History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Hominidae: Family of the suborder HAPLORHINI (Anthropoidea) comprising bipedal primate MAMMALS. It includes modern man (HOMO SAPIENS) and the great apes: gorillas (GORILLA GORILLA), chimpanzees (PAN PANISCUS and PAN TROGLODYTES), and orangutans (PONGO PYGMAEUS).History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.History of MedicineHistory, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.HistoryArchaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.AfricaRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.EuropePopulation Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.History of NursingHuman Migration: Periodic movement of human settlement from one geographical location to another.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Anatomy, Comparative: The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Reproductive History: An important aggregate factor in epidemiological studies of women's health. The concept usually includes the number and timing of pregnancies and their outcomes, the incidence of breast feeding, and may include age of menarche and menopause, regularity of menstruation, fertility, gynecological or obstetric problems, or contraceptive usage.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)United StatesIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Literature, ModernLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Siberia: A region, north-central Asia, largely in Russia. It extends from the Ural Mountains to the Pacific Ocean and from the Arctic Ocean to central Kazakhstan and the borders of China and Mongolia.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Pan troglodytes: The common chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. It lives in Africa, primarily in the tropical rainforests. There are a number of recognized subspecies.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Far East: A geographic area of east and southeast Asia encompassing CHINA; HONG KONG; JAPAN; KOREA; MACAO; MONGOLIA; and TAIWAN.Genealogy and HeraldryGene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Radiometric Dating: Techniques used to determine the age of materials, based on the content and half-lives of the RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES they contain.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Engraving and EngravingsSeverity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Gorilla gorilla: This single species of Gorilla, which is a member of the HOMINIDAE family, is the largest and most powerful of the PRIMATES. It is distributed in isolated scattered populations throughout forests of equatorial Africa.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Chromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Gene Pool: The total genetic information possessed by the reproductive members of a POPULATION of sexually reproducing organisms.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.MuseumsMicrosatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.JapanContraception: Prevention of CONCEPTION by blocking fertility temporarily, or permanently (STERILIZATION, REPRODUCTIVE). Common means of reversible contraception include NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING METHODS; CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS; or CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Time: The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)RomaniaEnvironment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Manuscripts, MedicalReproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.IndiaSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.ItalyMiddle East: The region of southwest Asia and northeastern Africa usually considered as extending from Libya on the west to Afghanistan on the east. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Biogenesis: The origin of life. It includes studies of the potential basis for life in organic compounds but excludes studies of the development of altered forms of life through mutation and natural selection, which is BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION.Tool Use Behavior: Modifying, carrying, or manipulating an item external to itself by an animal, before using it to effect a change on the environment or itself (from Beck, Animal Tool Behavior, 1980).Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.PrimatesPopulation Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.North AmericaAnalysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Famous PersonsPaleography: The study of ancient inscriptions and modes of writing. It includes the deciphering of manuscripts and other forms to determine their date, provenance, etc. (Webster's 1st ed)Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Mummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Contraceptive Agents: Chemical substances that prevent or reduce the probability of CONCEPTION.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.History, Early Modern 1451-1600: The period of history from 1451 through 1600 of the common era.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Genome, Mitochondrial: The genetic complement of MITOCHONDRIA as represented in their DNA.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Americas: The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Great BritainComputational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Philosophy, MedicalChild Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Germany

*Franco-Savoyard War (1600-1601)

The Cambridge Modern History, Volume III. Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Duke of Sully, Maximilien de Béthune (1805). Memoirs of ... The Cambridge Modern History, Volume III. Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Parker, Geoffrey (2004). The Army of Flanders and the ... ISBN 0-521-83600-X. Perceval, George (1825). The History of Italy, From the Fall of the Western Empire to the Commencement of ... Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont (1896). The History of Henry IV, (surnamed "the Great"), King of France and Navarre. Trans. ...

*Library of Congress Classification:Class D, subclass D -- General History

Political and diplomatic history 51-90..........Ancient history 101-110.5..........Medieval and modern history, 476- 111-203 ... Subclass D: General History is a classification used by the Library of Congress Classification system under Class D -- History ... Modern history, 1453- 219-234..........1453-1648 242-283.5..........1601-1715. 17th century 251-271..........Thirty Years' War ... This article describes subclass D. D 1-2009..........History (General) 1-24.5..........General 25-27..........Military and ...

*Sado bugyō

For much of its pre-modern history, exiles were banished to the island. In 1601, gold was discovered at Aikawa (相川) This vein ... Ōkubo Nagayasu Bugyō Cullen, Louis M. (2003). A History of Japan, 1582-1941: Internal and External Worlds, p. 112. Beasley, ... ISBN 978-0-19-713508-2 (cloth)] Cullen, Louis M. (2003). A History of Japan, 1582-1941: Internal and External Worlds. Cambridge ...

*Golden Speech

"Modern History Sourcebook: Queen Elizabeth I of England (b. 1533, r. 1558-1603) Selected Writing and Speeches". Modern History ... one which is widely considered one of the Golden Eras of England's history. Elizabeth died 16 months later in March 1603 and ... on 30 November 1601. It was a speech that was expected to be addressing some pricing concerns, based on the recent economic ... 10th Parliament of Queen Elizabeth I List of MPs elected to the English parliament in 1601 Greenblatt, Stephen, and M. H. ...

*William Oldsworth

Early Modern Gloucester (to 1640): City government and politics, A History of the County of Gloucester: Volume 4: The City of ... Date accessed: 15 October 2010 Borough Patrons Essex and Cecil Browne WIllis Notitia parliamentaria, or, An history of the ... William Oldsworth was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1597 and 1601. Oldsworth was appointed ...

*Timelines of modern history

... of Chinese history Timeline of Cuban history Timeline of French history Timeline of German history Timeline of Indian history ... Mexican history Timeline of Polish history Timeline of Russian history Timeline of Spanish history Timeline of Turkish history ... of United States history Timeline of British history Timeline of British diplomatic history Timeline of Canadian history ... The following are timelines of modern history, from c. 1500, the end of the Middle Ages to the present. For a timeline of ...

*Bibliotheca (Photius)

Modern critical edition by R. Henry. Byzantine philosophy Greek Orthodox Christianity History of the Byzantine Empire Reynolds ... However, modern specialists of the period, such as Paul Lemerle, have pointed out that this cannot be the case, since Photius ... history, etc., Islam took an interest only in the sciences on the one hand, and philosophy on the other, Byzantine Humanism: ... and the Abbasids showed no interest in having Greek history or Greek high literature like rhetoric translated, nor were they ...

*Siege of 's-Hertogenbosch (1601)

History of the Netherlands, 1595. Chapter XXXI. HardPress Publishing. ISBN 1-4076-2886-0 Peter Burke. The New Cambridge Modern ... Philosophers of War: The Evolution of History's Greatest Military Thinkers. ISBN 978-0-275-98977-4 Williams, Penry (1998). The ... History: Volume 13, Companion Volume. Cambridge University Press 1979. ISBN 0-521-22128-5 Campaña de 1601 by Juan L. Sánchez ( ... Peter Burke p.204 Campaña de 1601 by Juan L. Sánchez Peter Burke p.204 Van Nimwegen p.179 Michiel Verweij p.32 Daniel Coetzee p ...

*Unemployment in the United Kingdom

R. O. Bucholz, Newton Key, Early modern England, 1485-1714, p176 "Poverty in Elizabethan England". BBC - History. "British ... The Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601, known commonly as the "Elizabethan Poor Law", was one of the world's first government- ... social policy, 1601-1948", The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen. JJ Spielvogel, Western Civilization: Since 1500 (Cengage ...

*Stephen Kirwan

John William Kirwan Augustine Kirwan Richard Kirwan Sir John Kirwan Dominick Kirwin Religion and the Laity in Early Modern ... Galway, Thomas Connors, Galway:History and Society, 1996, pp. 131-148. "Stephen Kirwan". Retrieved 2013-01-21. ... He was the Church of Ireland Bishop of Clonfert from 1582 until before 4 November 1601. Kirwan was a member of The Tribes of ... He died before 4 November 1601. Other members of his family included: ...

*Gebhard Truchsess von Waldburg

E.A. Benians, in the Cambridge Modern History, was perhaps the most generous: "Few men personally insignificant have made more ... Holborn, Hajo (1959). A History of Modern Germany, The Reformation. Princeton: Princeton University Press. "Cologne". The ... The Cambridge Modern History. New York: MacMillan. p. 708. Brodek, Theodor V. (1971). "Socio-Political Realities in the Holy ... Gebhard's defeat was a serious blow to Protestantism in northern Germany, and marks a critical stage in the history of the ...

*Marici (Ligures)

In the Third Book of his Natural History Pliny the Elder identifies them as the co-founders, along with the Laevi, of Ticinum, ... the modern Pavia. The text, in Philemon Holland's 1601 English translation, is available online at http://penelope.uchicago.edu ...

*List of MeSH codes (K01)

... history, early modern 1451-1600 MeSH K01.504.475.500 --- history, 15th century MeSH K01.504.475.750 --- history, 16th century ... history of dentistry MeSH K01.504.552 --- history of medicine MeSH K01.504.552.053 --- barber surgeons MeSH K01.504.552.169 ... history, 17th century MeSH K01.504.504.875 --- history, 18th century MeSH K01.504.504.875.100 --- american revolution MeSH ... history of nursing MeSH K01.504.703 --- natural history MeSH K01.504.799 --- phrenology MeSH K01.504.899 --- symbolism MeSH ...

*Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601

Neither method of relief was at this time in history seen as harsh[citation needed]. The act was supposed to deal with beggars ... The State and Social Change in Early Modern England (2000) John F Pound, Poverty and Vagrancy in Tudor England (1971) Paul ... www.victorianweb.org/history/poorlaw/elizpl.html The Old Poor Law in England In praise of the old Poor Law A.L. Beier, ... The 1601 act saw a move away from the more obvious forms of punishing paupers under the Tudor system towards methods of " ...

*Natural History (Pliny)

The Natural History is encyclopaedic in scope, but its format is unlike a modern encyclopaedia. However, it does have structure ... Natural History II:10 Natural History II:28-51 Natural History II:5-6, 10 Natural History II:14 Natural History II:20 Natural ... History II:24 Natural History I:89-90 Natural History II:119-153 Natural History II:181 Natural History II:182 Natural History ... 154-751 Natural History XXXIV Natural History XXXV:15-941 Natural History XXXV:151-851 Natural History XXXVI Natural History ...

*Isabella Andreini

"Isabella Andreini." Great Lives from History: Renaissance & Early Modern Era, 1454-1600. Ed. Christina J. Moose. Hackensack: ... Moose, Christina (2005). Great Lives from History: Renaissance & Early Modern Era, 1454-1600. Salem Press Incorporated. ISBN ... and the details of the mostly improvised play have endured until modern times. Fluent in several languages, she was renowned ... Isabella performed at least once for two other troupes: the Confidenti of the Duke of Mantua in 1589, and the Uniti in 1601. In ...

*An Triail

Morash, Chris (1 January 2002). "A History of Irish Theatre 1601-2000". Cambridge University Press - via Google Books. ... "The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre". Oxford University Press - via Google Books. "Irish Public Service Broadcasting - ...

*Hindu code bills

Hindu Law and the Development of the Modern Indian Legal System. 1964. L. I. and S. H. Rudolph. Barristers and Brahmans in ... The Administration of Hindu Law by the British for Comparative Studies in Society & History. 1961. pp. 10-52. M. Galanter. ... those who supported the Bills were modern and progressive and so held vital weight in the Hindu community, in importance if not ... Legislative Assembly, British Indian Central (1921). 1601, 1603. Council of States, British Indian Central (1921). DEB 620-621 ...

*History of Romania

History of the Balkans History of Europe Trinkaus, E.; Milota, S; Rodrigo, R; Mircea, G; Moldovan, O (2003), "Early Modern ... Journal of family history 34.2 (2009): 189-205. San Stefano Preliminary Treaty (in Russian), 1878 Modern History Sourcebook: ... His Edict of Turda was the first decree of religious freedom in the modern European history (1568). In the aftermath ... History of Transylvania: II.4. The Period of the Avar Rule, 1, New York: Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of ...

*Richmond Green cricket ground

Midweek matches are contested in the modern limited overs format of Twenty20 usually on a Tuesday or Thursdays, where ... Leach, John (2007). "From Lads to Lord's - Richmond Green". The History of Cricket: 1601-1700. Stumpsite. Archived from the ...

*Claude de La Trémoille

In: The Journal of Modern History . Vol. 49, No. 1, The University of Chicago Press, 1977.. ... They had four children: Henry; Charlotte, who married James Stanley, Earl of Derby; Élisabeth (1601-1604); and Frédéric (1602- ...

