also known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), reduce hot flashes, but they provide an alternative for women who are not candidates for hormone therapy. (canyonranch.com)
  • There is no question that hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for bothersome hot flashes, but in many cases, hormone therapy is not appropriate, and some women simply choose not to try it. (menopause.org)
  • Rob Finizio, left, and Dr. Brian Bernick are co-founders of TherapeuticsMD in Boca Raton, which just received FDA approval for its single-pill hormone therapy for menopausal hot flashes. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Boca Raton -based TherapeuticsMD on Monday announced its single-pill hormone therapy for menopausal hot flashes has been approved for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Hot flashes (also known as hot flushes) are a form of flushing, often caused by the changing hormone levels that are characteristic of menopause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Males with prostate cancer or testicular cancer can also have hot flashes, especially those who are undergoing hormone therapy with antiandrogens, also known as androgen antagonists, which reduce testosterone to castrate levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transgender men on hormone blockers to halt their female puberty also commonly experience hot flashes, because hormone blockers simulate or induce menopause. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this large group of women who were not users of hormone therapy, persistent hot flashes and night sweats for 10 or more years were associated with a slight but significant increase in breast cancer incidence," said Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton. (siasat.com)
  • Night sweats menopause and hot flashes (or hot flushes) are mostly caused by hormone imbalance. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • This new, well-designed study puts forth good evidence that hormone therapy does not improve quality of life in recently menopausal women who do not have numerous hot flashes," says Dr. Margery Gass, executive director of The North American Menopause Society. (redorbit.com)
  • For the women with mild or no hot flashes, hormone therapy made no difference. (redorbit.com)
  • If you have hot flashes, Female Plus™ is the best basic nutritional support supplement to help smooth hormone rhythms. (wellnessresources.com)
  • And taking a high quality broad-spectrum nutritional women's vitamin supplement and Omega-3 fatty acids with Ubiquinol can help with hormone imbalance and the hot flash dance. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • The reasoning behind taking a non-hormone treatment for hot flashes is to reduce the risk of breast cancer. (anh-usa.org)
  • We don't know exactly how hormone changes cause hot flashes, but they seem to result from the temporary instability of the heat regulation center in the brain. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Amitriptyline - Is this medicine 10mg for anxiety and hot flushes? (drugs.com)
  • The effect of dietary soy supplementation on hot flushes. (medindia.net)
  • Venlafaxine in management of hot flushes in survivors of breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial. (medindia.net)
  • The effect of isoflavones phyto-estrogens in relieving hot flushes in Peruvian postmenopausal women. (medindia.net)
  • Women who experienced the most intense hot flushes-the kind that woke them up at night-had a particularly low risk of breast cancer," said Li, the senior author of the study. (thedailybeast.com)
  • And these hot flashes and flushes can last for a few seconds or up to five minutes. (healthy.net)
  • Menopausal women often struggle with sleep-between the hot flashes (hot flushes) and night sweats, it can be difficult to enjoy quality and restful sleep. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The hot flushes can go on for years post menopause, so I think it's just coincidental i'm afraid. (womens-health.com)
  • Learn the reasons for hot flashes (hot flushes), night sweats menopause and menopause stages. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • These are typically the women that get hot flushes (hot flashes) and night sweats menopause. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • All studies published to date show that isoflavones are not a miracle cure for hot flushes, with approximately cutting the number of daily hot flushes by half. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Men can experience hot flushes just like women can. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Men can experience hot flushes as many as 10 times a day. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Thus, men feel the hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Men who experience hot flushes should see their doctor, who can perform a blood test to see whether the cause is a testosterone deficiency also known as male hypogonadism. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Treatment can be directed at the cause of the hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Hot flushes that are a result of andropause can be treated with bioidentical testosterone replacement therapy. (ehow.co.uk)
  • If men undergoing prostate cancer treatment are given small doses of oestrogen, which helps females with hot flushes, their episodes will also diminish. (ehow.co.uk)
  • There are other conditions that can cause hot flushes in men. (ehow.co.uk)
  • In addition, infections such as HIV or tuberculosis can lead to hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • If you experience hot flushes, your doctor may recommend you avoid drinking alcohol or caffeinated beverages. (ehow.co.uk)
