Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Heart-Lung Transplantation: The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Heart, Artificial: A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Mycophenolic Acid: An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Immunocompromised Host: A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.United StatesHospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cod Liver Oil: Oil obtained from fresh livers of the cod family, Gadidae. It is a source of VITAMIN A and VITAMIN D.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Water-Electrolyte Imbalance: Disturbances in the body's WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Hospital Planning: Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Drug Substitution: The practice of replacing one prescribed drug with another that is expected to have the same clinical or psychological effect.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Ganciclovir: An ACYCLOVIR analog that is a potent inhibitor of the Herpesvirus family including cytomegalovirus. Ganciclovir is used to treat complications from AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus infections.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Postpericardiotomy Syndrome: A nonspecific hypersensitivity reaction caused by TRAUMA to the PERICARDIUM, often following PERICARDIOTOMY. It is characterized by PERICARDIAL EFFUSION; high titers of anti-heart antibodies; low-grade FEVER; LETHARGY; loss of APPETITE; or ABDOMINAL PAIN.Cytomegalovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Cyclosporins: A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Alternariosis: Opportunistic fungal infection by a member of ALTERNARIA genus.Opportunistic Infections: An infection caused by an organism which becomes pathogenic under certain conditions, e.g., during immunosuppression.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis: Lung infections with the invasive forms of ASPERGILLUS, usually after surgery, transplantation, prolonged NEUTROPENIA or treatment with high-doses of CORTICOSTEROIDS. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis can progress to CHRONIC NECROTIZING PULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS or hematogenous spread to other organs.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Mycobacterium haemophilum: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that causes granulomatous or ulcerating skin lesions in immunosuppressed persons. This organism owes its name to its requirement for growth of high levels of iron, conveniently supplied as blood, heme, or ferric ammonium citrate.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Rats, Inbred LewCoronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.CreatininePatient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Trichosporonosis: Fungal infections caused by TRICHOSPORON that may become systemic especially in an IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST. Clinical manifestations range from superficial cutaneous infections to systemic lesions in multiple organs.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overFetal Tissue Transplantation: Transference of fetal tissue between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hospitals, Municipal: Hospitals controlled by the city government.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mice, Inbred C57BLMyocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Nitroglycerin: A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Hospitals, Maternity: Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.
He received his heart transplant on 3 December 1967, at the Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The operation ... Bosman told him there was a man in the hospital who was desperately ill and in need of a heart transplant, and perhaps Edward ... As later heart transplants would reveal, the signs noted at that time were part of a resettling program for the new heart and ... Washkansky was actually the second human recipient of a heart transplant overall, in that James Hardy had done a transplant in ...
"Pediatric Heart Transplant in Toronto 2000". CTSNetJournals.org. Retrieved 2012-12-28. "Dr. Koirala's Bio". CTSNet.org. ... "T.U. Teaching Hospital Payroll". Teaching Hospital of Nepal. Retrieved 2012-12-28. "Koirala's membership in a national medical ... "Sahid Gangalal Hospital's Annual Report (2007" (PDF). Sahid Gangalal Hospital. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 20, ... His social initiative came at the time when Nepal completely lacked resources to treat heart patients, and the rate of heart ...
"1st heart transplant at pvt hospital". Hidustan Times. May 2011. Retrieved June 10, 2015. "M R Girinath". My Doc Advisor. 2015 ... C. Walton Lillehei Panangipalli Venugopal Christian Medical College and Hospital AIIMS, New Delhi Open heart surgery India ... an American pioneer of open heart surgery, at the University of Minnesota Hospitals in Minneapolis, USA. With the assistance of ... He is credited with the first successful performance of open heart surgery in India which he performed in 1962. He served as ...
"Heart Transplant facility at Global Hospitals Mumbai". Medical Dialogues. Nomani, Ziaulla (21 August 2013). "Why Heart doctors ... "Global Hospitals - Now a Destination for Heart Transplantation". Global Hospital. 23 February 2017. Pandit, Sadaguru (29 ... Iyer, Malathy (28 February 2017). "Mumbai's heart transplant program gets a push". Timesofindia. Thakur, Savita (4 March 2017 ... Hamdulay is the alumni of Sion Hospital and also has studied and trained in cardiac surgery at Toronto General Hospital, ...
