A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Most histamine H1 receptors operate through the inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol second messenger system. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, hormone release, and cerebral glyconeogenesis. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H2 receptors act via G-proteins to stimulate ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are gastric acid secretion, smooth muscle relaxation, inotropic and chronotropic effects on heart muscle, and inhibition of lymphocyte function. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.
Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate HISTAMINE H3 RECEPTORS. They have been used to correct SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and MEMORY DISORDERS.
The secretion of histamine from mast cell and basophil granules by exocytosis. This can be initiated by a number of factors, all of which involve binding of IgE, cross-linked by antigen, to the mast cell or basophil's Fc receptors. Once released, histamine binds to a number of different target cell receptors and exerts a wide variety of effects.
Histamine substituted in any position with one or more methyl groups. Many of these are agonists for the H1, H2, or both histamine receptors.
A histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic reactions, hay fever, rhinitis, urticaria, and asthma. It has also been used in veterinary applications. One of the most widely used of the classical antihistaminics, it generally causes less drowsiness and sedation than PROMETHAZINE.
A histamine H2 receptor agonist that is often used to study the activity of histamine and its receptors.
A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits HISTAMINE binding to HISTAMINE H2 RECEPTORS. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits GASTRIC ACID secretion, as well as PEPSIN and GASTRIN output.
A histamine H2 receptor antagonist that is used as an anti-ulcer agent.
A photographic fixative used also in the manufacture of resins. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck Index, 9th ed). Many of its derivatives are ANTITHYROID AGENTS and/or FREE RADICAL SCAVENGERS.
A highly potent and specific histamine H2 receptor agonist. It has been used diagnostically as a gastric secretion indicator.
A histamine H1 antagonist used as an antiemetic, antitussive, for dermatoses and pruritus, for hypersensitivity reactions, as a hypnotic, an antiparkinson, and as an ingredient in common cold preparations. It has some undesired antimuscarinic and sedative effects.
A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion.
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to histamine, forming N-methylhistamine, the major metabolite of histamine in man. EC 2.1.1.8.
Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.
A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.
A histamine H1 antagonist. It has mild hypnotic properties and some local anesthetic action and is used for allergies (including skin eruptions) both parenterally and locally. It is a common ingredient of cold remedies.
A family of hexahydropyridines.
An antagonist of histamine that appears to block both H2 and H3 histamine receptors. It has been used in the treatment of ulcers.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
An enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of histidine to histamine and carbon dioxide. It requires pyridoxal phosphate in animal tissues, but not in microorganisms. EC 4.1.1.22.
A class of non-sedating drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM), thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. These antihistamines represent a heterogenous group of compounds with differing chemical structures, adverse effects, distribution, and metabolism. Compared to the early (first generation) antihistamines, these non-sedating antihistamines have greater receptor specificity, lower penetration of BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER, and are less likely to cause drowsiness or psychomotor impairment.
A dibenzoxepin tricyclic compound. It displays a range of pharmacological actions including maintaining adrenergic innervation. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it appears to block reuptake of monoaminergic neurotransmitters into presynaptic terminals. It also possesses anticholinergic activity and modulates antagonism of histamine H(1)- and H(2)-receptors.
An undecenyl THIOUREA which may have topical anti-inflammatory activity.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A histamine H1 antagonist with low sedative action but frequent gastrointestinal irritation. It is used to treat ASTHMA; HAY FEVER; URTICARIA; and RHINITIS; and also in veterinary applications. Tripelennamine is administered by various routes, including topically.
Quantitative determination of receptor (binding) proteins in body fluids or tissue using radioactively labeled binding reagents (e.g., antibodies, intracellular receptors, plasma binders).
A potent mast cell degranulator. It is involved in histamine release.
A selective histamine H1-receptor antagonist devoid of central nervous system depressant activity. The drug was used for ALLERGY but withdrawn due to causing LONG QT SYNDROME.
Histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic rhinitis; ASTHMA; and URTICARIA. It is a component of COUGH and COLD medicines. It may cause drowsiness.
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.
The largest family of cell surface receptors involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They share a common structure and signal through HETEROTRIMERIC G-PROTEINS.
Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.
Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES).
Chemical substances which inhibit the function of the endocrine glands, the biosynthesis of their secreted hormones, or the action of hormones upon their specific sites.
A cycloheptathiophene blocker of histamine H1 receptors and release of inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed for the treatment of asthma, rhinitis, skin allergies, and anaphylaxis.
Dibenzoxepins are heterocyclic compounds consisting of a seven-membered oxepin ring fused with two benzene rings, which have been used as building blocks in the synthesis of various pharmaceutical agents, including some antidepressants and antipsychotics.
Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of NEUROKININ-1 RECEPTORS.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate DOPAMINE RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of dopamine or exogenous agonists. Many drugs used in the treatment of psychotic disorders (ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS) are dopamine antagonists, although their therapeutic effects may be due to long-term adjustments of the brain rather than to the acute effects of blocking dopamine receptors. Dopamine antagonists have been used for several other clinical purposes including as ANTIEMETICS, in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, and for hiccup. Dopamine receptor blockade is associated with NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.
A histamine analog and H1 receptor agonist that serves as a vasodilator. It is used in MENIERE DISEASE and in vascular headaches but may exacerbate bronchial asthma and peptic ulcers.
An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.
A family of iminourea derivatives. The parent compound has been isolated from mushrooms, corn germ, rice hulls, mussels, earthworms, and turnip juice. Derivatives may have antiviral and antifungal properties.
A potent second-generation histamine H1 antagonist that is effective in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, chronic urticaria, and pollen-induced asthma. Unlike many traditional antihistamines, it does not cause drowsiness or anticholinergic side effects.
Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.
Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.
The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A ligand that binds to but fails to activate the INTERLEUKIN 1 RECEPTOR. It plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of INFLAMMATION and FEVER. Several isoforms of the protein exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.
Compounds with two BENZENE rings fused to AZEPINES.
An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.
Phenomena and pharmaceutics of compounds that bind to the same receptor binding-site as an agonist (DRUG AGONISM) for that receptor but exerts the opposite pharmacological effect.
A histamine H2 receptor antagonist with low toxicity that inhibits gastric acid secretion. The drug is used for the treatment of duodenal ulcers.
A serotonin antagonist and a histamine H1 blocker used as antipruritic, appetite stimulant, antiallergic, and for the post-gastrectomy dumping syndrome, etc.
Antihistamine drug now withdrawn from the market in many countries because of rare but potentially fatal side effects.
Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number one carbon adjacent to the benzyl portion, in contrast to ISOINDOLES which have the nitrogen away from the six-membered ring.
Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and GABA RECEPTOR AGONISTS.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
A histamine H1 antagonist. It is used in hypersensitivity reactions, in rhinitis, for pruritus, and in some common cold remedies.
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
Granular leukocytes characterized by a relatively pale-staining, lobate nucleus and cytoplasm containing coarse dark-staining granules of variable size and stainable by basic dyes.
Compounds with BENZENE fused to AZEPINES.
Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4, often used in pharmaceuticals as smooth muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and antihistamines, but can also be found as recreational drugs with stimulant and entactogen properties.
The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)
A synthetic pentapeptide that has effects like gastrin when given parenterally. It stimulates the secretion of gastric acid, pepsin, and intrinsic factor, and has been used as a diagnostic aid.
Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
Drugs that bind to nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC) and block the actions of acetylcholine or cholinergic agonists. Nicotinic antagonists block synaptic transmission at autonomic ganglia, the skeletal neuromuscular junction, and at central nervous system nicotinic synapses.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
One of the HISTAMINE H1 ANTAGONISTS with little sedative action. It is used in treatment of hay fever, rhinitis, allergic dermatoses, and pruritus.
Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
A phenothiazine derivative with histamine H1-blocking, antimuscarinic, and sedative properties. It is used as an antiallergic, in pruritus, for motion sickness and sedation, and also in animals.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2 RECEPTORS.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.
A family of gastrointestinal peptide hormones that excite the secretion of GASTRIC JUICE. They may also occur in the central nervous system where they are presumed to be neurotransmitters.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta-methylacetylcholine (methacholine).
A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.
Compounds based on a propanolamine attached via an OXYGEN atom to a phenoxy ring. The side chain is one carbon longer than PHENYLETHYLAMINES.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT3 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN or SEROTONIN 5-HT3 RECEPTOR AGONISTS.
A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN or SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTOR AGONISTS. Included under this heading are antagonists for one or more specific 5-HT2 receptor subtypes.
The sudden, forceful, involuntary expulsion of air from the NOSE and MOUTH caused by irritation to the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.
Cell-surface proteins that bind SEROTONIN and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Several types of serotonin receptors have been recognized which differ in their pharmacology, molecular biology, and mode of action.
CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.
Compounds containing phenyl-1-butanone.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Area in the hypothalamus bounded medially by the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior column of the FORNIX (BRAIN). The medial edge of the INTERNAL CAPSULE and the subthalamic region form its lateral boundary. It contains the lateral hypothalamic nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, lateral tuberal nuclei, and fibers of the MEDIAL FOREBRAIN BUNDLE.
An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
Injections into the cerebral ventricles.
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS.
Pyrrolidines are saturated, heterocyclic organic compounds containing a five-membered ring with four carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom (NRCH2CH2), commonly found as structural components in various alkaloids and used in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other organic materials.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Agents that antagonize ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTORS. Many drugs in this class specifically target the ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
A slowly hydrolyzed CHOLINERGIC AGONIST that acts at both MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS and NICOTINIC RECEPTORS.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.
Pyridines substituted in any position with an amino group. May be hydrogenated, but must retain at least one double bond.
Rounded or pyramidal cells of the GASTRIC GLANDS. They secrete HYDROCHLORIC ACID and produce gastric intrinsic factor, a glycoprotein that binds VITAMIN B12.
An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.
A centrally active muscarinic antagonist that has been used in the symptomatic treatment of PARKINSON DISEASE. Benztropine also inhibits the uptake of dopamine.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.
A subtype of enteroendocrine cells found in the gastrointestinal MUCOSA, particularly in the glands of PYLORIC ANTRUM; DUODENUM; and ILEUM. These cells secrete mainly SEROTONIN and some neuropeptides. Their secretory granules stain readily with silver (argentaffin stain).
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the actions of the endogenous adrenergic transmitters EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE.
The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA-A RECEPTORS thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous GABA-A RECEPTOR AGONISTS.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.
Phosphoric acid esters of inositol. They include mono- and polyphosphoric acid esters, with the exception of inositol hexaphosphate which is PHYTIC ACID.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A group of LEUKOTRIENES; (LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4) that is the major mediator of BRONCHOCONSTRICTION; HYPERSENSITIVITY; and other allergic reactions. Earlier studies described a "slow-reacting substance of ANAPHYLAXIS" released from lung by cobra venom or after anaphylactic shock. The relationship between SRS-A leukotrienes was established by UV which showed the presence of the conjugated triene. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Bethanechol compounds are parasympathomimetic agents that directly stimulate muscarinic receptors, primarily used to treat urinary retention and nonobstructive bladder dysfunction by increasing bladder contractility and decreasing post-void residual volume.
The excretory duct of the testes that carries SPERMATOZOA. It rises from the SCROTUM and joins the SEMINAL VESICLES to form the ejaculatory duct.
A chromone complex that acts by inhibiting the release of chemical mediators from sensitized mast cells. It is used in the prophylactic treatment of both allergic and exercise-induced asthma, but does not affect an established asthmatic attack.
Proteins that bind specific drugs with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Drug receptors are generally thought to be receptors for some endogenous substance not otherwise specified.
The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.
Compounds with a BENZENE fused to IMIDAZOLES.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Thiazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a sulfur atom and a nitrogen atom, which are bound by two carbon atoms to form a five-membered ring, and are widely found in various natural and synthetic substances, including some pharmaceuticals and vitamins.
Guanosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate), monoanhydride with phosphorothioic acid. A stable GTP analog which enjoys a variety of physiological actions such as stimulation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, cyclic AMP accumulation, and activation of specific proto-oncogenes.
Cell surface proteins that bind ENDOTHELINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.
A potent noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) used mainly as a research tool. The drug has been considered for the wide variety of neurodegenerative conditions or disorders in which NMDA receptors may play an important role. Its use has been primarily limited to animal and tissue experiments because of its psychotropic effects.
Inbred ICR mice are a strain of albino laboratory mice that have been selectively bred for consistent genetic makeup and high reproductive performance, making them widely used in biomedical research for studies involving reproduction, toxicology, pharmacology, and carcinogenesis.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.
An alkaloid from SOLANACEAE, especially DATURA and SCOPOLIA. Scopolamine and its quaternary derivatives act as antimuscarinics like ATROPINE, but may have more central nervous system effects. Among the many uses are as an anesthetic premedication, in URINARY INCONTINENCE, in MOTION SICKNESS, as an antispasmodic, and as a mydriatic and cycloplegic.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT1 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN 5-HT1 RECEPTOR AGONISTS. Included under this heading are antagonists for one or more of the specific 5-HT1 receptor subtypes.
A condition characterized by inactivity, decreased responsiveness to stimuli, and a tendency to maintain an immobile posture. The limbs tend to remain in whatever position they are placed (waxy flexibility). Catalepsy may be associated with PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA, CATATONIC), nervous system drug toxicity, and other conditions.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.
The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A bridged-ring tetracyclic antidepressant that is both mechanistically and functionally similar to the tricyclic antidepressants, including side effects associated with its use.
A direct acting sympathomimetic used as a vasoconstrictor to relieve nasal congestion. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1251)
Compounds that inhibit the action of prostaglandins.
"In the context of medicine, 'History' refers to the detailed narrative account of a patient's past and present health conditions, symptoms, treatments, lifestyle, and other relevant information, obtained through interviewing the patient or their significant others."
Potent activator of the adenylate cyclase system and the biosynthesis of cyclic AMP. From the plant COLEUS FORSKOHLII. Has antihypertensive, positive inotropic, platelet aggregation inhibitory, and smooth muscle relaxant activities; also lowers intraocular pressure and promotes release of hormones from the pituitary gland.
The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A3 RECEPTORS.
Biphenyl compounds are organic substances consisting of two phenyl rings connected by a single covalent bond, and can exhibit various properties and uses, including as intermediates in chemical synthesis, components in plastics and dyes, and as additives in fuels.
An enzyme of the lyase class that catalyzes the formation of CYCLIC AMP and pyrophosphate from ATP. EC 4.6.1.1.
A group of enzymes including those oxidizing primary monoamines, diamines, and histamine. They are copper proteins, and, as their action depends on a carbonyl group, they are sensitive to inhibition by semicarbazide.
Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the action or biosynthesis of estrogenic compounds.
A genus of the family Muridae consisting of eleven species. C. migratorius, the grey or Armenian hamster, and C. griseus, the Chinese hamster, are the two species used in biomedical research.
Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.
Purine bases found in body tissues and fluids and in some plants.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
Triazoles are a class of antifungal drugs that contain a triazole ring in their chemical structure and work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, an essential component of fungal cell membranes, thereby disrupting the integrity and function of the membrane.
Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.
Compounds that contain a BENZENE ring fused to a furan ring.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.

