The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.
Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.
Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.
A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.
Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.
Genetic loci in the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex that encode polymorphic products which control the immune response to specific antigens. The genes are found in the HLA-D region in humans and in the I region in mice.
The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.
Genetic loci in the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex which encode polymorphic characteristics not related to immune responsiveness or complement activity, e.g., B loci (chicken), DLA (dog), GPLA (guinea pig), H-2 (mouse), RT-1 (rat), HLA-A, -B, and -C class I genes of man.
The major group of transplantation antigens in the mouse.
Genetic loci responsible for the encoding of histocompatibility antigens other than those encoded by the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX. The antigens encoded by these genes are often responsible for graft rejection in cases where histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. The location of some of these loci on the X and Y chromosomes explains why grafts from males to females may be rejected while grafts from females to males are accepted. In the mouse roughly 30 minor histocompatibility loci have been recognized, comprising more than 500 genes.
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.
A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.
Human immune-response or Class II antigens found mainly, but not exclusively, on B-lymphocytes and produced from genes of the HLA-D locus. They are extremely polymorphic families of glycopeptides, each consisting of two chains, alpha and beta. This group of antigens includes the -DR, -DQ and -DP designations, of which HLA-DR is most studied; some of these glycoproteins are associated with certain diseases, possibly of immune etiology.
An 11-kDa protein associated with the outer membrane of many cells including lymphocytes. It is the small subunit of the MHC class I molecule. Association with beta 2-microglobulin is generally required for the transport of class I heavy chains from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. Beta 2-microglobulin is present in small amounts in serum, csf, and urine of normal people, and to a much greater degree in the urine and plasma of patients with tubular proteinemia, renal failure, or kidney transplants.
A component of the murine major histocompatibility complex class I family. It contains one Ig-like C1-type domain and functions in processing and presentation of exogenous peptide antigens to the immune system.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The phenomenon of target cell destruction by immunologically active effector cells. It may be brought about directly by sensitized T-lymphocytes or by lymphoid or myeloid "killer" cells, or it may be mediated by cytotoxic antibody, cytotoxic factor released by lymphoid cells, or complement.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
A heterogeneous group of immunocompetent cells that mediate the cellular immune response by processing and presenting antigens to the T-cells. Traditional antigen-presenting cells include MACROPHAGES; DENDRITIC CELLS; LANGERHANS CELLS; and B-LYMPHOCYTES. FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS are not traditional antigen-presenting cells, but because they hold antigen on their cell surface in the form of IMMUNE COMPLEXES for B-cell recognition they are considered so by some authors.
Molecules on the surface of T-lymphocytes that recognize and combine with antigens. The receptors are non-covalently associated with a complex of several polypeptides collectively called CD3 antigens (ANTIGENS, CD3). Recognition of foreign antigen and the major histocompatibility complex is accomplished by a single heterodimeric antigen-receptor structure, composed of either alpha-beta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, ALPHA-BETA) or gamma-delta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA) chains.
The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens encoded by more than 30 detectable alleles on locus B of the HLA complex, the most polymorphic of all the HLA specificities. Several of these antigens (e.g., HLA-B27, -B7, -B8) are strongly associated with predisposition to rheumatoid and other autoimmune disorders. Like other class I HLA determinants, they are involved in the cellular immune reactivity of cytolytic T lymphocytes.
Polymorphic class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens present on almost all nucleated cells. At least 20 antigens have been identified which are encoded by the A locus of multiple alleles on chromosome 6. They serve as targets for T-cell cytolytic responses and are involved with acceptance or rejection of tissue/organ grafts.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.
A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.
A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
Membrane antigens associated with maturation stages of B-lymphocytes, often expressed in tumors of B-cell origin.
Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.
A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic basis of the immune response (IMMUNITY).
Differentiation antigens found on thymocytes and on cytotoxic and suppressor T-lymphocytes. CD8 antigens are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family and are associative recognition elements in MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) Class I-restricted interactions.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).
The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A sex-specific cell surface antigen produced by the sex-determining gene of the Y chromosome in mammals. It causes syngeneic grafts from males to females to be rejected and interacts with somatic elements of the embryologic undifferentiated gonad to produce testicular organogenesis.
Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.
A group of the D-related HLA antigens found to differ from the DR antigens in genetic locus and therefore inheritance. These antigens are polymorphic glycoproteins comprising alpha and beta chains and are found on lymphoid and other cells, often associated with certain diseases.
A specific HLA-A surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-A*02 allele family.
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*07 allele family.
Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) antigens encoded by a small cluster of structural genes at the C locus on chromosome 6. They have significantly lower immunogenicity than the HLA-A and -B determinants and are therefore of minor importance in donor/recipient crossmatching. Their primary role is their high-risk association with certain disease manifestations (e.g., spondylarthritis, psoriasis, multiple myeloma).
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Bone marrow-derived lymphocytes that possess cytotoxic properties, classically directed against transformed and virus-infected cells. Unlike T CELLS; and B CELLS; NK CELLS are not antigen specific. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cells is determined by the collective signaling of an array of inhibitory and stimulatory CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. A subset of T-LYMPHOCYTES referred to as NATURAL KILLER T CELLS shares some of the properties of this cell type.
Measure of histocompatibility at the HL-A locus. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from two individuals are mixed together in tissue culture for several days. Lymphocytes from incompatible individuals will stimulate each other to proliferate significantly (measured by tritiated thymidine uptake) whereas those from compatible individuals will not. In the one-way MLC test, the lymphocytes from one of the individuals are inactivated (usually by treatment with MITOMYCIN or radiation) thereby allowing only the untreated remaining population of cells to proliferate in response to foreign histocompatibility antigens.
Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.
Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.
An HLA-DR antigen associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS that are encoded by DRB1*01 alleles.
Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.
T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated alpha and beta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells. Unlike immunoglobulins, the alpha-beta T-cell receptors recognize antigens only when presented in association with major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules.
A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.
The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.
Cells artificially created by fusion of activated lymphocytes with neoplastic cells. The resulting hybrid cells are cloned and produce pure MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES or T-cell products, identical to those produced by the immunologically competent parent cell.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Antigenic determinants recognized and bound by the T-cell receptor. Epitopes recognized by the T-cell receptor are often located in the inner, unexposed side of the antigen, and become accessible to the T-cell receptors after proteolytic processing of the antigen.
An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.
The degree of antigenic similarity between tissues of the mother and those of the FETUS. Maternal-fetal histocompatibility can determine the acceptance and health of the fetus.
The demonstration of the cytotoxic effect on a target cell of a lymphocyte, a mediator released by a sensitized lymphocyte, an antibody, or complement.
Microbial antigens that have in common an extremely potent activating effect on T-cells that bear a specific variable region. Superantigens cross-link the variable region with class II MHC proteins regardless of the peptide binding in the T-cell receptor's pocket. The result is a transient expansion and subsequent death and anergy of the T-cells with the appropriate variable regions.
A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
55-kDa antigens found on HELPER-INDUCER T-LYMPHOCYTES and on a variety of other immune cell types. CD4 antigens are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family and are implicated as associative recognition elements in MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX class II-restricted immune responses. On T-lymphocytes they define the helper/inducer subset. CD4 antigens also serve as INTERLEUKIN-15 receptors and bind to the HIV receptors, binding directly to the HIV ENVELOPE PROTEIN GP120.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Transmembrane proteins that form the alpha subunits of the HLA-DR antigens. They are also referred to as the HLA-DR heavy chains.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
A group of the D-related HLA antigens (human) found to differ from the DR antigens in genetic locus and therefore inheritance. These antigens are polymorphic glycoproteins comprising alpha and beta chains and are found on lymphoid and other cells, often associated with certain diseases.
A subtype of HLA-DRB beta chains that includes over one hundred allele variants. The HLA-DRB1 subtype is associated with several of the HLA-DR SEROLOGICAL SUBTYPES.
T-cell enhancement of the B-cell response to thymic-dependent antigens.
Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.
An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.
Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens encoded by alleles on locus B of the HLA complex. The HLA-G antigens are considered non-classical class I antigens due to their distinct tissue distribution which differs from HLA-A; HLA-B; and HLA-C antigens. Note that several isoforms of HLA-G antigens result from alternative splicing of messenger RNAs produced from the HLA-G*01 allele.
The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.
Subunits of the antigenic determinant that are most easily recognized by the immune system and thus most influence the specificity of the induced antibody.
Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.
Cell surface molecules on cells of the immune system that specifically bind surface molecules or messenger molecules and trigger changes in the behavior of cells. Although these receptors were first identified in the immune system, many have important functions elsewhere.
An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*03 alleles.
A cultured line of C3H mouse FIBROBLASTS that do not adhere to one another and do not express CADHERINS.
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*27 allele family.
The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Antigens expressed on the cell membrane of T-lymphocytes during differentiation, activation, and normal and neoplastic transformation. Their phenotypic characterization is important in differential diagnosis and studies of thymic ontogeny and T-cell function.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
A soluble substance elaborated by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated T-LYMPHOCYTES which induces DNA synthesis in naive lymphocytes.
Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.
Subpopulation of CD4+ lymphocytes that cooperate with other lymphocytes (either T or B) to initiate a variety of immune functions. For example, helper-inducer T-cells cooperate with B-cells to produce antibodies to thymus-dependent antigens and with other subpopulations of T-cells to initiate a variety of cell-mediated immune functions.
A specific HLA-A surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-A*01 allele family.
Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.
A costimulatory ligand expressed by ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS that binds to CTLA-4 ANTIGEN with high specificity and to CD28 ANTIGEN with low specificity. The interaction of CD80 with CD28 ANTIGEN provides a costimulatory signal to T-LYMPHOCYTES, while its interaction with CTLA-4 ANTIGEN may play a role in inducing PERIPHERAL TOLERANCE.
The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.
An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*04 alleles.
Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*08 allele family.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
A group of lymphocyte surface antigens located on mouse LYMPHOCYTES. Specific Ly antigens are useful markers for distinguishing subpopulations of lymphocytes.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*40 allele family.
A broad specificity HLA-DR antigen that is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*01:15 and DRB1*01:16 alleles.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Transmembrane proteins that form the beta subunits of the HLA-DQ antigens.
Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.
Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.
Transmembrane proteins that form the beta subunits of the HLA-DR antigens. They are also referred to as the HLA-DR light chains.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
Benzene derivatives which are substituted with three nitro groups in any position.
Complex of at least five membrane-bound polypeptides in mature T-lymphocytes that are non-covalently associated with one another and with the T-cell receptor (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL). The CD3 complex includes the gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta chains (subunits). When antigen binds to the T-cell receptor, the CD3 complex transduces the activating signals to the cytoplasm of the T-cell. The CD3 gamma and delta chains (subunits) are separate from and not related to the gamma/delta chains of the T-cell receptor (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA).
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A family of MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that require ATP hydrolysis for the transport of substrates across membranes. The protein family derives its name from the ATP-binding domain found on the protein.
Glycoproteins expressed on cortical thymocytes and on some dendritic cells and B-cells. Their structure is similar to that of MHC Class I and their function has been postulated as similar also. CD1 antigens are highly specific markers for human LANGERHANS CELLS.
The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.
A costimulatory ligand expressed by ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS that binds to CD28 ANTIGEN with high specificity and to CTLA-4 ANTIGEN with low specificity. The interaction of CD86 with CD28 ANTIGEN provides a stimulatory signal to T-LYMPHOCYTES, while its interaction with CTLA-4 ANTIGEN may play a role in inducing PERIPHERAL TOLERANCE.
ENDOPEPTIDASES which have a cysteine involved in the catalytic process. This group of enzymes is inactivated by CYSTEINE PROTEINASE INHIBITORS such as CYSTATINS and SULFHYDRYL REAGENTS.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A large multisubunit complex that plays an important role in the degradation of most of the cytosolic and nuclear proteins in eukaryotic cells. It contains a 700-kDa catalytic sub-complex and two 700-kDa regulatory sub-complexes. The complex digests ubiquitinated proteins and protein activated via ornithine decarboxylase antizyme.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.
Products of the retroviral NEF GENE. They play a role as accessory proteins that influence the rate of viral infectivity and the destruction of the host immune system. nef gene products were originally found as factors that trans-suppress viral replication and function as negative regulators of transcription. nef stands for negative factor.
A lectin found in ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM membranes that binds to specific N-linked OLIGOSACCHARIDES found on newly synthesized proteins. It may play role in PROTEIN FOLDING or retention and degradation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A system of cisternae in the CYTOPLASM of many cells. In places the endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the plasma membrane (CELL MEMBRANE) or outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. If the outer surfaces of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes are coated with ribosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum is said to be rough-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, ROUGH); otherwise it is said to be smooth-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, SMOOTH). (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Receptors that are specifically found on the surface of NATURAL KILLER CELLS. They play an important role in regulating the cellular component of INNATE IMMUNITY.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
The smaller fragment formed when complement C4 is cleaved by COMPLEMENT C1S. It is an anaphylatoxin that causes symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE) but its activity is weaker than that of COMPLEMENT C3A or COMPLEMENT C5A.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Proteins encoded by the NEF GENES of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
A class of animal lectins that bind to carbohydrate in a calcium-dependent manner. They share a common carbohydrate-binding domain that is structurally distinct from other classes of lectins.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.
Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Methods used for studying the interactions of antibodies with specific regions of protein antigens. Important applications of epitope mapping are found within the area of immunochemistry.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.
Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.
Eukaryotic cell line obtained in a quiescent or stationary phase which undergoes conversion to a state of unregulated growth in culture, resembling an in vitro tumor. It occurs spontaneously or through interaction with viruses, oncogenes, radiation, or drugs/chemicals.
Immunological rejection of leukemia cells following bone marrow transplantation.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Cellular uptake of extracellular materials within membrane-limited vacuoles or microvesicles. ENDOSOMES play a central role in endocytosis.
An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.
A family of receptors found on NK CELLS that have specificity for a variety of HLA ANTIGENS. KIR receptors contain up to three different extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains referred to as D0, D1, and D2 and play an important role in blocking NK cell activation against cells expressing the appropriate HLA antigens thus preventing cell lysis. Although they are often referred to as being inhibitory receptors, a subset of KIR receptors may also play an activating role in NK cells.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A strain of non-obese diabetic mice developed in Japan that has been widely studied as a model for T-cell-dependent autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in which insulitis is a major histopathologic feature, and in which genetic susceptibility is strongly MHC-linked.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Structurally-related receptors that are typically found on NATURAL KILLER CELLS. They are considered lectin-like proteins in that they share sequence homology with the carbohydrate binding domains of C-TYPE LECTINS. They differ from classical C-type lectins, however, in that they appear to lack CALCIUM-binding domains.
An abundant cytosolic protein that plays a critical role in the structure of multilamellar myelin. Myelin basic protein binds to the cytosolic sides of myelin cell membranes and causes a tight adhesion between opposing cell membranes.
A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of immune system, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electrical equipment.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Proteins transcribed from the E3 region of ADENOVIRUSES but not essential for viral replication. The E3 19K protein mediates adenovirus persistence by reducing the expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on the surface of infected cells.
The processes triggered by interactions of ANTIBODIES with their ANTIGENS.
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*35 allele family.
A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.
Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.

