Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Equidae: A family of hoofed MAMMALS consisting of HORSES, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.African horse sickness virus: A species of ORBIVIRUS that causes disease in horses, mules, and donkeys. Via its principal vector CULICOIDES, it can also infect dogs, elephants, camels, cattle, sheep, goats, and, in special circumstances, humans.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Equine Infectious Anemia: Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Perissodactyla: An order of ungulates having an odd number of toes, including the horse, tapir, and rhinoceros. (Dorland, 27th ed)Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Infectious Anemia Virus, Equine: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.Taylorella equigenitalis: A species of bacteria which is comprised of gram-negative rods which often approach a spherical shape. They are nonmotile and microaerophilic. They are considered parasites of horses and are pathogenic for mares. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Endometritis: Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Varicellovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE. Its species include those causing CHICKENPOX and HERPES ZOSTER in humans (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN), as well as several animal viruses.Journalism: The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.Journalism, Dental: Content, management, editing, policies, and printing of dental periodicals such as journals, newsletters, tabloids, and bulletins.History of DentistryCellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.New YorkJournalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.WalesNew South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.EnglandAfrican Horse Sickness: An insect-borne reovirus infection of horses, mules and donkeys in Africa and the Middle East; characterized by pulmonary edema, cardiac involvement, and edema of the head and neck.Ceratopogonidae: A family of biting midges, in the order DIPTERA. It includes the genus Culicoides which transmits filarial parasites pathogenic to man and other primates.Orbivirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE infecting a wide range of arthropods and vertebrates including humans. It comprises at least 21 serological subgroups. Transmission is by vectors such as midges, mosquitoes, sandflies, and ticks.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion: A disease of the PITUITARY GLAND characterized by the excess amount of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secreted. This leads to hypersecretion of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) by the ADRENAL GLANDS resulting in CUSHING SYNDROME.Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma: A pituitary adenoma which secretes ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN, leading to CUSHING DISEASE.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Pituitary Irradiation: Radiation therapy used to treat the PITUITARY GLAND.MinnesotaTicks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Anaplasma phagocytophilum: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ANAPLASMA, family ANAPLASMATACEAE, formerly called Ehrlichia phagocytophila or Ehrlichia equi. This organism is tick-borne (IXODES) and causes disease in horses and sheep. In humans, it causes human granulocytic EHRLICHIOSIS.Ixodidae: A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.Borrelia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus BORRELIA.Arachnid Vectors: Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.MarylandCopyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.

Fusariotoxicosis from barley in British Columbia. I. Natural occurrence and diagnosis. (1/1799)

Clinical sickness was observed in domestic ducks, geese, horses and swine during October 1973. All species showed upper alimentary distress with mortalities occurring in the geese. Barley derived from a common source had been fed. Examination of the barley revealed invasion by Fusarium spp and detection of a high level of dermatitic fusariotoxins.  (+info)

Urethrorectal fistula in a horse. (2/1799)

Anomalies of the urethra are uncommon. Urethrorectal fistula in horses has only been reported in foals and only in conjunction with other congenital anomalies. This report describes the diagnosis, surgical management, and possible etiologies of a unique case of urethrorectal fistula in a mature gelding.  (+info)

Mediators of anaphylaxis but not activated neutrophils augment cholinergic responses of equine small airways. (3/1799)

Neutrophilic inflammation in small airways (SA) and bronchospasm mediated via muscarinic receptors are features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in horses (COPD). Histamine, serotonin, and leukotrienes (LTs) are reported to be involved in the exacerbation of COPD, and currently, histamine has been shown to increase tension response to electrical field simulation (EFS) in equine SA. We tested the effects of these mediators and the effects of activated neutrophils on the cholinergic responses in SA. Histamine, serotonin, and LTD4 had a synergistic effect on EFS responses and only an additive effect on the tension response to exogenous ACh or methacholine. Atropine and TTX entirely eliminated the EFS-induced tension response in the presence of all three inflammatory mediators, indicating that augmentation of the EFS response applies only to the endogenous cholinergic response. Neutrophils isolated from control and COPD-affected horses were activated by zymosan, producing 18.1 +/- 2.3 and 25.0 +/- 2.3 nmol superoxide. 10(6) cells-1. 30 min-1, respectively. However, in contrast to the profound effect of mediators, incubation of SA for over 1 h in a suspension of up to 30 x 10(6) zymosan-treated neutrophils/ml did not significantly affect EFS responses of SA isolated from either control or COPD-affected horses. We conclude that in equine SA 1) the endogenous cholinergic responses are subject to strong facilitation by inflammatory mediators; 2) activated neutrophils do not affect cholinergic responses in SA; and 3) in acute bouts of equine COPD, histamine, LTD4, and serotonin (mediators primarily associated with type I allergic reaction) rather than mediators derived from neutrophils most likely contribute to increased cholinergic airway tone.  (+info)

