World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History of MedicineHistory, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.World War II: Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.HistoryHistory, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.World War I: Global conflict primarily fought on European continent, that occurred between 1914 and 1918.Cercopithecidae: The family of Old World monkeys and baboons consisting of two subfamilies: CERCOPITHECINAE and COLOBINAE. They are found in Africa and part of Asia.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Platyrrhini: An infraorder of New World monkeys, comprised of the families AOTIDAE; ATELIDAE; CEBIDAE; and PITHECIIDAE. They are found exclusively in the Americas.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.History of NursingRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cebidae: A family of New World monkeys in the infraorder PLATYRRHINI, consisting of nine subfamilies: ALOUATTINAE; AOTINAE; Atelinae; Callicebinae; CALLIMICONINAE; CALLITRICHINAE; CEBINAE; Pithecinae; and SAIMIRINAE. They inhabit the forests of South and Central America, comprising the largest family of South American monkeys.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.United StatesCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Reproductive History: An important aggregate factor in epidemiological studies of women's health. The concept usually includes the number and timing of pregnancies and their outcomes, the incidence of breast feeding, and may include age of menarche and menopause, regularity of menstruation, fertility, gynecological or obstetric problems, or contraceptive usage.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Arenaviruses, New World: One of two groups of viruses in the ARENAVIRUS genus and considered part of the New World complex. It includes JUNIN VIRUS; PICHINDE VIRUS; Amapari virus, and Machupo virus among others. They are the cause of human hemorrhagic fevers mostly in Central and South America.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.AfricaSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.EuropeLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.IndiaArab World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the administrative, intellectual, social, and cultural domination of the Arab empire. The Arab world, under the impetus of Islam, by the eighth century A.D., extended from Arabia in the Middle East to all of northern Africa, southern Spain, Sardinia, and Sicily. Close contact was maintained with Greek and Jewish culture. While the principal service of the Arabs to medicine was the preservation of Greek culture, the Arabs themselves were the originators of algebra, chemistry, geology, and many of the refinements of civilization. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, p260; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p126)Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.South AmericaAge of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.JapanFamily: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.BrazilAge Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.North AmericaModels, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.IranHIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Middle East: The region of southwest Asia and northeastern Africa usually considered as extending from Libya on the west to Afghanistan on the east. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Callithrix: A genus of the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE occurring in forests of Brazil and Bolivia and containing seventeen species.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).New York CityChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Terrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.MexicoNeoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)ItalyChild Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.MuseumsPopulation Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.Famous PersonsGreat BritainTurkeyBody Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Historiography: The writing of history; the principles, theory, and history of historical writing; the product of historical writing. (Webster, 3d ed)Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Rescue Work: Activities devoted to freeing persons or animals from danger to life or well-being in accidents, fires, bombings, floods, earthquakes, other disasters and life-threatening conditions. While usually performed by team efforts, rescue work is not restricted to organized services.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Earth (Planet): Planet that is the third in order from the sun. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the SOLAR SYSTEM.
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Both PC Magazine and PC World use Sencore equipment to help them test and review new LCD televisions. "Company History". ... Arar, Yardena (26 October 2009). "Ho We Test HDTVs". PC World. Retrieved 22 April 2010. [1] [2]. ...
"Ding Finding Form in Beijing". World Snooker. Retrieved 12 April 2015. "World Rankings After 2015 World Championship". World ... "Ranking History". Snooker.org. Retrieved 6 February 2011. Profile on worldsnooker.com Zak Surety at CueTracker: Snooker Results ... "Zak Surety Q&A". World Snooker. Retrieved 28 July 2014. "Zak Surety". World Snooker. Retrieved 13 August 2014. "UK Players Tour ... Surety dropped off the tour after being unable to break into the top 64 in the world rankings during his two year stay and he ...