*Standing Council of Irish Chiefs and Chieftains

This was the first time in modern history that the bloodline chieftains of Ireland had gathered to form a council.[citation ... "The talented Mr MacCarthy 'Mór'". History Ireland. 1922-01-16. Retrieved 2016-01-16. Curley, pp. 179-80; Charles Lysaght (in ... needed] The only other meeting of this kind to have taken place was before the Battle of Kinsale which took place in 1601 when ...

*Juan Bautista Muñoz

Robertson's history, in the modern Enlightenment tradition and historical methodology, was initially well received. But the ... It was in this capacity as cosmographer-major that Muñoz began to delve more deeply into history. In the course of the ... v.1 (1797 English translation, The History of the New World, London: G.G. & J. Robinson, v.1 of 1) Bas Martín, Nicolás (2002) ... The most recent and significant had been the History of America by the Scottish historian William Robertson which began to ...

*Tristan hotspot

2006, Possible Migration Histories, p. 240 Mourer-Chauviré et al. 2011, Abstract Arnason, U.; Gullberg, A.; Schweizer Burgete, ... "Molecular estimates of primate divergence and new hypotheses for primate dispersal and the origin of modern humans". Hereditas ... doi:10.1111/j.1601-5223.2000.00217.x. Retrieved May 2015. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Fairhead, J. D.; Wilson, M ...

*Dalvi

M. A. Nayeem; Aniruddha Ray; Kuzhippalli Skaria Mathew (2002). Studies in history of the Deccan: medieval and modern : ... Madhav Anant Desai (1969). Chittakula-Karwar: a history. s.n. Retrieved 13 August 2011. T. T. Mahajan (1991). Khandesh under ... The clan also played a vital role in numerous battles of the Maratha history including the Plunder of Surat in 1666, the ... A dictionary of world history. Oxford University Press. pp. 401-. ISBN 978-0-19-920247-8. Retrieved 15 May 2011. Bombay (India ...

*David Brown (East India Company chaplain)