Mepyramine inhibits platelet activating factor-induced rabbit platelet aggregation: role of intracellular histamine. (1/894)

AIM: To study the possible role of intracellular histamine (HA) in platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet activation. METHODS: Washed rabbit platelet suspension was used to test the inhibitory effect of mepyramine (Mep, an H1 receptor antagonist) on PAF-induced platelet aggregation. The thromboxane B2 (TXB2) generation was measured by radioimmunoassay and the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) concentration was determined by the specific fluorescence indicator Fura-2. RESULTS: Mep > 100 mumol.L-1 generated a concentration-dependent inhibition on PAF-induced aggregation, with an IC50 value of 162 (95% confidence limits: 114-232 mumol.L-1). Cimetidine, an H2 receptor antagonist, even up to 400 mumol.L-1 had no effect on it. Exogenous HA (10 mumol.L-1) and H1 receptor agonist, 2-thiazolylethylamine had no energetic effect. alpha-Fluoromethylhistidine, an inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, did not inhibit platelet responses. However, in platelets permeabilized with saponin (8-10 mg.L-1), exogenous HA attenuated the inhibitory effect of Mep to about 50% at a concentration of 50 mumol.L-1. Preincubation of platelets with Mep (100 or 200 mumol.L-1) resulted in an inhibition on TXB2 generation and [Ca2+]i elevation induced by PAF. CONCLUSION: Platelets activated by PAF is associated with an intracellular HA synthesis and release via a common pathway of TXB2 generation and the rise of [Ca2+]i.  (+info)

Considerations in pharmaceutical conversion: focus on antihistamines. (2/894)

The practice of pharmaceutical conversion, which encompasses three types of drug interchange (generic, brand, and therapeutic substitution), is increasing in managed care settings. Pharmaceutical conversion has numerous implications for managed care organizations, their healthcare providers, and their customers. Although drug cost may be a driving consideration in pharmaceutical conversion, a number of other considerations are of equal or greater importance in the decision-making process may affect the overall cost of patient care. Among these considerations are clinical, psychosocial, and safety issues; patient adherence; patient satisfaction; and legal implications of pharmaceutical conversion. Patient-centered care must always remain central to decisions about pharmaceutical conversion. This article discusses the issues related to, and implications of, pharmaceutical conversion utilizing the antihistamines class of drugs as the case situation.  (+info)

Treatment of allergic rhinitis: an evidence-based evaluation of nasal corticosteroids versus nonsedating antihistamines. (3/894)

Allergic rhinitis is a high-cost, high-prevalence disease. In the 12 months ending March 31, 1997 $3.1 billion was spent in the United States for medications to manage this illness. Allergic rhinitis affects quality of life and interferes with work productivity. Nonsedating antihistamines are the most common and most expensive therapy for this condition. This study reviewed 13 randomized studies in which blinded investigators compared management of allergic rhinitis by means of intranasal steroids to management by means of nonsedating antihistamine. Evidence tables demonstrated that in all studies in which total nasal symptoms and nasal obstruction were recorded, the nasal steroid was statistically superior to the nonsedating antihistamine. For nasal blockage the nonsedating antihistamines did not perform better than placebo. For all other nasal symptoms the intranasal steroid was statistically superior in most reports and equal or numerically better in the remaining papers. When these data are linked to those from cost analysis and quality-of-life studies, the evidence strongly suggests that nasal steroids should be first-line therapy for allergic rhinitis. In four reports on the combination of a nonsedating antihistamine compared to a nasal steroid alone, there was no significant difference between these two treatments. Like asthma, allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease and should be managed with anti-inflammatory medication. Making such a change in the management of allergic rhinitis should increase efficacy and decrease costs.  (+info)

Rate-dependent blockade of a potassium current in human atrium by the antihistamine loratadine. (4/894)

The antihistamine loratadine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms associated with allergies. Although generally believed to be free of adverse cardiac effects, there are a number of recent reports suggesting that loratadine use may be associated with arrhythmias, in particular atrial arrhythmias. Nothing is known regarding the potassium channel blocking properties of loratadine in human cardiac cells. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, the effects of loratadine on the transient outward K current (Ito), sustained current (Isus), and current measured at -100 mV (IK1 and Ins), the major inward and outward potassium currents present in human atrial myocytes, were examined in order to provide a possible molecular mechanism for the observed atrial arrhythmias reported with loratadine use. Loratadine rate-dependently inhibited Ito at therapeutic concentrations with 10 nM loratadine reducing Ito amplitude at a pacing rate of 2 Hz by 34.9+/-6.0%. In contrast, loratadine had no effect on either Isus or current measured at -100 mV. These results may provide a possible mechanism for the incidences of supraventricular arrhythmias reported with the use of loratadine.  (+info)

Risk of ventricular arrhythmias associated with nonsedating antihistamine drugs. (5/894)

AIMS: To quantify and compare the incidence of ventricular arrhythniias associated with the use of five nonsedating antihistamines: acrivastine, astemizole, cetirizine, loratadine and terfenadine. The effects of age, sex, dose, duration of treatment, and the interaction with P450 inhibitor drugs were also examined. METHODS: We carried out a cohort study with a nested case-control analysis using the UK-based General Practice Research database (GPRD). The study cohort included persons aged less than 80 years old who received their first prescription for any of the five study drugs between January 1, 1992 and September 30, 1996. We estimated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias with current use of antihistamines as compared with non use. RESULTS: The study cohort included 197425 persons who received 513012 prescriptions. Over the study period 18 valid cases of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias were detected. Nine occurred during the current use of any antihistamine, resulting in a crude incidence of 1.9 per 10000 person-years (95%CI: 1.0-3.6) and a relative risk of 4.2 (95%CI: 1.5-11.8) as compared with non use. Astemizole presented the highest relative risk (RR= 19.0; 95%CI: 4.8-76.0) of all study drugs, while terfenadine (RR=2.1; 95%CI:0.5-8.5) was in the range of other nonsedating antihistamines. Older age was associated with a greater risk of ventricular arrhythmias (RR=7.4; 95%CI: 2.6-21.4) and seemed to increase the effect of antihistamines (RR=6.4; 95%CI: 1.7-24.8). The proportions of high dose terfenadine and the concomitant use with P450 inhibitors among current users of terfenadine were 2.7% and 3.4%, respectively over the study period with no single case of ventricular arrhythmias occurring in the presence of these two risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The use of nonsedating antihistamines increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmias by a factor of four in the general population. Yet, the absolute effect is quite low requiring 57000 prescriptions, or 5300 person-years of use for one case to occur. The risk associated with terfenadine was no different from that with other nonsedating antihistamines.  (+info)

Study of cardiac repolarization in healthy volunteers performed with mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist. (6/894)

AIMS: The occurrence of serious dysrhythmias, such as torsades de pointes, with terfenadine and astemizole had led to a reexamination of the potential effect of H1 antihistamines on cardiac repolarization. Mizolastine is a potent, selective, nonsedating peripherally acting H1-receptor antagonist which is registered for rhinitis and urticaria at a recommended dose of 10 mg once daily. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of mizolastine, on ventricular repolarization in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy young volunteers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised study with three parallel groups. Each group consisted of 2 way cross-over 7 day treatment periods where mizolastine (10, 20 or 40 mg) and placebo were randomly administered. On day 1 and day 7, 12-lead ECG recordings were performed prior and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 20 h after dosing and from day 2 to day 6, before dosing and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after. RESULTS: Whatever the analysis used (raw data, changes from baseline, incidence of individual out-of-range values) no significant differences were observed at any dose level vs placebo, on any of ECG parameters (HR, PR, QRS, QT, and QTc). In particular, no effect of mizolastine vs placebo was shown on QT and QTc although 95% CIs were wide. The only subject who exhibited a QTc>/=450 ms received placebo for 7 days. CONCLUSIONS: This study found no evidence of an effect of mizolastine up to 40 mg (four times the therapeutic dose) on ventricular repolarization in healthy volunteers.  (+info)

Alcohol-histamine interactions. (7/894)

Alcohol and histamine metabolic pathways in the body have the common enzymes aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase. The metabolite of ethanol, acetaldehyde, can effectively compete with the metabolites of histamine, methylimidazole acetaldehyde, and imidazole acetaldehyde. At the periphery, alcohol and acetaldehyde liberate histamine from its store in mast cells and depress histamine elimination by inhibiting diamine oxidase, resulting in elevated histamine levels in tissues. Histamine mediates alcohol-induced gastric and intestinal damage and bronchial asthma as well as flushing in Orientals. On the other hand, alcohol provokes food-induced histaminosis and histamine intolerance, which is an epidemiological problem. There are many controversial reports concerning the effect of H2 receptor antagonists on ethanol metabolism and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the stomach. In addition, alcohol affects histamine levels in the brain by modulating histamine synthesis, release, and turnover. Histamine receptor antagonists can affect ethanol metabolism and change the sensitivity of animals to the hypnotic effects of alcohol. In contrast to other neurotransmitters, the involvement of the brain histamine system in the mechanisms of the central actions of alcohol and in the pathogenesis of alcoholism is poorly studied and understood.  (+info)

Sequential randomised and double blind trial of promethazine prophylaxis against early anaphylactic reactions to antivenom for bothrops snake bites. (8/894)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of the H1 antihistamine promethazine against early anaphylactic reactions to antivenom. DESIGN: Sequential randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Public hospital in a venom research institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 101 patients requiring antivenom treatment after being bitten by bothrops snakes. INTERVENTION: Intramuscular injection of promethazine (25 mg for adults and 0.5/kg for children) or placebo given 15-20 min before starting intravenous infusion of antivenom. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence and severity of anaphylactic reactions occurring within 24 hours after antivenom. RESULTS: Reactions occurred in 12 of 49 patients treated with promethazine (24%) and in 13 of 52 given placebo (25%); most were mild or moderate. Continuous sequential analysis indicated that the study could be interrupted at the 22nd untied pair, without preference for promethazine or placebo. CONCLUSION: Prophylaxis with promethazine does not prevent early reactions. Patients should be observed carefully during antivenom infusion and the subsequent few hours.  (+info)

Histamine H3 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that are widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. They are activated by the neurotransmitter histamine and function as autoreceptors, inhibiting the release of histamine from presynaptic nerve terminals. Histamine H3 receptors also modulate the activity of other neurotransmitters, such as acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, by regulating their synthesis, release, and uptake.

Histamine H3 receptors have been identified as potential targets for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including sleep disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Antagonists or inverse agonists of Histamine H3 receptors may enhance the release of neurotransmitters in the brain, leading to improved cognitive function, mood regulation, and reward processing. However, further research is needed to fully understand the therapeutic potential and safety profile of Histamine H3 receptor modulators.

Histamine H1 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in various cells throughout the body, including those of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. They are activated by the neurotransmitter histamine, which is released by mast cells and basophils in response to allergic reactions, inflammation, or immune responses.

When histamine binds to H1 receptors, it triggers a range of physiological responses that contribute to the symptoms of allergies, including vasodilation (leading to redness and warmth), increased vascular permeability (resulting in fluid leakage and swelling), and smooth muscle contraction (causing bronchoconstriction, gut cramping, and nasal congestion).

Histamine H1 receptors are also involved in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles, where they contribute to the promotion of wakefulness. Antihistamines that block H1 receptors are commonly used to treat allergies, hay fever, and other conditions associated with histamine release.

Histamine is defined as a biogenic amine that is widely distributed throughout the body and is involved in various physiological functions. It is derived primarily from the amino acid histidine by the action of histidine decarboxylase. Histamine is stored in granules (along with heparin and proteases) within mast cells and basophils, and is released upon stimulation or degranulation of these cells.

Once released into the tissues and circulation, histamine exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions through its interaction with four types of G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors). Histamine's effects are diverse and include modulation of immune responses, contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, stimulation of gastric acid secretion, and regulation of neurotransmission.

Histamine is also a potent mediator of allergic reactions and inflammation, causing symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing. Antihistamines are commonly used to block the actions of histamine at H1 receptors, providing relief from these symptoms.

Histamine H2 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that are widely distributed throughout the body, including in the stomach, heart, and brain. They are activated by the neurotransmitter histamine, which is released by mast cells in response to an allergen or injury. When histamine binds to H2 receptors, it triggers a variety of physiological responses, such as increasing gastric acid secretion, regulating heart rate and contractility, and modulating neurotransmitter release in the brain. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists, also known as H2 blockers, are commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcers by reducing gastric acid production. Examples of H2 blockers include ranitidine (Zantac), famotidine (Pepcid), and cimetidine (Tagamet).

Histamine H1 antagonists, also known as H1 blockers or antihistamines, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine at the H1 receptor. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergic reaction or injury. It causes various symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheal and flare reactions (hives).

H1 antagonists prevent the binding of histamine to its receptor, thereby alleviating these symptoms. They are commonly used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever, hives, and eczema, as well as motion sickness and insomnia. Examples of H1 antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec), and doxylamine (Unisom).

Histamine agonists are substances that bind to and activate histamine receptors, leading to the initiation or enhancement of various physiological responses. Histamine is a naturally occurring molecule that plays a key role in the body's immune and allergic responses, as well as in the regulation of sleep, wakefulness, and appetite.

There are four main types of histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4), each with distinct functions and signaling pathways. Histamine agonists can be selective for one or more of these receptor subtypes, depending on their pharmacological properties.

For example, H1 agonists are commonly used as decongestants and antihistamines to treat allergies, while H2 agonists are used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcers. H3 agonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, while H4 agonists are being studied for their role in inflammation and immune regulation.

It is important to note that histamine agonists can also have adverse effects, particularly if they are not selective for a specific receptor subtype or if they are used at high doses. These effects may include increased heart rate, blood pressure, and bronchodilation (opening of the airways), as well as gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Histamine H2 antagonists, also known as H2 blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine on the H2 receptors in the stomach. Histamine is a chemical that is released by the body during an allergic reaction and can also be released by certain cells in the stomach in response to food or other stimuli. When histamine binds to the H2 receptors in the stomach, it triggers the release of acid. By blocking the action of histamine on these receptors, H2 antagonists reduce the amount of acid produced by the stomach, which can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach ulcers. Examples of H2 antagonists include ranitidine (Zantac), famotidine (Pepcid), and cimetidine (Tagamet).

Histamine receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to histamine, a biologically active compound involved in various physiological and pathophysiological processes in the body. There are four types of histamine receptors, designated H1, H2, H3, and H4, which are classified based on their specific responses to histamine.

Histamine receptors, Histamine (H1) are G protein-coupled receptors that are widely distributed in the body, including in the smooth muscle of blood vessels, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. When histamine binds to H1 receptors, it activates a signaling pathway that leads to the contraction of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, and stimulation of sensory nerve endings, resulting in symptoms such as itching, sneezing, and runny nose. Antihistamines, which are commonly used to treat allergies, work by blocking H1 receptors and preventing histamine from binding to them.

It's worth noting that while histamine has many important functions in the body, excessive or inappropriate activation of histamine receptors can lead to a range of symptoms and conditions, including allergic reactions, inflammation, and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Histamine antagonists, also known as histamine blockers or H1-blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is released during an allergic reaction. Histamine causes many of the symptoms of an allergic response, such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and hives. By blocking the effects of histamine, these medications can help to relieve or prevent allergy symptoms.

Histamine antagonists are often used to treat conditions such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic reactions. They may also be used to treat stomach ulcers caused by excessive production of stomach acid. Some examples of histamine antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), and famotidine (Pepcid).

It's important to note that while histamine antagonists can be effective at relieving allergy symptoms, they do not cure allergies or prevent the release of histamine. They simply block its effects. It's also worth noting that these medications can have side effects, such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and dizziness, so it's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking them.

Histamine H3 antagonists, also known as inverse agonists, are a class of drugs that block the activity of histamine at the H3 receptor. Histamine is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter and autacoid involved in various physiological functions, including the modulation of wakefulness and arousal, regulation of food intake, and control of blood pressure and fluid balance.

The H3 receptor is primarily located in the central nervous system (CNS) and acts as an auto-receptor on histamine-containing neurons to regulate the release of histamine. By blocking the activity of these receptors, histamine H3 antagonists increase the release of histamine in the CNS, which can lead to increased wakefulness and arousal.

Histamine H3 antagonists have been studied for their potential therapeutic use in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including narcolepsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Alzheimer's disease. However, further research is needed to fully understand the clinical benefits and safety of these drugs.

Histamine release is the process by which mast cells and basophils (types of white blood cells) release histamine, a type of chemical messenger or mediator, into the surrounding tissue fluid in response to an antigen-antibody reaction. This process is a key part of the body's immune response to foreign substances, such as allergens, and helps to initiate local inflammation, increase blood flow, and recruit other immune cells to the site of the reaction.

Histamine release can also occur in response to certain medications, physical trauma, or other stimuli. When histamine is released in large amounts, it can cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and hives. In severe cases, it can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

Methylhistamines are not a recognized medical term or a specific medical condition. However, the term "methylhistamine" may refer to the metabolic breakdown product of the antihistamine drug, diphenhydramine, which is also known as N-methyldiphenhydramine or dimenhydrinate.

Diphenhydramine is a first-generation antihistamine that works by blocking the action of histamine, a chemical released during an allergic reaction. When diphenhydramine is metabolized in the body, it is converted into several breakdown products, including methylhistamines.

Methylhistamines are not known to have any specific pharmacological activity or clinical significance. However, they can be used as a marker for the presence of diphenhydramine or its metabolism in the body.

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve allergic symptoms caused by hay fever, hives, and other allergies. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Chlorpheniramine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, syrup, and injection.

Common side effects of chlorpheniramine include drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, and dizziness. It may also cause more serious side effects such as rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, and confusion, especially in elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions. Chlorpheniramine should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, particularly in children, pregnant women, and people with medical conditions such as glaucoma, enlarged prostate, and respiratory disorders.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking chlorpheniramine, as taking too much can lead to overdose and serious complications. If you experience any unusual symptoms or have concerns about your medication, it is best to consult with a healthcare provider.

Dimaprit is not a medical condition or disease. It is actually a synthetic peptide that acts as an agonist for certain types of receptors found in the body, specifically the H2 histamine receptors. These receptors are involved in various physiological processes, such as regulating gastric acid secretion and modulating immune responses.

As a research tool, Dimaprit is used to study the functions of H2 histamine receptors and their roles in different biological systems. It is not typically used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine.

Cimetidine is a histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonist, which is a type of medication that reduces the production of stomach acid. It works by blocking the action of histamine on the H2 receptors in the stomach, which are responsible for stimulating the release of stomach acid. By blocking these receptors, cimetidine reduces the amount of stomach acid produced and can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach ulcers.

Cimetidine is available by prescription in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid. It is typically taken two or three times a day, depending on the specific condition being treated. Common side effects of cimetidine may include headache, dizziness, diarrhea, and constipation.

In addition to its use in treating stomach acid-related conditions, cimetidine has also been studied for its potential anti-cancer properties. Some research suggests that it may help to enhance the immune system's response to cancer cells and reduce the growth of certain types of tumors. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine the optimal dosage and duration of treatment.

Metiamide is not generally considered a medical term, but it is a medication that has been used in the past. Medically, metiamide is defined as a synthetic histamine H2-receptor antagonist, which means it blocks the action of histamine at the H2 receptors in the stomach. This effect reduces gastric acid secretion and can be useful in treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and other conditions associated with excessive stomach acid production.