Standardized nomenclature for inbred strains of mice: sixth listing. (1/714)

Rules for designating inbred strains of mice are presented, along with a list of strains with their origins and characteristics, a table of biochemical polymorphisms, and standard subline designations.  (+info)

Inhibition of allorecognition by a human class II MHC-derived peptide through the induction of apoptosis. (2/714)

The interaction of the T-cell receptor with the major histocomatibility complex (MHC)-peptide complex is central to T-cell activation. Variation in the nature of the peptide bound within the groove of the MHC molecule may result in an altered T-cell response. Because some naturally processed peptides bound within the groove of the class II MHC molecule are derived from the MHC molecules themselves, we studied the inhibitory effects of synthetic class II MHC peptides on alloimmune responses in vitro. Three peptides derived from a highly conserved region of the class II MHC alpha chains inhibited the rat mixed lymphocyte response (MLR) in a dose-dependent manner, with the human HLA-DQA1 peptide also inhibiting the human and mouse MLR. No effect was seen on mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation. HLA-DQA1 inhibited cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) generation in a dose-response fashion, with no reduction in preformed CTL killing, suggesting that the inhibitory effect is targeted at CD4(+) T-cell function. Cell-cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that restimulation of primed T cells in the presence of HLA-DQA1 resulted in increased apoptosis, whereas unstimulated cells were not affected. These data demonstrate that synthetic peptides derived from highly conserved regions of the class II MHC alpha chain can alter CD4(+) T-lymphocyte alloimmune responses in vitro, and this effect is mediated by the induction of apoptosis in activated T cells.  (+info)

B cell lymphoproliferative disorders following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: risk factors, treatment and outcome. (3/714)

Twenty-six cases of B cell lymphoproliferative disorder (BLPD) were identified among 2395 patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) for which an overall incidence of BLPD was 1.2%. The true incidence was probably higher, since 9/26 of the diagnoses were made at autopsy. No BLPD was observed following autologous HSCT, so risk factor analyses were confined to the 1542 allogeneic HSCT. Factors assessed were HLA-mismatching (> or = 1 antigen), T cell depletion (TCD), presence of acute GvHD (grades II-IV), donor type (related vs unrelated), age of recipient and donor, and underlying disease. Factors found to be statistically significant included patients transplanted for immune deficiency and CML, donor age > or = 18 years, TCD, and HLA-mismatching, with recipients of combined TCD and HLA-mismatched grafts having the highest incidence. Factors found to be statistically significant in a multiple regression analysis were TCD, donor age and immune deficiency, although 7/8 of the patients with immunodeficiencies and BLPD received a TCD graft from a haploidentical parent. The overall mortality was 92% (24/26). One patient had a spontaneous remission, but subsequently died >1 year later of chronic GVHD. Thirteen patients received therapy for BLPD. Three patients received lymphocyte infusions without response. The only patients with responses and longterm survival received alpha interferon (alphaIFN). Of seven patients treated with alphaIFN there were four responses (one partial and three complete). These data demonstrate that alphaIFN can be an effective agent against BLPD following HSCT, if a timely diagnosis is made.  (+info)

Feasibility of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor on international registries for New Zealand patients. (4/714)

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice for several hematological conditions. Unfortunately, for the majority (70%) of patients an HLA-matched sibling donor is not available and a matched unrelated donor must be found if they are to proceed to allogeneic transplantation. Most of the donors on international registries are of Caucasian ethnic origin. It has been recognized that patients from certain racial groups have a reduced chance of finding an unrelated donor. This study reports the feasibility of finding an unrelated donor for our local New Zealand patients of Caucasian, New Zealand Maori and Pacific Islander ethnic origin presenting with transplantable hematological conditions at a single center. The search was performed on international registries using HLA-A,B and DR typings for our patients. Six of six and five of six matches were evaluated. We have shown that Maori and Pacific Islanders have significantly lower hit rates than Caucasians when searched for 6/6 antigen matches, but there was no significant difference between the three ethnic groups in finding a 5/6 antigen matched donor. This study supports the policy of the New Zealand Bone Marrow Donor Registry in recruiting New Zealand Maori and Pacific Islanders.  (+info)

Increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease, obstructive bronchiolitis, and alopecia with busulfan versus total body irradiation: long-term results of a randomized trial in allogeneic marrow recipients with leukemia. Nordic Bone Marrow Transplantation Group. (5/714)

Leukemic patients receiving marrow from HLA-identical sibling donors were randomized to treatment with either busulfan 16 mg/kg (n = 88) or total body irradiation ([TBI] n = 79) in addition to cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg. The patients were observed for a period of 5 to 9 years. Busulfan-treated patients had an increased risk of veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver (12% v 1%, P =.01) and hemorrhagic cystitis (32% v 10%, P =.003). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was similar in the two groups, but the 7-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 59% in the busulfan-treated group versus 47% in the TBI group (P =.05). Death from GVHD was more common in the busulfan group (22% v 3%, P <.001). Obstructive bronchiolitis occurred in 26% of the busulfan patients but in only 5% of the TBI patients (P <.01). Complete alopecia developed in 8 busulfan patients and partial alopecia in 17, versus five with partial alopecia in the TBI group (P <.001). Cataracts occurred in 5 busulfan-treated patients and 16 TBI patients (P =.02). The incidence of relapse after 7 years was 29% in both groups. Seven-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) in patients with early disease was 21% in the busulfan group and 12% in the TBI group. In patients with more advanced disease, the corresponding figures were 64% and 22%, respectively (P =.004). Leukemia-free survival (LFS) in patients with early disease was 68% in busulfan-treated patients and 66% in TBI patients. However, 7-year LFS in patients with more advanced disease was 17% in the busulfan group versus 49% in the TBI group (P <.01). In patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in first chronic phase, 7-year LFS was 72% and 83% in the two groups, respectively.  (+info)

Transplantation of anergic histoincompatible bone marrow allografts. (6/714)

BACKGROUND: Successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation relies on global immunosuppression or elimination of T cells. In contrast, the induction of anergy can inactivate specific sets of alloreactive T cells in the donor marrow. Previous work has shown that anergy can be induced by blocking the interaction of the B7 molecule on the surface of antigen-presenting cells with the CD28 molecule on the surface of T cells, thus preventing key signaling events essential for the activation of T cells. To investigate the feasibility of this approach with respect to transplantation of histoincompatible bone marrow, we undertook a clinical trial of ex vivo induction of anergy in T cells present in donor marrow to recipient alloantigens. METHODS: Outcomes in 12 transplant recipients were evaluated. The recipients' peripheral-blood lymphocytes were collected before myeloablation and served as alloantigen-presenting cells. To induce alloantigen-specific anergy, bone marrow from a donor mismatched with the recipient for one HLA haplotype was cocultured with irradiated cells from the recipient for 36 hours in the presence of CTLA-4-Ig, an agent that inhibits B7:CD28-mediated costimulation. After conventional myeloablation and immunoprophylaxis, the treated donor cells were transfused into the recipient. RESULTS: After the induction of anergy, the frequency of T cells capable of recognizing alloantigens of the recipient in donor marrow was sharply reduced (P<0.001), whereas the responsiveness to alloantigens from persons unrelated to the recipient or the donor was unaffected (P=0.51). In the 11 patients who could be evaluated, the haploidentical bone marrow cells engrafted. Of these 11 patients, 3 had acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) confined to the gastrointestinal tract. No deaths were attributable to GVHD. Five of the 12 patients were alive and in remission 4.5 to 29 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Donor bone marrow treated ex vivo to induce anergy to alloantigens from the recipient can reconstitute hematopoiesis in vivo with a relatively low risk of GVHD.  (+info)