Sharif was re-elected for a third non-consecutive term on 5 June 2013, which is a record in the history of Pakistan. The post ... "World: South Asia: Pakistan army seizes power". BBC News. 12 October 1999. Retrieved 7 October 2012. "Nawaz Sharif calls for an ... "Prime ministers". World Statesmen. Retrieved 9 September 2012. Mughal, M Yakub. "Special Edition (Liaqat Ali Khan)". The News ... "Parliamentary history". National Assembly of Pakistan. Retrieved 20 October 2012. Nagendra Kr. Singh (2003). Encyclopaedia of ...
Worlds in 1981 ISAF World Women's Sailing Championship in 1991 International A-class catamaran Worlds in 1997 Melges 24 Worlds ... "ABYC History". Alamitos Bay Yacht Club. "Chuck Kober: Team Sailor". Yachting. October 1983. "Remembering Charles M. Kober, Past ... Finn Gold Cup in 1974 Tornado World Championships in 1977 and 1993 International 14 Fleet Racing World Championships in 1979 ... Howard Hamlin and Mike Martin won the 505 World Championship in 1999. Sarah Glaser won a silver medal in the 470 class at the ...
"World History". Charters Towers Regional Council. Archived from the original on 6 April 2011. Retrieved 24 June 2011. The Oil ... Separation of Queensland History of Queensland History of Brisbane Federation of Australia "History". New Hope Coal. Retrieved ... Queensland and the History Wars, in 'Passionate Histories: Myth, memory and Indigenous Australia' Aboriginal History Monograph ... Ørsted-Jensen, Robert: Frontier History Revisited: - Colonial Queensland and the 'History War, Brisbane 2011; Evans, Raymond: ...
"World Snooker Rankings After the 2014 World Championship" (PDF). World Snooker. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 May 2014 ... "Ranking History". Snooker.org. Retrieved 6 February 2011. http://www.thecueview.com/2017-italian-snooker-open.html "Official ... "Official World Snooker Ranking List for the 2013/2014 Season" (PDF). World Snooker. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 June ... "O'Donnell And Sutton Excited By Q School". World Snooker. Retrieved 17 June 2012. "MOD Ready To Rock". World Snooker. Archived ...
"Timelines: Southampton". History World. Retrieved 1 October 2013. Alwyn A. Ruddock (1946). "Alien Merchants in Southampton in ... "World Wars". British History Timeline. BBC. Retrieved 23 September 2013. "Movie Theaters in Southampton, England". ... "Borough of Southampton". History, gazetteer, and directory of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. Sheffield: William White. 1878 ... History of Southampton Timelines of other cities in South East England: Oxford, Portsmouth, Reading Samantha Letters (2005), " ...
WORLD CUP , History , 1974: Zaire's show of shame". BBC News. 2002-05-22. Retrieved 2013-11-15. Courtney, Barrie (14 June 2007 ... "History of the FIFA World Cup Preliminary Competition (by year)" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football ... while not participating in qualification for the 1978 FIFA World Cup and 1986 FIFA World Cup. In the 1988 African Cup of ... As Zaire they were the first Sub-Saharan African team to qualify for the FIFA World Cup and twice won the Africa Cup of Nations ...
Goff, Richard D. (2011). World History. Cengage Learning,. p. 531. ISBN 9781111345143. Marshall, Sir John Hubert (1906). ... Mehr-un-Nissa, bestowed with the title Nur Jahan, meaning "Light of the World," was the fourth child of Asmat Begum and her ...
Runner's World. 32 (8): 114. "Some History". World Quadrathlon Federation. Retrieved 2015-04-15. Densing, J.M (March 2015). ... The World Quadrathlon Federation's World Cup has been running since 2001, and constitutes a series of races in multiple ... The World Quadrathlon Federation defines that a quadrathlon consists of in any order, though usually as above. The distances, ... International championship world cup races can be evaluated with more points that what was previously stated. Every place can ...