However, metiamide has largely been replaced by other H2 blockers like cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine due to its association with a rare but serious side effect called agranulocytosis, which is a severe decrease in white blood cell count that can increase the risk of infections.

Thiourea is not a medical term, but a chemical compound. It's a colorless crystalline solid with the formula SC(NH2)2. Thiourea is used in some industrial processes and can be found in some laboratory reagents. It has been studied for its potential effects on certain medical conditions, such as its ability to protect against radiation damage, but it is not a medication or a treatment that is currently in clinical use.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Impromidine" is not a widely recognized or established term in medical science or pharmacology. It does not appear to be listed in standard medical dictionaries or scientific literature as a drug, diagnostic agent, or medical condition.

If you have any more context or details about where you encountered this term, I'd be happy to help you try to figure out what it might refer to!

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine medication used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, runny nose, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions. Diphenhydramine can also be used to treat motion sickness, insomnia, and symptoms of the common cold.

In addition to its antihistamine effects, diphenhydramine also has anticholinergic properties, which means it can help to reduce secretions in the nose and throat, and may have a drying effect on the mouth and eyes. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, liquid, and topical creams or ointments.

It's important to note that diphenhydramine can cause drowsiness, so it should be used with caution when operating heavy machinery or driving a vehicle. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to speak with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Famotidine is a type of medication called an H2 blocker, or histamine-2 receptor antagonist. It works by reducing the amount of acid produced in the stomach. Famotidine is commonly used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines, and to manage conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

Famotidine is available by prescription and over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid. It is important to take famotidine exactly as directed by a healthcare professional, and to talk to them about any potential risks or side effects.

Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism and degradation of histamine, which is a biogenic amine involved in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Histamine is released by mast cells and basophils during allergic reactions and inflammation, and it can cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing.

HNMT is responsible for methylating the primary amino group of histamine, forming N-methylhistamine, which is then further metabolized by other enzymes. HNMT is primarily found in tissues such as the liver, kidney, and intestine, but it is also present in the brain and other organs.

Inhibition of HNMT has been suggested to be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating histamine-mediated disorders, such as allergies, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of HNMT in these conditions and to develop effective treatments that target this enzyme.

Histamine agents are substances that can either increase or decrease the level or action of histamine in the body. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to allergies, inflammation, or injury. It causes various symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheal and flare reactions in the skin.

Histamine-releasing agents are substances that can trigger the release of histamine from mast cells and basophils. Examples include certain medications (e.g., opioids, vancomycin), physical stimuli (e.g., heat, exercise), and venoms (e.g., bee stings).

Histamine-inhibiting agents are substances that can block the action of histamine or prevent its release from mast cells and basophils. Examples include antihistamines, which bind to histamine receptors and prevent histamine from exerting its effects, and mast cell stabilizers, which prevent the degranulation of mast cells and the subsequent release of histamine and other mediators.

Histamine-enhancing agents are substances that can increase the level or action of histamine in the body. Examples include histamine agonists, which mimic the effects of histamine by binding to its receptors, and histamine precursors, which provide the building blocks for the synthesis of histamine.

Overall, histamine agents have important clinical implications in the management of allergies, inflammation, and other conditions associated with histamine release or action.

Ranitidine is a histamine-2 (H2) blocker medication that works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces. It is commonly used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines, and to manage conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Ranitidine is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn. Additionally, ranitidine can be used to prevent and treat upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by stress or injury in critically ill patients.

The medication is available in both prescription and over-the-counter forms, and it comes in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. As with any medication, ranitidine should be taken as directed by a healthcare professional, and its potential side effects and interactions with other medications should be carefully monitored.

Pyrilamine is an antihistamine drug that is primarily used to relieve allergic symptoms such as sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance naturally produced by the body during an allergic reaction. Pyrilamine may also be used to treat motion sickness and to help with tension headaches or migraines.

Pyrilamine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and syrup, and it can be taken with or without food. Common side effects of pyrilamine include dizziness, dry mouth, and drowsiness. It is important to avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving or operating heavy machinery, until you know how pyrilamine affects you.

Like all medications, pyrilamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who can determine the appropriate dosage and monitor for any potential side effects or interactions with other drugs. It is essential to follow the instructions provided by your healthcare provider carefully and not exceed the recommended dose.

Piperidines are not a medical term per se, but they are a class of organic compounds that have important applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Medically relevant piperidines include various drugs such as some antihistamines, antidepressants, and muscle relaxants.

A piperidine is a heterocyclic amine with a six-membered ring containing five carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. The structure can be described as a cyclic secondary amine. Piperidines are found in some natural alkaloids, such as those derived from the pepper plant (Piper nigrum), which gives piperidines their name.

In a medical context, it is more common to encounter specific drugs that belong to the class of piperidines rather than the term itself.

Burimamide is a medication that was developed in the 1970s and is known as a histamine H2 receptor antagonist. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is involved in allergic reactions and inflammation. Burimamide was originally developed to treat gastric ulcers, but it has largely been replaced by other medications with similar mechanisms of action, such as ranitidine and cimetidine, which have fewer side effects and are more effective.

The medical definition of 'Burimamide' is:

A synthetic histamine H2 receptor antagonist that was developed to treat gastric ulcers. It works by blocking the action of histamine at the H2 receptors in the stomach, reducing the production of stomach acid and promoting the healing of ulcers. Burimamide has largely been replaced by other medications with similar mechanisms of action, such as ranitidine and cimetidine, which have fewer side effects and are more effective.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Histidine Decarboxylase is a medical term that refers to an enzyme found in various organisms, including humans. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the conversion of the amino acid L-histidine into histamine, which is a biogenic amine that acts as a neurotransmitter and inflammatory mediator in the human body.

Histidine decarboxylase is found in several tissues, including the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and skin. It requires pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor for its enzymatic activity. Abnormal levels or activity of histidine decarboxylase have been implicated in several medical conditions, including allergic reactions, inflammation, and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Inhibitors of histidine decarboxylase are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of various diseases, such as mast cell-mediated disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, and neurological conditions associated with abnormal histamine levels.

Histamine H1 antagonists, non-sedating, also known as second-generation antihistamines, are medications that block the action of histamine at the H1 receptor without causing significant sedation. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergen, leading to allergic symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and hives.

The non-sedating antihistamines have a higher affinity for the H1 receptor and are less lipophilic than first-generation antihistamines, which results in less penetration of the blood-brain barrier and reduced sedative effects. Examples of non-sedating antihistamines include cetirizine, levocetirizine, loratadine, desloratadine, fexofenadine, and rupatadine. These medications are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema.

Doxepin is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) medication that is primarily used to treat depression and anxiety disorders. It works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, in the brain. Doxepin is also used in the treatment of insomnia, as it can help to improve sleep quality and reduce nighttime awakenings.

In addition to its antidepressant and sedative effects, doxepin has anti-inflammatory properties and is sometimes used off-label to treat chronic itching associated with various skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis.

Like other TCAs, doxepin can cause a range of side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dizziness, and drowsiness. It may also cause weight gain, sexual dysfunction, and orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure upon standing). In rare cases, doxepin can cause more serious side effects, such as seizures, irregular heart rhythms, and serotonin syndrome (a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive levels of serotonin in the body).

Doxepin is available in immediate-release and extended-release forms, and is typically taken orally once or twice a day. The dosage may vary depending on the individual's age, weight, and medical history, as well as the specific condition being treated. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking doxepin, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Isothiuronium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that can be referred to in a medical context. It is a type of organic compound called an isothiouronium salt, which contains a nitrogen atom bonded to a sulfur atom and two organic groups.

Isothiouronium compounds are known to have various biological activities, including inhibition of certain enzymes and potential use as therapeutic agents. However, they can also be toxic in high concentrations. Therefore, exposure to isothiuronium compounds may require medical attention, particularly if it occurs through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact.

In a medical context, isothiuronium may be mentioned in the context of drug metabolism, toxicology, or pharmacology, depending on the specific compound and its biological activity.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Tripelennamine is not typically referred to as a "medical definition" in and of itself, but it is a medication with specific pharmacological properties. Tripelennamine is an older antihistamine drug that works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. It is primarily used to treat symptoms associated with allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes.

Tripelennamine may also be used for its sedative properties to help manage anxiety or promote sleep. However, it is not commonly used in modern medical practice due to the availability of newer antihistamines with fewer side effects.

It's important to note that Tripelennamine can cause significant drowsiness and should be used with caution when operating heavy machinery or driving. It may also interact with other medications, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider of all the drugs you are taking before starting Tripelennamine.

A radioligand assay is a type of in vitro binding assay used in molecular biology and pharmacology to measure the affinity and quantity of a ligand (such as a drug or hormone) to its specific receptor. In this technique, a small amount of a radioactively labeled ligand, also known as a radioligand, is introduced to a sample containing the receptor of interest. The radioligand binds competitively with other unlabeled ligands present in the sample for the same binding site on the receptor. After allowing sufficient time for binding, the reaction is stopped, and the amount of bound radioligand is measured using a technique such as scintillation counting. The data obtained from this assay can be used to determine the dissociation constant (Kd) and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of the receptor-ligand interaction, which are important parameters in understanding the pharmacological properties of drugs and other ligands.

4-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine (also known as 4-MeO-N-MEPEA or 4-MeO-PMA) is a synthetic psychoactive substance that belongs to the phenethylamine class. It is a designer drug, which means it is manufactured and distributed for recreational use as an alternative to illegal drugs.

It acts as a stimulant and entactogen, producing effects similar to those of MDMA (ecstasy) but with less potency. The compound has been linked to several cases of severe intoxication, including fatalities, due to its ability to increase heart rate and blood pressure, cause dehydration, hyperthermia, and serotonin syndrome.

It is important to note that the use of 4-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine and other designer drugs can be dangerous and illegal in many jurisdictions. Always consult a medical professional for accurate information regarding specific substances.

Terfenadine is an antihistamine medication that has been used to treat symptoms of allergies such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic reactions. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Terfenadine was first approved for use in the United States in 1985, but it is no longer available in many countries due to concerns about rare but serious side effects related to heart rhythm disturbances. It has been replaced by other antihistamines that are considered safer and more effective.

Triprolidine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve symptoms caused by allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Triprolidine may also be used to help relieve symptoms of motion sickness.

It is important to note that this definition is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice. If you have any questions about triprolidine or its use, it is best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Gastric acid, also known as stomach acid, is a digestive fluid produced in the stomach. It's primarily composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium chloride (NaCl). The pH of gastric acid is typically between 1.5 and 3.5, making it a strong acid that helps to break down food by denaturing proteins and activating digestive enzymes.

The production of gastric acid is regulated by the enteric nervous system and several hormones. The primary function of gastric acid is to initiate protein digestion, activate pepsinogen into the active enzyme pepsin, and kill most ingested microorganisms. However, an excess or deficiency in gastric acid secretion can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders such as gastritis, ulcers, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a family of membrane receptors that play an essential role in cellular signaling and communication. These receptors possess seven transmembrane domains, forming a structure that spans the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane. They are called "G-protein-coupled" because they interact with heterotrimeric G proteins upon activation, which in turn modulate various downstream signaling pathways.

When an extracellular ligand binds to a GPCR, it causes a conformational change in the receptor's structure, leading to the exchange of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) for guanosine triphosphate (GTP) on the associated G protein's α subunit. This exchange triggers the dissociation of the G protein into its α and βγ subunits, which then interact with various effector proteins to elicit cellular responses.

There are four main families of GPCRs, classified based on their sequence similarities and downstream signaling pathways:

1. Gq-coupled receptors: These receptors activate phospholipase C (PLC), which leads to the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). IP3 induces calcium release from intracellular stores, while DAG activates protein kinase C (PKC).
2. Gs-coupled receptors: These receptors activate adenylyl cyclase, which increases the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and subsequently activates protein kinase A (PKA).
3. Gi/o-coupled receptors: These receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase, reducing cAMP levels and modulating PKA activity. Additionally, they can activate ion channels or regulate other signaling pathways through the βγ subunits.
4. G12/13-coupled receptors: These receptors primarily activate RhoGEFs, which in turn activate RhoA and modulate cytoskeletal organization and cellular motility.

GPCRs are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and sensory perception. Dysregulation of GPCR function has been implicated in numerous diseases, making them attractive targets for drug development.

Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are found in connective tissues throughout the body, including the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the immune system and help to defend the body against pathogens by releasing chemicals such as histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes, which help to attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury. Mast cells also play a role in allergic reactions, as they release histamine and other chemicals in response to exposure to an allergen, leading to symptoms such as itching, swelling, and redness. They are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and mature in the tissues where they reside.

Imidazoles are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a double-bonded nitrogen atom and two additional nitrogen atoms in the ring. They have the chemical formula C3H4N2. In a medical context, imidazoles are commonly used as antifungal agents. Some examples of imidazole-derived antifungals include clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole. These medications work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes, leading to increased permeability and death of the fungal cells. Imidazoles may also have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anticancer properties.

Hormone antagonists are substances or drugs that block the action of hormones by binding to their receptors without activating them, thereby preventing the hormones from exerting their effects. They can be classified into two types: receptor antagonists and enzyme inhibitors. Receptor antagonists bind directly to hormone receptors and prevent the hormone from binding, while enzyme inhibitors block the production or breakdown of hormones by inhibiting specific enzymes involved in their metabolism. Hormone antagonists are used in the treatment of various medical conditions, such as cancer, hormonal disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.

Ketotifen is an antihistamine and mast cell stabilizer used in the prevention and treatment of allergic reactions. It works by blocking the release of histamine, a substance that causes allergic symptoms, and preventing the activation of mast cells, which play a key role in allergic responses. Ketotifen is available as an oral medication and is often used to treat chronic urticaria (hives) and other allergic conditions. It may also have some benefits in the treatment of asthma.

It's important to note that ketotifen should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause side effects such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and increased appetite. Additionally, it may interact with other medications, so it is important to inform your doctor of all medications you are taking before starting ketotifen.

Dibenzoxepins are a class of organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring consisting of two benzene rings fused to an oxygen atom. This structure is a heterocyclic compound, and dibenzoxepins are aromatic in nature. They can be found in some natural sources, but many dibenzoxepin derivatives are synthesized for use in pharmaceuticals and other applications.

In the medical field, certain dibenzoxepin derivatives have been explored for their potential therapeutic benefits. For instance, some of these compounds have shown promise as anti-inflammatory, analgesic (pain-relieving), and antipyretic (fever-reducing) agents. Additionally, some dibenzoxepin derivatives are being investigated for their potential use in treating neurological disorders such as depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia due to their ability to interact with various neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

It is important to note that while these compounds have shown promise in preclinical studies, further research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy in humans before they can be approved as medications. Additionally, individual dibenzoxepin derivatives may have different properties, indications, and side effects, so it's essential to consult medical literature or healthcare professionals for specific information on each compound.

Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of substance P, a neuropeptide involved in pain transmission and inflammation. These drugs work by binding to NK-1 receptors found on nerve cells, preventing substance P from activating them and transmitting pain signals. NK-1 receptor antagonists have been studied for their potential use in treating various conditions associated with pain and inflammation, such as migraine headaches, depression, and irritable bowel syndrome. Some examples of NK-1 receptor antagonists include aprepitant, fosaprepitant, and rolapitant.

Dopamine antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain associated with various functions including movement, motivation, and emotion. These drugs work by binding to dopamine receptors and preventing dopamine from attaching to them, which can help to reduce the symptoms of certain medical conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

There are several types of dopamine antagonists, including:

1. Typical antipsychotics: These drugs are primarily used to treat psychosis, including schizophrenia and delusional disorders. Examples include haloperidol, chlorpromazine, and fluphenazine.
2. Atypical antipsychotics: These drugs are also used to treat psychosis but have fewer side effects than typical antipsychotics. They may also be used to treat bipolar disorder and depression. Examples include risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine.
3. Antiemetics: These drugs are used to treat nausea and vomiting. Examples include metoclopramide and prochlorperazine.
4. Dopamine agonists: While not technically dopamine antagonists, these drugs work by stimulating dopamine receptors and can be used to treat conditions such as Parkinson's disease. However, they can also have the opposite effect and block dopamine receptors in high doses, making them functionally similar to dopamine antagonists.

Common side effects of dopamine antagonists include sedation, weight gain, and movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia. It's important to use these drugs under the close supervision of a healthcare provider to monitor for side effects and adjust the dosage as needed.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Excitatory amino acid antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of excitatory neurotransmitters, particularly glutamate and aspartate, in the brain. These drugs work by binding to and blocking the receptors for these neurotransmitters, thereby reducing their ability to stimulate neurons and produce an excitatory response.

Excitatory amino acid antagonists have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in a variety of neurological conditions, including stroke, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, their use is limited by the fact that blocking excitatory neurotransmission can also have negative effects on cognitive function and memory.

There are several types of excitatory amino acid receptors, including N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), and kainite receptors. Different excitatory amino acid antagonists may target one or more of these receptor subtypes, depending on their specific mechanism of action.

Examples of excitatory amino acid antagonists include ketamine, memantine, and dextromethorphan. These drugs have been used in clinical practice for various indications, such as anesthesia, sedation, and treatment of neurological disorders. However, their use must be carefully monitored due to potential side effects and risks associated with blocking excitatory neurotransmission.