HLA-C and HLA-DQB1 compatibility in unrelated cord blood transplants. (7/714)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells have been definitively proved to be a source of hematopoietic stem cells with repopulating capacity when transplanted into pediatric hosts with neoplastic or non-neoplastic disease. Moreover, due to the immaturity of the UCB lymphoid compartment, these transplants are usually associated with a low incidence and severity of GvHD. This clinical observation and the immaturity of the UCB lymphoid compartment justify the acceptance of UCB units which differ from their recipient by 1 or 2 HLA antigens of the six HLA A, B and DRB1 antigens conventionally typed. Whether the number and type of HLA disparities affect clinical outcome of UCB transplants has not, however, been clearly demonstrated yet. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the present study on 14 pediatric patients with high risk leukemia transplanted with UCB from unrelated donors, evaluation of HLA compatibility was extended to HLA-C and DQB1 genes and correlated to the engraftment rate and occurrence of GvHD. Conditioning regimen and GvHD prophylaxis were identical in all cases. HLA-A and B antigens were typed by serology, whereas DNA based methods were used to define HLA-C gene groups, and HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles. RESULTS: Conventional HLA-A, B and DRB1 typing demonstrated that 12 recipient/donor pairs differed at one HLA locus, while 2 pairs had 2 HLA disparities. The extended HLA-typing showed that only one out of the six pairs with a different HLA-A locus had additional mismatches at HLA-C and DQB1 loci, whereas all the remaining 8 pairs, which already differed at HLA-B and/or DRB1 loci after conventional typing, had additional HLA-C and/or DQB1 mismatches (p = 0.002). By contrast, engraftment rate and occurrence of GvHD did not significantly correlate with level of HLA-mismatches even after extended HLA-typing. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The present data show that additional mismatched HLA-C and/or DQB1 antigens are significantly more frequent in pairs which after conventional HLA-typing differed at HLA-B and/or DRB1 loci, than in those showing one HLA-A mismatch. This observation provides an additional criterion for selection of UCB donors with the closest HLA-match when more than one unit are available. We did not, however, observe any correlation between engraftment rate, occurrence of GvHD and degree of HLA disparities detected either by standard or extended typing. These data support the notion that certain HLA differences do not affect the clinical outcome of UCB transplants and indicate that the expensive and time consuming molecular typing of HLA-C and DQB1 loci might be avoided for UCB donor selection.  (+info)

Rapamycin reverses chronic graft vascular disease in a novel cardiac allograft model. (8/714)

BACKGROUND: Chronic graft vascular disease (CGVD) in cardiac allografts has been defined as a slowly evolving vasculopathy unresponsive to conventional immunosuppression. We compared 4 rodent models of CGVD to evaluate the reproducibility of CGVD in heart allografts. Rapamycin (Rapa) and cyclosporine (CSA) were then used to treat CGVD. METHODS AND RESULTS: Hearts were harvested and placed heterotopically into allogenic recipients. CGVD scores of PVG allografts from ACI recipients treated with CSA on days 1 through 10 were significantly elevated on day 90 (n=16) compared with other models (immunosuppression used): (1) Lewis to F344 recipients (CSA), (2) Brown Norway to Lewis (FK506), and (3) DA to Wistar-Firth (methylprednisolone, azathioprine, CSA). Although delayed (day 60 to 90) CSA treatment had no effect (n=6), delayed Rapa (3 mg. kg-1. d-1 IP) reversed CGVD in PVG grafts (0.22+/-0.19 on day 90, n=6). ACI isografts showed no evidence of CGVD (n=6) at day 90. Immunohistochemistry of PVG grafts revealed perivascular infiltrates consisting of CD4(+) T cells and limited numbers of macrophages persisting up to day 90. Flow cytometry demonstrated increased levels of anti-donor antibody at day 90, which was significantly inhibited by Rapa treatment. CONCLUSIONS: PVG grafts developed a significant increase in CGVD without evidence of ongoing myocardial rejection. This CGVD appeared to be mediated by both cellular and humoral mechanisms, given CD4(+) perivascular infiltrates and increased levels of anti-donor antibody. The anti-CGVD effectiveness of Rapa during a period in which there was little myocardial cellular infiltrate supports a novel mechanism of effect such as smooth muscle or B-cell inhibition.  (+info)