"Home > The Games > Results history". World Games. Retrieved 2014-11-20. ... She is the winner of multiple European Karate Championships and World Karate Championships Karate medals. Her twin sister is ...
"Straight No Chaser Open Another SIX PACK at the Fabulous Fox Theatre this November". Broadway World. May 15, 2017. Retrieved ... "Straight No Chaser > Chart History > Billboard 200". Billboard Nielsen Business Media, Inc. " ...
"Corsair F-27 history". Pipkin Meade Ltd. Retrieved March 21, 2012. "Boat of the Year Winners (1985-2008)". Sailing World. ... For the first time in history the Nippon Ocean Racing Club recognised the F-27 as an official class in 1990, and during the ... "Farrier Marine: History". "Farrier Marine: Trimaran Designs". "Farrier Command 10". "Original Report on the First F-9/F-31 ... They were followed by the F-25C, the F-31, and the Corsair F-28, judged as Sailing World's 1998 Performance Multihull Sailboat ...
World history. New York: Henry Holt and company. 1994. "Prophet John". Webb, Robert L. (2006-10-01) [1991]. John the Baptizer ... Lost Worlds: Knights Templar, July 10, 2006 video documentary on The History Channel, directed and written by Stuart Elliott " ... The next day John saw Jesus coming towards him, and exclaimed: "Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! I ... Haifa, Israel: Bahá'í World Centre. p. 63. ISBN 0-85398-976-1. Effendi, Shoghi (1988). Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Wilmette ...
Title History. MECW Title Histories Archived 2011-01-03 at the Wayback Machine.. Wrestling Information Archive. Previous MECW ... Like World Wrestling Entertainment and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, MECW wrestlers are classified as independent contractors ... With the WWE buyout of World Championship Wrestling, many thought Main Event Championship Wrestling was going to be the next ... Joshua Stratton (2011-01-14). MECW Returns to Monroe City, IN tomorrow night.. World News. Sarah Brubeck (2010-08-01). " ...
"Gitzo World". Manfrotto. Retrieved 21 July 2017. "International Catalogue" (PDF). Gitzo. 2007. Archived from the original (PDF ... "History". Manfrotto. Retrieved September 24, 2017. "About Gitzo". Gitzo. Archived from the original on 12 October 1997. ... Between 1942 and 1944 during World War II, the company produced military support systems. During the late 1940s, tripods and ...
"Home > The Games > Results history". World Games. Retrieved 2014-11-22. "W Thomas - EKF National Kumite Coach". English Karate ... William Thomas son Jordan Thomas is also a world class karateka. In March 2017, Thomas moved to Hong Kong to coach the Hong ... He is the winner of multiple European Karate Championships and World Karate Championships Karate medals. ... "Jordan Thomas follows father's success with world karate gold". BBC. 30 October 2016. ...
Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Moffett, Marian; Fazio, Michael W.; Wodehouse, Lawrence (2003). World History of ... Stokstad, Marilyn (2008). Art history. Pearson Education. p. 333. ISBN 9780131577046. "World Heritage Sites - Mahabalipuram - ... Even the epic name, Draupadi, the common spouse of the Pandavas, is not supported by history. Along with several other ... "Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram". World Heritage. Retrieved 2007-02-08. "File:Five Rathas, Mahabalipuram.jpg". ...
ISBN 978-3-03911-575-4. "August von Briest (Philipp Friedrich August Wilhelm von Briest)" (in German). World history. Retrieved ... She wrote novels, short stories, fairy tales, as well as essays, on Greek mythology, on the history of fashion, and travelogues ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Pendergast, Sara; Pendergast, Tom (2003). Reference Guide to World Literature: ...
"Calles and the United States, 1924-1934". World History. June 21, 2015. Mancke, Richard B. (1979). Mexican Oil and Natural Gas ... Carrillo, Alejandro (1938). "Mexican People and the Oil Companies". World Affairs. 101, no. 3: 171-72. Brown, Jonathan C.; ... whose banking history linked him to a number of Mexico's creditors. Morrow made a significant impression on Calles, who proved ...