Betahistine is a medication that is primarily used to treat symptoms associated with Ménière's disease, which is an inner ear disorder that can cause vertigo (dizziness), tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and hearing loss. Betahistine is thought to work by improving blood flow in the inner ear and reducing the pressure in the fluid-filled compartments of the ear.

Betahistine is a histamine analogue, which means that it has a similar chemical structure to histamine, a naturally occurring compound in the body that plays a role in various physiological processes, including the regulation of blood flow and inflammation. Betahistine acts as an agonist at H1 and H3 histamine receptors and as an antagonist at H2 receptors, which leads to its therapeutic effects on the inner ear.

The medication is available in tablet form and is typically taken two or three times a day, with or without food. The dosage may vary depending on the individual's response to treatment and any underlying medical conditions. Common side effects of betahistine include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, as well as headache, dizziness, and dry mouth.

It is important to note that betahistine may interact with other medications, including certain antidepressants, antihistamines, and sedatives, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider of all the medications you are taking before starting treatment with betahistine. Additionally, individuals with asthma or a history of peptic ulcers should use caution when taking this medication, as it may exacerbate these conditions.

Pruritus is a medical term derived from Latin, in which "prurire" means "to itch." It refers to an unpleasant sensation on the skin that provokes the desire or reflex to scratch. This can be caused by various factors, such as skin conditions (e.g., dryness, eczema, psoriasis), systemic diseases (e.g., liver disease, kidney failure), nerve disorders, psychological conditions, or reactions to certain medications.

Pruritus can significantly affect a person's quality of life, leading to sleep disturbances, anxiety, and depression. Proper identification and management of the underlying cause are essential for effective treatment.

Guanidines are organic compounds that contain a guanidino group, which is a functional group with the formula -NH-C(=NH)-NH2. Guanidines can be found in various natural sources, including some animals, plants, and microorganisms. They also occur as byproducts of certain metabolic processes in the body.

In a medical context, guanidines are most commonly associated with the treatment of muscle weakness and neuromuscular disorders. The most well-known guanidine compound is probably guanidine hydrochloride, which has been used as a medication to treat conditions such as myasthenia gravis and Eaton-Lambert syndrome.

However, the use of guanidines as medications has declined in recent years due to their potential for toxicity and the development of safer and more effective treatments. Today, guanidines are mainly used in research settings to study various biological processes, including protein folding and aggregation, enzyme inhibition, and cell signaling.

Cetirizine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic skin conditions. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Cetirizine is available over-the-counter and by prescription in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, and syrup.

The medical definition of Cetirizine is:

Cetirizine hydrochloride: A second-generation antihistamine with selective peripheral H1 receptor antagonist activity. A potent and long-acting inhibitor of the early and late phases of the allergic reaction, it exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and has a more favorable side effect profile than many other antihistamines. It is used in the management of allergic rhinitis, chronic urticaria, and angioedema.

Narcotic antagonists are a class of medications that block the effects of opioids, a type of narcotic pain reliever, by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and blocking the activation of these receptors by opioids. This results in the prevention or reversal of opioid-induced effects such as respiratory depression, sedation, and euphoria. Narcotic antagonists are used for a variety of medical purposes, including the treatment of opioid overdose, the management of opioid dependence, and the prevention of opioid-induced side effects in certain clinical situations. Examples of narcotic antagonists include naloxone, naltrexone, and methylnaltrexone.

Gastric mucosa refers to the innermost lining of the stomach, which is in contact with the gastric lumen. It is a specialized mucous membrane that consists of epithelial cells, lamina propria, and a thin layer of smooth muscle. The surface epithelium is primarily made up of mucus-secreting cells (goblet cells) and parietal cells, which secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor, and chief cells, which produce pepsinogen.

The gastric mucosa has several important functions, including protection against self-digestion by the stomach's own digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid. The mucus layer secreted by the epithelial cells forms a physical barrier that prevents the acidic contents of the stomach from damaging the underlying tissues. Additionally, the bicarbonate ions secreted by the surface epithelial cells help neutralize the acidity in the immediate vicinity of the mucosa.

The gastric mucosa is also responsible for the initial digestion of food through the action of hydrochloric acid and pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins into smaller peptides. The intrinsic factor secreted by parietal cells plays a crucial role in the absorption of vitamin B12 in the small intestine.

The gastric mucosa is constantly exposed to potential damage from various factors, including acid, pepsin, and other digestive enzymes, as well as mechanical stress due to muscle contractions during digestion. To maintain its integrity, the gastric mucosa has a remarkable capacity for self-repair and regeneration. However, chronic exposure to noxious stimuli or certain medical conditions can lead to inflammation, erosions, ulcers, or even cancer of the gastric mucosa.

"Competitive binding" is a term used in pharmacology and biochemistry to describe the behavior of two or more molecules (ligands) competing for the same binding site on a target protein or receptor. In this context, "binding" refers to the physical interaction between a ligand and its target.

When a ligand binds to a receptor, it can alter the receptor's function, either activating or inhibiting it. If multiple ligands compete for the same binding site, they will compete to bind to the receptor. The ability of each ligand to bind to the receptor is influenced by its affinity for the receptor, which is a measure of how strongly and specifically the ligand binds to the receptor.

In competitive binding, if one ligand is present in high concentrations, it can prevent other ligands with lower affinity from binding to the receptor. This is because the higher-affinity ligand will have a greater probability of occupying the binding site and blocking access to the other ligands. The competition between ligands can be described mathematically using equations such as the Langmuir isotherm, which describes the relationship between the concentration of ligand and the fraction of receptors that are occupied by the ligand.

Competitive binding is an important concept in drug development, as it can be used to predict how different drugs will interact with their targets and how they may affect each other's activity. By understanding the competitive binding properties of a drug, researchers can optimize its dosage and delivery to maximize its therapeutic effect while minimizing unwanted side effects.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring protein that acts as a competitive inhibitor of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor. IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in various physiological processes, including the immune response and inflammation. The binding of IL-1 to its receptor triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of inflammatory genes and cellular responses.

IL-1Ra shares structural similarities with IL-1 but does not initiate the downstream signaling pathway. Instead, it binds to the same receptor site as IL-1, preventing IL-1 from interacting with its receptor and thus inhibiting the inflammatory response.

Increased levels of IL-1Ra have been found in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and sepsis, where it acts to counterbalance the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1. Recombinant IL-1Ra (Anakinra) is used clinically as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

Muscarinic antagonists, also known as muscarinic receptor antagonists or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to regulate various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Muscarinic antagonists work by binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. By blocking the action of acetylcholine at these receptors, muscarinic antagonists can produce a range of effects depending on the specific receptor subtype that is affected.

For example, muscarinic antagonists may be used to treat conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways and reducing bronchoconstriction. They may also be used to treat conditions such as urinary incontinence or overactive bladder by reducing bladder contractions.

Some common muscarinic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and tiotropium. It's important to note that these drugs can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and confusion, especially when used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time.

Dibenzazepines are a class of chemical compounds that contain a dibenzazepine structure, which is a fusion of a benzene ring with a diazepine ring. Dibenzazepines have a wide range of pharmacological activities and are used in the treatment of various medical conditions.

Some of the medically relevant dibenzazepines include:

1. Antipsychotics: Some antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and olanzapine, have a dibenzazepine structure. These drugs are used to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.
2. Antidepressants: Mianserin and mirtazapine are dibenzazepine antidepressants that work by blocking the uptake of serotonin and noradrenaline in the brain. They are used to treat depression, anxiety, and insomnia.
3. Anticonvulsants: Some anticonvulsant drugs, such as levetiracetam and brivaracetam, have a dibenzazepine structure. These drugs are used to treat epilepsy and other seizure disorders.
4. Anxiolytics: Prazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with a dibenzazepine structure that is used to treat anxiety disorders.
5. Analgesics: Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic with a dibenzazepine structure that is used to treat moderate to severe pain.

It's important to note that while these drugs have a dibenzazepine structure, they may also contain other functional groups and have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, it's essential to consider the specific pharmacological properties of each drug when prescribing or administering them.

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs suddenly after exposure to an allergen (a substance that triggers an allergic reaction) to which the person has previously been sensitized. The symptoms of anaphylaxis include rapid onset of symptoms such as itching, hives, swelling of the throat and tongue, difficulty breathing, wheezing, cough, chest tightness, rapid heartbeat, hypotension (low blood pressure), shock, and in severe cases, loss of consciousness and death. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) and other supportive measures to stabilize the patient's condition.

Drug inverse agonism is a property of certain drugs that can bind to and stabilize the inactive conformation of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) or other type of receptor. This results in a reduction of the receptor's basal activity, which is the level of signaling that occurs in the absence of an agonist ligand.

An inverse agonist drug can have the opposite effect of an agonist drug, which binds to and stabilizes the active conformation of a receptor and increases its signaling activity. An inverse agonist drug can also have a greater effect than a simple antagonist drug, which binds to a receptor without activating or inhibiting it but rather prevents other ligands from binding.

Inverse agonism is an important concept in pharmacology and has implications for the development of drugs that target GPCRs and other types of receptors. For example, inverse agonist drugs have been developed to treat certain conditions such as anxiety disorders, where reducing the basal activity of a particular receptor may be beneficial.

Nizatidine is a histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonist, which is a type of medication that works by reducing the amount of acid produced by the stomach. It is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines, and to manage conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Nizatidine is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

The medical definition of Nizatidine is: "A synthetic histamine H2-receptor antagonist that is used in the treatment of gastric ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is also used to manage Zollinger-Ellison syndrome."

Cyproheptadine is an antihistamine and anticholinergic medication that is primarily used to treat symptoms of allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itching. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions.

Cyproheptadine also has other uses, including the treatment of migraines and cluster headaches, appetite stimulation in people with certain medical conditions, and as a sedative in some cases. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, and syrup.

Like all medications, cyproheptadine can have side effects, including drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness, and blurred vision. It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully and talk to a healthcare provider if you experience any bothersome or persistent side effects.

Astemizole is a second-generation antihistamine that was previously used to treat symptoms associated with allergies, such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic skin reactions. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. However, astemizole has been withdrawn from the market in many countries due to rare but serious side effects on the heart.

Indole is not strictly a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that can be found in the human body and has relevance to medical and biological research. Indoles are organic compounds that contain a bicyclic structure consisting of a six-membered benzene ring fused to a five-membered pyrrole ring.

In the context of medicine, indoles are particularly relevant due to their presence in certain hormones and other biologically active molecules. For example, the neurotransmitter serotonin contains an indole ring, as does the hormone melatonin. Indoles can also be found in various plant-based foods, such as cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, kale), and have been studied for their potential health benefits.

Some indoles, like indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane, are found in these vegetables and can have anti-cancer properties by modulating estrogen metabolism, reducing inflammation, and promoting cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells. However, it is essential to note that further research is needed to fully understand the potential health benefits and risks associated with indoles.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyridines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of organic compounds with the chemical structure of a six-membered ring containing one nitrogen atom and five carbon atoms (heterocyclic aromatic compound).

In a biological or medical context, pyridine derivatives can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. For example, some medications contain pyridine rings as part of their chemical structure. However, "Pyridines" itself is not a medical term or condition.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) antagonists are substances that block the action of GABA, which is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. GABA plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and reducing the transmission of nerve impulses.

GABA antagonists work by binding to the GABA receptors without activating them, thereby preventing the normal function of GABA and increasing neuronal activity. These agents can cause excitation of the nervous system, leading to various effects depending on the specific type of GABA receptor they target.

GABA antagonists are used in medical treatments for certain conditions, such as sleep disorders, depression, and cognitive enhancement. However, they can also have adverse effects, including anxiety, agitation, seizures, and even neurotoxicity at high doses. Examples of GABA antagonists include picrotoxin, bicuculline, and flumazenil.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine medication that is primarily used to treat symptoms of motion sickness, such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.

The chemical name for dimenhydrinate is 8-chlorotheophylline 1-((2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)dimethylamino) derivative. It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions, and is typically taken orally.

In addition to its use as an anti-motion sickness medication, dimenhydrinate may also be used to treat symptoms of vertigo, Meniere's disease, and other inner ear disorders. However, it should be used with caution, as it can cause drowsiness, dry mouth, and other side effects.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking dimenhydrinate, and to talk to a healthcare provider before using it if you have any medical conditions or are taking other medications.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical drugs that block the activity of purinergic P1 receptors, which are a type of G-protein coupled receptor found in many tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated by extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine and ATP, and play important roles in regulating a variety of physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, neurotransmission, and immune response.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists work by binding to these receptors and preventing them from being activated by nucleotides. This can have various therapeutic effects, depending on the specific receptor subtype that is targeted. For example, A1 receptor antagonists have been shown to improve cardiac function in heart failure, while A2A receptor antagonists have potential as anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents.

However, it's important to note that the use of purinergic P1 receptor antagonists is still an area of active research, and more studies are needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Basophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are granulocytes, which means they contain granules filled with chemicals that can be released in response to an infection or inflammation. Basophils are relatively rare, making up less than 1% of all white blood cells.

When basophils become activated, they release histamine and other chemical mediators that can contribute to allergic reactions, such as itching, swelling, and redness. They also play a role in inflammation, helping to recruit other immune cells to the site of an infection or injury.

Basophils can be identified under a microscope based on their characteristic staining properties. They are typically smaller than other granulocytes, such as neutrophils and eosinophils, and have a multi-lobed nucleus with dark purple-staining granules in the cytoplasm.

While basophils play an important role in the immune response, abnormal levels of basophils can be associated with various medical conditions, such as allergies, infections, and certain types of leukemia.

Benzazepines are a class of heterocyclic compounds that contain a benzene fused to a diazepine ring. In the context of pharmaceuticals, benzazepines refer to a group of drugs with various therapeutic uses, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants. Some examples of benzazepine-derived drugs include clozapine, olanzapine, and loxoprofen. These drugs have complex mechanisms of action, often involving multiple receptor systems in the brain.

Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4. They have the molecular formula N-NRR' where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Piperazines have a wide range of uses in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and as building blocks in organic synthesis.

In a medical context, piperazines are used in the manufacture of various drugs, including some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and anti-worm medications. For example, the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine and the antidepressant drug nefazodone both contain a piperazine ring in their chemical structure.

However, it's important to note that some piperazines are also used as recreational drugs due to their stimulant and euphoric effects. These include compounds such as BZP (benzylpiperazine) and TFMPP (trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), which have been linked to serious health risks, including addiction, seizures, and death. Therefore, the use of these substances should be avoided.

Gastric juice is a digestive fluid that is produced in the stomach. It is composed of several enzymes, including pepsin, which helps to break down proteins, and gastric amylase, which begins the digestion of carbohydrates. Gastric juice also contains hydrochloric acid, which creates a low pH environment in the stomach that is necessary for the activation of pepsin and the digestion of food. Additionally, gastric juice contains mucus, which helps to protect the lining of the stomach from the damaging effects of the hydrochloric acid. The production of gastric juice is controlled by hormones and the autonomic nervous system.

Pentagastrin is a synthetic polypeptide hormone that stimulates the release of gastrin and hydrochloric acid from the stomach. It is used diagnostically to test for conditions such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a rare disorder in which tumors in the pancreas or duodenum produce excessive amounts of gastrin, leading to severe ulcers and other digestive problems.

Pentagastrin is typically administered intravenously, and its effects are monitored through blood tests that measure gastric acid secretion. It is a potent stimulant of gastric acid production, and its use is limited to diagnostic purposes due to the risk of adverse effects such as nausea, flushing, and increased heart rate.

Anti-allergic agents, also known as antihistamines, are a class of medications used to treat allergies. They work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is released during an allergic reaction and causes symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes.

There are two main types of antihistamines: first-generation and second-generation. First-generation antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), can cause drowsiness and other side effects, such as dry mouth and blurred vision. They are typically used for the treatment of short-term symptoms, such as those caused by seasonal allergies or a mild reaction to an insect bite.

Second-generation antihistamines, such as loratadine (Claritin) and cetirizine (Zyrtec), are less likely to cause drowsiness and other side effects. They are often used for the long-term treatment of chronic allergies, such as those caused by dust mites or pet dander.

In addition to their use in treating allergies, antihistamines may also be used to treat symptoms of motion sickness, insomnia, and anxiety. It is important to follow the instructions on the label when taking antihistamines and to talk to a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using these medications.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

The ileum is the third and final segment of the small intestine, located between the jejunum and the cecum (the beginning of the large intestine). It plays a crucial role in nutrient absorption, particularly for vitamin B12 and bile salts. The ileum is characterized by its thin, lined walls and the presence of Peyer's patches, which are part of the immune system and help surveil for pathogens.

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter that is found primarily in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of humans and other animals. It is produced by the conversion of the amino acid tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), and then to serotonin.

In the CNS, serotonin plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and behavior, among other functions. It also acts as a vasoconstrictor, helping to regulate blood flow and blood pressure. In the GI tract, it is involved in peristalsis, the contraction and relaxation of muscles that moves food through the digestive system.

Serotonin is synthesized and stored in serotonergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use serotonin as their primary neurotransmitter. These neurons are found throughout the brain and spinal cord, and they communicate with other neurons by releasing serotonin into the synapse, the small gap between two neurons.