Risk-stratification based on a biomarker and associated prophylaxis could help reduce the incidence of graft-vs-host disease in patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation.
Looking for histocompatible? Find out information about histocompatible. see transplantation, medical transplantation, medical, surgical procedure by which a tissue or organ is removed and replaced by a corresponding part,... Explanation of histocompatible
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.. Year introduced: 1982. PubMed search builder options. Subheadings: ...
This is a phase II multi-institutional therapeutic study of a non-myeloablative T cell receptor (TCR) alpha/beta depleted haploidentical transplantation with
Organs:, Serology: Antigen,, Congenic Resistant Lines: B10.A, B10.BR, B10.D2/O, B10.M, Genes: H-2 - Histocompatibility-2, Strains: C3H, H-2G (HTG). ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Chemotherapy vs HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplants for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission. AU - Oh, H.. AU - Gale, R. P.. AU - Zhang, M. J.. AU - Passweg, J. R.. AU - Ino, T.. AU - Murakami, H.. AU - Ohno, R.. AU - Rowlings, P. A.. AU - Sobocinski, K. A.. AU - Tanimoto, M.. AU - Tomonaga, M.. AU - Weisdorf, D. J.. AU - Horowitz, M. M.. PY - 1998. Y1 - 1998. N2 - There is controversy about whether chemotherapy or an HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplant is better treatment for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first remission. A previous study of patients treated in 1980-1987 showed similar leukemia-free survivals with these approaches. We re-examined this issue in more recently treated patients receiving different chemotherapy. Chemotherapy subjects (n = 76) participated in trial ALL-87 of the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group (JALSG). Transplant subjects (n = 214) were reported to the International Bone Marrow Transplant ...
National Marrow Donor Program News. Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about National Marrow Donor Program From The tribunedigital-sunsentinel
In the absence of an HLA-matched donor, the best treatment for acquired aplastic anemia patients refractory to immunosuppression is unclear. We collected and analyzed data from all acquired aplastic anemia patients who underwent a haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide in Europe from 2011 to 2017 (n = 33). The cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 67% (CI95%: 51-83%) at D +28 and was unaffected by age group, stem cell source, ATG use, or Baltimore conditioning regimen.
H-Y is a transplantation antigen that can lead to rejection of male organ and bone marrow grafts by female recipients, even if the donor and recipient match at the major histocompatibility locus of humans, the HLA (human leukocyte antigen) locus. However, the origin and function of H-Y antigens has eluded researchers for 40 years. One human H-Y antigen presented by HLA-B7 was identified as an 11-residue peptide derived from SMCY, an evolutionarily conserved protein encoded on the Y chromosome. The protein from the homologous gene on the X chromosome, SMCX, differs by two amino acid residues in the same region. The identification of H-Y may aid in transplantation prognosis, prenatal diagnosis, and fertilization strategies. ...
The NMDP (National Marrow Donor Program) is not able to break down the likelihood of finding a match for patients of mixed heritage. However, the challenge for finding a match is probably greatest in this growing community of racially and ethnically diverse people because the tissue type is very complex. The chance that two people from two different groups will create a new tissue type in children is very high. This is why there is such a great need for donors from all backgrounds to join the Be The Match Registry - to increase the likelihood that all patients will find a match ...
Neoplasm:, Organs:, Serology:, Bioassays, Techniques:, Transplantation:, Types of Tumors:, Congenic Resistant Lines: B10.D2/N, B10.M, Genes: H-2 - Histocompatibility-2, Strains: AKR, BALB/C, CBA, C3H/HE, C57BL, C57BL/KS, DBA/1 (12), DBA/2 (212), H-2G (HTG), NZB, SJL, SWR, WB, Unknown:. ...
Bone Marrow Transplant largely depends on a matched HLA or a Histocompatible match, which, generally comes from a related donor due to unique DNA design in each person. Finding a matching donor in relation is not a difficult and can be easily found but in some cases it is seen that a person may not have a matching HLA within family. In that case, doctors look for similar HLA in unrelated donors ...
The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) is a nonprofit organization founded in 1986 and based in Minneapolis, Minnesota that operates the Be The Match Registry of volunteer hematopoietic cell donors and umbilical cord blood units in the United States. The Be The Match Registry is the worlds largest hematopoietic cell registry, listing nearly 16 million individuals and nearly 238,000 cord blood units. Hematopoietic cells from NMDP donors or cord blood units are used to transplant patients with a variety of blood, bone marrow or immune system disorders. As of September 2016, the NMDP had facilitated more than 80,000 transplants worldwide. The NMDP coordinates the collection of hematopoietic (blood-forming) cells that are used to perform what used to be called bone marrow transplants, but are now more properly called hematopoietic cell transplants. Patients needing a hematopoietic cell transplant but who lack a suitably matched donor in their family can search the Be The Match registry for a ...
Global leader in bone marrow transplantation. We conduct research to improve transplant outcomes provide support and resources for patients.
Health,...MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL Minn. June 4 /- The Minneapolis-St... ...This is the third year in a row that Weber Shandwick has worked with t... ...,Weber,Shandwick,Chosen,By,National,Marrow,Donor,Program(R),To,Head,Awareness,Campaign,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Of the haplotypes mentions above, A24-Cw*0702::DQ2 or A1::B8-DR1-DQ5, none appear to be ancestral to A1::DQ2. An A1::DQ2 appears in India, however its major antigen genes superficially resemble European A1-B8 and it appears to be a homoplastic recombinant from a common DR3-DQ2 ancestor, about 70,000 years ago.[5] Components of the haplotype are found in Europe (Basque have two major haplotypes of DR3-DQ2) and A1-B8 of Indian origin is of very low frequency. In Morocco B8::DQ2, in the Western Sahara A1-B8 haplotype if found and also DQ2.5 is found in high frequency, but not as a single haplotype. In Kenya two slightly variant HLA-A and B alleles for an A1-B8 haplotype. One possibility is that peoples from central Asia or the Middle East migrated into Iberia as peoples from Africa crossed into Iberia from the south prior to the Neolithic, recombination occurred resulting in the haplotype, and bearers favorably expanded into Europe prior to the Holocene. Another possibility is that if formed in ...
Since its inception, Jeffersons BMT Program has completed more than 1,000 bone marrow transplants, with increasingly impressive outcomes. These include the regions highest actual one-year patient survival rates, according to National Marrow Donor Program Center Specific analyses for 2013 and 2014. The transplant program now has an international reputation for its unique approach to haplo-identical transplants. Drs. Flomenberg, Grosso, Carabasi, Wagner, and Filicko-OHara all play important roles in the transplant effort. Dr. Neal Flomenberg continues to lead this program and remains an active clinical participant in all programmatic activities.. In an October 2014 article published in the Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Jefferson reported disease-free and overall survival at 2 years are 74% and 77%, respectively, consistent with the findings (of previous work) and supporting the use of this approach in earlier stage patients lacking a matched related donor.. In the BBMTs ...
CONCORD, N.C. (May 11, 2006) - Three NASCAR mothers and wives, Kim Labonte, Mary Evernham and Ramona Vickers, are getting behind the wheel to drive support to the Thanks Mom! Marrow Donor Recruitment Campaign taking place in more than 80 cities around the country this Mothers Day weekend. This super-charged group is sounding the call for more volunteer donors who want to give the gift of life by joining the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP) Registry: - Kim Labonte, Thomasville, N.C., wife of NASCAR iron man Terry Labonte. The Labontes have hosted several donor drives in North Carolina. - Mary Evernham, Charlotte, N.C., spent many years on the racing circuit helping out however needed, from sewing sponsor patches on the drivers uniforms, to measuring the heat in the tires. Mary has retired from the track and focuses full-time on her family, including 14-year old son Ray J., who battled leukemia as a toddler. - Ramona Vickers, Thomasville, N.C., mother of driver Brian Vickers, 2003 NASCAR ...
SAMAR is a 501(c) 3 community based network partner and official recruitment center of the Be The Match Registry which is managed by the National Marrow Donor Program.
CIRM announced today that its President and CEO, Randy Mills, is soon leaving for a new job as President of the National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match in Minnesota. Update: Dr. Maria Millan, the CIRM Vice President of Therapeutics, will be […]. ...
Hi, everyone! By way of background, Im a 31-year-old male and was diagnosed about two months ago with AML. I achieved remission after my second round of chemotherapy and am now gearing up for a transplant. I have a younger sibling who is a half-match and am told that I dont have any suitable unrelated matches.. Ive sought opinions from two different hospitals: one is recommending using my sibling as the donor (haploidentical transplant), while the other wants to use unrelated cord blood. Does anyone have experience with either method (or been in a situation where theyve had to make a decision like this) and have any advice? Thank you so much in advance for your help!. ...
Despite continued reductions in short-term rejection rates, long-term outcomes have not significantly improved in the past decade. In the face of this the press...
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Medina DJ, Gharibo M, Savage P, Cohler A , et al. A pilot study of allogeniec cellular therapy for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. Leukemia Research . 2008 Dec;32(12):1842- ...
allogenic effect factor: soluble mediator from histocompatible cell interactions which induces cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in vitro; glycoprotein composed of 2 subunits 40,000 & 12,000 daltons; possesses Ia antigen
bone marrow donor programme - List of free articles written by article author bone marrow donor programme which can be reprinted or published on your blog, website or ezine.
Rationale: Chemotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin may induce the engraftment cross the immunologic barrier in the setting of HLA-haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In addition, depletion CD3±CD19 cells may contribute to prevent developing severe acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) in haploidentical transplantation.. Purpose: This phase I/II trial is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin with CD3±CD19 depleted graft from haploidentical donors in treating patients with aplastic anemia. ...
Foster, R.H., Brouwer, A.M., Dillon, R., Bitsko, M.J., Godder, K., Stern, M. (2017). Cancer was a speed bump in my path to enlightenment: A qualitative analysis of situational coping experiences among young adult survivors of childhood cancer. Journal of psychosocial oncology, 35(4), 377-392. View in Pubmed Shenoy, S., Eapen, M., ..., Gooder, K., et al (2016). A trial of unrelated donor marrow transplantation for children with severe sickle cell disease. Blood, 128(21), 2561-2567. View in Pubmed Helou, M., Ning, Y., ..., Gooder, K., et al (2014). Vitamin d deficiency in children with cancer. Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology, 36(3), 212-217. View in Pubmed Eckrich, M.J., Ahn, K.W., ..., Godder, K., et al (2014). Effect of race on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia. American journal of hematology, 89(2), 125-129. View in Pubmed Foster, R.H., Russell, C.C., Dillon, R., Bitsko, M.J., Godder, K., Stern, M. (2014). Relations among ...
Foster, R.H., Brouwer, A.M., Dillon, R., Bitsko, M.J., Godder, K., Stern, M. (2017). Cancer was a speed bump in my path to enlightenment: A qualitative analysis of situational coping experiences among young adult survivors of childhood cancer. Journal of psychosocial oncology, 35(4), 377-392. View in Pubmed Shenoy, S., Eapen, M., ..., Gooder, K., et al (2016). A trial of unrelated donor marrow transplantation for children with severe sickle cell disease. Blood, 128(21), 2561-2567. View in Pubmed Helou, M., Ning, Y., ..., Gooder, K., et al (2014). Vitamin d deficiency in children with cancer. Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology, 36(3), 212-217. View in Pubmed Eckrich, M.J., Ahn, K.W., ..., Godder, K., et al (2014). Effect of race on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia. American journal of hematology, 89(2), 125-129. View in Pubmed Foster, R.H., Russell, C.C., Dillon, R., Bitsko, M.J., Godder, K., Stern, M. (2014). Relations among ...
Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. ...
For the next two weeks, the National Marrow Donor Program is running a registration campaign to boost the ranks of committed bone marrow donors. Typically
Come get swabbed and (maybe) save a life! As part of our community service efforts Crown College, College 8, College 9, and College 10 are partnering with DKMS to add people to the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP) Registry. Students, staff, faculty and members of the public are invited to register as potential bone marrow donors. http://crown.ucsc.edu/activities/bone_marrow_event.html @ College 9 Namaste Lounge & Porter Hitchcock Lounge
We extract and present high-resolution HLA allele and haplotype frequency data available from the National Marrow Donor Program databases from four major U.S. census categories of race and ethnicity. Population-based high-resolution HLA frequencies defined on the basis of from one to five loci are p …
PubMedID: 25649994 | Unrelated cord blood compared with haploidentical grafts in patients with hematological malignancies. | Cancer | 6/1/2015
Individual leucocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility may be the key determining the incident of graft\vs\web host disease (GVHD) in sufferers. replies, correlate with markers involved with GVHD and will potentially end up being useful in the analysis of the natural processes involved with this disease. mismatched pairs. We discovered that a lot of genes linked to immune function were differentially regulated; these genes were also found to be associated with GVHD. The most highly upregulated genes were IFN\inducible genes and IFN neutralisation in MLCs abrogated their induction. The microRNA\155 (miR\155) was also found to be significantly induced in the mismatched setting but its induction was not diminished by blocking IFN. We are proposing that measuring gene expression in MLC could be a simpler and faster method of identifying functional incompatibilities between potential donorCrecipient pairs that are not detected by DNA typing techniques, compared with the traditional cellular assays. ...
Leonardo Javier Arcuri published a systematic review comparing patient outcomes when treated with haploidentical vs unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)