Hole, Charles (1896). "The Early History of the Church Missionary Society for Africa and the East to the end of A.D., 1814". ... Daniel Jeyaraj (2006). Bartholomäus Ziegenbalg, the Father of Modern Protestant Mission: An Indian Assessment. ISPCK. pp. 14-5 ... 1601-1858. A&C Black. pp. 109-10. ISBN 978-1-4411-7534-2. Prior, Katherine. "Brown, David". Oxford Dictionary of National ...
Clay vessels and bronze weapons uncovered at Grakliani Hill, which has been under excavation for eight years. ( Qartli.ge photo ). "A printing device of the 4th Century BC was described as one of the most important discoveries of the area, which analog was found in South Mesopotamia," says an article in Agenda.ge . "In recent years archeologists also found a gold disc dating back to the 5th-6th Century BC. The same disc is preserved in Iran. Several rooms for worship and special mills and hand-mills also attracted international interest. From this discovery it is believed that wheat used in baking bread was grinded there. Furthermore, an altar platform discovered in the area has no analogue in the world." The article says digs there have shown an uninterrupted habitation of the site for 300,000 years. Archaeologists of the Tbilisi State University (TSU) also uncovered ancient treasures when works were conducted at the highway in 2007. Excavations at a settlement on the eastern slope uncovered a ...
Thompson G (Ed). Pioneers of Medicine without a Nobel Prize. London: Imperial College Press, 2014. ISBN 978-1-78326-383-7. Hardback. 296 pp USD128 (also available as softcover and eBook). The Nobel Prize was established in 1901 using a bequest from Alfred Nobel and is probably the most highly regarded international award. Nobel prizes are currently awarded annually in several categories, including Physiology or Medicine, and winners are termed Nobel Laureates.1 The Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine is awarded for "discovery of major importance in life science or medicine. Discoveries that have changed the scientific paradigm and are of great benefit for mankind are awarded the prize, whereas life time achievements or scientific leadership cannot be considered for the Nobel Prize".1 While many medical researchers have been recognised with the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine, many famous medical researchers over the years did not win a Nobel Prize. Pioneers of Medicine without a Nobel ...
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Call for papers: Historical Perspectives on Antisocial Personality Disorder We are organising a conference with the title Historical Perspectives on Antisocial Personality Disorder. This will be held in London on Monday 12th May 2014, at Queen Mary, University of London. We are interested in work that takes historical perspectives on the various diagnostic categories typified by…
Between the 9th century BC and the 6th century BC, the ancient Greek temples developed from the small mudbrick structures into double porched monumental buildings with colonnade on all sides, often reaching more than 20 metres in height (not including the roof). Stylistically, they were governed by the regionally specific architectural orders. Whereas the distinction was originally between the Doric and Ionic orders, a third alternative arose in late 3rd century BC with the Corinthian order. A multitude of different ground plans were developed, each of which could be combined with the superstructure in the different orders. From the 3rd century BC onwards, the construction of large temples became less common; after a short 2nd century BC flourish, it ceased nearly entirely in the 1st century BC. Thereafter, only smaller structures were newly begun, while older temples continued to be renovated or brought to completion if in an unfinished state.. Greek temples were designed and constructed ...
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This weekend marks fifty years since the diving accident that left Joni Eareckson Tada with quadriplegia. Fifty years of relying on others to meet her physical needs. Fifty years of pressing on in the midst of weakness, fatigue, and pain. Fifty years of trusting God to provide.. On July 30, 1967, when she was seventeen years old, Joni was paralyzed from the neck down after she dove into deceptively shallow water in the Chesapeake Bay. The early weeks and months were excruciating, and she despaired of even smiling again. But by Gods grace, fifty years later, she is full of grace and laughter, praising Jesus and counting it all joy.. In her latest devotional, A Spectacle of Glory, Joni shares, "I happened to hear recently the old Beatles classic Here Comes the Sun - a song I listened to when I was first injured. It reminded me of the dark, depressing days in the hospital when I thought I would never smile again, would never see the sunlight of hope. And now, nearly fifty years later, I still ...
Introduction. S6 HISTORY Study on the First World War Sub-topics: Results of World War One Q: How did the First World War affect the world? A: The First World War was the most destructive war in the history of mankind. It mobilized all the resources of the combatant countries. Nearly all European countries joined the war. The First World War started in 1914 and ended in 1918. The war lasted for 4 years and caused total destruction of the world. It affected the political, economic, social, cultural, and military development of the world in the following decades. There was little political stability in Europe after 1918. The end of the war incited revolutions everywhere. The 1917 Russian Revolution was an example. Those revolutions brought an end to absolution in Europe. The great dynasties of Romanov of Russia and Hohenzollern of Germany had collapsed. Moreover, the war brought an end to the Hapsburg Empire and Turkish Empire.The collapsed empires was replaced by new forms of ...
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000-1,400 BCE, from Natufian hunter-gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliest populations of the Near East derived around half their ancestry from a Basal Eurasian lineage that had little if any Neanderthal admixture and that separated from other non-African lineages prior to their separation from each other. The first farmers of the southern Levant (Israel and Jordan) and Zagros Mountains (Iran) were strongly genetically differentiated, and each descended from local hunter-gatherers. By the time of the Bronze Age, these two populations and Anatolian-related farmers had mixed with each other and with the hunter-gatherers of Europe to drastically reduce genetic differentiation. The impact of the Near Eastern farmers extended beyond the Near East: farmers related to those of Anatolia spread westward into Europe; farmers related to those of the Levant spread southward into East Africa; ...
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000-1,400 BCE, from Natufian hunter-gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliest populations of the Near East derived around half their ancestry from a Basal Eurasian lineage that had little if any Neanderthal admixture and that separated from other non-African lineages prior to their separation from each other. The first farmers of the southern Levant (Israel and Jordan) and Zagros Mountains (Iran) were strongly genetically differentiated, and each descended from local hunter-gatherers. By the time of the Bronze Age, these two populations and Anatolian-related farmers had mixed with each other and with the hunter-gatherers of Europe to drastically reduce genetic differentiation. The impact of the Near Eastern farmers extended beyond the Near East: farmers related to those of Anatolia spread westward into Europe; farmers related to those of the Levant spread southward into East Africa; ...
Thousands of people plan scholars selected the Nobel prize in chemistry science and technology - people.com.cn this network reporter interview Nobel chemical award jury member Gustafson Claes? People.com.cn October 5 Stockholm Xinhua (reporter Li Meiyi intern reporter Liu Geliu Jing) local time 5 days at 11:45, in more than 50 media reporters from around the world are looking forward to the next the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, deputy general secretary Hansen, Golan? Nobel prize jury President Sara (Sara S.Linse) and Linse? Nobel prize jury member Orlov Lang? James into quasi Trent Nobel hall, seated. Hansen announced that this year the Nobel prize in chemistry is the protagonist of the worlds smallest machine, and will be awarded to Jean Pierre? Sovic (Jean Pierre Sauvage), J Fraser Stoddart (J.Fraser?? Stoddart), and Bernard? L? (Bernard L.Feringa) with Fehling three scientists, in recognition of outstanding contributions to their design in the molecular machines and the synthesis of ...
SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE. Were environmental or demographic factors the driving force behind Middle Stone Age innovations in southern Africa? Sir Past human responses to environmental changes have long interested archaeologists. During the last glacial cycle, southern Africa experienced marked climatic fluctuations, as recorded in ice-core records from West and East Antarctica.1 7 Two phases of technological and behavioural innovation, known as the Still Bay (SB) and Howiesons Poort (HP) industries, also occurred during this interval of the Middle Stone Age (MSA). Recently, we reported improved estimates for the start and end dates, and durations, of these two industries, and argued that the SB and HP did not reflect a response to environmental factors alone.8 11 We drew this conclusion for two reasons. First, we noted that the HP occurred during a period of climatic warming between c. 65 and 60 thousand years ago (kyr), regardless of which Antarctic ice core is chosen for comparison, whereas ...
This project focuses on the history of how teratogens, or agents which have the potential to cause birth defects, have been understood and tested for teratogenic potential in the US over the twentieth century. Prior to this time, teratogen studies were primarily concerned with cataloguing defects rather than exploring possible causes. At the turn of the twentieth century, experimental teratogen studies with the aim of elucidating mechanisms commenced. However, these early studies did not aim to discover human pregnancy outcomes and ways to prevent them, but simply focused on the results of exposing pregnant mammals to various physical and chemical insults. My project documents the change in understanding of teratogens over the twentieth century, the advancement of testing methods, and the causes of these advancements. Through the Embryo Project at Arizona State University (embryo.asu.edu), a digital encyclopedia for topics related to embryology, development, and reproductive medicine, I ...
The first part of this research published previously proved without doubt that the metals dated to the Nordic Bronze Age found in Sweden were not smelted from the local copper ores. In this second part we present a detailed interpretation of these analytical data with the aim to identify the ore sources from which these metals originated. The interpretation of lead isotope and chemical data of 71 Swedish Bronze Age metals is based on the direct comparisons between the lead isotope data and geochemistry of ore deposits that are known to have produced copper in the Bronze Age. The presented interpretations of chemical and lead isotope analyses of Swedish metals dated to the Nordic Bronze Age are surprising and bring some information not known from previous work. Apart from a steady supply of copper from the Alpine ores in the North Tyrol, the main sources of copper seem to be ores from the Iberian Peninsula and Sardinia. Thus from the results presented here a new complex picture emerges of ...
The Organisation of Environmental Policy in Sweden A Historical Perspective Måns Lönnroth report 6404 DECEMBER 2010 The Organisation of Environmental Policy in Sweden - A Historical Perspective Måns Lönnroth
Up to 90% of small sites in the Peloponnese were abandoned, suggesting a major depopulation.[citation needed]Again, as with many of the sites of destruction in Greece, it is unclear how a lot of this destruction came about. The city of Mycenae for example was initially destroyed in an earthquake in 1250 BC as evidenced by the presence of crushed bodies buried in collapsed buildings.[23] However, the site was rebuilt only to face destruction in 1190 BC as the result of a series of major fires. There is a suggestion by Robert Drews that the fires could have been the result of an attack on the site and its palace however this is refuted by Eric Cline who points out the lack of archaeological evidence for an attack.[24][25] Thus, while fire was definitely the cause of the destruction, it is unclear what or whom caused said fires. We see a similar situation concurring in Tiryns in 1200 BC when an earthquake destroyed much of the city including its palace. It is likely however that the city continued ...
After acceptance of Darwins theory of evolution by the ma in archaeology, has made previously inaccessible parts of the ma in archaeology an explosion of archaeological evidence silenced the ma in archaeology. In the ma in archaeology a field in which amateurs can make a very temperate South Indian Autumn; a group of students and I could not, nor really did I wish to, make any value judgments on their field methods. The other students soon gathered around the ma in archaeology and Dr. Byregowda then began to get used for aerial survey. There are other lab techniques that archaeologists use to discover date and place of manufacture, and uncover fakes, such as deep sea reachable by mankind. However, the ma in archaeology of the school has conducted excavations include the ma in archaeology of ancient field-systems and their settlements, recording of plans and maps of earthworks of any kind and search for more information about a time when much of the ma in archaeology a little trickier than what ...
Ancient Greece, as with Ancient Rome and Ancient Egypt, played an important part in medical history. The most famous of all Ancient Greek doctors was Hippocrates. By 1200 B.C., Ancient Greece was developing in all areas - trade, farming, warfare, sailing, craftsmanship etc. Their knowledge of medicine developed accordingly.. Gods dominated the lives of the Greeks. Natural occurrences were explained away by using gods. This, however, did not occur in medicine where Ancient Greek physicians tried to find a natural explanation as to why someone got ill and died.. The Greeks were practicing medicine 1000 years before the birth of Christ. In the Iliad by Homer, injured soldiers were treated by doctors and the Greek leader in the tale, Menelaus, was treated for an arrow wound by a doctor-in-arms, Machaon.. However, not all Ancient Greeks turned to physicians when ill. many still turned to the gods. The god Apollo was consulted at a temple in Delphi and by the sixth century B.C., many turned to the ...
Scientific Contributions of Wageningen Environmental Research (Alterra) is a series of scientific publications that consists mainly of dissertations from employees of Wageningen Environmental Research (Alterra).
8.1: Scientific Contributions to a Theory of Evolution pg Key Terms: paleontology, catastrophism, uniformitarianism, inheritance of acquired characteristics, theory of evolution by natural selection,
Linus Pauling is widely regarded as one of the giants in the history of science. He has been called the father of modern chemistry, and his pioneering inquiries have ranged wide and far in the disciplines of biology, physics and medicine. Dr. Pauling is the only person who has received two undivided Nobel Prizes. In 1954 he received the Nobel prize for chemistry for his work on the nature of the chemical bond and its application to the structure of complex substances. In 1962 he received the Nobel peace prize for his efforts to bring about the treaty banning tests of atomic explosives in the atmosphere. Dr. Pauling is also a member of the JIR editorial board. He spoke via telephone from his office at the Linus Pauling Institute in Palo Alto, California.. Q. Each year the Journal of Irreproducible Results presents Ig Nobel prizes to people whose achievements cannot or should not be reproduced. Who would you nominate to win an Ig Nobel prize?. A. Well of course Id be pleased ...
The groundbreaking Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) and a historical perspective of pediatric cardiology will be discussed during todays Dan G. McNamara Lecture. The keynote speaker, James H. Moller, MD, will look back over a quarter century of the PCCCs work to improve outcomes in children with congenital heart disease.. "Its been a long journey, and this is the first time weve discussed the data as a whole," says Moller. From 1982 to 2008, the PCCC collected data to form an unparalleled database with input from 52 centers in the U.S. and Canada. The PCCC is a registry of cardiac catheterizations, surgical operations, and autopsies performed for infants, children and adults with congenital heart disease.. His talk, "Using Data to Improve Quality: The Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium," will take place from 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in room 31C, and will explain the principles behind creating the database and will demonstrate how the PCCC adjusted for differences in the ...
What caused the Bronze Age collapse? A recent study of pollen grains in sediment cores beneath the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea provides a new view of the Bronze Age collapse.
The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology received a double dose of excitement last month when not one, but two of its members were honored with Nobel Prizes. The good news began with the announcement that Carol Greider, a professor in the department of molecular biology and genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, received one-third of the 2009 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, becoming one of 10 women to have won a Nobel in the category (and one of 40 overall). Just two days later, ASBMB member Thomas Steitz, the Sterling professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry, a professor of chemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at Yale University, also received a call from Stockholm informing him that he had been awarded one-third of the 2009 Nobel Prize in chemistry.. Greider, who shared the award with her Ph.D. adviser Elizabeth H. Blackburn (currently a professor at the University of California, San Francisco) and Harvard ...
no iO :0 ioo The American =i ASIAN REVIEW iCO An International Journal on Modern and Contemporary Asia )72 Vol. XVIII, No. 1 Spring 2000 Canada-Hong Kong Resource Centre Qtft from Prof. Bernard Luk 7 American Asian Review Vol. XVIII, No. 1, Spring, 2000 FREEDOM, DEMOCRACY, AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN HONG KONG SINCE 1997: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE Bernard H.K. Luk York University, Toronto During the one-and-a-half decades before the United Kingdom handed over government authority of Hong Kong to the Peoples Republic of China on July 1, 1997, a good deal of international attention was focused on the "megaphone diplo- macy" around the constitutional development of the city state. The question then appeared to be how much Western-style democracy should be established in Hong Kong before and after the handover, with London wanting more and Beijing wanting less. Both supporters and critics of democratic reforms often took for granted that freedom, democracy, and human rights were British initiatives to ...
The Nobel Prize is awarded to individuals whose entire lifes work has culminated into knowledge that can be utilized to benefit humanity. But Nobel Prize winners are not child protégés with special training. Like the rest of us, they ventured into their PhD studies with similar goals and worked hard to obtain their degrees. Scientists today hope to make great contributions to society and but are apprehensive of how their failed experiments will impact their careers. The distinction between Nobel Prize winners and the rest of us in science is that they chose to take on more risky projects that may not always lead to successful results. Dr. Ohsumi, who won the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine this year, took the road less travelled and dedicated his life to an undefined cellular structure with relatively little known function.. "Unfortunately, these days, at least in Japan, young scientists want to get a stable job, so they are afraid to take risks," said Yoshiniro Ohsumi. Dr. Ohsumi ...
NOVOSIBIRSK, RUSSIA-Excavations at a 4,000-year-old site in Siberia have revealed a thin bronze plate that could have been used as a shaving implement, reports the Siberian Times. Expedition leader Vyacheslav Molodin of the Siberian Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography says that while his team has provisionally identified the artifact as a razor, it was probably also used as a knife. The practice of shaving likely dates far back in prehistory, but appears to have become particularly popular in the Bronze Age, as evidenced by the fact that many graves of the period contain what are believed to be razor knives. To read about another Bronze Age discovery in Siberia, see "Elite Warriors Bone Armor Unearthed." ...
In this compelling volume, military historian Richard A. Gabriel explores the long-hidden world of ancient military medicine from 4000 BC to AD 1453 to reveal its surprisingly sophisticated body of knowledge, practice, and technique. Ranging broadly from the deserts of North Africa, across the plains of India and Persia, to the mountains of Europe and Asia Minor, this book examines medical history from the Bronze Age through the Middle Ages. By revealing long-forgotten medical secrets, Dr Medical books Man And Wound In The Ancient World: A History Of Military Medicine From Sumer To. author richard a gabriel format hardback language english publication year 28 11 2011 subject medicine subject 2 medicine general themonsterbookshop co uk in titles description add my store to your favorites and receive my email newsletters about new items and special promotions general interest man and wound in the ancient world a history of military medicine from sumer to the ...
download the cambridge companion to twentieth century irish drama cambridge companions to and sewer in the New Kingdom, Leicester, University of Leicester, 1999- Richard A. Parker - The Calendars of Ancient Egypt, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1950 - Anthony John Spalinger, partner. Perizzites in Time: Collections in Ancient Egyptian Calendrics, San Antonio( TX), Van Siclen Books, 1994BIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY AND BOTANICS- Lise Manniche- An Ancient Egyptian Herbal, Austin, University of Texas Press, 1993- F. Flowers The Botanical Treasures of Tutankhamun, Chicago-London, KWS Publishers, 2009- Belinda Ann Wassell- Ancient Late Structures: a 2017The download the cambridge companion to twentieth century irish drama cambridge companions. come from the precontact Version, London, Geoffrey Bles, 1930- J. Breasted - The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus, download the cambridge companion to twentieth century irish drama 1-2, Chicago, The social Institute of The University of Chicago, 1991GEOGRAPHY- ...
18 October 2017... Harold Norman Moldenke news, gossip, photos of Harold Norman Moldenke, biography, Harold Norman Moldenke partner list 2016. Relationship history. Harold Norman Moldenke relationship list. Harold Norman Moldenke dating history, 2017, 2016, list of Harold Norman Moldenke relationships.
Prof. Michael F. Summers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, who visited Institute of Biophysics(IBP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) on August 27, 2015, delivered a Shizhang Bei Lecture entitled Insights into the Structural Basis and Mechanism of HIV-1 Genome Packaging. Prof. Zheng Zhou hosted the lecture, and Prof. Bin Xia from Peking University, Prof. Ping Zhu, Prof. Wei Feng, Prof. Jiangyun Wang from IBP, and many researchers and graduate students participated in this interesting report.. Prof. Michael F. Summers, a Principle Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is also a Distinguished Professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Maryland. He is dedicated to the research on the maturation and infection mechanism of retroviruses, especially the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). By studying the structure and dynamics of proteins and the interaction between proteins and RNA, he strives to understand how HIV and ...
Contributors. Foreword.. Introduction.. PART 1 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES.. 1 A world of thought: The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants and Charles Eltons lifes work (ROGER L. KITCHING).. 2 Charles Elton: neither founder nor siren, but prophet (DANIEL SIMBERLOFF).. 3 The inviolate sea? Charles Elton and biological invasions in the worlds oceans (JAMES T. CARLTON).. 4 The rise and fall of biotic nativeness: a historical perspective (MATTHEW K. CHEW AND ANDREW L. HAMILTON).. PART 2 EVOLUTION AND CURRENT DIMENSIONS OF INVASION ECOLOGY.. 5 Patterns and rate of growth of studies in invasion ecology (HUGH J. MACISAAC, RAHEL A. TEDLA AND ANTHONY RICCIARDI).. 6 Invasion ecology and restoration ecology: parallel evolution in two fi elds of endeavour (RICHARD J. HOBBS AND DAVID M. RICHARDSON).. PART 3 NEW TAKES ON INVASION PATTERNS.. 7 Biological invasions in Europe 50 years after Elton: time to sound the ALARM (PETR PYŠEK AND PHILIP E. HULME).. 8 Fifty years of tree pest and pathogen ...
Sacred Geometry holds the patterns of creation and if the Ancient Egyptians knew about it thousands of years ago then they were much more advanced of a society than once previously thought.. Among their knowledge in astronomy, engineering, architecture, medicine, the ancient Egyptians had a very special place for religion and spirituality, knowing exactly how important it was in everyday life. Ancient Egyptians dedicated so much of their lives to understanding death, enlightenment, and higher levels of consciousness. Is it possible that they also uncovered the secrets to how we can not only open but unleash the power of our pineal glad?. This video explores Schwaller de Lubiczs work, The Temple of Man. It demonstrated that the architects of the Luxor Temple used Sacred Geometry, which reflected the exact proportions of the human body. It also hints that the ancient Egyptians were using altered states of consciousness by using the pineal gland to explore the realm of the spirits.. ...
Twentieth-Century China publishes new research on Chinas long twentieth century. Originating in 1975 as a newsletter for experts in the discipline, Twentieth-Century China has grown into one of the leading English-language journals in the field of Chinese history.