Abnormal levels of serotonin have been linked to a variety of disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraines. Medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are commonly used to treat these conditions.

Nicotinic antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of nicotine at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). These receptors are found in the nervous system and are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as well as by nicotine. When nicotine binds to these receptors, it can cause the release of various neurotransmitters, including dopamine, which can lead to rewarding effects and addiction.

Nicotinic antagonists work by binding to nAChRs and preventing nicotine from activating them. This can help to reduce the rewarding effects of nicotine and may be useful in treating nicotine addiction. Examples of nicotinic antagonists include mecamylamine, varenicline, and cytisine.

It's important to note that while nicotinic antagonists can help with nicotine addiction, they can also have side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and abnormal dreams. Additionally, some people may experience more serious side effects, such as seizures or cardiovascular problems, so it's important to use these medications under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

In anatomical terms, the stomach is a muscular, J-shaped organ located in the upper left portion of the abdomen. It is part of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a crucial role in digestion. The stomach's primary functions include storing food, mixing it with digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid to break down proteins, and slowly emptying the partially digested food into the small intestine for further absorption of nutrients.

The stomach is divided into several regions, including the cardia (the area nearest the esophagus), the fundus (the upper portion on the left side), the body (the main central part), and the pylorus (the narrowed region leading to the small intestine). The inner lining of the stomach, called the mucosa, is protected by a layer of mucus that prevents the digestive juices from damaging the stomach tissue itself.

In medical contexts, various conditions can affect the stomach, such as gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining), peptic ulcers (sores in the stomach or duodenum), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach cancer. Symptoms related to the stomach may include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing.

Pheniramine is an antihistamine drug that works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. It is used to relieve or prevent symptoms of hay fever and other allergies such as rash, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. Pheniramine may also be used to treat motion sickness and to help with sleep before surgery.

It's important to note that pheniramine can cause drowsiness, so it should not be taken with alcohol or other drugs that may also cause drowsiness. It is also recommended to consult a healthcare professional before taking this medication, especially for children under 2 years old and people with certain medical conditions such as glaucoma, enlarged prostate, and difficulty urinating.

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at A2 receptors. Adenosine is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that acts as a neurotransmitter and has various physiological effects, including vasodilation and inhibition of heart rate.

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists work by binding to A2 receptors and preventing adenosine from activating them. This results in the opposite effect of adenosine, leading to vasoconstriction and increased heart rate. These drugs are used for a variety of medical conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and heart failure.

Examples of Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists include theophylline, caffeine, and some newer drugs such asistradefylline and tozadenant. These drugs have different pharmacological properties and are used for specific medical conditions. It is important to note that adenosine A2 receptor antagonists can have side effects, including restlessness, insomnia, and gastrointestinal symptoms, and should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The trachea, also known as the windpipe, is a tube-like structure in the respiratory system that connects the larynx (voice box) to the bronchi (the two branches leading to each lung). It is composed of several incomplete rings of cartilage and smooth muscle, which provide support and flexibility. The trachea plays a crucial role in directing incoming air to the lungs during inspiration and outgoing air to the larynx during expiration.

Promethazine is an antihistamine and phenothiazine derivative, which is commonly used for its sedative, anti-emetic (prevents vomiting), and anti-allergic properties. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms, and by blocking the action of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain that helps transmit signals.

Promethazine is used to treat various conditions such as allergies, motion sickness, nausea and vomiting, and as a sedative before and after surgery or medical procedures. It may also be used for its calming effects in children with certain behavioral disorders.

Like all medications, promethazine can have side effects, including drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, and dizziness. More serious side effects may include seizures, irregular heartbeat, and difficulty breathing. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when taking promethazine and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Adrenergic alpha-1 receptor antagonists, also known as alpha-blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine at alpha-1 receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the smooth muscle of blood vessels, the bladder, and the eye.

When norepinephrine binds to alpha-1 receptors, it causes smooth muscle to contract, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased blood pressure, and other effects. By blocking these receptors, alpha-blockers can cause relaxation of smooth muscle, leading to vasodilation (expansion of blood vessels), decreased blood pressure, and other effects.

Alpha-blockers are used in the treatment of various medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate), and pheochromocytoma (a rare tumor of the adrenal gland). Examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin, prazosin, and terazosin.

It's important to note that while alpha-blockers can be effective in treating certain medical conditions, they can also have side effects, such as dizziness, lightheadedness, and orthostatic hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up). As with any medication, it's important to use alpha-blockers under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Purinergic P2 receptor antagonists are pharmaceutical agents that block the activity of P2 receptors, which are a type of cell surface receptor that binds extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and ADP. These receptors play important roles in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, inflammation, and platelet aggregation.

P2 receptors are divided into two main subfamilies: P2X and P2Y. The P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane upon activation, while the P2Y receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that activate intracellular signaling pathways.

Purinergic P2 receptor antagonists are used in clinical medicine to treat various conditions, such as chronic pain, urinary incontinence, and cardiovascular diseases. For example, the P2X3 receptor antagonist gefapixant is being investigated for the treatment of refractory chronic cough, while the P2Y12 receptor antagonists clopidogrel and ticagrelor are used to prevent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Overall, purinergic P2 receptor antagonists offer a promising therapeutic approach for various diseases by targeting specific receptors involved in pathological processes.

A ligand, in the context of biochemistry and medicine, is a molecule that binds to a specific site on a protein or a larger biomolecule, such as an enzyme or a receptor. This binding interaction can modify the function or activity of the target protein, either activating it or inhibiting it. Ligands can be small molecules, like hormones or neurotransmitters, or larger structures, like antibodies. The study of ligand-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes and developing drugs, as many therapeutic compounds function by binding to specific targets within the body.

Substance P is an undecapeptide neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, belonging to the tachykinin family of peptides. It is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is primarily found in sensory neurons. Substance P plays a crucial role in pain transmission, inflammation, and various autonomic functions. It exerts its effects by binding to neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, which are expressed on the surface of target cells. Apart from nociception and inflammation, Substance P is also involved in regulating emotional behaviors, smooth muscle contraction, and fluid balance.

Gastrins are a group of hormones that are produced by G cells in the stomach lining. These hormones play an essential role in regulating gastric acid secretion and motor functions of the gastrointestinal tract. The most well-known gastrin is known as "gastrin-17," which is released into the bloodstream and stimulates the release of hydrochloric acid from parietal cells in the stomach lining.

Gastrins are stored in secretory granules within G cells, and their release is triggered by several factors, including the presence of food in the stomach, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and vagus nerve stimulation. Once released, gastrins bind to specific receptors on parietal cells, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and the activation of enzymes that promote hydrochloric acid secretion.

Abnormalities in gastrin production can lead to several gastrointestinal disorders, including gastrinomas (tumors that produce excessive amounts of gastrin), which can cause severe gastric acid hypersecretion and ulcers. Conversely, a deficiency in gastrin production can result in hypochlorhydria (low stomach acid levels) and impaired digestion.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Methacholine compounds are medications that are used as a diagnostic tool to help identify and confirm the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath. These compounds act as bronchoconstrictors, causing narrowing of the airways in individuals who have heightened sensitivity and reactivity of their airways, such as those with asthma.

Methacholine is a synthetic derivative of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that mediates nerve impulse transmission in the body. When inhaled, methacholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the smooth muscle surrounding the airways, leading to their contraction and narrowing. The degree of bronchoconstriction is then measured to assess the patient's airway responsiveness.

It is important to note that methacholine compounds are not used as therapeutic agents but rather as diagnostic tools in a controlled medical setting under the supervision of healthcare professionals.

Bradykinin is a naturally occurring peptide in the human body, consisting of nine amino acids. It is a potent vasodilator and increases the permeability of blood vessels, causing a local inflammatory response. Bradykinin is formed from the breakdown of certain proteins, such as kininogen, by enzymes called kininases or proteases, including kallikrein. It plays a role in several physiological processes, including pain transmission, blood pressure regulation, and the immune response. In some pathological conditions, such as hereditary angioedema, bradykinin levels can increase excessively, leading to symptoms like swelling, redness, and pain.

Phenoxypropanolamines are a class of synthetic sympathomimetic amines that were widely used as decongestants and appetite suppressants in pharmaceutical preparations. They act by stimulating the alpha-adrenergic receptors, leading to vasoconstriction and decreased nasal congestion.

The phenoxypropanolamine structure consists of a phenoxy group attached to a propylamine chain, which is then substituted with a hydroxyl or methoxy group at the beta-carbon position. Examples of phenoxypropanolamines include norephedrine (also known as phenylpropanolamine), norpseudoephedrine, and cetirizine dihydrochloride.

However, it is important to note that the use of phenoxypropanolamines in over-the-counter medications has been largely discontinued due to safety concerns. Studies have shown an association between phenylpropanolamine use and an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, particularly in women. Therefore, these compounds are no longer commonly used in medical practice.

Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the serotonin 5-HT3 receptors, which are found in the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. These receptors play a role in regulating nausea and vomiting, among other functions.

When serotonin binds to these receptors, it can trigger a series of events that lead to nausea and vomiting, particularly in response to chemotherapy or surgery. By blocking the 5-HT3 receptors, serotonin cannot bind to them and therefore cannot trigger these events, which helps to reduce nausea and vomiting.

Examples of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists include ondansetron (Zofran), granisetron (Kytril), palonosetron (Aloxi), and dolasetron (Anzemet). These medications are commonly used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery.

Leukotriene antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of leukotrienes, which are chemicals released by the immune system in response to an allergen or irritant. Leukotrienes cause airway muscles to tighten and inflammation in the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing. By blocking the action of leukotrienes, leukotriene antagonists can help relieve these symptoms and improve lung function. These medications are often used to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Examples of leukotriene antagonists include montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

Serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of serotonin, a neurotransmitter, at 5-HT2 receptors. These receptors are found in the central and peripheral nervous systems and are involved in various physiological functions such as mood regulation, cognition, appetite control, and vasoconstriction.

By blocking the action of serotonin at these receptors, serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonists can produce a range of effects depending on the specific receptor subtype that they target. For example, some serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonists are used to treat psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, while others are used to treat migraines or prevent nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy.

Some common examples of serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonists include risperidone, olanzapine, and paliperidone (used for the treatment of schizophrenia), mirtazapine (used for the treatment of depression), sumatriptan (used for the treatment of migraines), and ondansetron (used to prevent nausea and vomiting).

Sneezing is an involuntary, forceful expulsion of air through the nose and mouth, often triggered by irritation or inflammation in the nasal passages. It is a protective reflex that helps to clear the upper respiratory tract of irritants such as dust, pollen, or foreign particles. The sneeze begins with a deep inspiration of air, followed by closure of the glottis (the opening between the vocal cords) and contraction of the chest and abdominal muscles. This builds up pressure in the lungs, which is then suddenly released through the nose and mouth as the glottis opens and the velum (the soft tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth) rises to block the nasal passage. The result is a powerful burst of air that can travel at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour, expelling mucus and any trapped irritants along with it.

Serotonin receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). They are widely distributed throughout the body, including the central and peripheral nervous systems, where they play important roles in regulating various physiological processes such as mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and cognition.

There are seven different classes of serotonin receptors (5-HT1 to 5-HT7), each with multiple subtypes, that exhibit distinct pharmacological properties and signaling mechanisms. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or ligand-gated ion channels, which activate intracellular signaling pathways upon serotonin binding.

Serotonin receptors have been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraine. Therefore, selective serotonin receptor agonists or antagonists are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

CHO cells, or Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, are a type of immortalized cell line that are commonly used in scientific research and biotechnology. They were originally derived from the ovaries of a female Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) in the 1950s.

CHO cells have several characteristics that make them useful for laboratory experiments. They can grow and divide indefinitely under appropriate conditions, which allows researchers to culture large quantities of them for study. Additionally, CHO cells are capable of expressing high levels of recombinant proteins, making them a popular choice for the production of therapeutic drugs, vaccines, and other biologics.

In particular, CHO cells have become a workhorse in the field of biotherapeutics, with many approved monoclonal antibody-based therapies being produced using these cells. The ability to genetically modify CHO cells through various methods has further expanded their utility in research and industrial applications.

It is important to note that while CHO cells are widely used in scientific research, they may not always accurately represent human cell behavior or respond to drugs and other compounds in the same way as human cells do. Therefore, results obtained using CHO cells should be validated in more relevant systems when possible.

Butyrophenones are a group of synthetic antipsychotic drugs that are primarily used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. They act as dopamine receptor antagonists, which means they block the action of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain associated with mood, motivation, and pleasure.

Some examples of butyrophenones include haloperidol, droperidol, and benperidol. These drugs are known for their potent antipsychotic effects and can also be used to manage agitation, aggression, and other behavioral disturbances in patients with various psychiatric and neurological disorders.

In addition to their antipsychotic properties, butyrophenones have been used off-label for their sedative and analgesic effects. However, they are associated with a range of side effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as involuntary muscle spasms and tremors, as well as other neurological and cardiovascular adverse reactions. Therefore, their use is typically reserved for cases where other treatments have been ineffective or contraindicated.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is a region in the hypothalamus, which is a part of the brain that plays a crucial role in regulating various autonomic functions and maintaining homeostasis. The LHA is located laterally to the third ventricle and contains several neuronal populations that are involved in diverse physiological processes such as feeding behavior, energy balance, sleep-wake regulation, and neuroendocrine function.

Some of the key neurons found in the LHA include orexin/hypocretin neurons, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, and agouti-related protein (AGRP) neurons. These neurons release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that modulate various physiological functions, including appetite regulation, energy expenditure, and arousal. Dysfunction in the LHA has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as narcolepsy, obesity, and depression.

Atropine is an anticholinergic drug that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central and peripheral nervous system. It is derived from the belladonna alkaloids, which are found in plants such as deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Jimson weed (Datura stramonium), and Duboisia spp.

In clinical medicine, atropine is used to reduce secretions, increase heart rate, and dilate the pupils. It is often used before surgery to dry up secretions in the mouth, throat, and lungs, and to reduce salivation during the procedure. Atropine is also used to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisoning, as well as to manage bradycardia (slow heart rate) and hypotension (low blood pressure) caused by beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers.

Atropine can have several side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, confusion, and difficulty urinating. In high doses, it can cause delirium, hallucinations, and seizures. Atropine should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, prostatic hypertrophy, or other conditions that may be exacerbated by its anticholinergic effects.

Norepinephrine, also known as noradrenaline, is a neurotransmitter and a hormone that is primarily produced in the adrenal glands and is released into the bloodstream in response to stress or physical activity. It plays a crucial role in the "fight-or-flight" response by preparing the body for action through increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and glucose availability.

As a neurotransmitter, norepinephrine is involved in regulating various functions of the nervous system, including attention, perception, motivation, and arousal. It also plays a role in modulating pain perception and responding to stressful or emotional situations.

In medical settings, norepinephrine is used as a vasopressor medication to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) that can occur during septic shock, anesthesia, or other critical illnesses. It works by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which helps to improve blood pressure and perfusion of vital organs.

Intraventricular injections are a type of medical procedure where medication is administered directly into the cerebral ventricles of the brain. The cerebral ventricles are fluid-filled spaces within the brain that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This procedure is typically used to deliver drugs that target conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as infections or tumors.

Intraventricular injections are usually performed using a thin, hollow needle that is inserted through a small hole drilled into the skull. The medication is then injected directly into the ventricles, allowing it to circulate throughout the CSF and reach the brain tissue more efficiently than other routes of administration.

This type of injection is typically reserved for situations where other methods of drug delivery are not effective or feasible. It carries a higher risk of complications, such as bleeding, infection, or damage to surrounding tissues, compared to other routes of administration. Therefore, it is usually performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled clinical setting.

Adenosine A1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at A1 receptors. Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside that acts as a neurotransmitter and modulator of various physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, neuronal excitability, and immune response.

Adenosine exerts its effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of cells, including A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors. The activation of A1 receptors leads to a variety of physiological responses, such as vasodilation, negative chronotropy (slowing of heart rate), and negative inotropy (reduced contractility) of the heart, as well as inhibition of neurotransmitter release in the brain.

Adenosine A1 receptor antagonists work by binding to and blocking the action of adenosine at A1 receptors, thereby preventing or reducing its effects on these physiological processes. These drugs have been investigated for their potential therapeutic uses in various conditions, such as heart failure, cardiac arrest, and neurological disorders.

Examples of adenosine A1 receptor antagonists include:

* Dipyridamole: a vasodilator used to treat peripheral arterial disease and to prevent blood clots.
* Caffeine: a natural stimulant found in coffee, tea, and chocolate, which acts as a weak A1 receptor antagonist.
* Rolofylline: an experimental drug that has been investigated for its potential use in treating acute ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury.
* KW-3902: another experimental drug that has been studied for its potential therapeutic effects in heart failure, cardiac arrest, and neurodegenerative disorders.

It's important to note that adenosine A1 receptor antagonists may have side effects and potential risks, and their use should be monitored and managed by healthcare professionals.

Pyrrolidines are not a medical term per se, but they are a chemical compound that can be encountered in the field of medicine and pharmacology. Pyrrolidine is an organic compound with the molecular formula (CH2)4NH. It is a cyclic secondary amine, which means it contains a nitrogen atom surrounded by four carbon atoms in a ring structure.