BACKGROUND:. In 1986, the Department of the Navy initiated the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry. Because the support of a National Bone Marrow Donor Registry was not very closely related to the Navys primary missions, in 1989 the management of the contract for the program was transferred by the Congress from the Navy to the NHLBI.. By 1989, bone marrow transplantation had become an effective and accepted treatment for an increasing number of diseases of the bone marrow and the immune system. Until only a few years prior to 1989, most marrow donors were siblings, carefully matched for HLA (tissue) antigens. Since only a small proportion of candidates for a bone marrow transplant have matched brothers or sisters, additional family members were tried as donors. These included parents, children, slightly mismatched siblings, and other relatives. Even with the broadening of the bone marrow donor source, no more than 30-40 percent of patients with diseases amenable to marrow transplant therapy had ...
Minorities are far less likely to find a compatible bone marrow donor on the national registry than whites. Although National Marrow Donor Program has doubled since 2004 the number of transplants it abets for black patients, still face the longest odds.
Background. Transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling is the treatment of choice for young patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia. For the older patient, the acceptable upper age limit for transplantation as first-line treatment varies. So the current analysis sought to identify age or ages at transplantation at which survival differed. Design and Methods. We studied the effect of patient age, adjusting for other significant factors affecting outcomes in 1543 patients with severe aplastic anemia after HLA-identical sibling transplantation using logistic and Cox regression. Age categories (,20 years, 20-40 years ,40 years) were determined using Martingale residual plots for overall survival and categories based on differences in overall survival. Results. Patients aged ,40 years were more likely to have had immunosuppressive therapy, to have a poor performance score and a longer interval from diagnosis to transplant. Neutrophil recovery was similar in all age groups but patients aged ...
DATRI, Indias largest adult unrelated Blood Stem Cell Donors Registry, today presented Indias first unrelated bone marrow donor, Naval Chaudary in a very unique yet emotional event.
To determine whether graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) reactions are important in preventing leukemia recurrence after bone marrow transplantation, we studied 2,254 persons receiving HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplants for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first remission, acute lymphoblastic …
To determine the impact that abatacept will make on the incidence of early, severe acute GVHD (aGvHD), when it is added to a standard GvHD prophylaxis regimen during unrelated-donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients with hematologic malignancies ...
Siblings who donate bone marrow to their brothers or sisters are more adaptive at school, their teachers tell researchers, but the children themselves arent so sure. These same sibling-donors report more anxiety and lower self-esteem than do non-donor siblings of transplant patients.
In both of these phase 1 clinical studies, myeloablative haploidentical BMT containing large numbers of alloanergized donor T cells resulted in acceptable engraftment and less severe aGVHD than historical reports using unmanipulated haploidentical BM. Moreover, alloanergized BMT was associated with rapid T-cell reconstitution, in vivo expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells, and early recovery of immunoglobulin production. Although substantial early TRM was observed in these very high risk patients, no TRM was related to viral infection, and long-term disease-free survival uncomplicated by cGVHD was seen in one-third of patients.. Alloanergization did not appear to impair immune reconstitution. The median ALCD+30 in our study (0.42 × 109/L), evaluated for all patients who survived to engraftment, was similar to that reported after conventional unmanipulated BMT from HLA-matched sibling donors (0.49 × 109/L).24 Both ALC and CD4+ T-cell counts rose rapidly by 3 months. The presence of CD4+ ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Sirolimus-containing graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in patients with lymphoma. AU - Mehta, Jayesh. PY - 2009/10/1. Y1 - 2009/10/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70350461744&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70350461744&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1200/JCO.2009.23.9483. DO - 10.1200/JCO.2009.23.9483. M3 - Letter. C2 - 19720890. AN - SCOPUS:70350461744. VL - 27. SP - e138. JO - Journal of Clinical Oncology. JF - Journal of Clinical Oncology. SN - 0732-183X. IS - 28. ER - ...
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Im doing the analysis by bouncing the file back and forth a couple of times between Word and Excel, using Word to first insert tabs between the output lines, and then Excel to delete the columns (formerly lines) I dont want (including the actual sequences) and to sort the results by both the match score and the locations of the ends of the matches. Then I use Word to insert tabs between each position of each alignment, and Excel to count the numbers of mismatches at each position and to graph the results ...
Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is an effective postremission strategy for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR). The value of administering consolidation chemotherapy before human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling transplantation is not established. Outcomes of patients with AML in first CR receiving no consolidation therapy, standard-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy, and high-dose cytarabine consolidation therapy before HLA-identical sibling transplantation were compared. Five-year treatment-related mortality rates were 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 42%) in patients receiving no consolidation chemotherapy, 22% (95% CI, 17% to 28%) in those receiving standard-dose cytarabine consolidation, and 24% (95% CI, 17% to 31%) in those receiving high-dose cytarabine (P = NS). Five-year cumulative incidences of relapse were 19% (10% to 30%), 21% (16% to 27%), and 17% (11% to 24%), respectively (P = NS). Five-year probabilities of ...
Nurses pricked his finger to get an extra drop of blood to test his compatibility with people who needed bone marrow transplants. Six months later, because antigens in their blood matched, he was asked to donate bone marrow to a Utah teen near death from leukemia. In 2003, he began recruiting bone marrow donors at Houston post offices for the National Marrow Donor Program. The donor registry allows patients and their physicians access to 10 million potential bone marrow donors worldwide. [...] donations are crucial to help those with blood and immune system diseases, such as leukemia and lymphoma.
WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.. A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patients cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with the same genetic markers as the recipient is the ideal donor.. For patients without a suitable sibling donor, a transplant from a matched unrelated donor is typically the next best option.. In the new study, researchers looked at just over 1,300 blood cancer patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, who sought a fully matched bone marrow donor between 2005 and 2017.. While 67 percent of patients with European ancestry received a matched transplant from an unrelated donor, the rate was only 33 percent for non-Europeans, including Asians, white Hispanics and Africans. Those of African ...
WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.. A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patients cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with the same genetic markers as the recipient is the ideal donor.. For patients without a suitable sibling donor, a transplant from a matched unrelated donor is typically the next best option.. In the new study, researchers looked at just over 1,300 blood cancer patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, who sought a fully matched bone marrow donor between 2005 and 2017.. While 67 percent of patients with European ancestry received a matched transplant from an unrelated donor, the rate was only 33 percent for non-Europeans, including Asians, white Hispanics and Africans. Those of African ...
Helper T-lymphocyte precursor (HTLp) frequency from 19 allogeneic bone marrow donors was tested to detect weak antigenic differences with the recipient, and then compared to the outcome. HTLp frequency was estimated in limiting dilution cultures, and HLA-DR and CD 80 expression by stimulating cells was measured by flow cytometry. 12/19 patients experienced acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) grade II-IV. A good correlation was found between high pretransplant HTLp frequency and grade II-IV aGVHD (median: 1/55848 PBMNC for II-IV GVHD versus 1/184346 for 0-I GVHD; P = 0.008). Sensitivity was 82%, specificity 63%, negative predictive value 71% and positive predictive value 75%. Long-term survivors also had a lower HTLp median frequency (1/143354) when compared with patients who died as a result of the transplant procedure (1/22100, P , 0.001). No correlation was found between HTLp frequency and HLA-DR or CD80 expression by patients cells. We conclude that HTLp frequency estimation can predict, ...
Most of the time, another person s blood stem cells must serve as the donor cells. Donors must be matched through a system called human leukocyte antigens (HLA). This system identifies proteins on the surface of our cells which code for our unique identity. Each of us has six important proteins -- three inherited from our mother and three from our father. In a typical family, each parent will match halfway and each sibling will have a 25 percent chance of matching the patient. Since a full match is best, many patients don t have a close enough match in their family. The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) was established 20 years ago to allow adults to donate their blood stem cells to a patient in need of a bone marrow donor. Currently there are over seven million adults who have volunteered to participate in the NMDP registry. The NMDP has facilitated over 20,000 transplants in the past 17 years. Even with the NMDP, roughly half of the patients in need of a bone marrow transplant cannot find a ...
Tunicates are the unique chordates to possess species reproducing sexually and asexually. Among them, the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri is a reference model for the study of similarities and differences in these two developmental pathways. We here illustrate the characterization and expression pattern during both pathways of a transcript for a gene orthologous to Dazap1. Dazap1 genes encode for RNA-binding proteins and fall into the Musashi-like (Msi-like) group. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that these are related to other RNA-binding proteins (Tardbp and several heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins types) that share the same modular domain structure of conserved tandem RNA Recognition Motifs (RRMs). We also classify the whole group as derived from a single ancient duplication of the RRM. Our results also show that Dazap1 is expressed with discrete spatiotemporal pattern during embryogenesis and blastogenesis of B. schlosseri. It is never expressed in wholly differentiated tissues, but
There are at least a couple of things which I know the general public can do that benefit those diagnosed with multiple myeloma. I know Jerry received numerous blood products, so donating blood is always important (Americas Blood Centers). And if youve ever considered being a registered bone marrow donor and just havent gone through it, consider it again (American Bone Marrow Donor Registry, National Marrow Donor Program).. Say a quiet prayer for Jerry, Nancy, Rhett, and Heath. If youre not much for prayer, please keep them in your thoughts. I know they would appreciate it. If you have thoughts or prayers to pass along to them, you can e-mail them to me or leave them a message in the Thoughts and Prayer Book.. Heath just started college this year, and he made the soccer team after over a week of tryouts under very difficult circumstances! We were all hoping he would make it. His dad taught him to play. Its a legacy he will carry on. And Rhett will be taking on some new responsibilties as ...
Section 218. (a) The commissioner, in collaboration with the commissioner of insurance, shall establish guidelines, criteria, and rules or regulations, as may be necessary, to ensure that human leukocyte antigen testing or histocompatibility locus antigen testing conducted for the purposes of section 17H of chapter 32A, section 47V of chapter 175, section 8V of chapter 176A, section 4V of chapter 176B and section 4N of chapter 176G conform to medical eligibility requirements and other test protocols established by the United States food and drug administration, the American Association of Blood Banks, the joint commission on accreditation of health care organizations and the national marrow donor program registry. The eligibility of a health care facility to conduct such tests shall be established by such guidelines, criteria, rules or regulations, which shall further require such a facility to obtain informed consent from test subjects prior to conducting such tests, and at the time of ...
Background: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) created the MSK Cancer Alliance in 2014, a dynamic and bidirectional collaboration with high-quality community providers to enhance access to state-of-the-art cancer care close to home. Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute (HHC), joined the MSK Cancer Alliance as the first member in 2014. Research suggests that bone marrow transplant (BMT) is an underutilized definitive therapy (Yao et al, Biol Blood Bone Marrow Transplant 2013) for patients with hematologic malignancies and the timing of a referral for transplant has significant impact on patient outcomes (National Marrow Donor Program, available at: https://bethematchclinical.org/transplant-indications-and-outcomes/additional-outcomes/timing-impact-on-outcomes/). MSK and HHC developed the BMT Shared Care program to improve access to transplant, ensure BMT specialist consults for appropriate candidates occur during initial treatment planning, reduce burdensome travel for patients by ...
The CIBMTR® (Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research®) is a research collaboration between the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP)/Be The Match® and the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). The CIBMTR collaborates with the global scientific community to advance hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and cellular therapy worldwide to increase survival and enrich quality of life for patients. The CIBMTR facilitates critical observational and interventional research through scientific and statistical expertise, a large network of transplant centers, and a unique and extensive clinical outcomes database. Our prospective and observational research is accomplished through scientific and statistical expertise, a large network of transplant centers and a clinical database of more than 500,000 patients. Support for the program is provided, in part, by grants and contracts from the National Institute of Health and Health Resources and Services Administration. Successful use of ...
