Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Elymus: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of wild rye is used with some other grasses.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Hydroponics: A technique for growing plants in culture solutions rather than in soil. The roots are immersed in an aerated solution containing the correct proportions of essential mineral salts. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Protochlorophyllide: A photo-active pigment localized in prolamellar bodies occurring within the proplastids of dark-grown bean leaves. In the process of photoconversion, the highly fluorescent protochlorophyllide is converted to chlorophyll.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Glucan 1,3-beta-Glucosidase: An exocellulase with specificity for 1,3-beta-D-glucasidic linkages. It catalyzes hydrolysis of beta-D-glucose units from the non-reducing ends of 1,3-beta-D-glucans, releasing GLUCOSE.Potassium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of potassium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. K atoms with atomic weights 37, 38, 40, and 42-45 are radioactive potassium isotopes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Pulvinus: A group of cells at the base of a leaf in certain plants that, by rapidly losing water, brings about changes in the position of the leaves. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Chlorophyllides: Products of the hydrolysis of chlorophylls in which the phytic acid side chain has been removed and the carboxylic acids saponified.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Gibberellins: A class of plant growth hormone isolated from cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus causing Bakanae disease in rice. There are many different members of the family as well as mixtures of multiple members; all are diterpenoid acids based on the gibberellane skeleton.Nitrate Reductase (NAD(P)H): An iron-sulfur and MOLYBDENUM containing FLAVOPROTEIN that catalyzes the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. This enzyme can use either NAD or NADP as cofactors. It is a key enzyme that is involved in the first step of nitrate assimilation in PLANTS; FUNGI; and BACTERIA. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.6.6.2.TurkmenistanPoaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Glucose-1-Phosphate Adenylyltransferase: An ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the addition of ADP to alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate to form ADP-glucose and diphosphate. The reaction is the rate-limiting reaction in prokaryotic GLYCOGEN and plant STARCH biosynthesis.Urobilinogen: A colorless compound formed in the intestines by the reduction of bilirubin. Some is excreted in the feces where it is oxidized to urobilin. Some is reabsorbed and re-excreted in the bile as bilirubin. At times, it is re-excreted in the urine, where it may be later oxidized to urobilin.Chlorophyll Binding Proteins: A large family of proteins that have been traditionally classified as the light-harvesting proteins of the photosynthetic reaction complex. Chlorophyll binding proteins are also found in non-photosynthetic settings where they may play a photoprotective role in response to light stress.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Cat's Claw: A vine (Uncaria tomentosa) indigenous to the Amazon rainforest whose name is derived from its hook-like thorns. It contains oxindole alkaloids and glycosides and has many medicinal uses.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Setaria Plant: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The small pointed seeds are grown for hay in North America and western Europe and important as food in China and other Asian countries.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Investigational New Drug Application: An application that must be submitted to a regulatory agency (the FDA in the United States) before a drug can be studied in humans. This application includes results of previous experiments; how, where, and by whom the new studies will be conducted; the chemical structure of the compound; how it is thought to work in the body; any toxic effects found in animal studies; and how the compound is manufactured. (From the "New Medicines in Development" Series produced by the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association and published irregularly.)Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.

Fusariotoxicosis from barley in British Columbia. I. Natural occurrence and diagnosis. (1/2002)

Clinical sickness was observed in domestic ducks, geese, horses and swine during October 1973. All species showed upper alimentary distress with mortalities occurring in the geese. Barley derived from a common source had been fed. Examination of the barley revealed invasion by Fusarium spp and detection of a high level of dermatitic fusariotoxins.  (+info)

Fusariotoxicosis from barley in British Columbia. II. Analysis and toxicity of syspected barley. (2/2002)

Fusariotoxin T-2, a trichothecene, was tentatively identified in barley samples which caused field outbreaks of mycotoxicosis in British Columbia. Geese died when fed the contaminated barley experimentally but mice were little affected after long term feeding. The methods used in the laboratory for trichothecene extraction and identification of T-2 toxin are described.  (+info)

A single limit dextrinase gene is expressed both in the developing endosperm and in germinated grains of barley. (3/2002)