Pyrrolidines can be found in certain natural substances and are also synthesized for use in pharmaceuticals and research. They have been used as building blocks in the synthesis of various drugs, including some muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, and antihistamines. Additionally, pyrrolidine derivatives can be found in certain plants and fungi, where they may contribute to biological activity or toxicity.

It is important to note that while pyrrolidines themselves are not a medical condition or diagnosis, understanding their chemical properties and uses can be relevant to the study and development of medications.

A chemical stimulation in a medical context refers to the process of activating or enhancing physiological or psychological responses in the body using chemical substances. These chemicals can interact with receptors on cells to trigger specific reactions, such as neurotransmitters and hormones that transmit signals within the nervous system and endocrine system.

Examples of chemical stimulation include the use of medications, drugs, or supplements that affect mood, alertness, pain perception, or other bodily functions. For instance, caffeine can chemically stimulate the central nervous system to increase alertness and decrease feelings of fatigue. Similarly, certain painkillers can chemically stimulate opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain.

It's important to note that while chemical stimulation can have therapeutic benefits, it can also have adverse effects if used improperly or in excessive amounts. Therefore, it's essential to follow proper dosing instructions and consult with a healthcare provider before using any chemical substances for stimulation purposes.

Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a class of medications that work by inhibiting the influx of calcium ions into cardiac and smooth muscle cells. This action leads to relaxation of the muscles, particularly in the blood vessels, resulting in decreased peripheral resistance and reduced blood pressure. Calcium channel blockers also have anti-arrhythmic effects and are used in the management of various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, angina, and certain types of arrhythmias.

Calcium channel blockers can be further classified into two main categories based on their chemical structure: dihydropyridines (e.g., nifedipine, amlodipine) and non-dihydropyridines (e.g., verapamil, diltiazem). Dihydropyridines are more selective for vascular smooth muscle and have a greater effect on blood pressure than heart rate or conduction. Non-dihydropyridines have a more significant impact on cardiac conduction and contractility, in addition to their vasodilatory effects.

It is important to note that calcium channel blockers may interact with other medications and should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Potential side effects include dizziness, headache, constipation, and peripheral edema.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs), also known as angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are a class of medications used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and protect against kidney damage in patients with diabetes. They work by blocking the action of angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and hormone that increases blood pressure and promotes tissue fibrosis. By blocking the binding of angiotensin II to its receptors, ARAs cause relaxation of blood vessels, decreased sodium and water retention, and reduced cardiac remodeling, ultimately leading to improved cardiovascular function and reduced risk of organ damage. Examples of ARAs include losartan, valsartan, irbesartan, and candesartan.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist, which means it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system by mimicking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is involved in transmitting signals between nerves and muscles. Carbachol binds to both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, but its effects are more pronounced on muscarinic receptors.

Carbachol is used in medical treatments to produce miosis (pupil constriction), lower intraocular pressure, and stimulate gastrointestinal motility. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to test for certain conditions such as Hirschsprung's disease.

Like any medication, carbachol can have side effects, including sweating, salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bradycardia (slow heart rate), and bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the airways in the lungs). It should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Adrenergic alpha-antagonists, also known as alpha-blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline at alpha-adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the smooth muscle of blood vessels, the heart, the genitourinary system, and the eyes.

When alpha-blockers bind to these receptors, they prevent the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response. This results in a relaxation of the smooth muscle, leading to vasodilation (widening of blood vessels), decreased blood pressure, and increased blood flow.

Alpha-blockers are used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension (high blood pressure), benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate), pheochromocytoma (a rare tumor of the adrenal gland), and certain types of glaucoma.

Examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin, prazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin. Side effects of alpha-blockers may include dizziness, lightheadedness, headache, weakness, and orthostatic hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing).

Aminopyridines are a group of organic compounds that contain an amino group (-NH2) attached to a pyridine ring, which is a six-membered aromatic heterocycle containing one nitrogen atom. Aminopyridines have various pharmacological properties and are used in the treatment of several medical conditions.

The most commonly used aminopyridines in medicine include:

1. 4-Aminopyridine (also known as Fampridine): It is a potassium channel blocker that is used to improve walking ability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological disorders. It works by increasing the conduction of nerve impulses in demyelinated nerves, thereby improving muscle strength and coordination.
2. 3,4-Diaminopyridine: It is a potassium channel blocker that is used to treat Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by muscle weakness. It works by increasing the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings, thereby improving muscle strength and function.
3. 2-Aminopyridine: It is an experimental drug that has been studied for its potential use in treating various neurological disorders, including MS, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. It works by increasing the release of neurotransmitters from nerve endings, thereby improving neuronal communication.

Like all medications, aminopyridines can have side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms, headache, dizziness, and in rare cases, seizures. It is important to use these drugs under the supervision of a healthcare provider and follow their dosage instructions carefully.

Parietal cells, also known as oxyntic cells, are a type of cell found in the gastric glands of the stomach lining. They play a crucial role in digestion by releasing hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor into the stomach lumen. Hydrochloric acid is essential for breaking down food particles and creating an acidic environment that kills most bacteria, while intrinsic factor is necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12 in the small intestine. Parietal cells are stimulated by histamine, acetylcholine, and gastrin to release their secretory products.

Capsaicin is defined in medical terms as the active component of chili peppers (genus Capsicum) that produces a burning sensation when it comes into contact with mucous membranes or skin. It is a potent irritant and is used topically as a counterirritant in some creams and patches to relieve pain. Capsaicin works by depleting substance P, a neurotransmitter that relays pain signals to the brain, from nerve endings.

Here is the medical definition of capsaicin from the Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary:

caпсаісіn : an alkaloid (C18H27NO3) that is the active principle of red peppers and is used in topical preparations as a counterirritant and analgesic.

Benztropine is an anticholinergic medication that is primarily used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as rigidity, tremors, and muscle spasms. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the brain that is involved in the regulation of motor function.

Benztropine is also used to treat side effects caused by certain medications, such as antipsychotics, that can cause Parkinson-like symptoms. It may be prescribed to help reduce drooling or to manage muscle stiffness and restlessness.

The medication comes in the form of tablets or a solution for injection and is typically taken orally once or twice a day. Common side effects of benztropine include dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and constipation. More serious side effects may include hallucinations, confusion, and irregular heartbeat.

It's important to note that benztropine can interact with other medications, so it's essential to inform your healthcare provider of all the drugs you are taking before starting this medication. Additionally, benztropine should be used cautiously in older adults, people with glaucoma or enlarged prostate, and those with a history of heart problems.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

Adrenergic alpha-2 receptor antagonists are a class of medications that block the action of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter and hormone, at adrenergic alpha-2 receptors. These receptors are found in the central and peripheral nervous system and play a role in regulating various physiological functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and insulin secretion.

By blocking the action of norepinephrine at these receptors, adrenergic alpha-2 receptor antagonists can increase sympathetic nervous system activity, leading to vasodilation, increased heart rate, and increased insulin secretion. These effects make them useful in the treatment of conditions such as hypotension (low blood pressure), opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression, and diagnostic procedures that require vasodilation.

Examples of adrenergic alpha-2 receptor antagonists include yohimbine, idazoxan, and atipamezole. It's important to note that these medications can have significant side effects, including hypertension, tachycardia, and agitation, and should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Enterochromaffin cells, also known as Kulchitsky cells or enteroendocrine cells, are a type of neuroendocrine cell found in the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract. These cells are responsible for producing and secreting a variety of hormones and neuropeptides that play important roles in regulating gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and sensation.

Enterochromaffin cells are named for their ability to take up chromaffin stains, which contain silver salts and oxidizing agents that react with the catecholamines stored within the cells. These cells can be further classified based on their morphology, location within the gastrointestinal tract, and the types of hormones they produce.

Some examples of hormones produced by enterochromaffin cells include serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), histamine, gastrin, somatostatin, and cholecystokinin. Serotonin is one of the most well-known hormones produced by these cells, and it plays a critical role in regulating gastrointestinal motility and secretion, as well as mood and cognition.

Abnormalities in enterochromaffin cell function have been implicated in a number of gastrointestinal disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and gastroparesis. Additionally, mutations in genes associated with enterochromaffin cells have been linked to several inherited cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Adrenergic antagonists, also known as beta blockers or sympatholytic drugs, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline (also known as epinephrine and norepinephrine) on the body. These neurotransmitters are part of the sympathetic nervous system and play a role in the "fight or flight" response, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate.

Adrenergic antagonists work by binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in the body, preventing the neurotransmitters from activating them. This results in a decrease in heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate. These medications are used to treat various conditions such as hypertension, angina, heart failure, arrhythmias, glaucoma, and anxiety disorders.

There are two types of adrenergic antagonists: beta blockers and alpha blockers. Beta blockers selectively bind to beta-adrenergic receptors, while alpha blockers bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors. Some medications, such as labetalol, have both beta and alpha blocking properties.

It is important to note that adrenergic antagonists can interact with other medications and may cause side effects, so it is essential to use them under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Capillary permeability refers to the ability of substances to pass through the walls of capillaries, which are the smallest blood vessels in the body. These tiny vessels connect the arterioles and venules, allowing for the exchange of nutrients, waste products, and gases between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The capillary wall is composed of a single layer of endothelial cells that are held together by tight junctions. The permeability of these walls varies depending on the size and charge of the molecules attempting to pass through. Small, uncharged molecules such as water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide can easily diffuse through the capillary wall, while larger or charged molecules such as proteins and large ions have more difficulty passing through.

Increased capillary permeability can occur in response to inflammation, infection, or injury, allowing larger molecules and immune cells to enter the surrounding tissues. This can lead to swelling (edema) and tissue damage if not controlled. Decreased capillary permeability, on the other hand, can lead to impaired nutrient exchange and tissue hypoxia.

Overall, the permeability of capillaries is a critical factor in maintaining the health and function of tissues throughout the body.

GABA-A receptor antagonists are pharmacological agents that block the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at GABA-A receptors. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and it exerts its effects by binding to GABA-A receptors, which are ligand-gated chloride channels. When GABA binds to these receptors, it opens the chloride channel, leading to an influx of chloride ions into the neuron and hyperpolarization of the membrane, making it less likely to fire.

GABA-A receptor antagonists work by binding to the GABA-A receptor and preventing GABA from binding, thereby blocking the inhibitory effects of GABA. This can lead to increased neuronal excitability and can result in a variety of effects depending on the specific antagonist and the location of the receptors involved.

GABA-A receptor antagonists have been used in research to study the role of GABA in various physiological processes, and some have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents for conditions such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia. However, their use is limited by their potential to cause seizures and other adverse effects due to excessive neuronal excitation. Examples of GABA-A receptor antagonists include picrotoxin, bicuculline, and flumazenil.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Electric stimulation, also known as electrical nerve stimulation or neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses low-voltage electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles. It is often used to help manage pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and mobility. The electrical impulses can be delivered through electrodes placed on the skin or directly implanted into the body.

In a medical context, electric stimulation may be used for various purposes such as:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help to block pain signals from reaching the brain and promote the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: Electric stimulation can help to strengthen muscles that have become weak due to injury, illness, or surgery. It can also help to prevent muscle atrophy and improve range of motion.
3. Wound healing: Electric stimulation can promote tissue growth and help to speed up the healing process in wounds, ulcers, and other types of injuries.
4. Urinary incontinence: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen the muscles that control urination and reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence.
5. Migraine prevention: Electric stimulation can be used as a preventive treatment for migraines by applying electrical impulses to specific nerves in the head and neck.

It is important to note that electric stimulation should only be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate (TDI) is not a medical term itself, but it is an important chemical in the industrial field, particularly in the production of polyurethane products. Therefore, I will provide a general definition of this compound.

Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate (TDI) is an organic chemical compound with the formula (CH3C6H3NCO)2. It is a colorless to light yellow liquid with a pungent odor and is highly reactive due to the presence of two isocyanate functional groups (-N=C=O). TDI is primarily used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams, coatings, and adhesives. Exposure to TDI can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract and may pose potential health hazards if not handled properly.

Inositol phosphates are a family of molecules that consist of an inositol ring, which is a six-carbon heterocyclic compound, linked to one or more phosphate groups. These molecules play important roles as intracellular signaling intermediates and are involved in various cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism.

Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), also known as phytic acid, is a form of inositol phosphate that is found in plant-based foods. IP6 has the ability to bind to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and iron, which can reduce their bioavailability in the body.

Inositol phosphates have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. For example, altered levels of certain inositol phosphates have been observed in cancer cells, suggesting that they may play a role in tumor growth and progression. Additionally, mutations in enzymes involved in the metabolism of inositol phosphates have been associated with several genetic diseases.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Bronchial provocation tests are a group of medical tests used to assess the airway responsiveness of the lungs by challenging them with increasing doses of a specific stimulus, such as methacholine or histamine, which can cause bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the airways) in susceptible individuals. These tests are often performed to diagnose and monitor asthma and other respiratory conditions that may be associated with heightened airway responsiveness.

The most common type of bronchial provocation test is the methacholine challenge test, which involves inhaling increasing concentrations of methacholine aerosol via a nebulizer. The dose response is measured by monitoring lung function (usually through spirometry) before and after each exposure. A positive test is indicated when there is a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or other measures of airflow, which suggests bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Other types of bronchial provocation tests include histamine challenges, exercise challenges, and mannitol challenges. These tests have specific indications, contraindications, and protocols that should be followed to ensure accurate results and patient safety. Bronchial provocation tests are typically conducted in a controlled clinical setting under the supervision of trained healthcare professionals.

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that is composed of a sugar (ribose) and the base adenine. It plays several important roles in the body, including serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other molecules such as ATP, NAD+, and RNA.

In the medical context, adenosine is perhaps best known for its use as a pharmaceutical agent to treat certain cardiac arrhythmias. When administered intravenously, it can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) by slowing conduction through the atrioventricular node and interrupting the reentry circuit responsible for the arrhythmia.

Adenosine can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between narrow-complex tachycardias of supraventricular origin and those that originate from below the ventricles (such as ventricular tachycardia). This is because adenosine will typically terminate PSVT but not affect the rhythm of VT.

It's worth noting that adenosine has a very short half-life, lasting only a few seconds in the bloodstream. This means that its effects are rapidly reversible and generally well-tolerated, although some patients may experience transient symptoms such as flushing, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

"SRS-A" is an older abbreviation for "Slow-Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis," which refers to a group of molecules called "leukotrienes." Leukotrienes are mediators of inflammation and play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. They are produced by mast cells and basophils upon activation, and cause bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

The term "SRS-A" is not commonly used in modern medical literature, as it has been largely replaced by the more specific names of its individual components: LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These leukotrienes are now collectively referred to as the "cysteinyl leukotrienes."

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a key role in the immune response to parasitic infections and allergies. It is produced by B cells in response to stimulation by antigens, such as pollen, pet dander, or certain foods. Once produced, IgE binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, which are immune cells found in tissues and blood respectively. When an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, the cross-linking of IgE molecules bound to the FcεRI receptor triggers the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and various cytokines from these cells. These mediators cause the symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as itching, swelling, and redness. IgE also plays a role in protecting against certain parasitic infections by activating eosinophils, which can kill the parasites.

In summary, Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune response to allergens and parasitic infections, it binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, when an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, it triggers the release of mediators from these cells causing the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Bethanechol compounds are a type of cholinergic agent used in medical treatment. They are parasympathomimetic drugs, which means they mimic the actions of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Specifically, bethanechol compounds stimulate the muscarinic receptors in the smooth muscle of the bladder and gastrointestinal tract, increasing tone and promoting contractions.

Bethanechol is primarily used to treat urinary retention and associated symptoms, such as those that can occur after certain types of surgery or with conditions like spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. It works by helping the bladder muscle contract, which can promote urination.

It's important to note that bethanechol should be used with caution, as it can have various side effects, including sweating, increased salivation, flushed skin, and gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. It may also interact with other medications, so it's crucial to discuss any potential risks with a healthcare provider before starting this treatment.

The vas deferens is a muscular tube that carries sperm from the epididymis to the urethra during ejaculation in males. It is a part of the male reproductive system and is often targeted in surgical procedures like vasectomy, which is a form of permanent birth control.

Cromolyn sodium is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as mast cell stabilizers. It works by preventing the release of certain chemicals from mast cells, which are immune system cells found in various tissues throughout the body, including the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract.

Mast cells play an important role in the body's allergic response. When a person is exposed to an allergen, such as pollen or pet dander, mast cells release chemicals like histamine, which can cause symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as itching, swelling, and inflammation.

Cromolyn sodium is used to prevent asthma attacks, hay fever, and other allergic reactions. It is often prescribed for people who have difficulty controlling their symptoms with other medications, such as inhaled corticosteroids or antihistamines.

The medication is available in various forms, including inhalers, nasal sprays, and eye drops. When used as an inhaler, cromolyn sodium is typically administered four times a day to prevent asthma symptoms. As a nasal spray or eye drop, it is usually used several times a day to prevent allergic rhinitis or conjunctivitis.

While cromolyn sodium can be effective in preventing allergic reactions, it does not provide immediate relief of symptoms. It may take several days or even weeks of regular use before the full benefits of the medication are felt.