Ballistic shock wave lithotripsy in an 18-year-old thoroughbred gelding. (4/1799)

Prolonged postoperative recuperation time and restricted exercise were circumvented by using ballistic shock wave lithotripsy to break up an 8-cm diameter vesical calculus and by flushing out the sand-like residue under epidural anesthesia with the horse standing. Recovery was uneventful.  (+info)

Amylopectinosis in fetal and neonatal Quarter Horses. (5/1799)

Three Quarter Horses, a stillborn filly (horse No. 1), a female fetus aborted at approximately 6 months of gestation (horse No. 2), and a 1-month-old colt that had been weak at birth (horse No. 3), had myopathy characterized histologically by large spherical or ovoid inclusions in skeletal and cardiac myofibers. Smaller inclusions were also found in brain and spinal cord and in some cells of all other tissues examined. These inclusions were basophilic, red-purple after staining with periodic acid-Schiff (both before and after digestion with diastase), and moderately dark blue after staining with toluidine blue. The inclusions did not react when stained with Congo red. Staining with iodine ranged from pale blue to black. Their ultrastructural appearance varied from amorphous to somewhat filamentous. On the basis of staining characteristics and diastase resistance, we concluded that these inclusions contained amylopectin. A distinctly different kind of inclusion material was also present in skeletal muscle and tongue of horse Nos. 1 and 3. These inclusions were crystalline with a sharply defined ultrastructural periodicity. The crystals were eosinophilic and very dark blue when stained with toluidine blue but did not stain with iodine. Crystals sometimes occurred freely within the myofibers but more often were encased by deposits of amylopectin. This combination of histologic and ultrastructural features characterizes a previously unreported storage disease in fetal and neonatal Quarter Horses, with findings similar to those of glycogen storage disease type IV. We speculate that a severe inherited loss of glycogen brancher enzyme activity may be responsible for these findings. The relation of amylopectinosis to the death of the foals is unknown.  (+info)

Genetic divergence with emergence of novel phenotypic variants of equine arteritis virus during persistent infection of stallions. (6/1799)

The persistently infected carrier stallion is the critical natural reservoir of equine arteritis virus (EAV), as venereal infection of mares frequently occurs after breeding to such stallions. Two Thoroughbred stallions that were infected during the 1984 outbreak of equine viral arteritis in central Kentucky subsequently became long-term EAV carriers. EAV genomes amplified from the semen of these two stallions were compared by sequence analysis of the six 3' open reading frames (ORFs 2 through 7), which encode the four known structural proteins and two uncharacterized glycoproteins. The major variants of the EAV population that sequentially arose within the reproductive tract of each carrier stallion varied by approximately 1% per year, and the heterogeneity of the viral quasispecies increased during the course of long-term persistent infection. The various ORFs of the dominant EAV variants evolved independently, and there was apparently strong selective pressure on the uncharacterized GP3 protein during persistent infection. Amino acid changes also occurred in the V1 variable region of the GL protein. This region has been previously identified as a crucial neutralization domain, and selective pressures exerted on the V1 region during persistent EAV infection led to the emergence of virus variants with distinct neutralization properties. Thus, evolution of the EAV quasispecies that occurs during persistent infection of the stallion clearly can influence viral phenotypic properties such as neutralization and perhaps virulence.  (+info)

Genetic and phenotypic changes accompanying the emergence of epizootic subtype IC Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses from an enzootic subtype ID progenitor. (7/1799)

Recent studies have indicated that epizootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viruses can evolve from enzootic, subtype ID strains that circulate continuously in lowland tropical forests (A. M. Powers, M. S. Oberste, A. C. Brault, R. Rico-Hesse, S. M. Schmura, J. F. Smith, W. Kang, W. P. Sweeney, and S. C. Weaver, J. Virol. 71:6697-6705, 1997). To identify mutations associated with the phenotypic changes leading to epizootics, we sequenced the entire genomes of two subtype IC epizootic VEE virus strains isolated during a 1992-1993 Venezuelan outbreak and four sympatric, subtype ID enzootic strains closely related to the predicted epizootic progenitor. Analysis by maximum-parsimony phylogenetic methods revealed 25 nucleotide differences which were predicted to have accompanied the 1992 epizootic emergence; 7 of these encoded amino acid changes in the nsP1, nsP3, capsid, and E2 envelope glycoprotein, and 2 were mutations in the 3' untranslated genome region. Comparisons with the genomic sequences of IAB and other IC epizootic VEE virus strains revealed that only one of the seven amino acid changes associated with the 1992 emergence, a threonine-to-methionine change at position 360 of the nsP3 protein, accompanied another VEE virus emergence event. Two changes in the E2 envelope glycoprotein region believed to include the major antigenic determinants, both involving replacement of uncharged residues with arginine, are also candidates for epizootic determinants.  (+info)