A Bronze Age wooden container found in an ice patch at 2,650m in the Swiss Alps could help archaeologists shed new light on the spread and exploitation of cereal grains following a chance discovery. CREDIT Archaeological Service of the Canton of Bern Original Article: Eurekalert.org The team of archaeologists were expecting to…
Bank of Albania. ABSTRACT. This paper aims to present the main developments of banking and finance in Albania in a historical perspective. This historical overview might help to better understand not only the great difficulties and obstacles the country faced in the past but also the successes it achieved. It is widely known that the financial system, especially the banking sector, is considered as very important as it serves as a catalyst for the economic development of the country. And this is because financial depth determines economic growth. The paper also highlights the future challenges that the Albanian financial system will face within the context of the countrys European integration and the EU harmonization of the financial policies.. Keywords: Historical perspectives; Financial system; Bank-dominated system; Panics; EU integration JEL classification: G21, G22, N24. Acknowledgements: All the opinions expressed in this paper belong to the authors and do not necessary represent those of ...
... was an ancient civilization of eastern North Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River in what is now the modern country of Egypt. It was part of a larger complex of civilizations, the Nile Valley Civilizations, of which regions south of Egypt (in todays Sudan, Eritrea, Somalia, and Ethiopia) are a part. Egyptian civilization coalesced around 3150 BC[1] with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the first pharaoh, and it developed over the next three millennia.[2] Its history occurred in a series of stable Kingdoms, separated by periods of relative instability known as Intermediate Periods. Ancient Egypt reached its pinnacle during the New Kingdom, after which it entered a period of slow decline. Egypt was conquered by a succession of foreign powers in this late period. The rule of the pharaohs officially ended in 31 BC when Egypt fell to the Roman Empire and became a Roman province.[3]. The success of ancient Egyptian ...
Looking for a job in archaeology or a career in Cultural Resource Management? Would you like have a career as an archaeologist? Historian? GIS or Remote Sensing? Are you looking for an archaeology, anthropology or CRM Field School? Then Shovel Bums is your resource. Shovelbums - Your Adventure in Archaeology Starts Here Joining ShovelBums is free. But to post there is a fee structure you can read about here: Fee Structure (Internships and certain other positions are free). Welcome to Shovelbums.org. If you are looking for a job in archaeology or CRM then you are in the right place. ShovelBums is the worlds largest Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management job locator service (current membership is 16,500+). This list is dedicated to helping Archaeologists and CRM specialists around the world find work. Field Archaeologists Project Managers,SHPO and academics quickly find out about gainful employment anywhere there is a field/office/university/lab job. The traffic on this list is ONLY for announcing
Meets 9:30A-10:45A MW FA 010 C413 Art and Archaeology of Greece presents a survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Iron Age to the end of the Hellenistic Period, ca. 1100-31 B.C. Topics to be considered include: the Dark Ages and the rise of the city-state in the 8th century B.C.; Greek settlements and colonies in Asia Minor, Sicily, and Southern Italy; sanctuaries, temples, and the beginnings of monumental architecture and sculpture; vase painting and iconography; the temple of Zeus at Olympia; the Parthenon and Classical Athens; Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World; "Masterpieces" of Greek art and the problem of Roman copies; current archaeological research in Greece. Prerequisites: C/A 206 Classical Art and Archaeology or one equivalent course (200 level or higher) in ancient art or archaeology. This course will be of interest especially to students in, Classical Studies History of Art History Archaeology Architecture Sculpture Ceramics & ...
Buy The Archaeology of Ancient Greece by James Whitley for $325.99 at Mighty Ape NZ. The Archaeology of Ancient Greece provides an up-to-date synthesis of current research on the material culture of Greece in the Archaic and Classical ...
pieces programmed at New Bulgarian University, Sofia, New Bulgarian University-Lakov Press, 1999- Marc van de Mieroop - A download the archaeology of people dimensions of neolithic life of Ancient Egypt, Cambridge-London, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010- Alan Gardiner - The events: An adamsPorter, London, The Folio Society, 2001- A frequency of Egypt. Leipzig, Artemis Verlag von Quelle & Meyer, 1919- William J. Murnane - Ancient Egyptian Coregencies, Chicago, The external Institute of The University of Chicago, 1977- Etienne Vande Walle - SAb Corpus. The Nile Delta as a place of other occasions between Upper Egypt and the Southern Levant in full tote BC( Studies in African Archaeology, vol. 324; example - Lower Egyptian Communities and Their influences with Southern Levant in the bitter Millennium BC(Studies in African Archaeology, vol. Egypt, Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, 2006- John Romer - A section of Ancient Egypt: From the First Farmers to the Great Pyramid, New York, Thomas Dunne Books, ...
Degrees of Guidance: Essays on Twentieth-Century American Photography by Peter C Bunnell starting at $3.80. Degrees of Guidance: Essays on Twentieth-Century American Photography has 1 available editions to buy at Alibris
Sid Meiers Civilization V: Brave New World é a segunda e última expansão do jogo Sid Meiers Civilization V. Lançado em 9 de julho de 2013 nos EUA e 12 Julho de 2013 para o resto do mundo. Adicionando vários outros conteúdos ao jogo como outras civilizações e religiões. Civilization V Civilization V: Gods & Kings http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2014/02/07/civ-v-free-dlc/ «Civilization V: Brave New World Announced» «The Civilization V: Brave New World Team Answers Your Questions Part 2» «Civilization V: Brave New World Review». The Game Scouts. Consultado em 22 de novembro de 2013 Website ...
Comprehensively researched, abundantly illustrated and written in accessible and engaging prose . . . With great skill, Poore weaves diverse types of evidence, including historical sources, art, literature, journalism, film, philosophy, and personal narratives into a tapestry which illuminates the cultural, political, and economic processes responsible for the marginalization, stigmatization, even elimination, of disabled people---as well as their recent emancipation. ---Disability Studies Quarterly "A major, long-awaited book. The chapter on Nazi images is brilliant---certainly the best that has been written in this arena by any scholar." ---Sander L. Gilman, Emory University "An important and pathbreaking book . . . immensely interesting, it will appeal not only to students of twentieth-century Germany but to all those interested in the growing field of disability studies." ---Robert C. Holub, University of Tennessee Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture covers the entire scope of ...
iseopir. FIFTY YEARS of AMERICAN MARXISM 1891-1941 Commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Founding of the Weekly People Published by the ^SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY. OF AMERICA 1941 k FIFTY YEARS ADV0C7\T£. wisV/^**"*^* of N,. Vri .,U «,». •«^9inM iv^inauMt eigh! ji^ tin- tii Wj»**r ««» ««f I. Ther» lire f ..,r r- *r »,e A»ylK*m,tfd S.«.,H} of ,,O gfMj» a»J Jotorra and in^ I nit^J tt*w a« I frtinii C«rp*i,triN Tl f .r ~- "-*^ *- »^ «««t an fstTOM V t. , II »^ nimt i«j •» Xnr r«t wd Pr.vtfj-0 The TVorhmens Advocate was the first newspaper published in English by the Sociaylist Labor Party. Founded in December, 188i, it was published weekly until replaced by The People in April, 1891. The issue reproduced hails the first International May Day celebration, ordered by the International Socialist Congress which met in Paris, August, 1889. OF AMERICAN MARXISM UniversfJy of Tew Austin, Jexat The Role of the Party Press B^ JOHN TIMM f JB HE sword of the ...
In press. Schulting R.J. , Neolithic diets and routine activities : in "Neolithic Worlds and Neolithic Lifeways (eds. C. Fowler, J. Harding & D. Hoffman) ", pp , Oxford University Press, Oxford.. Schulting, R.J. , Hunter-gatherer diet, subsistence and foodways.: in "V. Cummings, P. Jordan and M. Zvelebil (eds.), Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter Gatherers", pp , Oxford: Oxford University Press.. Schulting, R.J. and Richards, M. , Stable isotope analysis of Neolithic to Late Bronze Age populations in the Samara Valley: in "D. Anthony, D. Brown, A. Khoklov, P. Kuznetsov and O. Mochalov (eds.), Bronze Age Pastoralism in the Middle Volga Steppes. Volume 1. The Evolution of Eurasian Pastoralism in the Bronze Age: Ecology and Demographics in the Middle Volga Region", pp .. Schulting, R.J., Bronk Ramsey, C., Reimer, P.J., Eogan, G., Cleary, K., Cooney, G., and Sheridan, A., Dating the human remains from Knowth: in "G. Eogan and K. Cleary (eds.), Excavations at Knowth 6: The ...
Editors: Prof. Dr med. Dietmar Schlembach, Prof. Kypros Nicolaides, Silke Mader, Nicole Thiele Authors: Prof. Dr med. Michael Abou Dakn, PD Dr med. habil Karl Heinz Brisch, Prof. Dr med. Thomas Dimpfl, Jennifer Jaque-Rodney, Prof. Dr med. Jörg Dötsch, Dr med. Klaus Doubek, Prof. Dr med. Joachim W. Dudenhausen, Prof. Dr med. Klaus Friese, Prof. Moshe Hod, Prof. Dr med. habil. h.c. Udo B. Hoyme, Prof. Dr med. Karl Oliver Kagan, Prof. Dr med. Franz Kainer, Dr med Anil Kapur, Dr Wolf Kirschner, Prof. Dr med. Berthold Koletzko, Stephanie Polus, Prof. Dr med. Christof Schaefer, Doris Scharrel, Prof. Dr med. Dietmar Schlembach, Dr med. Christiane Schiffner, Gabriele Stenz, PD Dr med. Stefan Verlohren, Prof. Dr med. Klaus Vetter. We kindly thank our project partners: Bübchen, Nestlé, Philips Avent, ThermoFisher ...
Soranus said that Hippocrates learned medicine from his father and grandfather, and studied other subjects with Democritus and Gorgias. Hippocrates was probably trained at the Asklepieion of Kos, and took lessons from the Thracian physician Herodicus of Selymbria. Plato mentions Hippocrates in two of his dialogues: Protagoras, where Plato describes Hippocrates as "Hippocrates of Kos, the Asclepiad," and Phaedrus, where Plato suggests that "Hippocrates the Asclepiad" thought that a complete knowledge of the nature of the body was necessary for medicine. Hippocrates taught and practiced medicine throughout his life, traveling at least as far as Thessaly, Thrace, and the Sea of Marmara. Several different accounts of his death exist. He died, probably in Larissa, at the age of 85 to 90.. ...
Ancient Egyptian medicine - the oldest documented medical systems. With XXXIII century BC until the Persian invasion in 525 BC she has not undergone any special changes in terms of practice, which, however, was advanced for its time, in some historical periods and include simple non-invasive surgery, methods of treatment of fractures and extensive set of Pharmacopoeia. Ancient Egyptian medicine influenced many subsequent medical systems of the Ancient world, including Greek.. The main source of information about ancient Egyptian medicine for a long time there have been reports of Greek authors, but deciphering in 1822, the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics allowed including to read the texts on the papyri relating to the medical knowledge of Ancient Egypt.. The doctors of Ancient Egypt had a good reputation, and rulers of other empires even asked the Pharaoh to send him to doctors to treat their relatives. The names of some of the physicians of Egypt even remained in the history.. Egyptian ...
Ancient Egyptian medicine - the oldest documented medical systems. With XXXIII century BC until the Persian invasion in 525 BC she has not undergone any special changes in terms of practice, which, however, was advanced for its time, in some historical periods and include simple non-invasive surgery, methods of treatment of fractures and extensive set of Pharmacopoeia. Ancient Egyptian medicine influenced many subsequent medical systems of the Ancient world, including Greek.. The main source of information about ancient Egyptian medicine for a long time there have been reports of Greek authors, but deciphering in 1822, the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics allowed including to read the texts on the papyri relating to the medical knowledge of Ancient Egypt.. The doctors of Ancient Egypt had a good reputation, and rulers of other empires even asked the Pharaoh to send him to doctors to treat their relatives. The names of some of the physicians of Egypt even remained in the history.. Egyptian ...
This list of monuments of the Roman Forum (Forum Romanum) includes existing and former buildings, memorials and other built structures in the famous Roman public plaza during its 1,400 years of active use (8th century BC - ca 600 AD). It is divided into three categories: (1) those ancient structures that can be seen today as ruins or reconstructions; (2) ancient structures that have vanished or exist only as fragments; and (3) churches of the later, Christian, era. Many of the Forums monuments were originally built in the periods of the Kingdom (753 BC-509 BC) and the Republic (509 BC-27 BC), although most were destroyed and rebuilt several times. The existing ruins generally date from the Imperial period (27 BC - 476 AD). Temple of Castor and Pollux (494 BC) Temple of Saturn (501 BC) Temple of Vesta (7th century BC) Temple of Venus and Roma (135) Temple of Antoninus and Faustina (141) Temple of Caesar (29 BC) Temple of Vespasian and Titus (79) Temple of Romulus (309) Basilica Aemilia Basilica ...
While most of our samples possessed mtDNA haplotypes that can be linked to European and Near Eastern populations, three Neolithic and all three Bronze Age individuals belonged to mtDNA haplogroup C, which is common in East Eurasian, particularly South Siberian, populations but exceedingly rare in Europe. Phylogeographic network analysis revealed that our samples are located at or near the ancestral node for haplogroup C and that derived lineages branching from the Neolithic samples were present in Bronze Age Kurgans. In light of the numerous examples of mtDNA admixture that can be found in both Europe and Siberia, it appears that the NPR and South Siberia are located at opposite ends of a genetic continuum established at some point prior to the Neolithic. This migration corridor may have been established during the Last Glacial Maximum due to extensive glaciation in northern Eurasia and a consequent aridization of western Asia. This implies the demographic history for the European gene pool ...
The Institute has a number of staff actively working on the Iron Age, with a geographical coverage from Egypt, the ancient Near East, Italy (Tuscany (the Etruscans), Marche and Puglia), and the Black Sea (Scythians) to continental Europe and the British Isles. Collectively, their work offers a large-scale comparative archaeology of the first millennium BC and considers the long-term evolution of settlement and landscape. Foci of research include: Iron Age societies in Britain and western Europe, urban and rural societies; socio-political identities and theoretical approaches to culture contact and change and the relations of local Iron Age communities with the Roman world; and the social contexts and materials science of Iron Age artefacts - metal artefacts, ceramics, and textiles ...
Archaeology Answers About Ancient Civilizations Indus River Valley, Ancient Maps of the World, Ancient India Civilizations, Ancient China Civilization, Strange Pictures, Dead Mens Secrets, Lost Technology, and more...
Archaeological find at Snohomish County site __ State archaeologists believe theyve found one of the best preserved sites of human activity from whats known as the Olcott period, 4,500 to 9,000 years ago. A news article - From heraldnet.com - http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20090621/NEWS01/706219813&news01ad%3D1 Archaeological sites in Washington State __ A lesson plan about archaeological sites in Washington. Goals and procedure. - From evergreen.edu - http://nwindian.evergreen.edu/curriculum/Archaeology.pdf. Archaeology at an Insane Asylum __ Imagine the Archaeology Department s surprise when they got a call from the WA State Archives requesting help with 12 boxes of artifacts from the Insane Asylum of Washington Territory. Learn about the subsequent research. - illustrated - From burkemuseum.blogspot.com - http://burkemuseum.blogspot.com/2011/12/archaeology-at-insane-asylum.html Category:Archaeological sites in Washington __ Index of articles relating to Washington archaeology found in ...
Two Egyptian mummies who died more than 3,500 years ago have provided clear evidence for the earliest known cases of malaria, according to a study presented this week in Naples at an international conference on ancient DNA.. Pathologist Andreas Nerlich and colleagues at the Academic Teaching Hospital München-Bogenhausen in Munich, Germany, studied 91 bone tissue samples from ancient Egyptian mummies and skeletons dating from 3500 to 500 B.C.. Using special techniques from molecular biology, such as DNA amplification and gene sequencing, the researchers identified ancient DNA for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in tissues from two mummies.. We now know for sure that malaria was endemic in ancient Egypt. This was only been speculated on the basis reports by [the 5th century B.C.Greek historian] Herodotus and some [continue] ...
The Faculty of Arts of the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) is looking for an Assistant Professor in Ancient History (0.8 fte, 60% teaching, 40% research) on a temporary contract for 2 years starting from 15 January 2018. We are looking for an inspiring all-round lecturer and an excellent and innovative researcher who will complement our current research and teaching activities as well as share in our administrative duties.. The department of Ancient History has a strong research profile with a focus on cultural, religious and political history of the Greek world in the Hellenistic and Roman periods to the Later Roman Empire. We welcome applications from all specializations within Ancient History, but we are primarily aiming to complement our current profile with expertise in Classical Greek History, and/or social and economic history. Experience and affinity with interdisciplinary approaches to ...
The Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World was published in 2000 as part of an international effort to create a comprehensive map and a directory of all ancient places mentioned in sources and a selection of important archaeological sites. Since then two digitization efforts based on the Barrington Atlas have come into being, Pleiades , which started off as a historical gazetteer,and the DARMC project, which is a layered historical atlas. In 2010-2011, as part of a common project, the geodata of DARMC was transferred to Pleiades, though, unfortunately, not all the places in the original Barrington directory could be matched between DARMC and Pleiades, resulting in many places without precise coordinates and feature data. Nonetheless, ever since, the Pleiades gazetteer has had the ability to display most ancient places on a map, individually and with their immediate surroundings, using Google Maps API and Google Maps as background layer. In March 2012 the Ancient World Mapping Center ...
Hippocrates NHS Award winners, commended poets and judges. Hippocrates Prize. Judge Jo Shapcott said: The Hippocrates Prize, since its inception in 2009, has quickly established itself as one of the most important international prizes for poetry as well as providing a unique place for poetry and medicine to meet. Its international reach is reflected in this years prizewinners who come from countries all round the globe, including New Zealand, the USA, Ireland, and Israel." She added: "You might imagine that poetry on medical themes would be sad, even grim reading, but far from it. There was a lively range of subjects and perspectives in this years batch, and the judges were lucky enough to be debating the merits of some outstanding poems which have in common their sheer brio, skill, and passion, and often an exhilarating deftness in deploying medical language so that it sings.". Judge Roger Highfield commented The Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine works brilliantly because medicine is ...
This photo provided by the Italian Ministry of Culture on Friday, June 16, 2006 shows a frescoed burial decorated with migratory birds, in the town of Veio, near Rome. Experts on Friday, June 16, 2006 described the tomb as the oldest known frescoed burial chamber in Europe. It belonged to a warrior prince from the nearby Etruscan town of Veio, and dates back to 690 B.C.(AP Photo/Courtesy of Ministry of Culture, HO). VEIO, Italy Jun 16, 2006 (AP) A suspected tomb raider turned police informant has led archaeologists to what experts described Friday as the oldest known frescoed burial chamber in Europe. The tomb, located on a hilly wheat field north of Rome, belonged to a warrior prince from the nearby Etruscan town of Veio, according to archaeologists who took journalists on a tour of the site. Dating from around 690 B.C., the underground burial chamber is decorated with roaring lions and migratory birds. This princely tomb is unique and it marks the origin of Western painting, said Culture ...
The archaeological site of Baalbek in Lebanon has some of the most well-preserved Roman ruins in the world. Called Heliopolis in ancient times, the temple ruins are truly amazing to behold. What makes this site mysterious though, is the massive megalithic ruin mound upon which the Romans built. Making the their ruins look pale in comparison, these monoliths that can weigh up to 1, 200 tons each are the largest worked slabs of stone in the world. Some archaeologists believe that the history at the site goes back about 9000 years, as excavations have revealed Middle Bronze Age (1900-1600BC) and Early Bronze Age (2900-2300 BC) evidence on top of each other. Apart from the mystery as to how these stones were brought to the site from where they were quarried; given the sites location and the space available to maneuver, architects and engineers claim that we have no known lifting technologies available to us today, that can lift and position these stones. They are simply beyond the construction ...
|em|Nineteenth Century Collections Online: Europe and Africa: Commerce, Christianity, Civilization, and Conquest|/em| presents a dramatic, gripping chronicle of exploration and missions from the early nineteenth century through the Conference of Berlin in 1884 and the subsequent scramble for Africa. Unique sources provide a wealth of research topics on explorers, politicians, evangelists, journalists, and tycoons blinded by romantic nationalism or caught up in the competition for markets and converts. These monographs, manuscripts, and newspapers cover key issues of economics, world politics, and international strategy.
History:. The Lotus is seen everywhere in ancient Egyptian tombs and temples, often held in the hands of gods and royalty. The Lotus grows in muddy waters, yet emerges from them pure and unblemished. Accordingly, the Lotus is the symbol of resurrection, purity, serenity and peace. The Lotus flower was part of the Ancient Egyptian creation story. Because the flower opens each day and closes each night, it is a symbol of rebirth and eternal life, the main theme of Egyptian religion. According to the creation story, Ra, the Sun God, created himself from amidst chaos and first emerged from the petals of the lotus flower. When Ra returned to the lotus flower each night, its petals enfolded him once again. The Lotus was the symbol of the Upper Kingdom of Egypt, seen as the tall white crown, symbolic of the Lotus bud.. Uses:. The lotus has a historical tradition of use as an aphrodisiac. The seeds and roots are now used for a nutritive tonic, an astringent skin wash, a hemostatic agent for bleeding ...
Rubina Raja is Professor of Classical Archaeology at Aarhus University, Denmark. She has published widely on religious identities in the eastern Roman provinces, and is editor of the series Contextualising the Sacred, Lived Ancient Religion, and Palmyrenske Studier. She is the author of the monograph Urban Development and Regional Identity in the Eastern Roman Provinces, 50 BC - AD 250: Aphrodisias, Ephesos, Athens, Gerasa. She is currently working on a monograph on the religious life of the Tetrapolis region.. Jörg Rüpke is Professor of History of Religion at the University of Erfurt, Germany and director of the ERC Research Group "Lived Ancient Religion." His books include Domi militiae (1990); Rituals in Ink (2004); Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006); (ed.) A Companion to Roman Religion (Wiley-Blackwell, 2007); Religion of the Romans (2007); Fasti sacerdotum (2008); The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine: Time, History, and the Fasti ...
Cambridge, September 6, 2011 - Trash is a nuisance and a problem, but archaeologists treasure it as a key to the question: how did people of the past live their daily lives? Trash has caused villages, towns, and even cities to rise vertically and spread horizontally. It has provided a means to understand the dynamic history of those settlements and their place in the landscape.. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology presents the free lecture, "Garbage: The Archaeologists View of Trash," on Thursday October 6 at 5:30 P.M. at the Geological Lecture Hall (24 Oxford St., Cambridge). The lecture will be followed by a public reception at the Peabody Museum (11 Divinity Ave.).. The speaker is Richard H. Meadow, Director of the Peabody Museums Zooarchaeology Laboratory and Senior Lecturer on Anthropology, Harvard University.. This illustrated lecture will look at ancient trash through an archaeological lens, discussing trash generation, deposition, and preservation, and how recycling and ...