Drug receptors are specific protein molecules found on the surface of cells, to which drugs can bind. These receptors are part of the cell's communication system and are responsible for responding to neurotransmitters, hormones, and other signaling molecules in the body. When a drug binds to its corresponding receptor, it can alter the receptor's function and trigger a cascade of intracellular events that ultimately lead to a biological response.

Drug receptors can be classified into several types based on their function, including:

1. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These are the largest family of drug receptors and are involved in various physiological processes such as vision, olfaction, neurotransmission, and hormone signaling. They activate intracellular signaling pathways through heterotrimeric G proteins.
2. Ion channel receptors: These receptors form ion channels that allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane when activated. They are involved in rapid signal transduction and can be directly gated by ligands or indirectly through G protein-coupled receptors.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors have an intracellular domain that functions as an enzyme, activating intracellular signaling pathways when bound to a ligand. Examples include receptor tyrosine kinases and receptor serine/threonine kinases.
4. Nuclear receptors: These receptors are located in the nucleus and function as transcription factors, regulating gene expression upon binding to their ligands.

Understanding drug receptors is crucial for developing new drugs and predicting their potential therapeutic and adverse effects. By targeting specific receptors, drugs can modulate cellular responses and produce desired pharmacological actions.

The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the brain, characterized by its intricate folded structure and wrinkled appearance. It is a region of great importance as it plays a key role in higher cognitive functions such as perception, consciousness, thought, memory, language, and attention. The cerebral cortex is divided into two hemispheres, each containing four lobes: the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. These areas are responsible for different functions, with some regions specializing in sensory processing while others are involved in motor control or associative functions. The cerebral cortex is composed of gray matter, which contains neuronal cell bodies, and is covered by a layer of white matter that consists mainly of myelinated nerve fibers.

Benzimidazoles are a class of heterocyclic compounds containing a benzene fused to a imidazole ring. They have a wide range of pharmacological activities and are used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of the benzimidazoles are used as antiparasitics, such as albendazole and mebendazole, which are effective against a variety of worm infestations. Other benzimidazoles have antifungal properties, such as thiabendazole and fuberidazole, and are used to treat fungal infections. Additionally, some benzimidazoles have been found to have anti-cancer properties and are being investigated for their potential use in cancer therapy.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Edema is the medical term for swelling caused by excess fluid accumulation in the body tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it's most commonly noticed in the hands, feet, ankles, and legs. Edema can be a symptom of various underlying medical conditions, such as heart failure, kidney disease, liver disease, or venous insufficiency.

The swelling occurs when the capillaries leak fluid into the surrounding tissues, causing them to become swollen and puffy. The excess fluid can also collect in the cavities of the body, leading to conditions such as pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs) or ascites (fluid in the abdominal cavity).

The severity of edema can vary from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by other symptoms such as skin discoloration, stiffness, and pain. Treatment for edema depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, lifestyle changes, or medical procedures.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Thiazoles are organic compounds that contain a heterocyclic ring consisting of a nitrogen atom and a sulfur atom, along with two carbon atoms and two hydrogen atoms. They have the chemical formula C3H4NS. Thiazoles are present in various natural and synthetic substances, including some vitamins, drugs, and dyes. In the context of medicine, thiazole derivatives have been developed as pharmaceuticals for their diverse biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, and antihypertensive properties. Some well-known examples include thiazide diuretics (e.g., hydrochlorothiazide) used to treat high blood pressure and edema, and the antidiabetic drug pioglitazone.

Endothelin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. There are two main types of endothelin receptors: ETA and ETB. ETA receptors are found in vascular smooth muscle cells and activate phospholipase C, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium and subsequent contraction of the smooth muscle. ETB receptors are found in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. In endothelial cells, ETB receptor activation leads to the release of nitric oxide and prostacyclin, which cause vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells, ETB receptor activation causes vasoconstriction through a mechanism that is not fully understood.

Endothelin receptors play important roles in regulating blood flow, vascular remodeling, and the development of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. They are also involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in various tissues.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors are a type of ionotropic glutamate receptor, which are found in the membranes of excitatory neurons in the central nervous system. They play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory processes. NMDA receptors are ligand-gated channels that are permeable to calcium ions (Ca2+) and other cations.

NMDA receptors are composed of four subunits, which can be a combination of NR1, NR2A-D, and NR3A-B subunits. The binding of the neurotransmitter glutamate to the NR2 subunit and glycine to the NR1 subunit leads to the opening of the ion channel and the influx of Ca2+ ions.

NMDA receptors have a unique property in that they require both agonist binding and membrane depolarization for full activation, making them sensitive to changes in the electrical activity of the neuron. This property allows NMDA receptors to act as coincidence detectors, playing a critical role in synaptic plasticity and learning.

Abnormal functioning of NMDA receptors has been implicated in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and chronic pain. Therefore, NMDA receptors are a common target for drug development in the treatment of these conditions.

Adrenergic beta-2 receptor antagonists, also known as beta-2 adrenergic blockers or beta-2 antagonists, are a class of medications that block the action of epinephrine (adrenaline) and other catecholamines at beta-2 adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the lungs, blood vessels, and skeletal muscles.

Beta-2 adrenergic receptor antagonists are primarily used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They work by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways, which helps to reduce bronchoconstriction and improve breathing.

Some examples of beta-2 adrenergic receptor antagonists include:

* Butoxamine
* ICI 118,551
* Salbutamol (also a partial agonist)
* Terbutaline (also a partial agonist)

It's important to note that while these medications are called "antagonists," some of them can also act as partial agonists at beta-2 receptors, meaning they can both block the action of catecholamines and stimulate the receptor to some degree. This property can make them useful in certain clinical situations, such as during an asthma attack or preterm labor.

Dizocilpine maleate is a chemical compound that is commonly known as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. It is primarily used in research settings to study the role of NMDA receptors in various physiological processes, including learning and memory.

The chemical formula for dizocilpine maleate is C16H24Cl2N2O4·C4H4O4. The compound is a white crystalline powder that is soluble in water and alcohol. It has potent psychoactive effects and has been investigated as a potential treatment for various neurological and psychiatric disorders, although it has not been approved for clinical use.

Dizocilpine maleate works by blocking the action of glutamate, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in learning and memory, at NMDA receptors in the brain. By doing so, it can alter various cognitive processes and has been shown to have anticonvulsant, analgesic, and neuroprotective effects in animal studies. However, its use is associated with significant side effects, including hallucinations, delusions, and memory impairment, which have limited its development as a therapeutic agent.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Hypersensitivity is an exaggerated or inappropriate immune response to a substance that is generally harmless to most people. It's also known as an allergic reaction. This abnormal response can be caused by various types of immunological mechanisms, including antibody-mediated reactions (types I, II, and III) and cell-mediated reactions (type IV). The severity of the hypersensitivity reaction can range from mild discomfort to life-threatening conditions. Common examples of hypersensitivity reactions include allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, food allergies, and anaphylaxis.

Bronchoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (the bronchi and bronchioles) due to the contraction of the smooth muscles surrounding them. This constriction can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, which are common symptoms of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Bronchoconstriction can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens, irritants, cold air, exercise, and emotional stress. In some cases, it may also be caused by certain medications, such as beta-blockers or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Treatment for bronchoconstriction typically involves the use of bronchodilators, which are medications that help to relax the smooth muscles around the airways and widen them, making it easier to breathe.

Scopolamine hydrobromide is a synthetic anticholinergic drug, which means it blocks the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system. It is primarily used for its anti-motion sickness and anti-nausea effects. It can also be used to help with symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as muscle stiffness and tremors.

In medical settings, scopolamine hydrobromide may be administered as a transdermal patch, which is placed behind the ear to allow for slow release into the body over several days. It can also be given as an injection or taken orally in the form of tablets or liquid solutions.

It's important to note that scopolamine hydrobromide can have various side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and drowsiness. It may also cause confusion, especially in older adults, and should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, enlarged prostate, or certain heart conditions.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Serotonin 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical drugs that block the activation of serotonin 5-HT1 receptors. Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a neurotransmitter that plays a role in various physiological functions, including mood regulation, appetite control, and sensory perception. The 5-HT1 receptor family includes several subtypes (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT1F) that are widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems.

When serotonin binds to these receptors, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that can have excitatory or inhibitory effects on neuronal activity. By blocking the interaction between serotonin and 5-HT1 receptors, antagonists modulate the downstream consequences of receptor activation.

Serotonin 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are used in various clinical contexts to treat or manage a range of conditions:

1. Migraine prevention: Some 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonists, such as sumatriptan and rizatriptan, are highly effective in aborting migraine attacks by constricting dilated cranial blood vessels and reducing the release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides.
2. Nausea and vomiting: Certain 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, like ondansetron and granisetron, are used to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by blocking the activation of emetic circuits in the brainstem.
3. Psychiatric disorders: Although not widely used, some 5-HT1A receptor antagonists have shown promise in treating depression and anxiety disorders due to their ability to modulate serotonergic neurotransmission.
4. Neuroprotection: Preclinical studies suggest that 5-HT1A receptor agonists may have neuroprotective effects in various neurological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and stroke. However, further research is needed to establish their clinical utility.

In summary, serotonin 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are a diverse group of medications with applications in migraine prevention, nausea and vomiting management, psychiatric disorders, and potential neuroprotection. Their unique pharmacological profiles enable them to target specific pathophysiological mechanisms underlying various conditions, making them valuable tools in modern therapeutics.

Catalepsy is a medical condition characterized by a trance-like state, with reduced sensitivity to pain and external stimuli, muscular rigidity, and fixed postures. In this state, the person's body may maintain any position in which it is placed for a long time, and there is often a decreased responsiveness to social cues or communication attempts.

Catalepsy can be a symptom of various medical conditions, including neurological disorders such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, or brain injuries. It can also occur in the context of mental health disorders, such as severe depression, catatonic schizophrenia, or dissociative identity disorder.

In some cases, catalepsy may be induced intentionally through hypnosis or other forms of altered consciousness practices. However, when it occurs spontaneously or as a symptom of an underlying medical condition, it can be a serious concern and requires medical evaluation and treatment.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

Isoproterenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-adrenergic agonists. Medically, it is defined as a synthetic catecholamine with both alpha and beta adrenergic receptor stimulating properties. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby improving breathing.

Isoproterenol can also be used in the treatment of bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), cardiac arrest, and heart blocks by increasing the heart rate and contractility. However, due to its non-selective beta-agonist activity, it may cause various side effects such as tremors, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. Its use is now limited due to the availability of more selective and safer medications.

I couldn't find a medical definition for "Depression, Chemical" as it is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide you with information about chemical imbalances in the brain that are associated with depression.

Major depressive disorder (MDD), commonly referred to as depression, is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. While there is no definitive evidence that depression is solely caused by a "chemical imbalance," neurotransmitter irregularities in the brain are associated with depressive symptoms. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that transmit signals in the brain and other parts of the body. Some of the primary neurotransmitters involved in mood regulation include serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine.

In depression, it is thought that there may be alterations in the functioning of these neurotransmitter systems, leading to an imbalance. For example:

1. Serotonin: Low levels of serotonin are associated with depressive symptoms. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a common class of antidepressants, work by increasing the availability of serotonin in the synapse (the space between neurons) to improve communication between brain cells.
2. Norepinephrine: Imbalances in norepinephrine levels can contribute to depressive symptoms and anxiety. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are medications that target norepinephrine to help alleviate depression.
3. Dopamine: Deficiencies in dopamine can lead to depressive symptoms, anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure), and motivation loss. Some antidepressants, like bupropion, work by increasing dopamine levels in the brain.

In summary, while "Chemical Depression" is not a recognized medical term, chemical imbalances in neurotransmitter systems are associated with depressive symptoms. However, depression is a complex disorder that cannot be solely attributed to a single cause or a simple chemical imbalance. It is essential to consider multiple factors when diagnosing and treating depression.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Sulfonamides are a group of synthetic antibacterial drugs that contain the sulfonamide group (SO2NH2) in their chemical structure. They are bacteriostatic agents, meaning they inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing them outright. Sulfonamides work by preventing the bacteria from synthesizing folic acid, which is essential for their survival.

The first sulfonamide drug was introduced in the 1930s and since then, many different sulfonamides have been developed with varying chemical structures and pharmacological properties. They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections.

Some common sulfonamide drugs include sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (a combination of a sulfonamide and another antibiotic called trimethoprim). While sulfonamides are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can cause side effects such as rash, nausea, and allergic reactions. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Maprotiline is a tetracyclic antidepressant (TCA) medication that is primarily used to treat major depressive disorder. It works by increasing the levels of neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, in the brain, which can help to improve mood and alleviate symptoms of depression.

Maprotiline has a unique chemical structure that distinguishes it from other antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). It is considered to be a second-line treatment option for depression, typically reserved for use when other antidepressants have not been effective.

Like other TCAs, maprotiline can cause a range of side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and dizziness. It may also cause more serious side effects, such as seizures, irregular heartbeat, and changes in blood pressure. As a result, it is important to use maprotiline under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Maprotiline is available in tablet form and is typically taken two to four times per day, with or without food. The dosage may be gradually increased over time to achieve the desired therapeutic effect. It may take several weeks of treatment before the full benefits of maprotiline are felt.

Oxymetazoline is a direct-acting mainly α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, which is primarily used as a nasal decongestant and an ophthalmic vasoconstrictor. It constricts blood vessels, reducing swelling and fluid accumulation in the lining of the nose, thereby providing relief from nasal congestion due to allergies or colds. Oxymetazoline is available over-the-counter in various forms, such as nasal sprays, drops, and creams. It's important to follow the recommended usage guidelines, as prolonged use of oxymetazoline can lead to a rebound effect, causing further congestion.

Prostaglandin antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play many roles in the body, including causing inflammation, promoting uterine contractions during labor and menstruation, and regulating blood flow in various tissues.

Prostaglandin antagonists are often used to treat conditions that involve excessive prostaglandin activity, such as:

* Pain and inflammation associated with arthritis or musculoskeletal injuries
* Migraines and other headaches
* Dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation)
* Preterm labor

Examples of prostaglandin antagonists include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib, as well as specific prostaglandin receptor antagonists such as misoprostol and telmisartan.

It's important to note that while prostaglandin antagonists can be effective in treating certain conditions, they can also have side effects and potential risks, so it's important to use them under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

In the context of medical terminology, "history" refers to the detailed narrative of the patient's symptoms, illnesses, treatments, and other related information gathered during a medical consultation or examination. This is usually obtained by asking the patient a series of questions about their past medical conditions, current health status, family medical history, lifestyle habits, and any medications they are taking. The information collected in the medical history helps healthcare professionals to diagnose, treat, and manage the patient's health concerns more effectively. It is also an essential part of continuity of care, as it provides valuable insights into the patient's health over time.

Colforsin is a drug that belongs to a class of medications called phosphodiesterase inhibitors. It works by increasing the levels of a chemical called cyclic AMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) in the body, which helps to relax and widen blood vessels.

Colforsin is not approved for use in humans in many countries, including the United States. However, it has been used in research settings to study its potential effects on heart function and other physiological processes. In animals, colforsin has been shown to have positive inotropic (contractility-enhancing) and lusitropic (relaxation-enhancing) effects on the heart, making it a potential therapeutic option for heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions.

It is important to note that while colforsin has shown promise in preclinical studies, more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy in humans. Therefore, it should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional and in the context of a clinical trial or research study.

Nasal mucosa refers to the mucous membrane that lines the nasal cavity. It is a delicate, moist, and specialized tissue that contains various types of cells including epithelial cells, goblet cells, and glands. The primary function of the nasal mucosa is to warm, humidify, and filter incoming air before it reaches the lungs.

The nasal mucosa produces mucus, which traps dust, allergens, and microorganisms, preventing them from entering the respiratory system. The cilia, tiny hair-like structures on the surface of the epithelial cells, help move the mucus towards the back of the throat, where it can be swallowed or expelled.

The nasal mucosa also contains a rich supply of blood vessels and immune cells that help protect against infections and inflammation. It plays an essential role in the body's defense system by producing antibodies, secreting antimicrobial substances, and initiating local immune responses.

Adenosine A3 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at the A3 receptor. Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside that acts as a neurotransmitter and modulator of various physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, immune response, and neuromodulation.

The A3 receptor is one of four subtypes of adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that are widely distributed throughout the body. The activation of A3 receptors has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, including inflammation, pain, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer.

Adenosine A3 receptor antagonists have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents for various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, ischemic heart disease, and cancer. These compounds work by preventing the binding of adenosine to its receptor, thereby blocking its downstream signaling pathways.

Some examples of Adenosine A3 receptor antagonists include:

* MRS1523
* MRE-2029F20
* LUF5834
* VUF5574
* OT-7962

It is important to note that while Adenosine A3 receptor antagonists have shown promise in preclinical studies, their clinical efficacy and safety profile are still being evaluated in ongoing research.

Biphenyl compounds, also known as diphenyls, are a class of organic compounds consisting of two benzene rings linked by a single carbon-carbon bond. The chemical structure of biphenyl compounds can be represented as C6H5-C6H5. These compounds are widely used in the industrial sector, including as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, as solvents, and in the production of plastics and dyes. Some biphenyl compounds also have biological activity and can be found in natural products. For example, some plant-derived compounds that belong to this class have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties.