SFS, a novel fibronectin-binding protein from Streptococcus equi, inhibits the binding between fibronectin and collagen. (8/1799)

The obligate parasitic bacterium Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a serious disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. In this study we have, using shotgun phage display, cloned from S. equi subsp. equi and characterized a gene, called sfs, encoding a protein termed SFS, representing a new type of fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein. The sfs gene was found to be present in all 50 isolates of S. equi subsp. equi tested and in 41 of 48 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates tested. The sfs gene is down-regulated during growth in vitro compared to fnz, a previously characterized gene encoding an Fn-binding protein from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Sequence comparisons revealed no similarities to previously characterized Fn-binding proteins, but high scores were obtained against collagen. Besides similarity due to the high content of glycine, serine, and proline residues present in both proteins, there was a nine-residue motif present both in collagen and in the Fn-binding domain of SFS. By searching the Oklahoma S. pyogenes database, we found that this motif is also present in a potential cell surface protein from S. pyogenes. Protein SFS was found to inhibit the binding between Fn and collagen in a concentration-dependent way.  (+info)

  • More and more owners are choosing to keep their older horses on active duty rather than putting them to grass and at Petplan Equine we cater to this need by offering cover for illness up to 25 years of age - as long as cover is taken out before the horse's 20th birthday. (petplanequine.co.uk)
  • More and more, many practitioners are turning to the horse's own body to aid in the healing process, believing that with the right tools a horse can contribute to its own recovery. (platinumperformance.com)
  • EEE is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the horse's brain and spinal cord. (brainerddispatch.com)
  • It is the digestion of hay that produces heat to keep the horse warm, which means a horse's caloric intake will increase. (farmingmagazine.com)
  • Since the spread of the genetic defect is also a problem in horse-breeding in Germany, the Vereinigte Informationssysteme Tierhaltung (IT-Solutions for Animal Production) in Verden 2019 determined the possible origin of the genetic defect from the test results of around 2,000 horses and their pedigree records. (practicalhorsegenetics.com.au)
  • The Minnesota Board of Animal Health requires EIA infected horses be euthanized or quarantined for life because there is no vaccine or treatment, and once a horse is infected it remains a carrier for life and may not display any clinical signs. (brainerddispatch.com)
  • This condition has been reported to affect upwards of 25% of the horse population with increased prevalence in certain breeds including Appaloosas, draft horses, and warmbloods. (constantcontact.com)
  • By tracking the genomic changes that transformed prehistoric wild horses into domestic breeds, the researchers have revealed the genetic make-up of modern horses with unprecedented detail. (technologynetworks.com)
  • From a torn suspensory to arthritis and in between, these conditions and injuries can influence performance, impact comfort and shorten the careers of otherwise healthy horses. (platinumperformance.com)
  • Remarkably complex and efficient, the immune system is designed to protect your horse from a host of potential dangers, ranging from viruses and bacteria to toxins and environmental threats. (farnam.com)
  • This vaccination in particular provides protection against the bacteria called Clostridium tetani which is found in soil and horse manure. (thornegazette.co.uk)
  • Older horses often need only one "booster" vaccine annually, but this varies by region. (farnam.com)
  • The bottom line here for horse vaccinations is to do them for diseases that will kill your horse, do them judiciously if you need protection (open versus closed herds), avoid diseases by quarantining new arrivals and shake the vaccine like crazy before injecting them. (thehorsesadvocate.com)
  • Many horse owners don't understand how crucial it is to establish and maintain a regular vaccine program. (farnam.com)
  • Dr. Blair emphasizes the importance of nutrition when it comes to keeping the immune system strong, and urges horse owners to pay close attention to their feeding programs. (farnam.com)
The Horse: A Mirror of Man: Disease, Zodiac, and Bloodletting Charts
The Horse: A Mirror of Man: Disease, Zodiac, and Bloodletting Charts (nlm.nih.gov)
September 30, 1911 - Scientific American
September 30, 1911 - Scientific American (scientificamerican.com)