  • There are also special diets believed to limit the frequency of hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Proponents of alternative medicine believe that there are dietary supplements that can curb hot flushes. (ehow.co.uk)
  • We ran a clinical trial of black cohosh for hot flashes and found it did not help. (oncolink.org)
  • A large randomized placebo-controlled study was subsequently initiated, and failed to provide evidence that black cohosh reduced hot flashes more than placebo. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Is black cohosh good for hot flashes? (reference.com)
  • Soy, red clover, or black cohosh help some women with hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • Black cohosh may be effective for short-term treatment of hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • many women pursue other treatments for their hot flashes, including over-the-counter complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), including soy isoflavones, black cohosh, and omega-3 fatty acids. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • In summary, studies of CAM for the treatment of menopause-related hot flashes have demonstrated that treatments such as soy and black cohosh are not likely to be effective in most women, while the study of omega-3 fatty acids is promising yet too preliminary to conclude definitively that omega-3 fatty acids are effective. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • Women taking a placebo medication reported a 40% to 48% reduction in hot flashes, so the panel was skeptical that the further reduction reported by women taking paroxetine was "clinically meaningful. (latimes.com)
  • Escitalopram was associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of hot flashes relative to placebo, adjusted for race, site, and baseline hot flash frequency. (psychcentral.com)
  • In the placebo group, hot flash frequency decreased to 6.43 hot flashes per day (33 percent decrease or an average of 3.2 fewer hot flashes per day). (psychcentral.com)
  • Clinical improvement at week 8 (decrease of 50 percent or more from baseline in hot flash frequency) was significantly greater in the escitalopram group than in the placebo group (55 percent vs. 36 percent). (psychcentral.com)
  • The 3-week postintervention follow-up demonstrated that hot flashes increased after cessation of escitalopram but not after cessation of placebo, providing further evidence of escitalopram's effects," the authors write. (psychcentral.com)
  • The research team found that the women who took oxybutynin experienced significantly fewer hot flashes than the women who took the placebo. (healthline.com)
  • A few small studies suggested that this treatment had potential, but this is the first study to show that this hot flash treatment really is better than placebo. (innovations-report.com)
  • Explain to interested patients that the role of crushed flaxseed in reducing hot flashes came from a small, uncontrolled, phase II study, and the results still need to be confirmed in a large placebo-controlled trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The researchers found that in both groups, a third of the women reported a 50% decrease in hot flashes - which suggests that flaxseed works no better than a placebo and that hot flashes get better on their own. (time.com)
  • Yet the sizable placebo effect (a 36% placebo responder rate) -- common in menopausal treatment trials -- also "suggest the importance of nondrug factors in clinical care and the potential for nonmedical approaches as other possible therapies for reduction of hot flashes," they wrote in JAMA . (medpagetoday.com)
  • Hot flashes became significantly less bothersome with escitalopram as well, compared with placebo (mean decrease 0.63 versus 0.39 on a four-point scale, P =0.001). (medpagetoday.com)
  • After eight weeks, the frequency of hot flashes/night sweats decreased by 52.9 percent with estradiol, 47.6 percent with venlafaxine, and by 28.6 percent with placebo. (eurekalert.org)
  • The ameliorative effect on hot flashes/night sweats was statistically significant for each of the medications compared to placebo. (eurekalert.org)
  • A recent metaanalysis does demonstrate that some of these drugs do moderately decrease hot flashes.3 Furthermore, the antidepressant agents demonstrated to be effective do modulate serotonin in some way, whereas antidepressants found to be consistent with placebo effects in open-label pilot trials (ie, mirtazapine,6 bupropion,7 and desipramine8) do not impact serotonin. (empowher.com)
  • One study of women with a history of breast cancer showed that the drug reduced hot flashes by 15 to 20 percent compared to placebo. (canyonranch.com)
  • Data published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition ​ ​ indicated that 12 weeks of supplementation led to a 43% reduction in hot flashes, compared to 31% in the placebo group. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Data from 136 women with at least seven hot flashes per day indicated that hot flashes decreased in both placebo and soy germ extract groups after 12 weeks, with greater reductions in the soy group. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Soy isoflavones reduced hot flashes by 9 to 40 percent in some trials, but most trials showed no difference compared with placebo. (aafp.org)
  • 2 - 33 A potential confounder in most hot flash trials is the placebo response rate, which in the studies evaluated for this review was reported as between 18 and 40 percent. (aafp.org)
