Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Reed-Sternberg Cells: Large cells, usually multinucleate, whose presence is a common histologic characteristic of classical HODGKIN DISEASE.Antigens, CD30: A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that may play a role in the regulation of NF-KAPPA B and APOPTOSIS. They are found on activated T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; MAST CELLS and NK CELLS. Overexpression of CD30 antigen in hematopoietic malignancies make the antigen clinically useful as a biological tumor marker. Signaling of the receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Mechlorethamine: A biologic alkylating agent that exerts its cytotoxic effects by forming DNA ADDUCTS and DNA interstrand crosslinks, thereby inhibiting rapidly proliferating cells. The hydrochloride is an antineoplastic agent used to treat HODGKIN DISEASE and LYMPHOMA.Procarbazine: An antineoplastic agent used primarily in combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, and prednisone (the MOPP protocol) in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)Dacarbazine: An antineoplastic agent. It has significant activity against melanomas. (from Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p564)Antigens, CD20: Unglycosylated phosphoproteins expressed only on B-cells. They are regulators of transmembrane Ca2+ conductance and thought to play a role in B-cell activation and proliferation.Epstein-Barr Virus Infections: Infection with human herpesvirus 4 (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN); which may facilitate the development of various lymphoproliferative disorders. These include BURKITT LYMPHOMA (African type), INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS, and oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY).Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse: Malignant lymphoma composed of large B lymphoid cells whose nuclear size can exceed normal macrophage nuclei, or more than twice the size of a normal lymphocyte. The pattern is predominantly diffuse. Most of these lymphomas represent the malignant counterpart of B-lymphocytes at midstage in the process of differentiation.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Herpesvirus 4, Human: The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.Asparaginase: A hydrolase enzyme that converts L-asparagine and water to L-aspartate and NH3. EC 3.5.1.1.BostonPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.National Institute on Aging (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research into the nature of the aging process and diseases associated with the later stages of life. The Institute was established in 1974.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Urogenital Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.Hypermedia: Computerized compilations of information units (text, sound, graphics, and/or video) interconnected by logical nonlinear linkages that enable users to follow optimal paths through the material and also the systems used to create and display this information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.

Intensive investigation in management of Hodgkin's disease. (1/3116)

Ninety-eight patients with clinically localised Hodgkin's disease underwent laparotomy and splenectomy to determine the extent of microscopic spread. In 68 patients the procedure was carried out for untreated disease apparently confined above the diaphragm. Abdominal disease cannot be confidently excluded on the basis of non-invasive investigation at presentation. Clinical assessment of splenic disease was unreliable unless gross splenomegaly was present. Pedal lymphography was accurate in assessing para-aortic and iliac disease but of no value in assessing other intra-abdominal lymph node involvement, including that of the mesenteric lymph node. Trephine bone marrow biopsy findings were normal in all patients before surgery, and only one patient was found to have diseased bone marrow by Stryker-saw biopsy at operation. Liver disease was identified at operation in nine patients, some of whom were asymptomatic with clinically undetectable splenic and nodal disease. Detailed clinical staging failed to detect disease in one-third of patients who underwent laparotomy. These studies show that if radiotherapy is to remain the treatment of choice for disease truly localised to lymph nodes a detailed staging procedure, including laparotomy and splenectomy, remains essential. The value of this potentially curative treatment is considerably diminished in the patient who has been inadequately staged.  (+info)

Prednisone in MOPP chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. (2/3116)

High remission rates have been produced by MOPP (mustine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) chemotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease, but the prednisone component has caused adverse effects in patients who have undergone radiotherapy. The remission rates and length of remission were reviewed in 211 patients with Hodgkin's disease who received chemotherapy either with or without prednisone. In contrast to the findings of a British study, there were no significant differences in remission rates or length of remission between patients who had received prednisone and patients who had not. There were differences between the British prospective study and this retrospective one, but it is difficult to know what accounted for the substantial differences in the findings.  (+info)

Clinical presentation, course, and prognostic factors in lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease and lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin's disease: report from the European Task Force on Lymphoma Project on Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin's Disease. (3/3116)