Bone marrow donors are desperately needed across the country. Read this inspiring story about a woman who generously donated bone marrow to an anonymous recipient.
Everyone Active, who operate a number of leisure centres in the Essex area as well as over 90 leisure centres nationwide, is holding a series of special bone marrow donor recruitment events to help save the life of one of its managers, Chris Spencer.
One North West family is desperately seeking a bone marrow donor for their 8-year-old son as he battles a life-threatening blood disorder.
Read the latest Central stories, Rik Basra to attend bone marrow donor recruitment event on ITV News, videos, stories and all the latest Central news
New conditioning regimens are still needed to maximize efficacy and limit treatment-related deaths of allogeneic transplantation for advanced hematologi
For over 20 years, umbilical-cord blood has been used in approximately 30,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with severe hematologic diseases. Umbilical-cord blood transplants, however, are primarily performed on children and smaller adults since the number of available progenitor cells is limited. Previously, smaller studies suggested that double-unit cord-blood transplants may be advantageous for […]. [Read More] ...
I registered myself as a bone marrow donor in around June 2013. How I got to know the Bone Marrow Donor Programme (BMDP) was indirectly through my part-time
Michael Styler, MD, is a medical oncologist and hematologist practicing in Center City Philadelphia. He is board certified in internal medicine, with subspecialty certification in hematology and medical oncology.. Dr. Styler serves as director of the Stem Cell Processing Lab and of the Hahnemann National Marrow Donor Transplant Center.. ...
Stories like this, is the reason I become a donor. If one of my children were, God forbid, in the same situation , I would surley hope someone would come to our rescue.. ...
Behemoth leader Nergal has just found out he needs a marrow transplant to fight the sickness he has recently been diagnosed with (leukemia). In light of th
Students, faculty members and others lined up Tuesday to be tested as possible bone marrow donors for College of William and Mary history professor James Whittenburg.Whittenburg, 44, was diagnosed
One day as I was scrolling through my Facebook newsfeed I came upon THIS link that one of my friends had posted. After clicking on the link and watching the heartfelt video I broke down crying and once I composed myself I began thinking about how horrible it would be if I was in the same position. I…
R&B singer Rihanna had a great mind to hear the pleads of leukemia-stricken NYC mom and to go that extra mile to find a bone marrow donor her.
신장 관련 합병증은 allo-PBSCT의 흔한 합병증 중 하나이며. 급성 신부전의 발생에는 신장 질환, 기저 암 질환, 항암화학요법, 방사선 치료, 신독성 약제 등이 영향을 준다. 따라서 allo-PBSCT 이후의 급성 신부전의 흔한 형태는 급성 세뇨관괴사, 용혈성요독성증후군, 혈전성 미세혈관병증, 방사선 신염 등이다. 하지만 신증후군, 신염증후군과 같은 사구체 질환은 드물게 나타나는데 이는 대개 cGVHD와 연관이 있으며[2], allo-HSCT 환자에서 발생률은 1-4.3% 정도로 보고되고 있다[3]. 본 증례는 acute GVHD가 발생한 환자에서 진단 12개월 후 전신 부종, 거품뇨 등의 증상 없이 단백뇨가 발생하여 MN로 진단된 사례이다.. GVHD는 HSCT의 흔한 후기 합병증으로 이식 후 장기 생존자의 60-80%에서 발생하며 심각한 이환율과 사망률을 유발한다. GVHD는 자가면역 질환의 일환이기 때문에 ...
The invention provides a method of chemically-mechanically polishing a substrate comprising tungsten through use of a composition comprising a tungsten etchant, an inhibitor of tungsten etching, and water, wherein the inhibitor of tungsten polishing is a polymer, copolymer, or polymer blend comprising at least one repeating group comprising at least one nitrogen-containing heterocyclic ring or a tertiary or quaternary nitrogen atom. The invention further provides a chemical-mechanical polishing composition particularly useful in polishing tungsten-containing substrates.
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Major histocompatibility complex in animals[edit]. One example of where particular genes may be important in vertebrate animals ... for heterosis is the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Vertebrates inherit several copies of both MHC class I and MHC ...
Role of major histocompatibility complex[edit]. Main article: Major histocompatibility complex and sexual selection ... Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or, in humans, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) produces proteins that are essential for ... Evidence from the use of a Y-maze differentially scented by congenic mice of different major histocompatibility types". Journal ... College women were then asked to rate odors from several men, some with similar MHC (major histocompatibility complex) genes to ...
The tetramers used in the assay are made up of four major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, which are found on the ... "Major Histocompatibility Complex". InterPro. European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Retrieved 2018-12-02. "The Adaptive ...
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... and histocompatibility and immunogenetics. She is Professor of transfusion medicine at the Royal Free Hospital Medical School, ...
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Doherty, P.C. and Zinkernagel, R.M. A biological role for the major histocompatibility antigens. Lancet I, 1406-9 (1975). ... This is the genetic background against which scientists tried to uncover and understand the histocompatibility antigens. In the ... Bach FH, Amos DB (1967). "Hu-1: Major histocompatibility locus in man". Science. 156 (3781): 1506-8. Bibcode:1967Sci...156.1506 ... 1970) The genetics of histocompatibility. Hosp. Practice 5(8): 33-44 Yunis EJ, Dupont B, Hansen J (1976). "Immunogenetic ...
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Minor histocompatibility antigen H13 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HM13 gene. The minor histocompatibility ... "Entrez Gene: HM13 histocompatibility (minor) 13". "Entrez Gene: H13 histocompatibility (minor) 13". Snell GD, Cudkowicz G, ... Bunker HP (Jun 1967). "Histocompatibility genes of mice. VII. H-13, a new histocompatibility locus in the fifth linkage group ... If a related polymorphism exists, and if the HM13 serves as a Minor histocompatibility antigen, however, remains to be ...
Matheux, Franck; Villard, Jean (June 2004). "Cellular and gene therapy for major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency ... Reith, Walter; Picard, Capucine (2016). "Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Deficiency". Academic Press. 5: 378-390. ... is a rare recessive genetic condition in which a group of genes called major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II ... Major histocompatibility complex class II proteins are important because under normal function they have important ...
The haplotype can be written in an extended form covering the major histocompatibility loci as follows: HLA A*01:01 : Cw*07:01 ... Cameron PU, Mallal SA, French MA, Dawkins RL (December 1990). "Major histocompatibility complex genes influence the outcome of ... Goldberg MA, Arnett FC, Bias WB, Shulman LE (1976). "Histocompatibility antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus". Arthritis ... is a multigene haplotype that covers the MHC Class I region of the human major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6. A ...
Histocompatibility linked immune response genes. Science (Wash D.C.) 175: 273. 5. Katz, D.H. and B. Benacerraf, editor. 1976. ... The Role of Products of the Histocompatibility Gene Complex in Immune Responses. Academic Press, Inc., New York. 6. Alm, G.V. ... This cellular response to the histocompatibility antigens that occurs in the MLR is also involved in cell-mediated immune ... Lymphocyte interaction: A potential histocompatibility test in vitro. Science 143:813. 4. Benacerraf, B. and H.O. McDevitt. ...
She was a lieutenant colonel in the Indian Armed Forces, president of the American Society of Histocompatibility and ... She established India's first histocompatibility laboratory, in New Delhi. She was awarded the Shakuntala Devi Amir Chand Award ... In the United States, Balakrishnan was president of the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics from 1996 to ... "ASHI Presidents". American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Retrieved 2020-10-09. "In Memoriam - Dr. Kamala ...
Histocompatibility+Antigens+Class+II at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) MHC+Class+II+Genes ... Serrano-Martín MM, Moreno-Pérez D, García-Martín FJ, Jurado-Ortiz A (March 2007). "[Major histocompatibility complex class II ... MHC Class II molecules are a class of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules normally found only on professional ... Cross-presentation Bare lymphocyte syndrome "Histocompatibility". Archived from the original on 2008-12-26. Retrieved 2009-01- ...
This gene is located in the class II region of the MHC (major histocompatibility complex). Expression of this gene is induced ... Singal DP, Ye M, Quadri SA (Jan 1995). "Major histocompatibility-encoded human proteasome LMP2. Genomic organization and a new ... During the antigen processing for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I, the proteasome is the major degradation ... Martinez CK, Monaco JJ (Oct 1991). "Homology of proteasome subunits to a major histocompatibility complex-linked LMP gene". ...
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and body odor preferences[edit]. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a genotype ... In 2001, a study found that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (a polymorphic set of genes which is important for ... Penn, D. J.; Potts, W. K. (1999). "The evolution of mating preferences and major histocompatibility complex genes". The ... Thornhill, R.; Gangastad, S. W.; Miller, R.; Scheyd, G.; McCollongh, J. K.; Franklin, M. (2003). "Major histocompatibility ...
Asia Pacific Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Association), ARSHI( Arabian Society for Histocompatibility and ... ASHI also sponsors several awards in recognition of accomplishments and contributions to the field of histocompatibility and ... "ASHI History - American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics". www.ashi-hla.org. Retrieved 2020-04-09. "Acrobat ... "Awards - American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics". www.ashi-hla.org. Retrieved 2020-04-09. Official website ...
2016). "An ontology for major histocompatibility restriction". Journal of Biomedical Semantics. 7: 1. doi:10.1186/s13326-016- ...
All other histocompatibility genes came to be called minor. Initially, genetic mapping of the mouse class I antigens suggested ... Jan Klein is a Czech-American immunologist, best known for his work on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). He was born ... His major research focus was on the major histocompatibility complex, (MHC or Mhc), which comprises series of genes, which play ... George D. Snell named the tissue compatibility genes histocompatibility 1, 2, 3, etc., in the order of discovery, and since the ...
The major histocompatibility complex genes are important for the immune system, and appear to play a role in sexual attraction ... The MHC (major histocompatibility complex) is a group of genes essential for the immune system, playing an important role in ... The major histocompatibility complex and its functions. ISBN 978-0-8153-3642-6. Penn, Dustin; Potts, Wayne (1999). "The ... This includes the role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and their different ...
Iowa Regional Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Laboratory [1]. Field has conducted research [2] in transplantation ...
Ploegh, Hidde; Fuhrmann, Ulrike (January 28, 1985). "Manipulation of Glycans on Antigens of the Major Histocompatibility ... Complex". In Pernis, Benvenuto (ed.). Cell Biology of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. Academic Press. pp. 133-151. ISBN ...
"Awards - American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics". www.ashi-hla.org. Retrieved 11 February 2018. "Sir Andrew ...
Additionally, Hood was among the first to study, at the gene level, the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) gene family and ... Hood, L; Steinmetz, M; Malissen, B (April 1983). "Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex of the Mouse". Annual Review of ... Hood, Leroy; Steinmetz, Michael; Goodenow, Robert (April 1982). "Genes of the major histocompatibility complex" (PDF). Cell. 28 ...
Source for information on histocompatibility genes: A Dictionary of Plant Sciences dictionary. ... histocompatibility genes The genes for antigens that are responsible for the acceptance or rejection of foreign bodies in the ... histocompatibility genes The genes for antigens that are responsible for the acceptance or rejection of foreign bodies in the ... www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/histocompatibility-genes ...
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC), group of genes that code for proteins found on the surfaces of cells that help the ... Major histocompatibility complex (MHC), group of genes that code for proteins found on the surfaces of cells that help the ... The term histocompatibility, derived from the Greek word histo (meaning "tissue") and the English word compatibility, was ... major histocompatibility complex. Protein images comparing the MHC I (left) and MHC II (right) molecules. The orange segments ...
Information about histocompatibility antigens is expanding so rapidly that of all advances. In these volumes, we have it is ... Role of Histocompatibility Antigens in Cell-Cell Interaction Chapter 1 Histocompatibility Antigens and the T-Cell Repertoire ... Role of Histocompatibility Antigens in Cell-Cell Interaction. * Front Matter Pages 1-1 ... Information about histocompatibility antigens is expanding so rapidly that of all advances. In these volumes, we have it is ...
Clonal selection theory Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Tissue typing Transplant rejection "Histocompatibility". ... Histocompatibility, or tissue compatibility, is the property of having the same, or sufficiently similar, alleles of a set of ... The degree of histocompatibility required is dependent on individual factors, including the type of tissue or organ and the ... Histocompatibility testing is most relevant for topics related to whole organ, tissue, or stem cell transplants, where the ...
A histocompatibility antigen blood test looks at proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). These are found on the ... The major histocompatibility complex. In: Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, Schroeder HW, Few AJ, Weyand CM, eds. Clinical ... A histocompatibility antigen blood test looks at proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). These are found on the ... Human leukocyte antigen: the major histocompatibility complex of man. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henrys Clinical ...
The high-resolution x-ray crystal structures of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule, I-E(k), ... The high-resolution x-ray crystal structures of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule, I-E(k), ...
Minor histocompatibility antigen (also known as MiHA) are receptors on the cellular surface of donated organs that are known to ... Minor histocompatibility antigens are due to normal proteins that are in themselves polymorphic in a given population. Even ... Minor+histocompatibility+antigens at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). ... Immunisation of mothers against male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens has a pathogenic role in many cases of ...
Buy Histocompatibility Antigens by B. Parham from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE ... Histocompatibility Antigens: Structure and Function - World Crop Series (Paperback). B. Parham (editor) Sign in to write a ... The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) was discovered as a con- sequence of the chronic problem encountered by cancer ... This was initially called the Major Histocompatibility Locus but was subsequently shown to include many functionally related ...