  • The effect of soy isoflavone extracts on hot flashes has been studied extensively, but most studies have found that they are no more effective than placebo. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • It is important to note that in many of the trials, hot flashes improved in both placebo and treatment groups, indicating high placebo response rates in these studies and making it difficult to distinguish between the beneficial effects of soy, placebo response, and non-specific effects of monitoring and study participation. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • The investigators randomized 120 women to be treated with either 500mg of E-EPA three times a day or with placebo over an 8-week period and compared changes in hot flashes using a hot flash diary. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • 50% reduction in hot flashes) than those in the placebo group. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota found that 188 women who were randomly assigned to eat a daily flaxseed bar saw no more improvement in their hot flashes than women given flax-free "placebo" bars. (worldbulletin.net)
  • In general, hot flash studies have found a significant placebo effect, with women feeling better because they expect to. (worldbulletin.net)
  • The agency's press release said studies of the drug showed that Brisdelle "reduced hot flashes compared to placebo," though "the mechanism by which Brisdelle reduces hot flashes is unknown. (anh-usa.org)
  • Little is known as to why and how hot flashes occur. (webmd.com)
  • She may continue to experience hot flashes and night sweats, but they will probably occur less often. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Most women do not need to avoid trigger points entirely, but knowing which specific factors worsen hot flashes allows women to deal with them when they occur. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hot flashes are short, sudden feelings of heat that can occur across the entire body or in parts of the body. (healthgrades.com)
  • In the process, research - such as the work of scientists who have studied hot flashes and heart disease for decades and presented their findings at a meeting of the International Menopause Society in Rome in 2011- has demonstrated that hot flashes may be warning signs of heart disease when they are persistent, extremely frequent, and occur later rather than earlier in menopause. (newsmax.com)
  • How often hot flashes occur varies among women, but most women who report having hot flashes experience them daily. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Although the physiology of hot flashes has been studied for more than 30 years, no one is completely sure why or how they occur. (medindia.net)
  • Hot flashes occur in 75 percent of menopausal women and typically begin as a sudden sensation of heat on the face and upper chest that becomes generalized. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Night sweats are really just hot flashes that occur during sleeping hours. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Certain physical changes occur during a hot flash. (sharecare.com)
  • Hot flashes often occur during the night and have been associated with insomnia, or difficulty sleeping. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Non fever caused hot flashes can occur rarely or every few minutes. (wdxcyber.com)
  • How often do hot flashes usually occur? (sutterhealth.org)
  • When hot flashes occur at night, they may negatively impact sleep. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Could hot flashes only occur at night? (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Brisdelle contains a low dose of paroxetine that is especially formulated to treat hot flashes associated with menopause . (medicinenet.com)
  • How low doses of paroxetine help to treat hot flashes associated with menopause is not known. (medicinenet.com)
  • Traditionally, a variety of plant products has been used to treat hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • One of the treatments studied looked at using low doses of a class of drugs called selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat hot flashes. (newswise.com)
  • These vasomotor spasms, as they are called, start the chain of events that lead to the skin flushing and temperature changes known as hot flashes. (rush.edu)
  • 4- Excessive activity of the GnRH center affects the vasomotor center, causing hot flashes and night sweats, hot flashes side effects and the uncomfortable hot flash dance. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • Others feel sadness about the closure of their childbearing years, which is more often than not accompanied by unpleasant menopause-related conditions such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and irregular heartbeats. (qualityhealth.com)
  • TSECs pair the benefits of estrogens with SERMs to create a distinct clinical profile, which may provide relief of hot flashes and vaginal dryness as well as bone and uterine protection. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • There are a variety of treatments for bothersome hot flashes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Like all things menopause, hot flashes are an unwelcome scourge for the middle-aged women who get them, ranging in intensity from merely bothersome to majorly disruptive to daily life. (thedailybeast.com)
  • While none of these studies are conclusive-researchers need to replicate results to prove their conclusions are accurate-scientists are starting to rethink their long-held belief that hot flashes are a bothersome but benign rite of passage. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Hot flashes usually fade away eventually without treatment, and no treatment is necessary unless hot flashes are bothersome. (menopause.org)
  • Newswise - ROCHESTER, Minn. - A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. (newswise.com)