The single gene encoding limit dextrinase (pullulan 6-glucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.41) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) has 26 introns that range in size from 93 to 822 base pairs. The mature polypeptide encoded by the gene has 884 amino acid residues and a calculated molecular mass of 97,417 D. Limit dextrinase mRNA is abundant in gibberellic acid-treated aleurone layers and in germinated grain. Gibberellic acid response elements were found in the promoter region of the gene. These observations suggest that the enzyme participates in starch hydrolysis during endosperm mobilization in germinated grain. The mRNA encoding the enzyme is present at lower levels in the developing endosperm of immature grain, a location consistent with a role for limit dextrinase in starch synthesis. Enzyme activity was also detected in developing grain. The limit dextrinase has a presequence typical of transit peptides that target nascent polypeptides to amyloplasts, but this would not be expected to direct secretion of the mature enzyme from aleurone cells in germinated grain. It remains to be discovered how the enzyme is released from the aleurone and whether another enzyme, possibly of the isoamylase group, might be equally important for starch hydrolysis in germinated grain.  (+info)

Primary and secondary structural elements required for synthesis of barley yellow dwarf virus subgenomic RNA1. (4/2002)

Barley yellow dwarf luteovirus (BYDV) generates three 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) in infected cells. The promoter of sgRNA1 is a putative hot spot for RNA recombination in luteovirus evolution. The sgRNA1 transcription start site was mapped previously to either nucleotide 2670 or nucleotide 2769 of BYDV genomic RNA (gRNA) in two independent studies. Our data support the former initiation site. The boundaries of the sgRNA1 promoter map between nucleotides 2595 and 2692 on genomic RNA. Computer prediction, phylogenetic comparison, and structural probing revealed two stem-loops (SL1 and SL2) in the sgRNA1 promoter region on the negative strand. Promoter function was analyzed by inoculating protoplasts with a full-length infectious clone of the BYDV genome containing mutations in the sgRNA promoter. Because the promoter is located in an essential coding region of the replicase gene, we duplicated it in a nonessential part of the genome from which a new sgRNA was expressed. Mutational analysis revealed that secondary structure, but not the nucleotide sequence, was important at the base of SL1. Regions with both RNA primary and secondary structural features that contributed to transcription initiation were found at the top of SL1. Primary sequence, but not the secondary structure, was required in SL2, which includes the initiation site. Disruption of base pairing near the sgRNA1 start site increased the level of transcription three- to fourfold. We propose that both primary and secondary structures of the sgRNA1 promoter of BYDV play unique roles in sgRNA1 promoter recognition and transcription initiation.  (+info)

Barley BLZ2, a seed-specific bZIP protein that interacts with BLZ1 in vivo and activates transcription from the GCN4-like motif of B-hordein promoters in barley endosperm. (5/2002)

A barley endosperm cDNA, encoding a DNA-binding protein of the bZIP class of transcription factors, BLZ2, has been characterized. The Blz2 mRNA expression is restricted to the endosperm, where it precedes that of the hordein genes. BLZ2, expressed in bacteria, binds specifically to the GCN4-like motif (GLM; 5'-GTGAGTCAT-3') in a 43-base pair oligonucleotide derived from the promoter region of a Hor-2 gene (B1-hordein). This oligonucleotide also includes the prolamin box (PB; 5'-TGTAAAG-3'). Binding by BLZ2 is prevented when the GLM is mutated to 5'-GTGctTCtc-3' but not when mutations affect the PB. The BLZ2 protein is a potent transcriptional activator in a yeast two-hybrid system where it dimerizes with BLZ1, a barley bZIP protein encoded by the ubiquitously expressed Blz1 gene. Transient expression experiments in co-bombarded developing barley endosperms demonstrate that BLZ2 transactivates transcription from the GLM of the Hor-2 gene promoter and that this activation is also partially dependent on the presence of an intact PB. A drastic decrease in GUS activity is observed in co-bombarded barley endosperms when using as effectors equimolar mixtures of Blz2 and Blz1 in antisense constructs. These results strongly implicate the endosperm-specific BLZ2 protein from barley, either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with BLZ1, as an important transcriptional activator of seed storage protein genes containing the GLM in their promoters.  (+info)