"League One 2017/2018 Attendance Home matches". World Football. Retrieved 22 January 2018. "History". Statto. "Arthur Gnahoua ...
She subsequently took part in season 4 (in 2010) and season 5 and 7. She also took part in the History Channel's Ice Road ... "Rocky's World". Thelisakelly.com. Archived from the original on 2012-03-10. Retrieved 2012-03-15. "Tanzi's Album". Thelisakelly ... Lisa Kelly on Twitter Interview with Esquire magazine (June 11, 2010) Lisa Kelly Bio at history.com Interview with Huffpost.tv ... Lisa Kelly (born December 8, 1980) is an American trucker who has been featured on the History channel reality television ...
World history. New York: Henry Holt and company. 1994. Civilta Catolica February 6, 1869. Bäumer Marienlexikon, Eos St.Ottilien ... Ecumenical refers to "a solemn congregations of the Catholic bishops of the world at the invitation of the Pope to decide on ... The Council of Constance was one of the longest lasting in Church history. The influx of 15,000 to 20,000 persons into the ... These included all bishops from around the world, as well as many superiors of male religious orders. 2,540 took part in the ...
"Home > The Games > Results history". World Games. Retrieved 2016-07-13. ... She is the winner of multiple European Karate Championships and World Karate Championships Karate medals. " ...
History[edit]. The term 'computational neuroscience' was introduced by Eric L. Schwartz, who organized a conference, held in ... form of Bayesian inference and integration of different sensory information in generating our perception of the physical world. ...
"Mount Unzen eruption of 1792 , Japanese history". Encyclopædia Britannica. "What is the largest eruption ever? , Volcano World ... "This Day in History". Retrieved 2014-12-14. "The Italian Alps Avalanche of 1916". 2013-03-11. Retrieved 2014-12-14. "Worst ... "Galunggung , Volcano World , Oregon State University". volcano.oregonstate.edu. Natural Hazards Data from NOAA National ... Understanding Global Security, Peter Hough, 2008, chapter 8, page 192, table 8.1 'The ten worst natural disasters in history' " ...
Lang is the author of a number of books on history, including British History For Dummies and European History For Dummies. ... Dr Seán Lang is a Senior Lecturer in History at Anglia Ruskin University and has been teaching history to college and ... First World War For Dummies is the go-to source for readers seeking to learn more about the fundamental event of the 20th ... From the Somme to Gallipoli to the home front, First World War For Dummies provides an authoritative, accessible, and engaging ...
S6 HISTORY Study on the First World War Sub-topics: Results of World War One Q: How did the First World War affect the world? A ... The First World War started in 1914 and ended in 1918. The war lasted for 4 years and caused total destruction of the world. It ... The war changed the world completely and it also sowed the seeds of the Second World War. We can conclude that the War had a ... As a conclusion, the First World War affected the whole world. The political structure, economic development, cultural and ...
The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London 2015. All Rights Reserved. ... from the Natural History Museum online shop. ... The Complete World of Human Evolution book. £16.95 Add to ...
When the world is in turmoil, this Museum fights back using its most powerful tool: education. It is urgent that we teach ... Italy entered World War II on the Axis side on June 10, 1940, as the defeat of France became apparent. ... The Allied Powers, led by Great Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union, defeated the Axis in World War II. ... 1) territorial expansion and foundation of empires based on military conquest and the overthrow of the post-World War I ...
... actually a slight change the way natural history museums are presented because we have the ability to do both the digital world ... Secret Life of the Natural History Museum. What is behind the locked doors and hidden in drawers that the public never see? ... So yeah, the World Wide Web has made fantastic difference to the way people have used museum collections, and I might say all ... A surprising amount is known about the optics of this and how it would have worked for them to see the world. The study of ...
Our docents open up the world of folk art and the history of the museum to you. No reservations are required for docent tours, ...