  • While these findings are preliminary, our study suggests that limiting caffeine intake may be useful for those postmenopausal women who have bothersome hot flashes and night sweats," says Stephanie Faubion, M.D., director of the Women's Health Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. (newswise.com)
  • Women and their clinicians should consider these results as well as potential side effects as they evaluate treatment approaches to managing bothersome hot flashes. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • The latest study included women with bothersome hot flashes, such as those occurring at least an average of four times a day. (worldbulletin.net)
  • You can read more about treatments to help ease hot flashes on the Breastcancer.org All About Hot Flashes page and you can learn more about acupuncture in the Complementary and Holistic Medicine section. (breastcancer.org)
  • Surgical removal of the ovaries and some treatments for endometriosis can also induce hot flashes. (healthgrades.com)
  • Nothing can completely cure hot flashes, but some treatments and techniques may bring relief. (healthcentral.com)
  • the control group was told not to change their physical activity habits, which may or may not have included strength training, and to avoid other hot flash treatments. (healthcentral.com)
  • Earlier this year, Reed was lead author in a paper looking at new treatments for menopause, including hot flashes. (newswise.com)
  • No other treatments have U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for menopausal hot flashes, and the efficacy of alternative pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents is inconclusive, according to the article. (psychcentral.com)
  • Although hormonal treatments, some newer antidepressants, gabapentin, and clonidine have been shown to decrease hot flashes,(1-4), improved treatment options are needed to provide substantial relief without unwanted risks or side effects. (empowher.com)
  • What are the treatments for hot flashes? (menopause.org)
  • Although the available treatments for hot flashes do not cure hot flashes, they do offer relief. (menopause.org)
  • If we can better identify what genetic variants are associated with hot flashes, this could lead to novel treatments to relieve them," Crandall said in a journal news release. (healthywomen.org)
  • However, there is limited evidence to support the use of these treatments for hot flashes to date. (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • Besides bioidentical estriol, there are other natural treatments for hot flashes. (anh-usa.org)
  • Other medical treatments for hot flashes include antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs but these also have potential side effects such as nausea, dizziness, weight gain or sexual dysfunction. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Although those studies found a reduction in hot flashes and night sweats among postmenopausal women, studies that included women in perimenopause did not show the effect. (medscape.com)
  • Researchers in the latest issue of Harvard Women's Health Watch had explored the physiology of hot flashes experienced by some women in their menopausal or postmenopausal age. (medindia.net)
  • This is an uncontrolled pilot clinical trial to determine the feasibility of recruitment and effectiveness of a device called RESPeRATE that paces respiration to treat menopausal hot flashes in 12 peri- or postmenopausal women. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This is an uncontrolled pilot trial of the effects of learning paced respiration using RESPeRATE in 12 healthy peri- or postmenopausal women between 40 and 60 years old who report experiencing at least 4 hot flashes per day or 30 hot flashes per week. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • About 33 percent of the women reported having hot flashes, including 12.5 percent of the premenopausal women, 79 percent of perimenopausal women and 39.3 percent of postmenopausal women. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Each year the researchers followed up with them to gather any reports of hot flashes or night sweats, and every few years the women filled out a food survey. (reuters.com)
  • By the end of the study, Gold's team could find no consistent pattern between the amount of phytoestrogens eaten and how often or how severely women experienced hot flashes and night sweats. (reuters.com)
  • October 11, 2012 (Orlando, Florida) - Hot flashes and night sweats appear to be linked to higher serum glucose levels and indicators of insulin resistance , according to data presented here at the North American Menopause Society 23rd Annual Meeting. (medscape.com)
  • The 3075 participants in SWAN study were 42 to 52 years of age at study entry, and completed questionnaires about hot flashes and night sweats. (medscape.com)
  • Women who lost weight on a low-fat diet reduced hot flashes and night sweats ," says researcher Bette J. Caan, DrPH, senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research. (webmd.com)
  • About 80% of women report hot flashes and night sweats as they progress through menopause , according to Caan. (webmd.com)
  • Hot flashes are generally not serious, but they can interrupt sleep (they may be accompanied by night sweats ) and cause discomfort or embarrassment. (healthgrades.com)
  • For the intervention group, hot flashes (and night sweats) were cut nearly in half. (healthcentral.com)
  • Eating soy each day will probably not prevent hot flashes and night sweats in women heading into menopause , according to results from a study tracking the dietary habits of 1651 women. (medscape.com)