Thoroughbred Horse Gets Human Disease | Science News
Thoroughbred Horse Gets Human Disease | Science News (sciencenews.org)
October 6, 1962 | Science News
October 6, 1962 | Science News (sciencenews.org)
Heatwave Archives | Petfinder
Heatwave Archives | Petfinder (petfinder.com)
Turning Points: Getting back on the horse
Turning Points: Getting back on the horse (cnn.com)
MPI for Polymer Research | Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
MPI for Polymer Research | Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (mpg.de)
Senior Wellness Exams | AAEP
Senior Wellness Exams | AAEP (aaep.org)
Genetic Diseases Affecting Quarter Horses - InfoBarrel
Genetic Diseases Affecting Quarter Horses - InfoBarrel (infobarrel.com)
Trojan Horse Strategy and Treatment of Breast Cancer
Trojan Horse Strategy and Treatment of Breast Cancer (medindia.net)
Health-Promoting Texts Could Help Battle Heart Disease | Live Science
Health-Promoting Texts Could Help Battle Heart Disease | Live Science (livescience.com)
Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment | Live Science
Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment | Live Science (livescience.com)
Hendra virus research continues as more horses contract the disease - ABC Brisbane - Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Hendra virus research continues as more horses contract the disease - ABC Brisbane - Australian Broadcasting Corporation (abc.net.au)
Blood Type May Affect Heart Disease Risk | Live Science
Blood Type May Affect Heart Disease Risk | Live Science (livescience.com)
Exclusive: Teenager takes bet365 to court over £1m 'won' on horse races
Exclusive: Teenager takes bet365 to court over £1m 'won' on horse races (telegraph.co.uk)
AAEP Resort Symposium - Aruba, 2013 | IVIS
AAEP Resort Symposium - Aruba, 2013 | IVIS (ivis.org)
Amanda's Test Slideshow - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding
Amanda's Test Slideshow - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding (equisearch.com)
Equine disease: Cerebellar abiotrophy - MSU Extension
Equine disease: Cerebellar abiotrophy - MSU Extension (canr.msu.edu)
Diarrhea Treatments in Horses
Diarrhea Treatments in Horses (petmd.com)
A vaccination works by _______. a. curing a disease | bartleby
A vaccination works by _______. a. curing a disease | bartleby (bartleby.com)
Vesicular Stomatitis | Infectious Diseases | Diseases and Conditions | Topics | TheHorse.com
Vesicular Stomatitis | Infectious Diseases | Diseases and Conditions | Topics | TheHorse.com (thehorse.com)
Protein-Losing Enteropathy | Subtopics | TheHorse.com
Protein-Losing Enteropathy | Subtopics | TheHorse.com (thehorse.com)
Third horse rescued in Kentucky where 20 others were killed | KHON2
Third horse rescued in Kentucky where 20 others were killed | KHON2 (khon2.com)
Unassigned - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding
Unassigned - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding (equisearch.com)
Rare, incurable disease hits horse in Colorado; up to 240 others at risk | AspenTimes.com
Rare, incurable disease hits horse in Colorado; up to 240 others at risk | AspenTimes.com (aspentimes.com)
Graphics Influence Readers' Intent to Vaccinate [image] | EurekAlert! Science News
Graphics Influence Readers' Intent to Vaccinate [image] | EurekAlert! Science News (eurekalert.org)
Spanish ritual of horses and fire survives time and animal rights activists - Chicago Tribune
Spanish ritual of horses and fire survives time and animal rights activists - Chicago Tribune (chicagotribune.com)
Former British gold medal-winner put down due to rare disease
Former British gold medal-winner put down due to rare disease (horseandhound.co.uk)
May 2018 | Countercurrents
May 2018 | Countercurrents (countercurrents.org)
Equine infectious anemia possible problem in Weld County | FOX31 Denver
Equine infectious anemia possible problem in Weld County | FOX31 Denver (kdvr.com)
Hoof Anatomy & Physiology | Hoof Care and Balance | Hoof Care | Topics | TheHorse.com
Hoof Anatomy & Physiology | Hoof Care and Balance | Hoof Care | Topics | TheHorse.com (thehorse.com)
Defra, UK - Food and farming - Farm animals - Animal diseases - A-Z index of diseases - Equine Infectious Anaemia
Defra, UK - Food and farming - Farm animals - Animal diseases - A-Z index of diseases - Equine Infectious Anaemia (webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk)
Jwz: A neural network invents diseases you don't want
Jwz: A neural network invents diseases you don't want (jwz.org)
40 Years of Nordic Collaboration in Plant Genetic Resources | Nordic cooperation
40 Years of Nordic Collaboration in Plant Genetic Resources | Nordic cooperation (norden.org)
Horse - Wikipedia
Horse - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)