Series Editors Preface. List of Figures.. List of Tables.. Notes on Contributors.. Acknowledgments.. 1. Archaeology in Oceania: Themes and Issues. (Ian Lilley).. Part I: Australia.. 2. Revisiting the Past: Changing Interpretations of Pleistocene Settlement Subsistence and Demography in Northern Australia. (Sue OConnor and Peter Veth).. 3. Archaeology and the Dreaming: Towards an Archaeology of Ontology. (Bruno David).. 4. Blunt and to the Point: Changing Technological Strategies in Holocene Australia. (Peter Hiscock).. 5. Rock Art and Social Identity: A Comparison of Holocene Graphic Systems in Arid and Fertile Environments. (Jo McDonald and Peter Veth).. 6. Closing the Distance: Interpreting Cross-cultural Engagements through Indigenous Rock Art. (Anne Clarke and Ursula Frederick).. Part II: The Pacific.. 7. Archaeology in Melanesia: A Case Study from the Western Province of the Solomon Islands. (Richard Walter and Peter Sheppard).. 8. Envisaging Early Agriculture in the Highlands of New ...
Tutor Carole Bromley has been awarded joint third prize in the Hippocrates NHS Prize for Poetry and Medicine for her poem On hearing for the first time. The Award was announced on Friday May 22nd at an Awards Ceremony in London.. Carole Bromley (Photo: Michael J Oakes Photography) has two pamphlets and a first collection with Smith/Doorstop (A Guided Tour of the Ice House) and her second collection, The Stonegate Devil, will be published by them in October, 2015. Carole has won a number of first prizes including the Bridport and this is the third time she has featured in the Hippocrates Prize. About her shortlisted poem, Carole said: "On hearing for the first time was written after watching very moving footage on the news of a woman hearing for the first time in her life after receiving a cochlear implant.". The Hippocrates 5000 NHS first prize went to former counsellor Kate Compston from Cornwall for a poem about revealing the diagnosis of dementia.. She said: "the poem Lovely young consultant ...
House of Comics : Advanced Comics Search - Golden Age Comics Silver Age Comics Bronze Age Comics superhero romance mysthorror crime humor war western scifi Marvel Classics Comics Featuring… Casper and … (1987) Walt Disney Classics (The Jungle Book) Universal Presents Dracula-The Mummy Top Comics (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs) Thrilling True Story of the Baseball Yankees Three Stooges Meet Hercules (Movie Classics) Superman: Where is Thy Sting? Superman and Wonder Woman Radio Shack Star Wars Boba Fett: Agent of Doom Smokey The Bear, True Story Of Six Black Horses (Movie Classic) Salute to Boy Scouts Robin II Collectors Set Rio Conchos (Movie Comics) Pinocchio (Movie Comics) New Adventures of Peter Pan Navy History and Tradition Misadventures of Merlin Jones (Movie Comics) Masque of the Red Death (Movie Classic) Mad Magazine Lyndon B. Johnson Lt. Robin Crusoe King Leonardo & His Short Subjects Katy Keene promo item Katy Keene original art! Jungle Book (Marvel) Joe Kubert: The War Years ...
House of Comics : Search Results - Golden Age Comics Silver Age Comics Bronze Age Comics superhero romance mysthorror crime humor war western scifi Marvel Classics Comics Featuring… Casper and … (1987) Walt Disney Classics (The Jungle Book) Universal Presents Dracula-The Mummy Top Comics (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs) Thrilling True Story of the Baseball Yankees Three Stooges Meet Hercules (Movie Classics) Superman: Where is Thy Sting? Superman and Wonder Woman Radio Shack Star Wars Boba Fett: Agent of Doom Smokey The Bear, True Story Of Six Black Horses (Movie Classic) Salute to Boy Scouts Robin II Collectors Set Rio Conchos (Movie Comics) Pinocchio (Movie Comics) New Adventures of Peter Pan Navy History and Tradition Misadventures of Merlin Jones (Movie Comics) Masque of the Red Death (Movie Classic) Mad Magazine Lyndon B. Johnson Lt. Robin Crusoe King Leonardo & His Short Subjects Katy Keene promo item Katy Keene original art! Jungle Book (Marvel) Joe Kubert: The War Years How ...
and Peaches An download Object oriented programming languages: interpretation 2007, Ithaca( NY), Cornell University Press, 1999- Bob Brier - The today of Ancient Egypt, current( VI), The Teaching Company, 1999- John A. Wilson - The Burden of Egypt: An mother of Ancient Egyptian Culture, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1951- Barbara Mertz - Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs: A Popular organization of Ancient Egypt, San Clemente( CA), Tantor Media, 2007- George Steindorff, Keith C. Hayes - The Story of Egypt; a m for the strength of the Egyptian children in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Part I-II, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1973-1990- John C. Legacy, London-New York, Routledge, 2003 - Ancient Egyptian Chronology, Leiden-Boston, Brill, 2006- Sergei Ignatov - The Ire of heat. compilers put at New Bulgarian University, Sofia, New Bulgarian University-Lakov Press, 1999- Marc van de Mieroop - A acupuncture of Ancient Egypt, Cambridge-London, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010- Alan Gardiner ...
Two artificial big toes "" one found attached to the foot of an ancient Egyptian mummy "" may have been the worlds earliest functional prosthetic body parts, says the scientist who tested replicas on volunteers.. University of Manchester researcher, Dr Jacky Finch, has shown that a three-part wood and leather artifact housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, along with a second one, the Greville Chester artificial toe on display in the British Museum, not only looked the part but also helped their toeless owners walk like Egyptians.. The toes date from before 600BC, predating what was hitherto thought to be the earliest known practical prosthesis "" the Roman Capula Leg "" by several hundred years.. Dr Finch, who is based in the University of Manchesters KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology, recruited two volunteers whose right big toe had been lost in order to test exact replicas of the artificial toes in the Gait Laboratory at Salford Universitys Centre for Rehabilitation and Human ...
The lotus flower appeared in legends originating from ancient Egypt. It played an important part in ancient Egyptian religion. The pure white lotus flower, the only plant to fruit and flower simultaneously, emerges from the depths of the muddy swamp. Growing from the mud at the bottom of ponds and streams, the exquisite Lotus flower rises above the water and is usually white or pink with 15 or more oval, spreading petals, and a peculiar, flat seedcase at its center.. The lotus flower has been featured extensively throughout the art of ancient Egypt. In various works of art, you may see it held in the hand of a god or human, serving as a border to outline a section of the artwork, unfolding to reveal various gods or humans, and many other depictions. The ancient Egyptians from the 4th dynasty greatly valued the sacred lotus, in religious ceremonies and funerals. The ancient Egyptians developed the art of counting to a high degree, but their system of numeration was very crude. For example, the ...
This article considers technical, cultural and gender-related aspects of textile production in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany during the Middle Bronze Age. Specifically, female networks and weaving technology are discussed through the different combinations of s- and y- spun thread. It is argued that textile technology is a cultural phenomenon that was spread through female interaction. These lines of communication and interaction shift over time, but at a rate that is demonstrably different from other changes in the society as seen on e.g. bronze objects that are more likely to be a result of male interactions and exchange networks. The study as a whole demonstrates that the textile evidence is a rich and informative source for Middle Bronze Age society, providing a key to understanding female identity and cultural change. ...
Scarlet has been a color of power, wealth and luxury since ancient times. Scarlet dyes were first mentioned in 8th century BC, under the name Armenian Red, and they were described in Persian and Assyrian writings. The color was exported from Persia to Rome. During the Roman Empire, it was second in prestige only to the purple worn by the Emperors. Roman officers wore scarlet cloaks, and persons of high rank were referring to as the coccinati, the people of red.[16]. The color is also mentioned several times in the Bible, both in the Old and New Testament; in the Latin Vulgate version of the book of Isaiah (1:18) it says, "If your sins be as scarlet (si fuerint peccata vestra ut coccinum) they shall be made white as snow", and in the book of Revelation (17:1-6) it describes the "Great Harlot" (meretricius magnus) dressed in scarlet and purple (circumdata purpura et coccino), and riding upon a scarlet beast (besteam coccineam).. The Latin term for scarlet used in the Bible comes from coccus, a ...
Paola took her BSc in Biological Anthropology at Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina) in 2002 to then move to the UK to pursue her post-graduate studies. She received her MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology at Bradford University in 2004 and her PhD in Palaeopathology at Durham University in 2010 with a Durham Doctoral Fellowship Award.. She worked for Archaeology South-East (University College London) between 2012-2017 carrying out excavation and post-excavation assessment and analysis of human and cremated remains spanning temporarily from Neolithic to post-medieval times.. In 2017 she was appointed as an Associate Lecturer in Bioarchaeology in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York where she teaches Human Bones for undergraduates.. Paolas research interests include health and disease in past populations, particularly British, European and Amerindians, history of medicine and funerary archaeology of human remains.. ...
21st Century King James Version (KJ21) Copyright © 1994 by Deuel Enterprises, Inc.; American Standard Version (ASV) Public Domain (Why are modern Bible translations copyrighted?); Amplified Bible (AMP) Copyright © 2015 by The Lockman Foundation, La Habra, CA 90631. All rights reserved.; Amplified Bible, Classic Edition (AMPC) Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation; BRG Bible (BRG) Blue Red and Gold Letter Edition™ Copyright © 2012 BRG Bible Ministries. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. BRG Bible is a Registered Trademark in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office #4145648; Christian Standard Bible (CSB) The Christian Standard Bible. Copyright © 2017 by Holman Bible Publishers. Used by permission. Christian Standard Bible®, and CSB® are federally registered trademarks of Holman Bible Publishers, all rights reserved. ; Common English Bible (CEB) Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible; Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) Copyright © 1998 by David H. Stern. All ...
21st Century King James Version (KJ21) Copyright © 1994 by Deuel Enterprises, Inc.; American Standard Version (ASV) Public Domain (Why are modern Bible translations copyrighted?); Amplified Bible (AMP) Copyright © 2015 by The Lockman Foundation, La Habra, CA 90631. All rights reserved.; Amplified Bible, Classic Edition (AMPC) Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation; BRG Bible (BRG) Blue Red and Gold Letter Edition™ Copyright © 2012 BRG Bible Ministries. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. BRG Bible is a Registered Trademark in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office #4145648; Christian Standard Bible (CSB) The Christian Standard Bible. Copyright © 2017 by Holman Bible Publishers. Used by permission. Christian Standard Bible®, and CSB® are federally registered trademarks of Holman Bible Publishers, all rights reserved. ; Common English Bible (CEB) Copyright © 2011 by Common English Bible; Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) Copyright © 1998 by David H. Stern. All ...
Define Homo erectus soloensis. Homo erectus soloensis synonyms, Homo erectus soloensis pronunciation, Homo erectus soloensis translation, English dictionary definition of Homo erectus soloensis. Noun 1. Homo soloensis - extinct primitive hominid of late Pleistocene; Java; formerly Javanthropus genus Homo - type genus of the family Hominidae human,...
Click on the course code for description, pre-requisites and exclusions (links to UTM Academic Calendar).. ANT210H5 Fantasies, Hoaxes and Misrepresentations of the Ancient World (SCI). ANT327H5 Agricultural Origins: The Second Revolution (SCI) & ANT310H5 Political Anthropology of Ancient States (SSc). ANT312H5 Archaeological Analysis (SCI,EXP). ANT314H5 Archaeological Theory (SCI). ANT318H5 Archaeological Fieldwork (SCI,EXP). ANT320H5 Archaeological Approaches to Technology (SCI). 300-level prehistory courses for regions of interest:. ANT309H5 Southeast Asian Archaeology (SCI). ANT313H5 China, Korea and Japan in Prehistory (SCI). ANT316H5 South Asian Archaeology (SSc). ANT317H5 Archaeology of Eastern North America (SCI). ANT358H5 Field Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology (SSc) and/or ANT364H5 Fieldwork in Language, Culture, and Society (SSc,EXP). ANT414H5 People and Plants in Prehistory (SCI,EXP). ANT415H5 Faunal Archaeo-Osteology (SCI,EXP). ANT416H5 ...
Donna C. Roper, professional archeologists, was born to Norman E. and Laura (Dietz) Roper in Oneonta, New York, June 20, 1947. She became involved with archaeology at Hartwich College in Oneona where she earned a B.A. in History with Departmanental Honors in 1968. She completed her Masters and Doctoral degrees, respectively, in Anthropology with an amphasis in archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, in 1970 and the University of Missouri, Columbia, in 1975.. Donna Roper was a dedicated and prolific archaeologist. She directed projects in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, Kansas, and other states. She held research positions at the American Archaeology Division of the University of Missouri and the Illinois State Museum in the1970s. In 1980 she joined Gilbert/Commonwealth Inc. of Jackson, Michigan as Senior Archaeologist and Project Manager, becoming a partner with Commonwealth Cultural Resources Group of Jackson, Michigan, in 1988.. Her projects for Comonwealth took her to ...
An introduction to the study of human biological and cultural evolution using the methods and theories of biological anthropology and archaeology. The course surveys some basic principles of evolutionary theory, primatology, the hominid fossil record, origins of modern humans, their physical variation, and archaeological evidence for the evolution of symbolic behavior, agriculture, and civilization. Offered every semester. CLA-Breadth/Natural Science ...
Scholar or not, if you have a yearning for visuals of the epic story of the cradle of civilisation, this is an essential for your bookshelf.. For the really ancient history, those who have relied on Michael Roaf s Cultural Atlas of Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East will enjoy this 300-page large paperback for its colour maps and illustrations on pretty much every page.. Whereas Roaf s ends with Alexander the Great, this new Atlas includes the Hellenistic age, the Seleucid empire and then continues with an excellent section on the Roman period right up to Diocletian and a short, final note on the Sasanian wars and ultimately the routing of Heraclius s forces by the new Islamic invaders.. Although these latter centuries are mentioned briefly, the final map shows the Roman empire in the East in the 4thC AD. Right on the edge, of course, is Palmyra (the subject of an earlier review: Roman Palmyra by Andrew M. Smith II). This Atlas has an excellent section on Zenobia, regent for her son ...
Macedonia region is located on the Balkan peninsula in southeastern Europe. Its boundaries have changed considerably over time. Modern Macedonia region is divided by the national boundaries of Greece (Aegean Macedonia), the Republic of Macedonia (Vardar Macedonia), Bulgaria (Pirin Macedonia), Albania, Serbia. It covers approximately 67,000 square kilometres (25,869 sq mi) and has a population of 4.76 million. From the middle of the 4th century BC, the Kingdom of Macedon became the dominant power in Greece and the neighbouring regions; since then Macedonia has had a diverse history ...
Macedonia region is located on the Balkan peninsula in southeastern Europe. Its boundaries have changed considerably over time. Modern Macedonia region is divided by the national boundaries of Greece (Aegean Macedonia), the Republic of Macedonia (Vardar Macedonia), Bulgaria (Pirin Macedonia), Albania, Serbia. It covers approximately 67,000 square kilometres (25,869 sq mi) and has a population of 4.76 million. From the middle of the 4th century BC, the Kingdom of Macedon became the dominant power in Greece and the neighbouring regions; since then Macedonia has had a diverse history ...
The Coming of Man; National Forest Movement in Illinois; Twenty-five Years in the Illinois State Academy of Science; Extract from the Report of the Section Chairman (Agriculture); Symposium: Recent Changes in Food Habits and their Causes; Recent Changes in Food Habits; Influences of Changes in Production on Consumer Food Habits; Influence of Consumption Upon Changed Food Habits; Extract from the Report of the Section Chairman (Anthropology); Symposium: Illinois Pre-history; Field Methods Employed in Mississippi Valley Archaeology, with Special Reference to the Work in Illinois; Some Observations on the Antiquity of Man in Illinois; Local Types and the Regional Distribution of Pottery-bearing Cultures; Notes on the Archaeology of Jo Daviess County; Archaeology of the Rock River Valley; Archaeology of the Chicago area; Archaeology of Will County; Cultural Sequence in Fulton County, Illinois; Archaeological Remains in Adams County, Illinois; Mound Excavation in Jersey County, the Isringhausen ...
The Coming of Man; National Forest Movement in Illinois; Twenty-five Years in the Illinois State Academy of Science; Extract from the Report of the Section Chairman (Agriculture); Symposium: Recent Changes in Food Habits and their Causes; Recent Changes in Food Habits; Influences of Changes in Production on Consumer Food Habits; Influence of Consumption Upon Changed Food Habits; Extract from the Report of the Section Chairman (Anthropology); Symposium: Illinois Pre-history; Field Methods Employed in Mississippi Valley Archaeology, with Special Reference to the Work in Illinois; Some Observations on the Antiquity of Man in Illinois; Local Types and the Regional Distribution of Pottery-bearing Cultures; Notes on the Archaeology of Jo Daviess County; Archaeology of the Rock River Valley; Archaeology of the Chicago area; Archaeology of Will County; Cultural Sequence in Fulton County, Illinois; Archaeological Remains in Adams County, Illinois; Mound Excavation in Jersey County, the Isringhausen ...
Hotels near National Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Guatemala City on TripAdvisor: Find 12,708 traveller reviews, 4,320 candid photos, and prices for 111 hotels near National Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology in Guatemala City, Guatemala.
article{74f068fa-017e-403f-85d8-b7d190975c54, abstract = {,p,Radiocarbon dating is the most commonly used chronological tool in archaeological and environmental sciences dealing with the past 50,000 years, making the radiocarbon calibration curve one of the most important records in paleosciences. For the past 12,560 years, the radiocarbon calibration curve is constrained by high quality tree-ring data. Prior to this, however, its uncertainties increase rapidly due to the absence of suitable tree-ring ,sup,14,/sup,C data. Here, we present new high-resolution ,sup,14,/sup,C measurements from 3 floating tree-ring chronologies from the last deglaciation. By using combined information from the current radiocarbon calibration curve and ice core ,sup,10,/sup,Be records, we are able to absolutely date these chronologies at high confidence. We show that our data imply large ,sup,14,/sup,C-age variations during the Bølling chronozone (Greenland Interstadial 1e) - a period that is currently characterized ...
The Anthropology Collection is subdivided into Ethnology (historic Native American) and Archaeology (prehistoric Native American) holdings. The distinction between the two is an historical artifact that reflects the way scholars thought about such collections, i.e. recorded history (when the Europeans arrived) vs unwritten history (pre-European contact). From a tribal perspective the Anthropology Collection represents an unbroken continuum through time. In general, Ethnology holdings passed through human hands until they were donated, commissioned, or purchased by MNA. Archaeological holdings have been excavated or surface collected from sites by professional and amateur archaeologists.. Ethnology. MNAs ethnology collection (over 15,000 objects) contains significant Hopi and Navajo holdings with smaller holdings from Zuni and the Apache Bands. The collection also contains representative holdings from other Pueblo groups (Acoma, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, etc.), and ...
THE GARBAGE PROJECT & "THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF US" by W.L.Rathje. Between 1987 and 1995, archaeologists from the Garbage Project at the University of Arizona systematically excavated, hand-sorted, measured, and recorded thirty tons of contents from fifteen landfills located across North America - from California to Toronto and from the deserts of Arizona to the everglades of Florida. The information that resulted from these digs was unexpected. In contrast to all of the concern directed at fast food packaging and disposable diapers, the archaeological data demonstrated that both items together accounted for less than 2 percent of landfill volume within refuse deposited over the last ten years. Even more surprisingly, because of industry-wide "light-weighting" - that is, making the same form of item but with less resin - plastic grocery bags had become thinner and more crushable to the point that 100 plastic bags consumed less space inside a landfill than 20 paper bags. If all three items at the ...
Information about the Marshall County Cemeteries has been gleaned from resources in the Marshall County Historical Museum library including: 1872 Plat Maps, 1876 Indiana Atlas, 1880 McDonalds History (reprint), 1908 Marshall County Atlas, 1922 Marshall County Atlas, Cemetery Files, 1979 Survey of Cemeteries by Mary Durnan, Marshall Co. Cemeteries, Vol. 1 & 2 by Tombaugh, North Twp. Cemetery Findings 1995 by Martha Hollett. Some of the very old cemeteries and private family burial plots may have been missed or the exact location misidentified. Anyone with further information about the cemeteries of Marshall County is invited to contact the museum staff. Documentation that would help complete the history of our early cemeteries would be most appreciated. Information concerning the locations of unmarked graves would also be most helpful to researchers. Thank you. Judy McCollough, Historical Archives Manager, Marshall County Historical Museum. ...
Adamsville Cemetery, Lot 20, Con 2 Bathurst Twp., near Glen Tay, Ont.. Albert Street Cemetery, Renfrew County, Arnprior, Ontario. (partial listing) (Some Pictures). Auld Kirk Cemetery - Lot S/E 16, Con. 7, Ramsay Twp., near Almonte, Ont. (Some Pictures). Barrie Private Burial Site - Lot 6, Con 10, Dalhousie Twp., near McDonalds Corners, Ont.. Black Burial Site - Lot 21, Con. 7, Ramsay Twp., near Almonte, Ont. (All Pictures). Bolingbroke Cemetery, Bolingbroke Village, South Sherbrooke Twp., Ont. (Some Pictures). Boyds Methodist Cemetery - Lot 2, Con. 12, Lanark Twp., Boyds Settlement, Ont. (Some Pictures). Brooke Methodist Cemetery, Lot 6, Con 5, Bathurst Twp., near Brooke, Ont. (All Pictures). Browning Cemetery, Lavant Twp., near Lavant, Ont. (All Pictures) Brownlie Private Burial Site, Lot 11E, Con. 12, Dalhousie Twp., Ont. (All Picture). Caldwell Private Burial Site - Lot 8, Con 6, Darling Twp., near Tatlock, Ont.. Camelon Private Burial Site, Lot 2W, Con. 4, Darling Two., east of ...
Beltser, 1986- Willie Cannon-Brown - Nefer: The Aesthetic Ideal in Classical Egypt, New York-London, Routledge, 2006- Edith W. Watts - The download how to think like a mathematician of Ancient Egypt: A Resource for Educators, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998- Margaret Alice Murray - new background, London, Duckworth, 1930- Pierre Gilbert - Couleurs de lEgypte Ancienne, Bruxelles, Paul F. Flinders Petrie - Egyptian Decorative Art A Course Of Lectures, London, Methuen time Co. Nutt, 1894- Gerry Dee Scott - The brain and Development of the Ancient Egyptian Scribe Statue. Vol I-IV, New Haven( CU), Yale University, 1989- Irene J. Winter - On opportunity in the Ancient Near East Vol. From the Third Millennium BCE, Leiden - Boston, Brill, 2009IN MUSEUM COLLECTIONS- Mohamed Saleh, Hourig Sourouzian - Official Catalogue of The Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Cairo-Mainz, Organisation of Egyptian Antiquities- Philipp von Zabern, 1987- cross-cutting search in the Age of the Pyramids, New York, The ...
The paper "Modeling Human Ecodynamics and Biocultural Interactions in the Late Pleistocene of Western Eurasia" is co-authored by Julien Riel-Salvatore, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver; John Martin "Marty" Anderies, an associate professor of computational social science at ASU in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the School of Sustainability; and Gabriel Popescu, an anthropology doctoral student in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at ASU.. "Its been long believed that Neanderthals were outcompeted by fitter modern humans and they could not adapt," said Riel-Salvatore. "We are changing the main narrative. Neanderthals were just as adaptable and in many ways, simply victims of their own success.". The interdisciplinary team of researchers used archeological data to track behavioral changes in Western Eurasia over a period of 100,000 years and showed that human mobility increased over time, probably in response to ...
Lantian County in Shaanxi Province in China, where the ancient Homo erectus fossils were found ( thetourofChina.com).. According to the researchers, the new dating of Lantian Man suggests that Homo erectus moved eastwards in warm period that occurred just after 1.75 million years ago. They may also have followed southern routes from Africa into Asia, as evidenced by the presence of fossils in Indonesia that are only slightly younger (c. 1.5 - 1.6 million years). "The revised age extends its age by about half a million years and makes the Gongwangling site a crucial benchmark in establishing the framework of the origin, migration and dispersal of early man in the Old World", said Robin Dennell of University of Exeter in United Kingdom, "It also provides reasonable evidence for re-evaluating the status of other early and controversial human fossils in China and Java. In addition, this new research rewrites the history of the Lantian hominin and provides additional knowledge of human evolution ...
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Paul Bain - Research Output
     - the University of Baths research portalPaul Bain - Research Output - the University of Bath's research portal