The Major Histocompatibility System in Man and Animals. D Gotze,E Albert,H Balner. No preview available - 1977. ... The major histocompatibility system in man and animals. Dietrich G tze,Ekkehard D. Albert. Snippet view - 1977. ... The Major Histocompatibility System in Man and Animals. D. G tze. Limited preview - 2012. ... control GPLA graft rejection graft survival guinea pigs GvH reaction haplotypes histocompatibility antigens Histocompatibility ...
City of Hope strongly supports and values the uniqueness of all individuals and promotes a work environment where diversity is embraced. ...
Histocompatibility is a measurement of how similar the genes that govern the immune system are across people. It is an ... A high degree of histocompatibility, or similar MHC genes, is vital in other situations. For example, high histocompatibility ... Histocompatibility is the measure of how similar the genes that govern the immune system are across individuals. ... The genes that are relevant for histocompatibility are the ones that recognize foreign agents that invade the body and trigger ...
... Class 1 Protein, Histocompatibility Antigen Class II Molecule, HLA Class 2, MHC Class 2, MHC ... Major Histocompatibility Complex, Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen, Human Leukocyte Antigen, HLA Complex, MHC-Antigen ... complex, Histocompatibility Antigen Class I Molecule, HLA Class 1, MHC Class I, MHC-1, MHC Class 1, MHC Class 1 - Antigen ... Class II, MHC-2, MHC Class 2 - Antigen Complex, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Protein. ...
... Jyotsna Dhingra Behl, N. K. Verma, Neha Tyagi, Priyanka Mishra, ... M. Amills, V. Ramiya, J. Norimine, and H. A. Lewin, "The major histocompatibility complex of ruminants," OIE Revue Scientifique ... F. W. Schwaiger, J. Maddox, K. Ballingal et al., "The ovine major histocompatibility complex," in The Major Histocompatibilty ... M. A. Groenen, J. J. van der Poel, R. J. Dijkhof, and M. J. Giphart, "Cloning of the bovine major histocompatibility complex ...
... , Human Leukocyte Antigen B27, HLA-B27. ... Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens. Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens Aka: Major Histocompatibility Complex ... Search other sites for Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens NLM Pubmed Google Websites Google Images QuackWatch ... These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens." Click on the ...
Major histocompatibility complex genomics and human disease.. Trowsdale J1, Knight JC. ... Over several decades, various forms of genomic analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been extremely ...
Cytomegalovirus inhibits major histocompatibility class II expression on infected endothelial cells. [Am J Pathol. 1994] ... Modulation of major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by viral infection.. Rinaldo CR Jr1. ...
... any of numerous antigens involved in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans. The HLA genes, of which more than ... The major histocompatibility antigens were first discovered on the leukocytes (white blood cells) and are therefore usually ... the donors histocompatibility antigens (human leukocyte antigens) with those of the prospective recipient. The closer the ... These genes code for the major histocompatibility antigens, which are found on the surface of almost all nucleated somatic ...
Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules.. M J Grusby, H Auchincloss, R Lee, R S Johnson, J ... Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules.. M J Grusby, H Auchincloss, R Lee, R S Johnson, J ... Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules.. M J Grusby, H Auchincloss Jr, R Lee, R S Johnson ... Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules. Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ...
Polymorphism and balancing selection at major histocompatibility complex loci.. N Takahata, Y Satta and J Klein ... Polymorphism and balancing selection at major histocompatibility complex loci. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page ... Polymorphism and balancing selection at major histocompatibility complex loci.. N Takahata, Y Satta and J Klein ... Polymorphism and balancing selection at major histocompatibility complex loci.. N Takahata, Y Satta and J Klein ...
Female choice and variation in the major histocompatibility complex. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you ... The cause of the high genetic variability in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is not entirely clear. Recently, two ... Female choice and variation in the major histocompatibility complex.. P W Hedrick ... Female choice and variation in the major histocompatibility complex.. P W Hedrick ...
The major histocompatibility complex is part of a genome that codes for proteins on cells. Its important for immunity, since ... Is the histocompatibility complex the reason behind this? Post your comments. Please enter the following code: ... The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an area of the genome which codes for a series of proteins expressed on the cells ... There are a number of different tests which can be used to identify key areas of a persons major histocompatibility complex. ...
Genomewide scans suggest that other major histocompatibility complex genes further heighten this ris … ... Major Histocompatibility Genes and Ankylosing Spondylitis Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2006 Jun;20(3):601-9. doi: 10.1016/j. ... Genomewide scans suggest that other major histocompatibility complex genes further heighten this risk, although linkage ...
The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is one of the few identified gene systems in domestic animals that is associated ... Major Histocompatibility Complex Evolution, L. Andersson. The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Fish: Genetic Structure and ... The Major Histocompatibility Complex Region of Domestic Animal Species. By Lawrence B. Schook, Susan J. Lamont. Series Editor: ... The Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex, L.B. Schook, M.S. Rutherford, J.-K. Lee, Y.-C. Shia, M. Bradshaw, and J.K. Lunney ...
... incompatible histocompatability complex proteins can be the things that prevent an organ donor from being able to donate organs ... If Im right, incompatible histocompatability complex proteins can be the things that prevent an organ donor from being able to ...
Major histocompatibility complex class I diversity limits the repertoire of T cell receptors. Magdalena Migalska, Alvaro ... The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central for self-/non-self-recognition and acquired immunity. The extreme ... Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that initiate adaptive immune responses through the presentation ... Major histocompatibility complex class I diversity limits the repertoire of T cell receptors ...
... Ankit Bharat1 and T ... Ankit Bharat and T. Mohanakumar, "Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in ...
Effective Feb. 27, UNet users who enter HLA typing manually into any UNet system are required to double enter HLA typing for verification of data entry.
Director, Histocompatibility Laboratory. UNC Hospitals. Phone: 984-974-1452. FAX: 984-974-1679. [email protected] ... Copyright 2008-2015© The American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. All rights reserved. ASHI is ...
Does Histocompatibility Affect Homograft Valve Function After the Ross Procedure?. J.F. Matthias Bechtel, Claus Bartels, ... Does Histocompatibility Affect Homograft Valve Function After the Ross Procedure?. J.F. Matthias Bechtel, Claus Bartels, ... Does Histocompatibility Affect Homograft Valve Function After the Ross Procedure?. J.F. Matthias Bechtel, Claus Bartels, ...
Recombinant Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DO Alpha, Recombinant Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class ...
  • histocompatibility genes The genes for antigens that are responsible for the acceptance or rejection of foreign bodies in the form of transplanted tissues ( grafts ). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Histocompatibility, or tissue compatibility, is the property of having the same, or sufficiently similar, alleles of a set of genes called human leukocyte antigens (HLA), or major histocompatibility complex (MHC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Information about histocompatibility antigens is expanding so rapidly that of all advances. (springer.com)
  • A histocompatibility antigen blood test looks at proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Minor histocompatibility antigens are due to normal proteins that are in themselves polymorphic in a given population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Found on virtually every cell, MHC (Major Histocompatibility, HLA) Class-I (Antigens) Proteins consist of noncovalently bound polymorphic 44-kDa MHC membrane glycoprotein and nonpolymorphic 12-kDa b2-microglobulin. (fpnotebook.com)
  • These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) , any of the numerous antigens (substances capable of stimulating an immune response) involved in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans. (britannica.com)
  • Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens were generated by mating beta 2-microglobulin-deficient, and therefore class I-deficient, animals with MHC class II-deficient animals. (pnas.org)
  • Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that initiate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells. (pnas.org)
  • Laboratories worldwide were brought together to share sera and techniques for studying histocompatibility antigens. (ashi-hla.org)
  • It is believed that non-MHC-encoded so-called minor histocompatibility antigens (mHag) are involved in both graft-versus-host and graft-versus-leukemia activities. (nih.gov)
  • What is the role of histocompatibility complexes and blood group antigens in the pathophysiology of schistosomiasis (bilharzia)? (medscape.com)
  • The organisms, now called schistosomula, incorporate host proteins, including major histocompatibility complexes (MHCs) and blood group antigens, into their integuments. (medscape.com)
  • Because bone marrow (BM) transplantation is used with increasing frequency, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the establishment of tolerance to host minor histocompatibility antigens (MIHA) in recipients transplanted with T-cell-undepleted marrow grafts. (multibriefs.com)
  • Calabrese L, Clough J, Braun W. Histocompatibility antigens and rheumatic diseases. (jaoa.org)
  • In a model of congenic and intra-MHC recombinant rat strains, the differential role of various histocompatibility antigens in renal subcapsular transplantation of purified islets of Langerhans isevaluated. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Unlike other organs, islets matched for all MHC antigens, but incompatible at minor histocompatibility antigens, undergo rejection early after transplantation. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Immunodominant minor histocompatibility antigens expressed by mouse leukemic cells can serve as effective targets for T cell immunotherapy. (jci.org)
  • Numerous minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) show tissue-specific expression and can induce vigorous T cell responses. (jci.org)
  • Minor histocompatibility antigens are highly immunogeneic polymorphic peptides playing crucial roles in the clinical outcome of HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation. (haematologica.org)
  • Although the introduction of genome-wide association-based strategies significantly has accelerated the identification of minor histocompatibility antigens over the past years, more efficient, rapid and robust identification techniques are required for a better understanding of the immunobiology of minor histocompatibility antigens and for their optimal clinical application in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. (haematologica.org)
  • We show that the data set of the 1000 Genomes Project is suitable to identify all of the previously known minor histocompatibility antigens. (haematologica.org)
  • The 1000 Genomes Project-based identification of minor histocompatibility antigens thus represents a very convenient and robust method for the identification of new targets for cancer therapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. (haematologica.org)
  • 10 5 These highly immunogenic, non-HLA encoded allogeneic peptides are historically, perhaps mistakenly, designated as minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags). (haematologica.org)
  • Human atheromata, but not normal blood vessels, contain numerous smooth muscle cells (SMC) that bear class II major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens. (harvard.edu)
  • Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are an inherent system of alloantigens, which are the products of genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). (cdc.gov)
  • Minor histocompatibility antigens with expression restricted to the recipient hematopoietic compartment represent prospective immunological targets for graft-versus-leukemia therapy. (jci.org)
  • It remains unclear, however, whether donor T cell recognition of these hematopoietically derived minor histocompatibility antigens will induce significant graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). (jci.org)
  • On the other hand, the importance of minor histocompatibility antigens derived from nonhematopoietic tissues was demonstrated by the finding that [C57BL/6→BALB.B] chimeric mice succumbed to C57BL/6 CD4 + T cell-mediated GVHD. (jci.org)
  • GVHD occurs when mature T cells in the donor bone marrow (BM) graft respond to host tissues expressing incompatible histocompatibility antigens, represented by either MHC antigens or minor histocompatibility antigens (miHAs). (jci.org)
  • A histocompatibility antigen blood test looks at proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), which are found on the surface of nearly every cell in the human body. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • A study was undertaken to determine whether the expression of tumor-associated antigens, expression of major histocompatibility complex molecules, or the cellular composition of the vaccine cells correlates with vaccine efficacy. (aacrjournals.org)
  • We identified 9 minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) as targets for alloreactivity, of which 8 were novel HLA class II restricted MiHA. (frontiersin.org)
  • Donor T cells directed at hematopoietic system-specific minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) are considered important cellular tools to induce therapeutic graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects with low risk of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Histocompatibility Antigens Class I" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (umassmed.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Histocompatibility Antigens Class I" by people in this website by year, and whether "Histocompatibility Antigens Class I" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (umassmed.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Histocompatibility Antigens Class I" by people in Profiles. (umassmed.edu)
  • Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) , group of genes that code for proteins found on the surfaces of cells that help the immune system recognize foreign substances. (britannica.com)