PURPOSE: Recent studies have suggested that lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease (LPHD) is both clinically and pathologically distinct from other forms of Hodgkin's disease, including classical Hodgkin's disease (CHD). However, large-scale clinical studies were lacking. This multicenter, retrospective study investigated the clinical characteristics and course of LPHD patients and lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin's disease (LRCHD) patients classified according to morphologic and immunophenotypic criteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical data and biopsy material of all available cases initially submitted as LPHD were collected from 17 European and American centers, stained, and reclassified by expert pathologists. RESULTS: The 426 assessable cases were reclassified as LPHD (51%), LRCHD (27%), CHD (5%), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (3%), and reactive lesion (3%); 11% of cases were not assessable. Patients with LPHD and LRCHD were predominantly male, with early-stage disease and few risk factors. Patients with LRCHD were significantly older. Survival and failure-free survival rates with adequate therapy were similar for patients with LPHD and LRCHD, and were stage-dependent and not significantly better than stage-comparable results for CHD (German trial data). Twenty-seven percent of relapsing LPHD patients had multiple relapses, which is significantly more than the 5% of relapsing LRCHD patients who had multiple relapses. Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease patients had significantly superior survival after relapse compared with LRCHD or CHD patients; however, this was partly due to the younger average age of LPHD patients. CONCLUSION: The two subgroups of LPHD and LRCHD bore a close clinical resemblance that was distinct from CHD; the course was similar to that of comparable nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity patients. Thorough staging is necessary to detect advanced disease in LPHD and LRCHD patients. The question of how to treat such patients, either by reducing treatment intensity or following a "watch and wait" approach, remains unanswered.  (+info)

Autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease in children and adolescents. (4/3116)

PURPOSE: To determine the treatment outcome and clinical factors that are of prognostic significance for children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received treatment with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-three consecutive children and adolescents 21 years of age or younger with relapsed or refractory HD underwent HSCT. RESULTS: At day 100 after transplantation, 29 patients (55%) were in a complete remission or maintained a continuous complete response, six (11%) had a partial response, and 11 (21%) failed to respond or had progressive disease. The failure-free survival (FFS) at 5 years was 31%, and overall survival was 43%. Twenty-one patients died of progressive HD, and nine died secondary to transplantation-related complications, including two secondary leukemias. Prognostic factors important for FFS were normal pretransplantation lactate dehydrogenase levels (5-year FFS = 42%), compared with patients with elevated LDH levels (5-year FFS = 0%) (P < .001), and disease sensitivity at the time of HSCT with FFS in untreated relapse, sensitive disease, and resistant disease 44%, 35%, and 9%, respectively (P = .06). There was no statistically significant difference in FFS or overall survival between age subgroups that were analyzed (< 13, 13 to 18, 19 to 21) or in comparison with an adult cohort. CONCLUSION: HSCT is an effective treatment modality that can result in long-term cures and should be considered for children and adolescents with relapsed HD.  (+info)

Reduced health-related quality of life among Hodgkin's disease survivors: a comparative study with general population norms. (5/3116)

BACKGROUND: Late complications after curative treatment of Hodgkin's disease are of special relevance because most of the cured are young adults. The aims of the present study were: (1) to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Hodgkin's disease (HD) survivors with normative data from the general Norwegian population and (2) to examine the relations between disease/treatment characteristics and HRQOL in the HD survivors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 459 HD survivors aged 19-74 years (mean 44.0, SD 11.8) treated at the Norwegian Radium Hospital 1971-1991 were approached in 1994 and compared to norms from 2214 subjects approached in 1996. The norms are representative of the general Norwegian population. HRQOL was assessed by the Short Form 36 (SF-36), which measures HRQOL in eight separate scales (0 = worst health state, 100 = best health state). RESULTS: The HD survivors had lower scores than the normal controls on all scales after adjustment for age, gender and educational levels. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.01) were found in general health (10.4), physical functioning (6.1), role limitations (physical, 9.3), physical functioning (3.6) and in vitality (4.7). Patients with disease stage IB-IIB had the lowest scores on all scales. The differences in relation to stage/substage reached statistical significance (P < 0.01) in physical functioning and in role limitations (physical). Time since diagnosis, types of primary treatment or having relapsed were not associated with statistically significant differences in HRQOL. CONCLUSION: Long-term HD survivors have poorer HRQOL, primarily in physical health, than the general Norwegian population.  (+info)