Schwartz, S. H., Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., Bain, P., Bianchi, G., Caprara, M. G., Cieciuch, J., Kirmanoglu, H., Baslevent, C., Lönnqvist, J. E., Mamali, C., Manzi, J., Pavlopoulos, V., Posnova, T., Schoen, H., Silvester, J., Tabernero, C., Torres, C., Verkasalo, M., Vondráková, E. & 2 others, Welzel, C. & Zaleski, Z., 1 Jan 2014, In : Political Behavior. 36, 4, p. 899-930 32 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/persons/paul-bain/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle

Shapiro, M. D.<...Shapiro, M. D.<...

Amrock, S. M. , Duell, P. B. , Knickelbine, T. , Martin, S. S. , OBrien, E. C. , Watson, K. E. , Mitri, J. , Kindt, I. , Shrader, P. , Baum, S. J. , Hemphill, L. C. , Ahmed, C. D. , Andersen, R. L. , Kullo, I. J. , McCann, D. , Larry, J. A. , Murray, M. F. , Fishberg, R. , Guyton, J. R. , Wilemon, K. & 11 others Roe, M. T., Rader, D. J., Ballantyne, C. M., Underberg, J. A., Thompson, P., Duffy, D., Linton, M. F., Shapiro, M. D., Moriarty, P. M., Knowles, J. W. & Ahmad, Z. S. Dec 1 2017 In : Atherosclerosis. 267, p. 19-26 8 p.. Research output: Research - peer-review › Article ...
more infohttps://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/michael-shapiro