Protochlorophyllide b does not occur in barley etioplasts. (6/2002)

Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) etioplasts were isolated, and the pigments were extracted with acetone. The extract was analyzed by HPLC. Only protochlorophyllide a and no protochlorophyllide b was detected (limit of detection < 1% of protochlorophyllide a). Protochlorophyllide b was synthesized starting from chlorophyll b and incubated with etioplast membranes and NADPH. In the light, photoconversion to chlorophyllide b was observed, apparently catalyzed by NADPH :protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase. In darkness, reduction of the analogue zinc protopheophorbide b to zinc 7-hydroxy-protopheophorbide a was observed, apparently catalyzed by chlorophyll b reductase. We conclude that protochlorophyllide b does not occur in detectable amounts in etioplasts, and even traces of it as the free pigment are metabolically unstable. Thus the direct experimental evidence contradicts the idea by Reinbothe et al. (Nature 397 (1999) 80-84) of a protochlorophyllide b-containing light-harvesting complex in barley etioplasts.  (+info)

Formation of lipoxygenase-pathway-derived aldehydes in barley leaves upon methyl jasmonate treatment. (7/2002)

In barley leaves, the application of jasmonates leads to dramatic alterations of gene expression. Among the up-regulated gene products lipoxygenases occur abundantly. Here, at least four of them were identified as 13-lipoxygenases exhibiting acidic pH optima between pH 5.0 and 6.5. (13S,9Z,11E,15Z)-13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid was found to be the main endogenous lipoxygenase-derived polyenoic fatty acid derivative indicating 13-lipoxygenase activity in vivo. Moreover, upon methyl jasmonate treatment > 78% of the fatty acid hydroperoxides are metabolized by hydroperoxide lyase activity resulting in the endogenous occurrence of volatile aldehydes. (2E)-4-Hydroxy-2-hexenal, hexanal and (3Z)- plus (2E)-hexenal were identified as 2,4-dinitro-phenylhydrazones using HPLC and identification was confirmed by GC/MS analysis. This is the first proof that (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal is formed in plants under physiological conditions. Quantification of (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, hexanal and hexenals upon methyl jasmonate treatment of barley leaf segments revealed that hexenals were the major aldehydes peaking at 24 h after methyl jasmonate treatment. Their endogenous content increased from 1.6 nmol.g-1 fresh weight to 45 nmol.g-1 fresh weight in methyl-jasmonate-treated leaf segments, whereas (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, peaking at 48 h of methyl jasmonate treatment increased from 9 to 15 nmol.g-1 fresh weight. Similar to the hexenals, hexanal reached its maximal amount 24 h after methyl jasmonate treatment, but increased from 0.6 to 3.0 nmol.g-1 fresh weight. In addition to the classical leaf aldehydes, (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal was detected, thereby raising the question of whether it functions in the degradation of chloroplast membrane constituents, which takes place after methyl jasmonate treatment.  (+info)

Effect of the glycemic index and content of indigestible carbohydrates of cereal-based breakfast meals on glucose tolerance at lunch in healthy subjects. (8/2002)

BACKGROUND: Diets with a low glycemic index (GI) have been shown to improve glucose tolerance in both healthy and diabetic subjects. Two potential mechanisms are discussed in relation to long-term metabolic effects: a decreased demand for insulin in the postprandial phase and formation of short-chain fatty acids from fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates in the colon. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the effect of the GI and the indigestible carbohydrate--resistant starch (RS) and dietary fiber (DF)--content of cereal-based breakfasts on glucose tolerance at a second meal (lunch) in healthy subjects. DESIGN: The effects of 7 test breakfasts with known GIs (GI: 52-99) and RS + DF contents (2-36 g) were evaluated. White-wheat bread was used as a reference breakfast (high GI, low RS + DF content). Glucose and insulin responses after the second meal were measured in healthy subjects. In addition, the satiating capacity of 4 of the 7 test breakfasts was estimated before and during the second meal. RESULTS: Two of the 4 low-GI breakfasts improved glucose tolerance at the second meal. Only these 2 breakfasts were capable of postponing the in-between-meal fasting state. There was no measurable effect of fermentable carbohydrates on glucose tolerance at the second meal. The highest satiety score was associated with the barley breakfast that had a low GI and a high RS + DF content. CONCLUSIONS: Glucose tolerance can improve in a single day. Slow absorption and digestion of starch from the breakfast meal, but not the content of indigestible carbohydrates in the breakfast meal, improved glucose tolerance at the second meal (lunch).  (+info)