Patterson, Robbie (24 October 2014). "World-first dead heart transplant at Sydney's St Vincent's Hospital a game changer". News ... transplant. A "dead heart" is a heart donated after circulatory death (DCD), where the heart has stopped beating. As of 24 ... 3 patients had received DCD heart transplants. It helps to buy certain time(3 to 6 hrs) for the dead heart to transplant in a ... the medical director of the St Vincent's Heart Transplant Unit. St Vincent's Hospital and the Victor Chang Cardiac Research ...
A heart and lung transplant program commenced in 1990. Griepp stepped down as chairman in 2001 to pursue research and clinical ... then completed residencies at both Stanford Hospital and Bellevue Hospital Center. He also did a fellowship in cardiothoracic ... Children's Heart Fund Precious Heart Award, 2003 Distinguished Scientist Award, Bicuspid Aortic Foundation Partial list: Etz CD ... Human heart transplantation: current status. Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1976 August; 22(2): 171-175. PMID 788661 Griepp RB, ...
In 1968, the first heart transplant in Israel was performed there. The first implantation of an artificial heart in Israel was ... The hospital opened with 70 beds. It was named for Dr. Moshe Beilinson, one of its founders. HaSharon Hospital was built in ... 21 children underwent organ transplants, including a heart transplant. 8,360 children underwent miscellaneous operations, of ... HaSharon Hospital was founded in 1942 by a team of surgeons from the Beilinson Hospital as a satellite surgical unit. It was ...
A last resort form of treatment is heart transplant. An infant with dilated, failing heart was no rarity on the pediatric wards ... of hospitals in the mid-twentieth century. When such patients came to the autopsy table, most of the hearts showed the ... idiopathic hypertrophy of the heart, endocardial sclerosis, cardiac enlargement of unknown cause, etc. Some of these hearts ... This was thought to be a disease affecting both the heart muscle and the endocardium and it was given various names such as: ...
In 1986, he was the recipient of a heart transplant. The surgery was done in Papworth Hospital outside London by Dr. Mohsin ... Keith is one of the longest-living heart transplant recipients and has lived the majority of his life with his second heart. " ... He is the first athlete to have played professional sports after having undergone a heart transplant. Keith moved to Victoria, ... "Soccer Player With Transplanted Heart Upsets Thinking About Rehabilitation". Victoria: Los Angeles Times. 23 November 1990. ...
... pushing Will off the hospital roof; stabbing Sienna; suffering a heart attack when she requires another kidney transplant; ... But then Dylan tells her the reason he took the top was because he was a cross-dresser, Nico runs V to hospital, but because Dr ... Theresa is found to be a match to help Nico and they go through with the transplant which is successful. Peri then starts ... Whilst Dylan was being murdered by the Gloved Hand Killer in Dee Valley Hospital, Nico was talking to Peri about being able to ...
"Jose Pearson TB Hospital". Retrieved 20 November 2016. "Dr Chris Barnard performs the world's first human heart transplant". ... "Groote Schuur Hospital: Overview". Retrieved 6 October 2016. "The Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital". Retrieved 3 October 2016. ... "Kalafong Hospital". Retrieved 4 October 2016. "Tygerberg Hospital: Overview". Retrieved 4 October 2016. "Healthcare in South ... "Fort Grey TB Hospital". Retrieved 20 November 2016. "Madwaleni Hospital". Retrieved 6 October 2016. " ...
In December 2016 he had a heart transplant at Papworth Hospital. "Birthday's today". London: The Telegraph. 26 April 2012. ... "Mark Serwotka has successful heart transplant". PCS Public and Commercial Services Union. Retrieved 23 December 2016. [ ... He was readmitted to hospital on 30 August 2016, when the ventricular assist device developed a clot and his doctors then ... placed him on the urgent transplant list. ...
... a rare heart disease that causes rapid heart failure. He was considering a heart transplant, but his condition quickly ... After staying a week at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, Howard died of the heart ailment at age 51 in 1980. He ... Louis, Missouri to Travis Howard and Emaline Hill, a nurse at a local hospital. When he was six years old, his parents divorced ...
On February 7, 2003, she received the heart and lung transplant. The new organs had been flown in from Boston. Blood test ... Her family was approached by the hospital to determine if her salvageable organs could be donated for use in other transplant ... was a Mexican national who died after an organ transplant operation in which she received the heart and lungs of a patient ... When Jesica Santillan died of a botched heart-lung transplant, Nancy Rommelmann was nearly swallowed by the story February 19, ...