  • Even when a transplant donor and recipient are identical with respect to their major histocompatibility complex genes, the amino acid differences in minor proteins can cause the grafted tissue to be slowly rejected. (wikipedia.org)
  • The recipient developed GVHD despite having a HLA- matched genes at the Major Histocompatibility locus. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was initially called the Major Histocompatibility Locus but was subsequently shown to include many functionally related genes and renamed the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). (waterstones.com)
  • Histocompatibility is the measure of how similar the genes that govern the immune system are across individuals. (wisegeek.com)
  • The genes that are relevant for histocompatibility are the ones that recognize foreign agents that invade the body and trigger an immune response to fight them. (wisegeek.com)
  • These genes form a haplotype, or a group of genes concentrated on one area of a chromosome, called the major histocompatibility complex , or MHC. (wisegeek.com)
  • A high degree of histocompatibility, or similar MHC genes, is vital in other situations. (wisegeek.com)
  • Amino acid replacements in the peptide-binding region (PBR) of the functional major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes appear to be driven by balancing selection. (genetics.org)
  • Genomewide scans suggest that other major histocompatibility complex genes further heighten this risk, although linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B27 has confounded their precise identification. (nih.gov)
  • The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a set of genes with immunological and non-immunological functions and present in all vertebrates studied so far 1;2 . (dorak.info)
  • includes a variety of genes in vertebrates, which are responsible for the histocompatibility of tissues in transplantations, due to their function in immune recognition, amongst others. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Role of nonclassical class I genes of the chicken major histocompatibility complex Rfp-Y locus in transplantation immunity. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The chicken major histocompatibility complex ( MHC) genes are organized into two genetically independent clusters which both possess class I and class IIbeta genes: the classical B complex and the Restriction fragment pattern- Y ( Rfp-Y) complex. (biomedsearch.com)
  • To evaluate the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in the resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans , we conducted infection experiments in MHC-congenic strains of mice. (asm.org)
  • Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are unique in their general importance for conferring susceptibility or resistance to infectious and autoimmune diseases ( 5 ). (asm.org)
  • Herpesviruses encode a seemingly redundant repertoire of genes that interfere with the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway. (asm.org)
  • The American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics is an international society of professionals dedicated to advancing the science, education and application of immunogenetics and transplant immunology. (associationheadquarters.com)
  • Snell coined the term "histocompatibility" to describe the relationship between the H-2 cell-surface proteins and transplant acceptance. (wikipedia.org)
  • These peptides are normally around 9-12 amino acids in length and are bound to both the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an area of the genome which codes for a series of proteins expressed on the cells in the body. (wisegeek.com)
  • The T cells of the immune system interface with the proteins produced by the major histocompatibility complex, using this information to determine whether or not material encountered in the body belongs there. (wisegeek.com)
  • If I'm right, incompatible histocompatability complex proteins can be the things that prevent an organ donor from being able to donate organs to the people that need them. (physicsforums.com)
  • HLA-A and HLA-B code for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, which mainly presents peptide fragments derived by proteasomal degradation of "self" proteins on the cell surface of the antigen presenting cell to cytolytic T cells ( 1 - 3 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Minor histocompatibility Ags are peptides derived from polymorphic proteins that can be presented by APCs on MHC molecules. (jimmunol.org)
  • Structure and Function of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. (bbk.ac.uk)
  • These transport molecules are called the Major Histocompatibility Complex ( MHC ) proteins. (bbk.ac.uk)
  • Major Histocompatibility Complex proteins and their associated molecules are fundamental in the process of antigen presentation. (bbk.ac.uk)
  • The term histocompatibility , derived from the Greek word histo (meaning "tissue") and the English word compatibility , was applied to the MHC molecules to describe their function in transplantation reactions and does not reveal their true physiological function. (britannica.com)
  • Mice lacking major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules. (pnas.org)
  • The crucial immunological function of the classical human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, and -C, is the presentation of peptides to T cells. (rupress.org)
  • Tissue cells are normally protected from attack by self-reactive CD8 T-cells by a low expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the absence of costimulatory molecules, which prevents activation of naive T-cells ( 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) binds to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules at two sites on either side of the peptide groove. (rupress.org)
  • Interaction between a T cell receptor (TCR) and various ligands, i.e., anti-TCR antibodies, superantigens, peptides, or altered peptide ligands in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules can trigger different T helper cell (Th) effector functions. (psu.edu)
  • Pillars Article: Binding of Immunogenic Peptides to Ia Histocompatibility Molecules. (jimmunol.org)
  • Using flow cytometry analysis, we confirmed that HCV core protein accumulated in aa70Q clone transfected cells, and it caused a reduction in cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules induced by IFN treatment through enhanced protein kinase R phosphorylation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The 30th European Immunogenetics and Histocompatibility Conference will be held in Greece, on the island of Kos. (onelambda.com)
  • This year's 39th Asia-Pacific Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Association Conference, or APHIA 2015, is at the Mandarin Hotel in Bangkok. (onelambda.com)
  • THE HL-A system, the major histocompatibility locus in man analogous to the H-2 system in the mouse, has attracted the attention of many different groups. (annals.org)
  • H-Y is a transplantation antigen that can lead to rejection of male organ and bone marrow grafts by female recipients, even if the donor and recipient match at the major histocompatibility locus of humans, the HLA (human leukocyte antigen) locus. (sciencemag.org)
  • Human leukocyte antigen: the major histocompatibility complex of man. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Identified genetic risk factors within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), such as butyrophilin-like ( BTNL)2 , human leukocyte antigen ( HLA)-DRB1*03 and HLA-DRB1*15 , and protective factors, such as HLA-DRB1*01 , are found in many populations [ 1 , 2 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • A significant increase in the percentage of histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule-expressing tumor cells was the only marker with a positive correlation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The ovine major histocompatibility complex," in The Major Histocompatibilty Complex Region of Domestic Animal Species , L. B. Schook and S. J. Lamont, Eds. (hindawi.com)
  • The discovery of the MHC and role of histocompatibility in transplantation was a combined effort of many scientists in the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histocompatibility has a measurable effect on whole organ transplantation, increasing life expectancy of both the patient and organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • Towards effective and safe immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: identification of hematopoietic-specific minor histocompatibility antigen UTA2-1. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In transplantation, a major obstacle for graft acceptance in MHC-matched individuals is the mismatch of minor histocompatibility Ags. (jimmunol.org)
  • Dr. Amos organized and chaired the first World Health Organization HLA Nomenclature Committee and was instrumental in founding the American Association for Clinical Histocompatibility Testing (AACHT) later renamed ASHI. (ashi-hla.org)
  • Subsequently, while at the Roswell Park Memorial Hospital he developed a skin grafting model of tissue rejection which, with his work on leukoagglutination assays, helped lead to the discovery of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. (ashi-hla.org)
  • However, just as it is in humans, the most significant aspect of the Major Histocompatibility Complex to your dog's health is the role the MHC plays in so-called autoimmune diseases. (oldenglishsheepdogclubofamerica.org)
  • In humans, the entire histocompatibility complex is termed the HLA complex. (cdc.gov)
  • Clonal activation of CD4 + and CD8 + T lymphocytes depends on binding of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by their oe/3 receptors, eventually resulting in sufficient aggregation to initiate second messenger generation. (psu.edu)
  • Understanding the regulation of cell surface expression of specific peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes is hindered by the lack of direct quantitative analyses of specific peptide-MHC complexes. (psu.edu)
  • Difficulty in analyzing T cells was partially due to the fact that T lymphocytes recognize cell surface peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes and also due to the intrinsic low affinity of T-cell receptors (TCR) for cognate ligand. (asm.org)
  • CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) can recognize and kill target cells that express only a few cognate major histocompatibility complex class I-peptide (pMHC) complexes. (epfl.ch)
  • The Role of the Class I and II Major Histocompatibility Complexes. (bbk.ac.uk)
  • The high-resolution x-ray crystal structures of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule, I-E(k), occupied by either of two antigenic peptides were determined. (rcsb.org)
  • The three-dimensional structure of a Staphylococcus aureus superantigen, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), complexed with a human class II major histocompatibility molecule (DR1), was determined by x-ray crystallography. (sciencemag.org)
  • Amino Acid Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Core Affect Infectious Virus Production and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule Expression. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. (psu.edu)
  • The genetic set-up of the immune system, specifically the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may also influence individual resistance to infections. (lu.se)
  • Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed a new method for analyzing the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of the human genome. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Zusätzlich bieten wir Ihnen Histocompatibility (Minor) 13 Proteine (4) und viele weitere Produktgruppen zu diesem Protein an. (antikoerper-online.de)
  • Zusätzlich bieten wir Ihnen Class II, Major Histocompatibility Complex, Transactivator Proteine (3) und viele weitere Produktgruppen zu diesem Protein an. (antikoerper-online.de)
  • They cause problems of rejection less frequently than those of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, high histocompatibility between donors and hosts is the key to avoiding organ rejection after transplants. (wisegeek.com)
  • The most important genetic susceptibility factor for type 1 diabetes is encoded in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Polymorphism and balancing selection at major histocompatibility complex loci. (genetics.org)
  • The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) was discovered as a con- sequence of the chronic problem encountered by cancer biologists in the early years of this century: the failure to maintain tumor lines by serial passage in outbred mice. (waterstones.com)
  • Using established bone marrow irradiation chimeras across the multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-disparate, C57BL/6→BALB.B combination, we studied the occurrence of lethal GVHD mediated by CD4 + T cells in recipient mice expressing only hematopoietically derived alloantigens. (jci.org)
  • H. A. Lewin, "Genetic organization, polymorphism, and function of the bovine major histocompatibility complex," in The Major Histocompatibility Complex Region of Domestic Animal Species , L. B. Schook and S. J. Lamont, Eds. (hindawi.com)
  • The cause of the high genetic variability in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is not entirely clear. (genetics.org)
  • Philip W. Hedrick , Rhonda N. Lee , and Colleen Buchanan "Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, Canine Distemper, and Major Histocompatibility Complex Genetic Variation in Mexican Wolves," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 39(4), 909-913, (1 October 2003). (bioone.org)
  • Moreover, we demonstrate the power of this novel approach by the identification of the new HLA-DP4 restricted minor histocompatibility antigen UTDP4-1, which despite extensive efforts could not be identified using any of the previously developed biochemical, molecular biological or genetic strategies. (haematologica.org)
  • Minor histocompatibility antigen (also known as MiHA) are receptors on the cellular surface of donated organs that are known to give an immunological response in some organ transplants. (wikipedia.org)
  • These data suggest that severe acute CD4 + T cell-mediated GVHD across this minor histocompatibility antigen barrier depends on the expression of nonhematopoietically rather than hematopoietically derived alloantigens for maximal target-tissue infiltration and injury. (jci.org)
  • The human version of the histocompatibility complex was found by Jean Dausset in the 1950s, when he noticed that recipients of blood transfusions were producing antibodies directed against only the donor cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cytomegalovirus inhibits major histocompatibility class II expression on infected endothelial cells. (nih.gov)
  • The Major Histocompatibility Complex Region of Domestic Animal Species begins with a discussion of the evolution of Mhc. (routledge.com)
  • The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is one of the few identified gene systems in domestic animals that is associated with quantitative traits such as disease resistance, immune response, growth, and reproduction. (routledge.com)
  • Modulation of major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by viral infection. (nih.gov)
  • Identification of a colonial chordate histocompatibility gene. (stembook.org)
  • The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central for self-/non-self-recognition and acquired immunity. (pnas.org)
  • HLA, the human form of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), is located on chromosome 6 at 6p21.3. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major histocompatibility complex ( MHC ) is a large genomic region or gene family found in most vertebrates . (thefullwiki.org)