  • The research, published online October 31 and in print March 2013 in Menopause , followed up women in premenopause and early perimenopause who had not experienced hot flashes or night sweats when the study began. (medscape.com)
  • SSRIs have traditionally been used to treat depression, but low doses effectively reduced hot flashes and night sweats, the researchers found. (newswise.com)
  • WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 -- Women who believe they have a lot of hot flashes during the night may be more likely to experience mild depression during menopause, a new study suggests. (drugs.com)
  • Night sweats are hot flashes that happen at night, and they may disrupt your sleep. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Nighttime hot flashes (night sweats) may wake you from sleep and can cause long-term sleep disruptions. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Take adequate rest during the day if hot flashes restrict sound sleep at night. (medindia.net)
  • My hot flashes consisted of waking up in the night soaking wet -- no fever. (healingwell.com)
  • Hot flashes are more common at night. (harvard.edu)
  • Our new findings provide critical data for physicians and women making treatment decisions for hot flashes/night sweats. (eurekalert.org)
  • The objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic benefit and tolerability of low-dose estradiol and low-dose venlafaxine in alleviating hot flashes and night sweats. (eurekalert.org)
  • The primary outcome was the daily number of hot flashes and night sweats after treatment. (eurekalert.org)
  • The results for these outcomes were consistent with those for hot flash and night sweat frequency. (eurekalert.org)
  • The majority also report hot flashes and night sweats, which can be disruptive to falling and staying asleep. (psychcentral.com)
  • They also recorded the intensity of hot flashes and night sweats during this time. (psychcentral.com)
  • Early research also suggests that sage extract, when used with alfalfa extract for three months, can possibly lessen hot flashes and night sweats, adds WebMD. (reference.com)
  • If a woman is waking up 10 times a night with hot flashes, treatment might get her down to three times," Vinta explains. (rush.edu)
  • Hot flashes: Up to 75 percent of women in the menopause transition experience them (and their extra-annoying nighttime equivalent, night sweats). (canyonranch.com)
  • A condition that is often associated with hot flashes is called night sweats . (howstuffworks.com)
  • During the menopause transition up to 85 percent of women experience hot flashes during the day and night. (sharecare.com)
  • I stumbled upon it more than a dozen years ago and have found it works like a miracle for many women to eliminate hot flashes and night sweats. (healthy.net)
  • A new study from the researchers at the Pittsburgh site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) looked at menopausal women who were experiencing hot flashes and night sweats and their level of physical activity during the day to determine if they could offer some help. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The findings of this study contrast somewhat with those of another recent investigation from Finland, where 176 menopausal women with hot flashes and night sweats were randomly assigned to a six-month unsupervised aerobic training program (50 minutes four times a week) or to a control group. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Researchers at King's College London found that two-thirds of women who participated in six weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy experienced a "clinically significant" reduction in hot flashes and night sweats. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Hot flashes, along with night sweats, can be uncomfortable and disruptive. (staradvertiser.com)
  • Use natural progesterone supplementation or BHRT to eliminate hot flashes and night sweats menopause and systems of menopause. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • I was flashing day and night after my 5th treatment. (cancer.org)
  • Women's Hot Flashes and Night Sweats and Help! (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • Are you experiencing womens hot flashes and night sweats? (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • Make sure you start with natural progesterone supplementation first if, you are experiencing hot flashes and night sweats, womens hot flashes and night sweats and hot flashes side effects. (safemenopausesolutions.com)
  • When the moon comes out, hot flashes turn into night sweats. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Up to 80% of midlife women experience hot flashes or night sweats. (news-medical.net)
  • For the study, the researchers analyzed the entire human genome to identify links between genetic variations and hot flashes and night sweats. (healthywomen.org)
  • They also considered whether these women reported hot flashes or night sweats. (healthywomen.org)
  • Three out of four women experience hot flashes and night sweats during menopause. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Women who experience hot flashes and night sweats at the start of menopause had a 17% lower risk of stroke, an 11% lower risk of heart disease and an 11% lower risk of death during the study. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Why do I only get hot flashes in the middle of the night? (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Sleeping under too much bedding might also contribute to your middle-of-the-night hot flashes. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • In all, 26% of the women had hot flashes at the beginning of the study, with most reporting mild ones. (webmd.com)