"From the Heart at Papworth Hospital: UK pioneer in heart transplants". ITV News. Retrieved 2017-07-27. wscts_videos (2014-01-22 ... The Heart of the Matter: How Papworth Hospital transformed modern heart and lung Care. ISBN 9781848319424. OliverBoj (2013-06- ... English performed the first total artificial heart transplant in The UK in November1986. A Jarvic 7 heart was used as a bridge ... English did some open heart surgery at Addenbrooke's Hospital and also became involved with Roy Calne's pig heart transplant ...
Richter, Ruthann (2008). "What have we done? Forty Years of Heart Transplants". Retrieved 23 July 2017. Pioneers of Heart ... Brandt, Michelle (12 February 2003). "Reunion celebrates 35 years of heart transplantation at Stanford Hospital". Stanford ... International Recognition Award, Heart Research Foundation, 1982. Gold Heart Award, American Heart Association, for ... The world's first heart-lung transplant was performed in 1981, by both Shumway and Bruce Reitz. The René Leriche Prize, ...
... more than 200 heart transplants were performed at the Broussais Hospital. An artificial heart project as a bridge to transplant ... He also improved the heart transplant program, from 10 to 25 cases per year, so that the Foch Hospital became the 2nd-3rd most ... Gilles Dreyfus published several articles on heart transplant, such as Total orthotopic heart transplant: an alternative to the ... As Director of one of the largest centers for transplantation in Europe, he led a program of heart and lung transplant and ...
"First heart transplant surgery in Gujarat successful: Doctors at CIMS hospital in Ahmedabad". DeshGujarat News from Gujarat. ... He was the first doctor to have performed a heart transplant in Gujarat, India. He performed a bypass heart surgery on a 90 ... "State's first heart transplant saves 49-yr-old farmer's life - Ahmedabad Mirror". Ahmedabad Mirror. Retrieved 2017-01-17. " ... "British man loses heart to Gujarati, mends it in Gujarat - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2017-01-17. ...
"Science trumps sentiment as France claims breakthrough with first artificial heart transplant". The Independent. 22 December ... Boucicaut Hospital, Broussais Hospital and Laënnec Hospital). The hospital architect was Aymeric Zublena. The HEGP is located ... The Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou (HEGP) (Georges Pompidou European Hospital) is a French hospital located in Paris. The ... the HEGP is the last-born Parisian hospital resulting from the merger of three older hospitals ( ...
Blake and Krystle's daughter, Krystina, falls ill and needs a heart transplant. A donor is found, Krystina is fine, but the ... Blake awakens in the hospital with no memories of the last 25 years. Alexis has him discharged from the hospital and convinces ... helps Krystle escape captivity and informs Blake's doctor about the poisoning when he is rushed to the hospital after falling ...
After his heart transplant there in June 2005, Copley donated a reported $5 million to Sharp Healthcare, operator of Sharp ... Police and fire crews on the scene attempted CPR, and Copley was taken to nearby Scripps Memorial Hospital. Resuscitation ... He had been the recipient of a heart transplant in June 2005. Wilkens, John (November 20, 2012). "David Copley left his mark on ... "David C. Copley recovering from heart transplant". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved June 2, 2006. "Deborah Landis is founding ...
... is one of the youngest known recipients of a heart transplant. She received a new heart in 1984 at the age of 2 ... The operation was performed at Stanford Hospital, Stanford, California by the team of Norman Shumway, one of the early pioneers ... As of 2014, Craze was the only heart transplant recipient in the United States to survive 30 years with the same donor heart ... Benet, Lorenzo (21 November 2009). "A Mighty Heart". People. Retrieved 18 January 2012. "Heart transplant pioneer Shumway dies ...
In 1995, Richardson spent 123 days in the hospital awaiting a heart transplant. He died four years later at the age of sixty- ... two of whom were born after Richardson's heart transplant. Richardson was cremated. Biography portal Journalism portal ... Late in 1993, he was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, an incurable disease that attacks the heart muscle. ...
South African history: Denise Darvall Groote Schuur Hospital account of Washkansky's heart transplant. ... was the donor in the world's first successful human heart transplant, performed at Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa, by a ... The Race to Transplant the First Human Heart, Donald McRae, New York: Putnam, 2006, page 189. Every Second Counts, McRae, page ... and asked Edward if he would consider allowing them to transplant Denise's heart. Edward Darvall later said that he thought ...