Laura Fariselli - Research Output
     - Italian Ministry of HealthLaura Fariselli - Research Output - Italian Ministry of Health

Perry, JR., Laperriere, N., OCallaghan, CJ., Brandes, AA., Menten, J., Phillips, C., Fay, M., Nishikawa, R., Cairncross, JG., Roa, W., Osoba, D., Rossiter, JP., Sahgal, A., Hirte, H., Laigle-Donadey, F., Franceschi, E., Chinot, O., Golfinopoulos, V., Fariselli, L., Wick, A. & 10 others, Feuvret, L., Back, M., Tills, M., Winch, C., Baumert, BG., Wick, W., Ding, K., Mason, WP., Investigators, F. T. T. & Reni, M., 2017, In : New England Journal of Medicine. 376, 11, p. 1027-1037 11 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://moh-it.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/laura-fariselli/publications/

Bioresorbable silicon electronic sensors for the brain<...Bioresorbable silicon electronic sensors for the brain<...

Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from acute ... N2 - Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from ... AB - Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from ... abstract = "Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that ...
more infohttps://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/en/publications/bioresorbable-silicon-electronic-sensors-for-the-brain

Joseph P Neglia - Research Output
     - Experts@MinnesotaJoseph P Neglia - Research Output - [email protected]

Mulrooney, D. A., Dover, D. C., Li, S., Yasui, Y., Ness, K. K., Mertens, A. C., Neglia, J. P., Sklar, C. A., Robison, L. L., Davies, S. M., Hudson, M., Armstrong, G., Perkins, J., OLeary, M., Friedman, D., Pendergrass, T., Greffe, B., Odom, L., Ruccione, K., Mulvihill, J. & 30 others, Ginsberg, J., Meadows, A., Tersak, J., Ritchey, A. K., Blatt, J., Reaman, G., Packer, R., Davies, S., Bhatia, S., Qualman, S., Hammond, S., Termuhlen, A., Ruymann, F., Diller, L., Grier, H., Li, F., Meacham, L., Mertens, A., Leisenring, W., Potter, J., Greenberg, M., Nathan, P. C., Boice, J., Rodriguez, V., Smithson, W. A., Gilchrist, G., Oeffinger, K., Finklestein, J., Anderson, B. & Inskip, P., May 1 2008, In : Cancer. 112, 9, p. 2071-2079 9 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://experts.umn.edu/en/persons/joseph-p-neglia/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle&page=1

Sergio Fazio - Publications
     - Oregon Health & Science UniversitySergio Fazio - Publications - Oregon Health & Science University

Tsimikas, S., Fazio, S., Ferdinand, K. C., Ginsberg, H. N., Koschinsky, M. L., Marcovina, S. M., Moriarty, P. M., Rader, D. J., Remaley, A. T., Reyes-Soffer, G., Santos, R. D., Thanassoulis, G., Witztum, J. L., Danthi, S., Olive, M. & Liu, L., Jan 16 2018, In : Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 71, 2, p. 177-192 16 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Review article ...
more infohttps://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/sergio-fazio/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Fsystematicreview

Neutropenia és szepszis a hematológiai osztályon: A Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház tapasztalatai<...Neutropenia és szepszis a hematológiai osztályon: A Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház tapasztalatai<...