  • Taken daily, a class of antidepressants called SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) may improve hot flashes. (healthcentral.com)
  • Selective serotonin and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs) have been investigated for hot flash treatment with mixed results. (psychcentral.com)
  • Typically used as antidepressants, SSRIs have also been shown to reduce hot flashes. (rush.edu)
  • Some antidepressants (medicines for depression) known as SSRIs may help with hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • Clonidine, gabapentin, and some SSRIs effective for hot flashes. (nih.gov)
  • A small study found that 12 weeks of acupuncture provided the same relief from hot flashes related to breast cancer treatment as Effexor (chemical name: venlafaxine), an antidepressant medicine. (breastcancer.org)
  • Clonidine, a pill or patch typically used to treat high blood pressure, might provide some relief from hot flashes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • An OB-GYN shares five ways to find relief from hot flashes, which the majority of women experience during menopause. (rush.edu)
  • Get Relief from Hot Flashes (Finally! (canyonranch.com)
  • Because many other factors also influence sleep in menopausal women, the exact link between hot flashes and insomnia has been difficult to establish. (rxpgnews.com)
  • A link between hot flashes and FMD could not be established amongst these older women. (worldhealth.net)
  • There are 75 comments on the Reuters story from Nov 8, 2010, titled Cancer patients pick antidepressant for hot flashes . (topix.com)
  • FDA Approves a Dangerous New Antidepressant-for Hot Flashes! (anh-usa.org)
  • 22 responses to "FDA Approves a Dangerous New Antidepressant-for Hot Flashes! (anh-usa.org)
  • Effective nonhormonal therapies for hot flashes include antidepressants, such as venlafaxine (Effexor) and gabapentin (Neurontin), but not all women benefit from these agents, and toxicities may limit their use, the researchers said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Antidepressants, such as Effexor and Zoloft, have been shown in studies to help alleviate hot flashes . (time.com)
  • Although the authors proposed that a positive experiment would have supported a mechanism for why selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors decrease hot flashes, the negative results from their trial neither prove nor disprove whether some of these antidepressants decrease hot flashes. (empowher.com)
  • The researchers found that glucose levels and the degree of insulin resistance rose as the frequency of hot flashes rose. (medscape.com)
  • How hypnosis helps hot flashes is still not certain, but the researchers explained that it may be due to the fact that hypnosis can boost the function of the parasympathetic nerve system, which plays a part in hot flashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Now, women have another treatment option to treat their hot flashes, according to researchers from the Mayo Clinic. (healthline.com)
  • To measure the effectiveness of oxybutynin, the researchers studied 150 women who had experienced at least 28 hot flashes per week for at least a month. (healthline.com)
  • Flaxseed, also known as linseed, is another popular supplement that has not been well studied for hot flashes, the researchers said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It was too good to be true: a study by Mayo Clinic researchers finds that flaxseed doesn't help prevent hot flashes after all. (time.com)
  • Back in 2007, a small pilot study of 29 women by the same Mayo researchers had suggested that consuming 40 grams of crushed flaxseed a day helped reduce hot flashes. (time.com)
  • Some researchers believe that hot flashes are caused by too much dopamine. (healthy.net)
  • The researchers believe the different cardiovascular risk disease markers might indicate different temporal relations to hot flashes that progress from endothelial dysfunction to atherosclerosis all the way to clinical cardiovascular disease events. (worldhealth.net)
  • These variants increase the likelihood that women will experience hot flashes, the researchers said. (healthywomen.org)
  • Observing a good diet is one of the best ways to prevent hot flashes. (reference.com)
  • So regardless of whether you take steps to prevent hot flashes, you'll likely need some tactics for responding to them as they happen. (rush.edu)
  • Meanwhile, emerging research funded by NIH as part of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) suggests that persistent and frequent hot flashes may be an early marker of adverse vascular changes associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Of course, over time, hot flashes become less frequent on their own. (rush.edu)
  • My hot flashes have gotten way worse and more frequent. (womens-health.com)
  • Washington: Frequent hot flashes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, suggests a new study. (siasat.com)
  • About 80 percent of menopausal women in this country have hot flashes, some for as long as 15 years! (healthy.net)
  • As many as 85 percent of menopausal women experience hot flashes, sensations of heat that may also involve sweating, according to background information in the article. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine have been shown to reduce hot flashes by 19 to 60 percent and were well tolerated by study participants. (aafp.org)
  • Significantly more women saw a clinical improvement with at least a 50% reduction in hot flash frequency over the course of treatment with escitalopram as well (55% versus 36%, P =0.009). (medpagetoday.com)
  • This was a significant 47 percent decrease - or an average of 4.6 fewer hot flashes per day - than at the beginning of the study. (psychcentral.com)