The history of Christmas dinner in New Zealand. *Whats a punga?. *Seabird discoveries in remote southern Fiordland ... Caring for museum collections in a molecular world. Posted 23 May 2012. by Lara Shepherd & filed under Biodiversity, Museums. ... Many museums around the world now have molecular laboratories. DNA sequencing has many useful applications for museum research ...
World History Matters The TimeMap of World History - World History Atlas HistoryWorld World History For Us All - (Christian) ... groups World History Association Bridging World History H-World The H-World discussion list CLIOH-WORLD CLIOH-WORLD: European ... World History: The Big Eras, A Compact History of Humankind (2009), 96pp Neiberg, Michael S. Warfare in World History (2001) ... World history, global history or transnational history (not to be confused with diplomatic or international history) is a field ...
World History was a compilation album by Christian rock band Mad at the World. It highlighted songs from their first six studio ... album retrospective of Mad at the Worlds history." The Phantom Tollbooth review HM Magazine review Mad at the World Review by ... It did not include any songs from their 1995 album (The Dreamland Café). In 1998, KMG Records released World History, a ... The Phantom Tollbooth Mad at the World - World History Top Albums of 1998 by The Phantom Tollbooth. ...
This is a textbook is being written for High School students by High School students. Original draft created by students at Dublin Jerome High school. ...
History of World TB Day. Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... In 2018, as part of the "We Can Make History: End TB" World TB Day theme, CDC honored TB elimination leaders and history-makers ... History of World TB Day. ITS TIME!. Return to World TB Day ... History of World TB Day. On March 24, 1882, Dr. Robert Koch ... A Glimpse at the Colorful History of TB: Its Toll and Its Effect on the U.S. and the World. TB Notes 2000. U.S. Department of ...
Is the history of the modern world the history of Europe writ large? Or is it possible to situate the history of modernity as a ... the trade between peoples of differing cultures through world history. Extending from the ancient world to the coming of the ... As world history has matured as a field, its practitioners have found the movement of commodities between peoples, places, and ... Hodgson then shifts the historical focus and in a parallel move seeks to locate the history of Islamic civilisation in a world ...
... how a couple trips over the last seven hundred years radically reshaped the history of the world ... While Marco Polo is more famous, Battuta saw a far larger chunk of the known world, which he wrote about in the book Rihla and ... Its strange to say that a plague had an upside, but there was one for the scientific world in 1665. When the Great Plague hit ... He was the Rick Steves of his day, roaming the world to tell everyone what they were missing... only he did it seven hundred ...
... billing it as the worlds cheapest car: The anticipated price tag is ... www.history.com/this-day-in-history/worlds-cheapest-car-debuts-in-india ... On this day in 2008, at the New Delhi Auto Expo in India, Tata Motors debuts the Nano, billing it as the worlds cheapest car: ... Four years after the end of World War I, President Warren G. Harding orders U.S. occupation troops stationed in Germany to ...
A History of the World is a partnership between the BBC and the British Museum that focuses on world history, involving ... Telling a history of our world through objects. Click on the titles in the blue bar below [Location, Theme, Contributor Type, ... Profile of a Queen (coin) This coin is internationally famous as a rare realistic image of Cleopatra, one of the worlds most ... Cornish pasty money box THIS OBJECT IS PART OF THE PROJECT A HISTORY OF CORNWALL IN 100 OBJECTS. KING EDWARD MINE. The ...
A History of the World is a partnership between the BBC and the British Museum that focuses on world history, involving ... Telling a history of our world through objects. Click on the titles in the blue bar below [Location, Theme, Contributor Type, ... old clay tile with face motif age? Tile found in london on a building site no idea of its date or history think it may be ... Replica of the worlds first bicycle A wooden hobby horse with metal rimmed wheels. Pedal operated cranks drive the rear wheel. ...