Two heart transplants performed at the University of Michigan Hospital; and The adoption a statewide laws for open housing and ... "John Kobs Dies of Heart Attack". Lansing State Journal. January 27, 1968. p. 18 - via Newspapers.com. "Seaway Bill Author Dies ... at age 73 from a heart attack at his office in Detroit October 28 - Wilber M. Brucker, Governor of Michigan (1931-1933) and ...
On 15 April 1998, Pol Pot died in his sleep, apparently of heart failure.[398] His body was preserved with ice and formaldehyde ... Loth's house was one of the largest in the village and at transplanting and harvest time he hired poorer neighbors to carry out ... between 15,000 and 20,000 of these were removed from the city's hospitals and forced to march.[208] Checkpoints were erected ... He then travelled to Beijing to undergo cancer treatment at a military hospital, only returning to Cambodia in the summer of ...
Similar to a heart transplant, SynCardias Total Artificial Heart replaces both failing heart ventricles and the four heart ... Texas Childrens Hospital, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), Phoenix Childrens Hospital, Childrens Hospital of ... Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center and Mattel Childrens Hospital UCLA. Two additional childrens hospitals are ... To date, six pediatric hospitals have performed one or more implants of the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart: ...
Fifteen of 19 transplant recipients were discharged from the hospital. The 30-day operative mortality rate was 5.2% (1 of 19). ... Fifteen of 19 transplant recipients were discharged from the hospital. The 30-day operative mortality rate was 5.2% (1 of 19). ... Fifteen of 19 transplant recipients were discharged from the hospital. The 30-day operative mortality rate was 5.2% (1 of 19). ... Fifteen of 19 transplant recipients were discharged from the hospital. The 30-day operative mortality rate was 5.2{\%} (1 of 19 ...
The Former Detroit Lions GM has been under hospital care in New Jersey. ... Ex-Detroit Lions GM Matt Millen in hospital, awaiting heart transplant. Kirkland Crawford, Detroit Free Press Published 9:49 a. ... Ex-Detroit Lions GM Matt Millen in hospital, awaiting heart transplant. The Big Ten Network announced Matt Millen was stepping ... Ex-Detroit Lions GM Matt Millen in hospital, awaiting heart transplant The Big Ten Network announced Matt Millen was stepping ...
... sparking debate over whether behavioral or mental issues should factor into transplant decisions. ... An autistic man was denied a heart transplant, ... Autism Transplant Denial Sparks Debate. * By Sydney Lupkin ... It was hard enough for Karen Corby to hear that her autistic son would need a heart transplant to survive, but it was even ... Her son Paul, 23, has a left ventricle that didnt close after he was born, so his heart doesnt pump the right amount of blood ...
Medicaid funding for a Houston hospitals renowned heart transplant program could be cut off in mid-August because it hasnt ... home/heart center/ heart a-z list/ houston hospitals heart transplant program article ... Medicaid funding for a Houston hospitals renowned heart transplant program could be cut off in mid-August because it hasnt ... says the hospital has failed to fix problems that put patients at risk and plans to halt funding for the heart transplant ...
... amid a federal review of transplant centers that fall below ... Friday that it was voluntarily shutting its heart transplant ... access to heart transplants in the region.. UC San Diego had said earlier that it was committed to keeping its heart program ... UC San Diegos heart program, which opened in 1990, performed just four transplants last year, down from 10 the year before. To ... The hospitals action comes as the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is scrutinizing the performance of heart, ...
Similar to a heart transplant, SynCardias Total Artificial Heart replaces both failing heart ventricles and the four heart ... a heart transplant at Texas Childrens Hospital after 160 days of support with the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart. ... While awaiting a transplant, he was admitted to the hospital in April 2011 suffering from end-stage biventricular heart failure ... Jordan was born with multiple congenital heart defects, including a "reversed" heart (dextrocardia) and his heart vessels ...
... amid a federal review of transplant centers that fall below performance standards. It is a very difficult decision for all of ... UC San Diego Medical Center announced Friday that it was voluntarily shutting its heart transplant program - at least ... access to heart transplants in the region.. UC San Diego had said earlier that it was committed to keeping its heart program ... The hospitals action comes as the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is scrutinizing the performance of heart, ...