  • In terms of the role of E2, the research team determined that levels were not significantly linked with FMD and did not decrease the association between hot flashes and FMD in the study's young women (40-53 years-old). (worldhealth.net)
  • Hot flashes tend to decrease over time. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • See related handout on nonhormonal options for hot flashes . (aafp.org)
  • Twelve weeks later, the hypnosis group was found to have had 75% fewer hot flashes, while the control group only reported 13% fewer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Women in the first two groups experienced fewer hot flashes and reported better quality of life - that is, hot flashes had less of an impact on their work, social life, leisure activities, and sleep - compared with women in the third group. (healthcentral.com)
  • She also noted that an active lifestyle could lead to fewer hot flashes and a better overall mood. (aarp.org)
  • Although older women with PCOS reported fewer hot flashes and episodes of sweating compared with women without PCOS, they also reported significantly more hirsutism (64% vs. 9%).7 These dermatological effects can be detrimental to a woman's self-esteem and body image. (todaysdietitian.com)
  • But a man might get hot flashes as his testosterone level drops in middle age, especially if he's had a certain kind of prostate cancer treatment. (medicinenet.com)
  • All the women kept a hot flash and quality of life diary during the 12 weeks of treatment. (breastcancer.org)
  • While acupuncture appears to ease hot flashes, it's not clear how the treatment works. (breastcancer.org)
  • If you're having hot flashes because of breast cancer treatment and are considering medical treatment or have taken an antidepressant that didn't help or caused side effects, you might want to talk to your doctor about this study. (breastcancer.org)
  • Acupuncture is one of several complementary and holistic medicine techniques that have been shown to help women deal with menopausal or treatment-related hot flashes. (breastcancer.org)
  • Brisdelle is the first nonhormonal treatment for the hot flashes of menopause approved by the FDA. (latimes.com)
  • If hot flashes don't interfere with your life, you probably don't need treatment. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hot flashes subside gradually for most women, even without treatment, but it can take several years for them to stop. (mayoclinic.org)
  • A low-dose form of paroxetine (Brisdelle) is the only nonhormone treatment for hot flashes approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If hot flashes affect your daily activities or nighttime sleep, consider seeing your doctor to discuss treatment options. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We are currently running a clincial trial on acupuncture for the treatment of hot flashes in women with breast cancer. (oncolink.org)
  • Is Effexor a Good Treatment for Hot Flashes? (reference.com)
  • For their new research, the Mayo scientists created a randomized controlled trial, assigning 188 women with hot flashes (due to either menopause or breast-cancer treatment) to eat a fiber bar that contained either 40 g of flaxseed or no flaxseed for six weeks. (time.com)
  • A better understanding of the physiology and measurement of hot flashes would expedite the development and testing of more effective treatment options. (empowher.com)
  • One of my relatives who is having 50 years, was suffering from the hot flashes is searching for a treatment. (empowher.com)
  • In fact, from 50% to 80% of perimenopausal women try nonhormonal therapies for hot flashes, but without any real guidance on what works (and what doesn't), woman experiment with different products, often delaying their chance at finding effective treatment, wasting capital, or they suffer in silence. (menopause.org)
  • Hot flashes: phenomenology, quality of life, and search for treatment options. (nih.gov)
  • Although there is much anecdotal information about herbs and other nonconventional remedies, little or no research had been done to assess the efficacy or safety of these methods for the treatment of hot flashes. (nih.gov)
  • An immediate focus on some of the most promising of these therapies could broaden the available treatment options and should provide new insights into the mechanism underlying hot flashes. (nih.gov)
  • MEDLINE (1966-October 2005), PsycINFO (1974-October 2005), and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register Database (1966-October 2005) were searched for relevant trials that provided data on treatment of menopausal hot flashes using 1 or more nonhormonal therapies. (nih.gov)
  • Aromatherapy can be a particularly efficacious treatment for hot flashes because it has therapeutic mechanisms that are similar to the physiological mechanisms of hot flashes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Research on hot flashes is mostly focused on treatment options. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women who experience troublesome hot flashes are advised by some to try alternatives to hormonal therapies as the first line of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viagra is indicated for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men paxil for hot flashes reviews . (spiritofbaraka.com)
  • Soy and other isoflavones may be helpful in the short-term treatment of hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • Omega-3 fatty acids have recently been examined as a possible treatment for hot flashes and are an appealing treatment option, as their safety and cardiovascular benefits are well-established . (womensmentalhealth.org)