Bone marrow scintigraphy using technetium-99m antigranulocyte antibody in malignant lymphomas. (6/3116)

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the clinical reliability of immunoscintigraphy (IS) to detect infiltration of the bone marrow in patients with malignant lymphoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Whole body IS was performed in 103 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using Tc-99m labelled anti-NCA-95 which allows visualization of the granulopoietic bone marrow. Of these, 52% were studied prior to any therapy. Findings were compared to posterior iliac crest biopsy as well as MRI and/or follow-up examination. Criteria of marrow infiltration were a positive biopsy, positive follow-up, or positive results of MRI. RESULTS: Comparison of IS and biospy revealed concordant findings in 69 and discordant findings in 34 of 103 patients. Of the 34 patients with discordant results, IS showed lesions suspicious of bone marrow infiltration in 29 patients despite normal biopsy findings. When follow-up and additional examinations were taken into consideration, 10 patients remained with probably false positive and five with false negative IS findings. IS proved to be highly sensitive and specific in patients with HD (100% and 84%, respectively) and high-grade NHL (93% and 84%, respectively). Moderate sensitivity (60%) was found in low-grade NHL. This was possibly due to false negative IS in three to five patients with chemotherapy in contrast to one of five false negative results in patients without chemotherapy. CONCLUSION: Bone marrow scintigraphy using antigranulocyte antibodies is highly sensitive in HD and high-grade NHL. Positive findings in IS subsequent to a negative biopsy should be followed by guided re-biopsy or MRI.  (+info)

Autotransplants for Hodgkin's disease in patients never achieving remission: a report from the Autologous Blood and Marrow Transplant Registry. (7/3116)

PURPOSE: Hodgkin's disease patients who never achieve complete remission with conventional chemotherapy (i.e., those with primary induction failure) have a poor prognosis. Some subjects who receive high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor-cell infusion experience prolonged progression-free survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Detailed records from the Autologous Blood and Marrow Transplant Registry (ABMTR) on 122 Hodgkin's disease patients who failed to achieve complete remission after one or more conventional therapy regimens and subsequently received an autotransplant between 1989 and 1995 were reviewed. RESULTS: Median age was 27 years (range, 7 to 57 years). Median time from diagnosis to transplantation was 14 months (range, 5 to 38 months). Most patients received high-dose chemotherapy without radiation for pretransplantation conditioning (n = 107). The regimen most frequently used was cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and etoposide (n = 47). Fifteen patients received total-body irradiation (n = 15). The graft consisted of bone marrow (n = 86), blood stem cells (n = 25), or both (n = 11). The 100-day mortality was 12% (95% confidence interval, 7% to 19%). Sixty patients (50%) were considered to have achieved complete remission after autotransplantation; 37 of these had negative imaging studies, whereas scan abnormalities of unknown significance persisted in 23 patients. Twenty-seven patients (22%) had no response or progressive disease after transplantation. Probabilities of progression-free and overall survival at 3 years were 38% (95% confidence interval, 28% to 48%) and 50% (95% confidence interval, 39% to 60%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, "B" symptoms at diagnosis and poor performance score at transplantation were adverse prognostic factors for outcome. CONCLUSION: Autotransplants should be considered for patients with Hodgkin's disease who do not achieve complete remission with conventional therapy.  (+info)

Stimulation of autologous blood lymphocytes by malignant lymphoma cells and homogenates. (8/3116)