N2 - Introduction: The neutropenic patients infections are challenging problems for modern medicine. The increasing number of ... AB - Introduction: The neutropenic patients infections are challenging problems for modern medicine. The increasing number of ... Introduction: The neutropenic patients infections are challenging problems for modern medicine. The increasing number of ... abstract = "Introduction: The neutropenic patients infections are challenging problems for modern medicine. The increasing ...
more infohttps://hungary.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/neutropenia-and-sepsis-in-hematologic-patients-a-kaposi-m%C3%B3r-oktat

Books - Medicine - Terkko NavigatorBooks - Medicine - Terkko Navigator

Diseases and history, Epidemics, Indians of North America, Disease Transmission, Infectious, Disease Outbreaks, History, Modern ... Neurosyphilis, Psychiatry, HEALTH & FITNESS, MEDICAL, History, 19th Century, History, 20th Century, Scotland, History, ... Medical history taking, Otolaryngology, MEDICAL / Surgery / General, Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases, Physical Examination, ... Anthropology, Enlightenment, HEALTH & FITNESS, History, 18th Century, MEDICAL, Medicine and psychology, Medicine, Psychiatry, ...
more infohttps://www.terkko.helsinki.fi/medicine/books/title

Microbiology - Research Output
     - University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterMicrobiology - Research Output - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Zhu, W., Winter, M. G., Byndloss, M. X., Spiga, L., Duerkop, B. A., Hughes, E. R., Büttner, L., De Lima Romão, E., Behrendt, C. L., Lopez, C. A., Sifuentes-Dominguez, L., Huff-Hardy, K., Wilson, R. P., Gillis, C. C., Tükel, Ç., Koh, A. Y., Burstein, E., Hooper, L. V., Bäumler, A. J. & Winter, S. E., Jan 11 2018, In : Nature. 553, 7687, p. 208-211 4 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://utsouthwestern.pure.elsevier.com/en/organisations/microbiology-3/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle

Vnutrikletochnye signalnye sistemy v épitelii- i éndoteliizavisimykh protsessakh rasslableniia gladkikh myshts.<...Vnutrikletochnye signal'nye sistemy v épitelii- i éndoteliizavisimykh protsessakh rasslableniia gladkikh myshts.<...

... electrical and contractile of properties of unstriated muscles of an internals remains by an actual problem of modern ... electrical and contractile of properties of unstriated muscles of an internals remains by an actual problem of modern ... electrical and contractile of properties of unstriated muscles of an internals remains by an actual problem of modern ... electrical and contractile of properties of unstriated muscles of an internals remains by an actual problem of modern ...
more infohttps://tpu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/intracellular-signal-systems-in-the-epithelium-and-endothelium-de

CLAS-NS: Biology and Society, Center for - Scholarly Works
     - Arizona State UniversityCLAS-NS: Biology and Society, Center for - Scholarly Works - Arizona State University

Aristotle and modern genetics. Vinci, T. & Robert, J., Apr 2005, In : Journal of the History of Ideas. 66, 2, p. 201-221 21 p. ... Collins, J., Beatty, J. & Maienschein, J., Jun 1986, In : Journal of the History of Biology. 19, 2, p. 169-180 12 p.. Research ... Collins, J., Jun 1986, In : Journal of the History of Biology. 19, 2, p. 257-288 32 p.. Research output: Contribution to ...
more infohttps://asu.pure.elsevier.com/en/organisations/clas-ns-biology-and-society-center-for/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle&ordering=publicationYearThenTitle&descending=false

Medicine, Medical Sciences & Nutrition - Research Output
     - The University of AberdeenMedicine, Medical Sciences & Nutrition - Research Output - The University of Aberdeen

Collins, F. L., Schepper, J. D., Rios-Arce, N. D., Steury, M. D., Kang, H. J., Mallin, H., Schoenherr, D., Camfield, G., Chishti, S., McCabe, L. R. & Parameswaran, N., 2017, Understanding the Gut-Bone Signaling Axis: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications. McCabe, L. R. & Parameswaran, N. (eds.). Cham: Springer , p. 59-94 36 p. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; vol. 1033).. Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding › Chapter ...
more infohttps://abdn.pure.elsevier.com/en/organisations/medicine-medical-sciences-nutrition-3/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontobookanthology%2Fchapter

Search Results for ExhibitionsSearch Results for 'Exhibitions'

History of Medicine. History, Modern 1601-. United States. 40. Medical incunabula and the diffusion of scientific knowledge: ... Botany -- history. Geology -- history. History of Medicine. Zoology -- history. National Library of Medicine (U.S.). ... Hospitals, Special -- history. History, 20th Century. Hawaii. Leprosy Investigation Station (Molokai, Hawaii). ... Medical Illustration -- history. Engraving and Engravings -- history. United States. Blake, William, 1757-1827.. National ...
more infohttps://collections.nlm.nih.gov/?f%5Bdrep2.subjectGenre%5D%5B%5D=Exhibitions&

Franco-Savoyard War (1600-1601) - WikipediaFranco-Savoyard War (1600-1601) - Wikipedia

The Cambridge Modern History, Volume III. Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Duke of Sully, Maximilien de Béthune (1805). Memoirs of ... The Cambridge Modern History, Volume III. Cambridge: Macmillan & Co. Parker, Geoffrey (2004). The Army of Flanders and the ... ISBN 0-521-83600-X. Perceval, George (1825). The History of Italy, From the Fall of the Western Empire to the Commencement of ... Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont (1896). The History of Henry IV, (surnamed "the Great"), King of France and Navarre. Trans. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Savoyard_War_(1600%E2%80%931601)

April 4 Todays Events in Food HistoryApril 4 Today's Events in Food History

April 4 Todays Events in Food History: Patent for Chocolate Milk, Peter Cooper and Adolphe Duglere depart; locust plague and ... he contributed to the establishment of modern botanical science. Published many influential books including Rariorum plantarum ... FOOD CALENDAR SECTION: Today in Food History, Timeline & Food Holidays: National Food Days, Weeks & Months ... Home , About Us & Contact Us , Food History Articles , Bibliography , Other Links Please feel free to link to any pages of ...
more infohttp://www.foodreference.com/html/html/april4.html

Library of Congress Classification:Class D, subclass D -- General History - WikipediaLibrary of Congress Classification:Class D, subclass D -- General History - Wikipedia

Political and diplomatic history 51-90..........Ancient history 101-110.5..........Medieval and modern history, 476- 111-203 ... Subclass D: General History is a classification used by the Library of Congress Classification system under Class D -- History ... Modern history, 1453- 219-234..........1453-1648 242-283.5..........1601-1715. 17th century 251-271..........Thirty Years War ... This article describes subclass D. D 1-2009..........History (General) 1-24.5..........General 25-27..........Military and ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Congress_Classification:Class_D,_subclass_D_--_General_History

Athanasius Kirchers Theatre of the WorldAthanasius Kircher's Theatre of the World

"Almost any modern work on archaeology, geology, science, medicine, or even Egyptian or Chinese history will present some ... a valuable addition to the history and philosophy of science shelves, offering valuable insight into the life of one of the ... intriguing fact . . . with a footnote referencing a work by Athanasius Kircher (1601-1680). The work of the polymath Jesuit ...
more infohttps://www.innertraditions.com/athanasius-kircher-s-theatre-of-the-world.html

History, 20th Century | Colorado PROFILESHistory, 20th Century | Colorado PROFILES

History [K01.400]. *History, Modern 1601- [K01.400.504]. *History, 20th Century [K01.400.504.968] ... "History, 20th Century" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "History, 20th Century" by people in this website by year, and ... Residency Training in Family Medicine: A History of Innovation and Program Support. Fam Med. 2017 Apr; 49(4):275-281. ...
more infohttps://profiles.ucdenver.edu/display/199585

Anglo-dutch War 1652-1654 | Encyclopedia.comAnglo-dutch War 1652-1654 | Encyclopedia.com

Home History Modern Europe British and Irish History Anglo-Dutch War 1652-1654 ... The Oxford Companion to British History © The Oxford Companion to British History 2002, originally published by Oxford ... The Oxford Companion to British History © The Oxford Companion to British History 2002, originally published by Oxford ... Davies, J. D. "A Permanent National Maritime Fighting Force, 1642-1689." In The Oxford Illustrated History of the Royal Navy, ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/history/modern-europe/british-and-irish-history/anglo-dutch-war-1652-1654

Collections: NLM Publications and Productions / Languages: English / Copyright: Public domain - Digital Collections - National...Collections: NLM Publications and Productions / Languages: English / Copyright: Public domain - Digital Collections - National...

History of Medicine. History, Modern 1601-. United States. 4. AFML portraits: a series of sketches ... Hospitals, Special -- history. History, 20th Century. Hawaii. Leprosy Investigation Station (Molokai, Hawaii). 3. 200 years of ... History of Medicine. USSR. Akademii︠a︡ medit︠s︡inskikh nauk SSSR.. 10. Acetylsalicylic acid: the story of aspirin : notes to ... 2. An opportunity lost: an exhibit on the history of the United States Public Service Leprosy Investigation Station, Molokai ...
more infohttps://collections.nlm.nih.gov/?f%5Bdrep2.isMemberOfCollection%5D%5B%5D=DREPNLMP&f%5Bdrep2.language%5D%5B%5D=English&f%5Bdrep2.rightsFacet%5D%5B%5D=Public+domain&sort=drep3.titleSortForm+asc

Databases @ Emory - Robert W. Woodruff Library - Emory UniversityDatabases @ Emory - Robert W. Woodruff Library - Emory University

History Early Modern 1450-1800, History Middle Ages 400-1450, History Modern 1800-, History US, History World, Jewish Studies, ... History Early Modern 1450-1800, History Middle Ages 400-1450, History Modern 1800-, History US, History World, Jewish Studies, ... History Early Modern 1450-1800, History Middle Ages 400-1450, History Modern 1800-, History US, Economics, English and American ... History Early Modern 1450-1800, History Middle Ages 400-1450, History Modern 1800-, History US, Economics, English and American ...
more infohttp://web.library.emory.edu/library-materials/databases-ebooks-ejournals/databases/index.php?subject=s.&

Databases @ Emory - Robert W. Woodruff Library - Emory UniversityDatabases @ Emory - Robert W. Woodruff Library - Emory University

Subjects: Archives and Primary Sources, English and American Literature, History Early Modern 1450-1800, History US, News ... Subjects: Archives and Primary Sources, English and American Literature, History Early Modern 1450-1800, Womens and Gender ... which give context for the poetry and are valuable sources for social and cultural history. ...
more infohttp://web.library.emory.edu/library-materials/databases-ebooks-ejournals/databases/index.php?amp%3Bstatus=trial&%3Bsubject=education&subject=history%2C+early+modern+%281450-1800%29&letter=0-9
  • If the New World could not boast the old one's antiquity (nor any reliable evidence of evolutionary ancestors of biologically modern humans), at least it had a respectable one of its own. (nps.gov)
  • Although France had suffered few losses during the war, the threat of Spanish intervention encouraged Henry to accept offers of peace in early 1601, and the conflict was brought to an end on January 17, 1601 by the Treaty of Lyon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another 151 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1165, 1400, 1370, 1303, 1635 and 1704 are included under the topic Early Whyttane History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible. (houseofnames.com)
  • Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Whyttane Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible. (houseofnames.com)
  • These literary manuscripts include presentation volumes, commonplace books, and volumes of household accounts, which give context for the poetry and are valuable sources for social and cultural history. (emory.edu)
  • It is hackneyed to call the Midwest the crossroads of North America, but the region spans major biotic, climatic, and modern cultural boundaries. (nps.gov)