  • Póster presentado en Plant and Animal Genome XXI, celebrada en San Diego del 12 al 16 de enero de 2013. (csic.es)
  • Eight different 2-row barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars were grown in controlled environment chambers at five different temperatures until maturity. (nofima.no)
  • Babakov, A. 2004-10-13 00:00:00 Regulatory changes in the activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in salt-stressed roots were investigated using seven-day-old seedlings of two cultivars of barley (Hordeum disticum L.) with different salt tolerances: Moskovskii-121 (salt-tolerant) and Elf (salt-sensitive). (deepdyve.com)
  • Póster presentado en Plant and Animal Genome XXI, celebrada en San Diego del 12 al 16 de enero de 2013. (csic.es)
  • Genome-wide divergence analysis of WRKY gene family in Hordeum vulgare provided a framework for molecular evolution and functional roles. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 1753. Species Plantarum 1: 84-85 lectotype designated by Bowden, Canadian Journal of Botany 37: 679 (1959) Tropicos, Hordeum L. Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Flora of China Vol. 22 Page 395 大麦属 da mai shu Hordeum Linnaeus, Sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1753. Flora of Pakistan Altervista Flora Italiana genere Hordeum includes photos + distribution maps of several species Cabi, E. & M. Doğan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six plant species were tested including barley ( Hordeum vulgare ), Jerry oats (Avena sativa), rye (Secale cereale), wheat (Triticum aestivum), perennial ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), and ReGreen (wheat x wheatgrass hybrid (Triticum aestivum x Thinopyrum intermedium). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The timing of reproductive development determines spike architecture and thus yield in temperate grasses such as barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Reproductive development in barley is controlled by the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1 which accelerates flowering time under long-day (LD) conditions. (uni-koeln.de)
  • Allelic variation analysis and development of gene-specific molecular markers confering acid soil tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. (edu.au)
  • Distribution of15N in the soil-plant system during a four-year field lysimeter study with barley (Hordeum distichum L.) and perennial meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds. (diva-portal.org)
  • The leaf epidermises of 15 taxa of Hordeum, Psathyrostachys, and Hordelymus were examined under the light microscope. (brillonline.com)
  • Their greatest difference is shown in the intercostal zones of the lower epidermis between the group constituted by the cultivated barley and its close wild relatives and the group constituted by the wild species of Hordeum and the taxa of Psathyrostachys and Hordelymus. (brillonline.com)
  • Moreover, the wild species of Hordeum, which belong to the latter group, differ from the taxa of Psathyrostachys and Hordelymus by the number of rows of long-cells in the intercostal zones and the quantity of short-cells. (brillonline.com)
  • Garthwaite, A. J., R. von Bothmer and T. D. Colmer (2005) Salt tolerance in wild Hordeum species is associated with restricted entry of Na+ and Cl- into the shoots. (sussex.ac.uk)
Hordeum jubatum - Wikimedia Commons
Hordeum jubatum - Wikimedia Commons (commons.wikimedia.org)
Category:Hordeum murinum - Wikimedia Commons
Category:Hordeum murinum - Wikimedia Commons (commons.wikimedia.org)
Hordeum - Viquipèdia, l'enciclopèdia lliure
Hordeum - Viquipèdia, l'enciclopèdia lliure (ca.wikipedia.org)
Frontiers | Biofortified Crops Generated by Breeding, Agronomy, and Transgenic Approaches Are Improving Lives of Millions of...
Frontiers | Biofortified Crops Generated by Breeding, Agronomy, and Transgenic Approaches Are Improving Lives of Millions of... (frontiersin.org)
Hordeum jubatum - Wikispecies
Hordeum jubatum - Wikispecies (species.wikimedia.org)
Triticeae - Wikipedia
Triticeae - Wikipedia (en.m.wikipedia.org)
Apoplastic pH Signaling in Barley Leaves Attacked by the Powdery Mildew Fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei
Apoplastic pH Signaling in Barley Leaves Attacked by the Powdery Mildew Fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (apsnet.org)
Wheat pools in Canada - Wikipedia