  • They can get them if undergoing treatment for prostrate cancer using anti-testosterone therapy, using thermal blankets and from alcohol, hot liquids and other substances. (wdxcyber.com)
  • The FDA has approved the first non-hormonal treatment for hot flashes associated with menopause. (anh-usa.org)
  • What's the best treatment for hot flashes? (sutterhealth.org)
  • The only SSRI currently FDA-approved for easing hot flashes is paroxetine. (canyonranch.com)
  • The only SSRI FDA has approved thus far for treating hot flashes is paroxetine 7.5 mg. (menopause.org)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil) is an effective option for treating hot flashes. (aafp.org)
  • Both drugs contain higher doses of paroxetine than the version for hot flashes. (anh-usa.org)
  • The exact cause of hot flashes is unknown, but may be caused by circulation changes. (sharecare.com)
  • The stress relief exercise offers may also reduce the number and intensity of hot flashes. (healthcentral.com)
  • The frequency and intensity of hot flashes vary among women. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Though 85% of women experience hot flashes during menopause, that sisterhood is no solace when "you're sitting in a meeting at work or standing in front of a group of people and you get that sudden sensation of heat in your face, chest, and upper torso, like you've just walked outside during a heat wave," says Octavia Cannon, D.O., an ob/gyn in Charlotte, North Carolina. (healthcentral.com)
  • When going through menopause, many women experience hot flashes. (livestrong.com)
  • The first, published this month and funded by the National Cancer Institute, found that women who experience hot flashes have a 50 percent lower chance of developing the most common types of breast cancer. (thedailybeast.com)
  • I too experience Hot Flashes - I think my Doctor said it may have something to do with the Lupus -- I am in early menopause (which I heard can go 10 years - can someone PLEASE tell me this isn't so? (healingwell.com)
  • Hot flashes are experienced by many women, but not all women undergoing menopause experience hot flashes. (empowher.com)
  • As many as 75% of perimenopausal women in North America experience hot flashes, and for a quarter of these women, hot flashes are so disturbing that they seek help. (menopause.org)
  • Men can experience hot flashes, too. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Men can experience hot flashes when testosterone levels fall. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The newest data says that among women who experience hot flashes, the flashes continue on average for 7 years. (sharecare.com)
  • Women with physical disabilities, such as spinal cord injuries may experience hot flashes in different parts of the body or only on one side. (sharecare.com)
  • Doctors now theorize that the zone between the high and low set points in peri- and post-menopausal women who experience hot flashes is narrower than in women who do not experience any hot flashes. (sharecare.com)
  • Most women experience hot flashes for 6 months to 2 years, although some reports suggest that they last considerably longer-as long as 10 years, depending on when they began. (menopause.org)
  • Acupuncture is an alternative to medication that might help women who experience hot flashes. (staradvertiser.com)
  • Why do certain women experience hot flashes while others don't? (sutterhealth.org)
  • Injecting a little anesthetic near a nerve bundle in the neck cut troublesome hot flashes significantly, shows a new randomized, controlled trial published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (innovations-report.com)
  • Although some studies reveal that flaxseed does not significantly reduce hot flashes, one study in 2007 reported that menopausal women decreased the freque. (reference.com)
  • Menopause is a time of transition, and it is often complicated by hot flashes and sleep problems, both of which can have a significant negative impact on a woman's life. (emaxhealth.com)
  • During a hot flash a woman's body temperature goes up by 1 to 3 degrees, and the heart rate also goes up by five to 10 beats," said Dr. Suneela Vegunta, a Mayo Clinic women's health physician. (staradvertiser.com)
  • Hot flashes are the often a woman's first clear-cut sign of perimenopause. (estronaut.com)
  • Hot flashes are a result of the body's way of dealing with increased heat. (livestrong.com)
  • One line of research shows that women who have hot flashes have a lower tolerance for changes in the body's core (innermost) temperature than women who don't have hot flashes. (medindia.net)
  • The sweating during a hot flash can be seen as your body's attempt to get rid of heat. (menopause.org)
  • Other factors that may be involved in hot flashes include the body's core temperature regulation and brain chemicals. (sharecare.com)
  • Although their exact cause still isn't fully understood, hot flashes are thought to be the result of changes in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that regulates the body's temperature. (menopause.org)
  • The latest thinking is that hot flashes involve the hypothalamus, the area at the base of the brain that acts as the body's thermostat. (sutterhealth.org)
  • When a hot flash occurs, the brain thinks the body's temperature is too high. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Research suggests that women who have hot flashes may have an increased risk of heart disease and greater bone loss than women who do not have hot flashes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Women who have hot flashes have a thermoneutral zone that's so narrow, even the tiniest changes in core body temperature can trigger sweating (or chills). (medindia.net)