... an operation performed to replace a failing heart with a healthy heart. ... Learn more from Boston Childrens Hospital about heart transplant, ... Heart Transplant. What is a heart transplant?. A heart transplant is an operation that replaces a failing heart with a healthy ... Your transplant team cardiologist and the heart-transplant coordinator are the primary clinicians here at the hospital who will ...
A 23-year-old Chicago man who received two heart transplants as a teenager died in hospice care, days after he married his high ... Heart transplant patient dies after Chicago hospital wedding. CHICAGO (AP) - A 23-year-old Chicago man who received two heart ... Rodriguez, known to his family and friends as Javi, underwent two heart transplants, including one when he was 14 years old and ... Rodriguez, 23, who received two heart transplants as a teenager died in hospice care, days after he married his high school ...
... even the difficult high-risk cases while providing the best outcomes at the Yale New Haven Transplant Center ... Hospital sets milestone with 400th heart transplant. Yale New Haven Hospital Heart and Vascular Center has achieved a milestone ... including transplant. We are proud to be the only hospital in Connecticut offering pediatric heart transplants. ... Learn more about transplant record. Heart Transplants and Organ Donor Registration. Yale New Haven Transplantation Center is a ...
Learn about Boston Childrens Hospitals Heart Transplant Program, providing evaluation and innovative care for infants, ... Since the Heart Transplant Programs inception in 1986, we have performed more than 300 heart transplants. Our heart transplant ... Heart Transplant Program. The Boston Childrens Heart Transplant Program evaluates infants, children and adolescents who are ... Elizabeth Blume, MD, medical director of the Heart Transplant Program at Boston Childrens Hospital ...
The Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center evaluates ... Since the 1970s, the Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart ... Since the 1970s, the Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart ... In 2008, the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center completed the most heart transplants in the region. Personal ...
... in the hallway of a Chicago hospital while she awaited a heart transplant -- and the video got to rapper Drake, who decided to ... Drake Surprises Girl Waiting for Heart Transplant at Lurie Childrens. Today, Lurie Childrens Hospital heart transplant ... Drake surprises 11-year-old girl awaiting heart transplant at Chicago hospital. * Share ... Drake surprised 11-year-old Sofia Sanchez at a childrens hospital in Chicago. The girl is awaiting a heart transplant and ...
... based Northwell Healths proposed heart transplant center at the Manhasset, N.Y.-based North Shore University Hospital. ... State issues preliminary OK for Northwell hospitals heart transplant center. Alyssa Rege - Friday, June 9th, 2017. Print , ... "A life-saving heart transplant program at North Shore University Hospital will be a major resource for residents of Long Island ... based Northwell Healths proposed heart transplant center at the Manhasset, N.Y.-based North Shore University Hospital. ...
A West Palm Beach man became the first person to undergo a heart transplant operation at Shands Hospital at the University of ... Florida in Gainesville, hospital officials said late Tuesday ... Heart Transplant Is Hospital`s First. August 21, 1985,By James ... A West Palm Beach man became the first person to undergo a heart transplant operation at Shands Hospital at the University of ... Florida in Gainesville, hospital officials said late Tuesday night.. Officials said Stephen Stewart, 34, went into surgery at 8 ...
A Pennsylvania mom is fighting to get her 23-year-old autistic son the heart he needs to survive after doctors denied the ... "Basically, a heart transplant is substituting a chronic illness for a terminal disease. You got a transplant, now you have to ... 23-year-old Pennsylvania man with autism denied heart transplant by hospital. ... Paul Corby is able-bodied and high-functioning - his only trouble is his heart. Penn Medicine - a hospital group - denied him ...
Lukes is adding pre- and post-surgery care for heart transplant patients at its Wichita clinic that currently serves kidney ... He has survived five heart attacks and received a heart transplant at St. Lukes in Kansas City in 2010. ... Kansas Heart Hospital in northeast Wichita is one of more than 200 victims in an international ransomware attack and extortion ... Lukes has between 30 and 40 patients in the Wichita area who are awaiting a heart transplant or have already received one. ...
Learn more about the BWH Advanced Heart Disease Center ... to patients with various types of cardiomyopathy and heart ... BWH experts in the Advanced Heart Disease Program provide diagnostic and therapeutic services ... However, when a heart transplant is considered to be the best solution for a patient with advanced heart disease, we offer a ... The Brigham and Womens Hospital (BWH) Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support Program is committed to providing ...