Wheat pools in Canada - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
List of organisms by chromosome count - Wikipedia
List of organisms by chromosome count - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
The FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Gene Family in Barley (Hordeum vulgare) | Genetics
The FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Gene Family in Barley (Hordeum vulgare) | Genetics (genetics.org)
Genetic variation in nature - Scholarpedia
Genetic variation in nature - Scholarpedia (scholarpedia.org)
Frontiers | Comparative Genomics of Smut Pathogens: Insights From Orphans and Positively Selected Genes Into Host...
Frontiers | Comparative Genomics of Smut Pathogens: Insights From Orphans and Positively Selected Genes Into Host... (frontiersin.org)
PDB 2xfr structure summary ‹ Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) ‹ EMBL-EBI
PDB 2xfr structure summary ‹ Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) ‹ EMBL-EBI (ebi.ac.uk)
Molecular and phenotypic diversity of ICARDA spring barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) collection | SpringerLink
Molecular and phenotypic diversity of ICARDA spring barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) collection | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness-- Hordeum pusillum
Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness-- Hordeum pusillum (wnmu.edu)
Anatomical and ultrastructural responses of Hordeum sativum to the soil spiked by copper | SpringerLink
Anatomical and ultrastructural responses of Hordeum sativum to the soil spiked by copper | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
RNAseq revealed the important gene pathways controlling adaptive mechanisms under waterlogged stress in maize | Scientific...
RNAseq revealed the important gene pathways controlling adaptive mechanisms under waterlogged stress in maize | Scientific... (nature.com)
Project summaries - GRDC
Project summaries - GRDC (grdc.com.au)
PCA SKIN pHaze 16+ C-Strength 20% (old formulation) || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG
PCA SKIN pHaze 16+ C-Strength 20% (old formulation) || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG (ewg.org)
Cytogenetics, phylogeny and evolution of cultivated wheats - B.S. Gill, B. Friebe
Cytogenetics, phylogeny and evolution of cultivated wheats - B.S. Gill, B. Friebe (fao.org)
A methodological approach to the study of archaeological cereal meals: a case study at Çatalhöyük East (Turkey) | SpringerLink
A methodological approach to the study of archaeological cereal meals: a case study at Çatalhöyük East (Turkey) | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
EWG Skin Deep® | Estee Lauder Perfectionist Pro Multi-Defense UV Fluid, SPF 45 (2019
EWG Skin Deep® | Estee Lauder Perfectionist Pro Multi-Defense UV Fluid, SPF 45 (2019 (ewg.org)
How to Identify Weeds: 13 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow
How to Identify Weeds: 13 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow (wikihow.com)
Crops that feed the world 4. Barley: a resilient crop? Strengths and weaknesses in the context of food security | SpringerLink
Crops that feed the world 4. Barley: a resilient crop? Strengths and weaknesses in the context of food security | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
1. Introduction and Background | Genetically Modified Pest-Protected Plants: Science and Regulation | The National Academies...
1. Introduction and Background | Genetically Modified Pest-Protected Plants: Science and Regulation | The National Academies... (nap.edu)
Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) in Plants Under Physiological and Adverse Environmental Conditions: Current View | SpringerLink
Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) in Plants Under Physiological and Adverse Environmental Conditions: Current View | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Category:Images from Wiki Science Competition 2017 in Russia - Wikimedia Commons
Category:Images from Wiki Science Competition 2017 in Russia - Wikimedia Commons (commons.wikimedia.org)
Root-to-shoot signalling: apoplastic alkalinization, a general stress response and defence factor in barley ( Hordeum vulgare) ...
Root-to-shoot signalling: apoplastic alkalinization, a general stress response and defence factor in barley ( Hordeum vulgare) ... (link.springer.com)