Record held: 1967-1972. Height: 537m (1,762ft). The Fifties ushered in the era of the TV Tower. The Griffin Television Tower reached 480 metres in 1954, the KOBR-TV Tower 490 metres in 1956, and the Ostankino Tower in Moscow hit 537 metres in 1967. This broadcasting tower in the Russian capital took just four years to build and is still the tallest structure in Europe. ...
Curriculum and Instruction Home‎ , ‎History and Social Science‎ , ‎ World History I These standards will enable students to ... The study of history rests on knowledge of dates, names, places, events, and ideas. Historical ...
... www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii-history/videos/deconstructing-history-b-17" href="#" data-module-id="528e394da93ae" data-id ... World War II Battles Videos. * Play video Attack on Pearl Harbor 2min ... Get the Inside HISTORY newsletter for in-depth historical articles and videos.. Please enter a valid email address Sign me up ... By submitting your information, you agree to receive emails from HISTORY and A+E Networks. You can opt out at any time. More ...
Content on this site by Center for History and New Media with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, is ...
... and ideas that have shaped the world we live in. Covering the period from 1900 to the present day, this fully revised and ... and general readers interested in the modern world. ... new edition presents a global perspective on recent history, ... and winners of the Nobel Peace Prize.This comprehensive reference resource will be invaluable to students of history, politics ... A Dictionary of Contemporary World History (4 ed.) Christopher Riches and Jan Palmowski Previous Edition (3 ed.) Concise, ...
Guest: John Schmidt is a historian and the author of "On This Day in Chicago History." *#Otto von Bismarck ...
The world fully accepts South Africa now, and it will host the World Cup (soccer) in 2010. But while the outside world accepts ... Today the term "developing world" is preferred by some to the term of "Third World." Traditionally, the "First World" was the ... World History Lecture Thirteen. From Conservapedia. This is an old revision of this page, as edited by BethanyS (Talk , ... For most of the population in the world, the history of the 20th century can be summed up in one word: Independence. That is ...
These equations changed the course of history. The real-world applications of mathematical equations. ... History: Developed by Bell Labs engineer Claude Shannon in the years after World War 2. ... History: Though attributed to Pythagoras, it is not certain that he was the first person to prove it. The first clear proof ... History: Calculus as we currently know it was described around the same time in the late 17th century by Isaac Newton and ...
History: Developed by Bell Labs engineer Claude Shannon in the years after World War 2. ... History: Though attributed to Pythagoras, it is not certain that he was the first person to prove it. The first clear proof ... History: Calculus as we currently know it was described around the same time in the late 17th century by Isaac Newton and ... History: The initial work was by Blaise Pascal, but the distribution came into its own with Bernoulli. The bell curve as we ...
  • Panels relating to the history of the Cradle of Humankind (Sterkfontein and environs) and a display of replicas from the site give visitors a fascinating glimpse into this world heritage site. (wits.ac.za)
  • The Museum contains interesting and invaluable collections depicting the history of medicine, dentistry and pharmacy through the ages. (wits.ac.za)
  • Apart from the hundreds of items of medical historical interest on display, there are also documents, sculptures, pictures, videos and philatelic and medallion collections relating to medical history as well as the history of allied health sciences. (wits.ac.za)
  • He inspired countless students," Krishtalka said, "many of whom became world-renowned scholars, including Terry Vaughn and Mary Dawson, a 2007-2008 KU Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award winner. (kuendowment.org)
  • First World War For Dummies is the go-to source for readers seeking to learn more about the fundamental event of the 20th century. (wiley.com)
  • Best selling author of "Understanding World War I: A Concise History", and keynote speaker and commentator on military and international affairs Joseph V. Micallef dropped by Kilmeade and Friends to discuss how World War I transformed the 20th Century. (foxnews.com)
  • Dr Seán Lang is a Senior Lecturer in History at Anglia Ruskin University and has been teaching history to college and university students for more than three decades. (wiley.com)
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