... to transplant an adult heart into a recipient through a process known as Donation after Circulatory Death, or DCD. ... History was made at Duke University Hospital after a heart transplant team became the first in the U.S. ... History has been made at Duke University Hospital after a heart transplant team became the first in the U.S. to transplant an ... The DCD heart transplantation milestone occurred Sunday after a donated heart was deemed viable for transplant. The recipient, ...
You and your child will participate in an evaluation to assess your child for heart transplantation and explore other treatment ... After the evaluation, if your child has been accepted to have a heart transplant he will be placed on the United Network for ... If your child is referred to our Heart Transplant Program, you and your child will participate in an intensive evaluation. Our ... You and your child will spend a full day meeting with members of our team, including a transplant cardiologist, advanced ...
Timothy, his family and his heart transplant team celebrated his new heart and the hospitals milestone by reuniting exactly a ... Broward Teen Reunites With Heart Transplant Team. Joe DiMaggio Childrens Hospital Reaches Milestone With 50th Pediatric Heart ... Timothy waited for a new heart in the hospital for two months, under the care of the Joe DiMaggio Childrens Hospital heart ... making him the 50th transplant recipient for the Pediatric Heart Transplant Team at Joe DiMaggio Childrens Hospital. ...
Medical Services, Heart Center, Heart Transplant, Patient Stories, All Patient Stories Find out how baby Liam, born with a ... congenital heart defect, is doing after his heart transplant at St. Louis Childrens Hospital. ... Louis Childrens Hospital, All Rights Reserved St. Louis Childrens Hospital • One Childrens Place • St. Louis, MO • 63110 • ... Louis Childrens Hospital is affiliated with Washington University School of Medicine. Copyright © 2018, St. ...
She received a life-saving heart transplant at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia. ... Julia was 13 when she had a heart attack at school. ... Just six months after a heart transplant at Childrens Hospital ... She was admitted to CHOP that day and would remain in the Hospital until she could receive a heart transplant. She was at risk ... Thanks to a mechanical sidekick, Allison pioneered a safer path to a heart transplant at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia. ...
Record Number of Heart Transplants in 2008 Twenty-eight patients received lifesaving heart transplants at the MGH Heart Center ... director of the Cardiac Transplant/Heart Failure Program.. "We have launched a new technologies and offer heart failure ... director of the MGH Transplant Center and section chief of Cardiac Surgery. "The directors of the Heart Transplant Program have ... The 28 heart transplants represented a 70 percent increase over the number completed in 2007. In addition, the MGH also ...
  • This high volume of safe blood flow helps speed the recovery of vital organs, helping make the patient a better transplant candidate. (mdtmag.com)
  • We expect our growth trajectory to continue in 2013 as we pursue a Humanitarian Device Exemption (HDE) from the FDA for destination therapy and plan to introduce our smaller 50cc Total Artificial Heart designed to fit patients with a body surface area of less than 1.7. (mdtmag.com)
  • Results: Nineteen heart-lung transplantations were done in 17 patients. (utmb.edu)
  • All patients had New York Heart Association class III to IV symptoms, two were receiving ventilator support, and six were receiving oxygen. (utmb.edu)
  • Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130117/LA44048) "2012 was a momentous year for the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart with a record-breaking 125 implants performed at more than 50 Certified Centers worldwide," said Michael Garippa, SynCardia Chairman/CEO/President. (mdtmag.com)
  • Unlike a donor heart, the Total Artificial Heart is immediately available at SynCardia Certified Centers. (mdtmag.com)
  • SynCardia Systems, Inc. (www.syncardia.com), manufacturer of the world's first and only FDA, Health Canada and CE (Europe) approved Total Artificial Heart, announced today record-setting results for 2012 for implants, revenue and profit. (mdtmag.com)
  • About the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart SynCardia Systems, Inc. (Tucson, AZ) is the privately-held manufacturer of the world's first and only FDA, Health Canada and CE approved Total Artificial Heart. (mdtmag.com)
  • Diagnoses were congenital heart disease in 13, primary pulmonary hypertension in 2, and cystic fibrosis, cystic lymphangiectasia, viral pneumonia, and obliterative bronchiolitis in 1 each. (utmb.edu)
  • There have been more than 1,100 implants of the Total Artificial Heart, accounting for more than 290 patient years of life. (mdtmag.com)
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