The blastogenic response to autologous blood lymphocytes to whole-cell suspensions and to homogenates obtained from malignant lymphoma tissue has been investigated. Spleens were obtained from patients in whom laparotomy was performed for staging of malignant lymphoma. Cell suspensions prepared from tumour nodules were treated with mitomycin C and allowed to react with separated autologous blood lymphocytes for 6 days. Lymphocyte stimulation was measured by liquid scintillation counting after exposure to 3H-TdR. Cultures were also prepared in which autologous lymphocytes were treated with spleen tumour homogenate. Control experiments used spleens from staging procedures in which no tumour deposits were present, and normal spleens removed incidentally during other operations. In the controls, the uptake of TdR was never more than twice that of unstimulated lymphocytes. Greater degrees of lymphocyte stimulation were seen in 6 out of 14 patients, using whole tumour cells, and in 7 out of 16 patients, using tumour homogenates. The results indicate an antigenic difference between tumour and host cells, and suggest that lymphocytes can react to a tumour-associated antigen.  (+info)

  • They cautioned that the follow-up is too short for long-term effects of radiation -- such as coronary disease or second malignancies -- to affect future survival figures, so that the impact of the therapy may change. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Surgical stagingwith laparotomy (incision through the abdominal wall) and splenectomy (removal of the spleen) are the most accurate means of determining HD spread in patients who show disease above the diaphragm, the large abdominal muscle that controls breathing, and who are candidates for radiation therapy alone. (healthcommunities.com)
  • Clearly, to minimize the risk [for] cardiovascular disease, doses of both radiation to the heart and anthracyclines should be kept as low as possible without jeopardizing the patient's chance of cure. (healio.com)
  • At this time, the cause or causes of Hodgkin's disease are not known, and doctors can seldom explain why one person gets this disease and another does not. (cancercompass.com)
  • The causes of Hodgkin's disease remain incompletely known, but a higher incidence in men than in women has prompted an interest in the role of female sex hormones and reproductive history. (diva-portal.org)
  • Abnormal coagulation test results followed the course of disease, normalizing with tumor regression and reappearing during relapse. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In this pivotal single-arm study, one of the largest ever conducted in this patient population, 82% (n=106) of patients, most in their fifth line of therapy or beyond, achieved disease control (defined as stable disease or better) and 74% (n=96) achieved tumor reduction at a median follow-up of 9.6 months, demonstrating the sustained anticancer activity of LBH589. (prnewswire.com)
  • Moreover, the potential pro-apoptotic functions related to Bak and Bax in Hodgkin's disease might be surpassed by a stronger expression of anti-apoptotic molecules thus explaining tumor progression. (nih.gov)
  • Ninety-nine children with Stage IV Hodgkin's disease or Stage IIB/IIIB Hodgkin's disease with bulk disease (presence of a tumor of 6 cm or greater) were enrolled in the study. (nyp.org)
  • The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (also called extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]) pathway has been implicated in malignant transformation and in the regulation of cellular growth and proliferation of several tumor types, but its expression and function in Hodgkin disease (HD) are unknown. (bloodjournal.org)
  • 3. Hinterberger W, Hinterberger‐Fischer M, Marmont A M. Clinically demonstrable anti‐autoimmunity mediated by allogeneic immune cells favourably affects outcomes after stem cell transplantation in human autoimmune disease. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Cardiovascular disease is a widespread issue that affects millions across the world. (labroots.com)
  • PA nobinostat T rial in H odgkin's lymphoma) has begun enrollment, investigating the drug as a maintenance therapy following autologous stem cell transplant in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who have an increased risk for relapse(6). (prnewswire.com)
  • This is further supported by the results of allogenic HSCT for Crohn's disease, where the only relapse occurred in a patient who developed a mixed donor-host haematopoietic chimerism following allogenic HSCT. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome has signs and symptoms that overlap considerably with those of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome . (nih.gov)
  • Many would say that you have no more chance of developing Hodgkin's disease in the future than anybody else, and when you consider that the number of new cases diagnosed every year in the UK is about 1500, this is clearly a very small chance indeed. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • People who are concerned about the chance of developing Hodgkin's disease should talk with their doctor about the disease, the symptoms to watch for, and an appropriate schedule for checkups. (cancercompass.com)