Adenylate cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). It plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction and metabolism. Adenylate cyclase is activated by hormones and neurotransmitters that bind to G-protein-coupled receptors on the cell membrane, leading to the production of cAMP, which then acts as a second messenger to regulate various intracellular responses. There are several isoforms of adenylate cyclase, each with distinct regulatory properties and subcellular localization.

Allergic rhinitis, perennial type, is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the nasal passages caused by an allergic response to environmental allergens that are present throughout the year. Unlike seasonal allergic rhinitis, which is triggered by specific pollens or molds during certain times of the year, perennial allergic rhinitis is a persistent condition that occurs year-round.

Common allergens responsible for perennial allergic rhinitis include dust mites, cockroaches, pet dander, and indoor mold spores. Symptoms may include sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy eyes, ears, throat, or roof of the mouth. Treatment options typically involve avoiding exposure to the offending allergens, if possible, as well as medications such as antihistamines, nasal corticosteroids, and leukotriene receptor antagonists to manage symptoms. Immunotherapy (allergy shots) may also be recommended for long-term management in some cases.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Autoradiography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and localize the distribution of radioactively labeled compounds within tissues or organisms. In this process, the subject is first exposed to a radioactive tracer that binds to specific molecules or structures of interest. The tissue is then placed in close contact with a radiation-sensitive film or detector, such as X-ray film or an imaging plate.

As the radioactive atoms decay, they emit particles (such as beta particles) that interact with the film or detector, causing chemical changes and leaving behind a visible image of the distribution of the labeled compound. The resulting autoradiogram provides information about the location, quantity, and sometimes even the identity of the molecules or structures that have taken up the radioactive tracer.

Autoradiography has been widely used in various fields of biology and medical research, including pharmacology, neuroscience, genetics, and cell biology, to study processes such as protein-DNA interactions, gene expression, drug metabolism, and neuronal connectivity. However, due to the use of radioactive materials and potential hazards associated with them, this technique has been gradually replaced by non-radioactive alternatives like fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunofluorescence techniques.

Estrogen antagonists, also known as antiestrogens, are a class of drugs that block the effects of estrogen in the body. They work by binding to estrogen receptors and preventing the natural estrogen from attaching to them. This results in the inhibition of estrogen-mediated activities in various tissues, including breast and uterine tissue.

There are two main types of estrogen antagonists: selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and pure estrogen receptor downregulators (PERDS), also known as estrogen receptor downregulators (ERDs). SERMs, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, can act as estrogen agonists or antagonists depending on the tissue type. For example, they may block the effects of estrogen in breast tissue while acting as an estrogen agonist in bone tissue, helping to prevent osteoporosis.

PERDS, such as fulvestrant, are pure estrogen receptor antagonists and do not have any estrogen-like activity. They are used primarily for the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

Overall, estrogen antagonists play an important role in the management of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer and other conditions where inhibiting estrogen activity is beneficial.

"Cricetulus" is a genus of rodents that includes several species of hamsters. These small, burrowing animals are native to Asia and have a body length of about 8-15 centimeters, with a tail that is usually shorter than the body. They are characterized by their large cheek pouches, which they use to store food. Some common species in this genus include the Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) and the Daurian hamster (Cricetulus dauuricus). These animals are often kept as pets or used in laboratory research.

Azepines are heterocyclic chemical compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with one nitrogen atom and six carbon atoms. The term "azepine" refers to the basic structure, and various substituted azepines exist with different functional groups attached to the carbon and nitrogen atoms.

Azepines are not typically used in medical contexts as a therapeutic agent or a target for drug design. However, some azepine derivatives have been investigated for their potential biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer properties. These compounds may be the subject of ongoing research, but they are not yet established as medical treatments.

It's worth noting that while azepines themselves are not a medical term, some of their derivatives or analogs may have medical relevance. Therefore, it is essential to consult medical literature and databases for accurate and up-to-date information on the medical use of specific azepine compounds.

Xanthines are a type of natural alkaloids that are found in various plants, including tea leaves, cocoa beans, and mate. The most common xanthines are caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. These compounds have stimulant effects on the central nervous system and are often used in medication to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory issues.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed xanthine and is found in a variety of beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. It works by blocking adenosine receptors in the brain, which can lead to increased alertness and reduced feelings of fatigue.

Theophylline is another xanthine that is used as a bronchodilator to treat asthma and other respiratory conditions. It works by relaxing smooth muscles in the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Theobromine is found in cocoa beans and is responsible for the stimulant effects of chocolate. While it has similar properties to caffeine and theophylline, it is less potent and has a milder effect on the body.

It's worth noting that while xanthines can have beneficial effects when used in moderation, they can also cause negative side effects such as insomnia, nervousness, and rapid heart rate if consumed in large quantities or over an extended period of time.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Triazoles are a class of antifungal medications that have broad-spectrum activity against various fungi, including yeasts, molds, and dermatophytes. They work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, an essential component of fungal cell membranes, leading to increased permeability and disruption of fungal growth. Triazoles are commonly used in both systemic and topical formulations for the treatment of various fungal infections, such as candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and dermatophytoses. Some examples of triazole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole.

Pyrazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 2. The chemical structure of pyrazoles consists of a pair of nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other in the ring, which makes them unique from other azole heterocycles such as imidazoles or triazoles.

Pyrazoles have significant biological activities and are found in various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and natural products. Some pyrazole derivatives exhibit anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer properties.

In the medical field, pyrazoles are used in various drugs to treat different conditions. For example, celecoxib (Celebrex) is a selective COX-2 inhibitor used for pain relief and inflammation reduction in arthritis patients. It contains a pyrazole ring as its core structure. Similarly, febuxostat (Uloric) is a medication used to treat gout, which also has a pyrazole moiety.

Overall, pyrazoles are essential compounds with significant medical applications and potential for further development in drug discovery and design.

Benzofurans are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused to a furan ring. The furan ring is a five-membered aromatic heterocycle containing one oxygen atom and four carbon atoms. Benzofurans can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. Some benzofuran derivatives have biological activity and are used in medicinal chemistry, while others are used as flavorings or fragrances. However, some benzofuran compounds are also known to have psychoactive effects and can be abused as recreational drugs.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible, either spontaneously or with treatment.

The underlying cause of asthma involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors that result in hypersensitivity of the airways to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, viruses, exercise, and emotional stress. When these triggers are encountered, the airways constrict due to smooth muscle spasm, swell due to inflammation, and produce excess mucus, leading to the characteristic symptoms of asthma.

Asthma is typically managed with a combination of medications that include bronchodilators to relax the airway muscles, corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and leukotriene modifiers or mast cell stabilizers to prevent allergic reactions. Avoiding triggers and monitoring symptoms are also important components of asthma management.

There are several types of asthma, including allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, exercise-induced asthma, occupational asthma, and nocturnal asthma, each with its own set of triggers and treatment approaches. Proper diagnosis and management of asthma can help prevent exacerbations, improve quality of life, and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Naloxone is a medication used to reverse the effects of opioids, both illicit and prescription. It works by blocking the action of opioids on the brain and restoring breathing in cases where opioids have caused depressed respirations. Common brand names for naloxone include Narcan and Evzio.

Naloxone is an opioid antagonist, meaning that it binds to opioid receptors in the body without activating them, effectively blocking the effects of opioids already present at these sites. It has no effect in people who have not taken opioids and does not reverse the effects of other sedatives or substances.

Naloxone can be administered via intranasal, intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous routes. The onset of action varies depending on the route of administration but generally ranges from 1 to 5 minutes when given intravenously and up to 10-15 minutes with other methods.

The duration of naloxone's effects is usually shorter than that of most opioids, so multiple doses or a continuous infusion may be necessary in severe cases to maintain reversal of opioid toxicity. Naloxone has been used successfully in emergency situations to treat opioid overdoses and has saved many lives.

It is important to note that naloxone does not reverse the effects of other substances or address the underlying causes of addiction, so it should be used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for individuals struggling with opioid use disorders.

Benzothiepins are a class of heterocyclic compounds that contain a benzene fused to a thiepin ring. They do not have a specific medical definition, as they are not a type of drug or medication. However, some benzothiepin derivatives have been synthesized and studied for their potential pharmacological activity, particularly as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

One example of a benzothiepin derivative is benzothiophene, which has been investigated for its anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not widely used in clinical practice due to its potential toxicity. Therefore, the term 'benzothiepins' does not have a well-established medical meaning and is primarily used in the context of chemistry and pharmacology research.

Endothelin A (ETA) receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by the peptide hormone endothelin-1, endothelin-2, and endothelin-3. It is widely expressed in various tissues and organs, including vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, fibroblasts, and kidney cells. Activation of ETA receptor leads to vasoconstriction, increased cell proliferation, and fibrosis, which contribute to the development of hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, ETA receptor antagonists have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

Synaptic transmission is the process by which a neuron communicates with another cell, such as another neuron or a muscle cell, across a junction called a synapse. It involves the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic terminal of the neuron, which then cross the synaptic cleft and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, leading to changes in the electrical or chemical properties of the target cell. This process is critical for the transmission of signals within the nervous system and for controlling various physiological functions in the body.

Adrenergic beta-antagonists, also known as beta blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline (also known as epinephrine and norepinephrine) on beta-adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

Beta blockers work by binding to these receptors and preventing the activation of certain signaling pathways that lead to increased heart rate, force of heart contractions, and relaxation of blood vessels. As a result, beta blockers can lower blood pressure, reduce heart rate, and decrease the workload on the heart.

Beta blockers are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), heart failure, irregular heart rhythms, migraines, and certain anxiety disorders. Some common examples of beta blockers include metoprolol, atenolol, propranolol, and bisoprolol.

It is important to note that while beta blockers can have many benefits, they can also cause side effects such as fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Additionally, sudden discontinuation of beta blocker therapy can lead to rebound hypertension or worsening chest pain. Therefore, it is important to follow the dosing instructions provided by a healthcare provider carefully when taking these medications.

Propranolol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta blockers. Medically, it is defined as a non-selective beta blocker, which means it blocks the effects of both epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on the heart and other organs. These effects include reducing heart rate, contractility, and conduction velocity, leading to decreased oxygen demand by the myocardium. Propranolol is used in the management of various conditions such as hypertension, angina pectoris, arrhythmias, essential tremor, anxiety disorders, and infants with congenital heart defects. It may also be used to prevent migraines and reduce the risk of future heart attacks. As with any medication, it should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and contraindications.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that plays a significant role in various inflammatory and immune responses. It is a powerful lipid signaling molecule released mainly by activated platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial cells, and other cell types during inflammation or injury.

PAF has a molecular structure consisting of an alkyl chain linked to a glycerol moiety, a phosphate group, and an sn-2 acetyl group. This unique structure allows PAF to bind to its specific G protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) on the surface of target cells, triggering various intracellular signaling cascades that result in cell activation, degranulation, and aggregation.

The primary functions of PAF include:

1. Platelet activation and aggregation: PAF stimulates platelets to aggregate, release their granules, and activate the coagulation cascade, which can lead to thrombus formation.
2. Neutrophil and monocyte activation: PAF activates these immune cells, leading to increased adhesion, degranulation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
3. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability: PAF can cause vasodilation by acting on endothelial cells, leading to an increase in blood flow and facilitating the extravasation of immune cells into inflamed tissues.
4. Bronchoconstriction: In the respiratory system, PAF can induce bronchoconstriction and recruitment of inflammatory cells, contributing to asthma symptoms.
5. Neurotransmission modulation: PAF has been implicated in neuroinflammation and may play a role in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive functions.

Dysregulated PAF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting the PAF pathway may provide therapeutic benefits in these diseases.

Naltrexone is a medication that is primarily used to manage alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It works by blocking the effects of opioids and alcohol on the brain, reducing the euphoric feelings and cravings associated with their use. Naltrexone comes in the form of a tablet that is taken orally, and it has no potential for abuse or dependence.

Medically, naltrexone is classified as an opioid antagonist, which means that it binds to opioid receptors in the brain without activating them, thereby blocking the effects of opioids such as heroin, morphine, and oxycodone. It also reduces the rewarding effects of alcohol by blocking the release of endorphins, which are natural chemicals in the brain that produce feelings of pleasure.

Naltrexone is often used as part of a comprehensive treatment program for addiction, along with counseling, behavioral therapy, and support groups. It can help individuals maintain abstinence from opioids or alcohol by reducing cravings and preventing relapse. Naltrexone is generally safe and well-tolerated, but it may cause side effects such as nausea, headache, dizziness, and fatigue in some people.

It's important to note that naltrexone should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and it is not recommended for individuals who are currently taking opioids or who have recently stopped using them, as it can cause withdrawal symptoms. Additionally, naltrexone may interact with other medications, so it's important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before starting naltrexone therapy.

Airway resistance is a measure of the opposition to airflow during breathing, which is caused by the friction between the air and the walls of the respiratory tract. It is an important parameter in respiratory physiology because it can affect the work of breathing and gas exchange.

Airway resistance is usually expressed in units of cm H2O/L/s or Pa·s/m, and it can be measured during spontaneous breathing or during forced expiratory maneuvers, such as those used in pulmonary function testing. Increased airway resistance can result from a variety of conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchitis, and bronchiectasis. Decreased airway resistance can be seen in conditions such as emphysema or after a successful bronchodilator treatment.

Serotonin receptor agonists are a class of medications that bind to and activate serotonin receptors in the body, mimicking the effects of the neurotransmitter serotonin. These drugs can have various effects depending on which specific serotonin receptors they act upon. Some serotonin receptor agonists are used to treat conditions such as migraines, cluster headaches, and Parkinson's disease, while others may be used to stimulate appetite or reduce anxiety. It is important to note that some serotonin receptor agonists can have serious side effects, particularly when taken in combination with other medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). This can lead to a condition called serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by symptoms such as agitation, confusion, rapid heart rate, high blood pressure, and muscle stiffness.

Microdialysis is a minimally invasive technique used in clinical and research settings to continuously monitor the concentration of various chemicals, such as neurotransmitters, drugs, or metabolites, in biological fluids (e.g., extracellular fluid of tissues, blood, or cerebrospinal fluid). This method involves inserting a small, flexible catheter with a semipermeable membrane into the region of interest. A physiological solution is continuously perfused through the catheter, allowing molecules to diffuse across the membrane based on their concentration gradient. The dialysate that exits the catheter is then collected and analyzed for target compounds using various analytical techniques (e.g., high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry).

In summary, microdialysis is a valuable tool for monitoring real-time changes in chemical concentrations within biological systems, enabling better understanding of physiological processes or pharmacokinetic properties of drugs.

1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is a chemical compound that belongs to the class of xanthines. It is a methylated derivative of xanthine and is commonly found in some types of tea, coffee, and chocolate. This compound acts as a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which means it can increase the levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) by preventing its breakdown.

In medical terms, 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is often used as a bronchodilator and a stimulant of central nervous system. It is also known to have diuretic properties. This compound is sometimes used in the treatment of asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and other respiratory disorders.

It's important to note that 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine can have side effects, including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. It should be used under the supervision of a medical professional and its use should be carefully monitored to avoid potential adverse reactions.

In the field of organic chemistry, imines are a class of compounds that contain a functional group with the general structure =CR-NR', where C=R and R' can be either alkyl or aryl groups. Imines are also commonly referred to as Schiff bases. They are formed by the condensation of an aldehyde or ketone with a primary amine, resulting in the loss of a molecule of water.

It is important to note that imines do not have a direct medical application, but they can be used as intermediates in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals and bioactive compounds. Additionally, some imines have been found to exhibit biological activity, such as antimicrobial or anticancer properties. However, these are areas of ongoing research and development.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Neurotransmitter agents are substances that affect the synthesis, storage, release, uptake, degradation, or reuptake of neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that transmit signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron to another. These agents can be either agonists, which mimic the action of a neurotransmitter and bind to its receptor, or antagonists, which block the action of a neurotransmitter by binding to its receptor without activating it. They are used in medicine to treat various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and Parkinson's disease.

Dopamine is a type of neurotransmitter, which is a chemical messenger that transmits signals in the brain and nervous system. It plays several important roles in the body, including:

* Regulation of movement and coordination
* Modulation of mood and motivation
* Control of the reward and pleasure centers of the brain
* Regulation of muscle tone
* Involvement in memory and attention

Dopamine is produced in several areas of the brain, including the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. It is released by neurons (nerve cells) and binds to specific receptors on other neurons, where it can either excite or inhibit their activity.

Abnormalities in dopamine signaling have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric conditions, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addiction.

Furans are not a medical term, but a class of organic compounds that contain a four-membered ring with four atoms, usually carbon and oxygen. They can be found in some foods and have been used in the production of certain industrial chemicals. Some furan derivatives have been identified as potentially toxic or carcinogenic, but the effects of exposure to these substances depend on various factors such as the level and duration of exposure.

In a medical context, furans may be mentioned in relation to environmental exposures, food safety, or occupational health. For example, some studies have suggested that high levels of exposure to certain furan compounds may increase the risk of liver damage or cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of these substances.

It's worth noting that furans are not a specific medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a class of chemical compounds with potential health implications. If you have concerns about exposure to furans or other environmental chemicals, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and recommendations.

Methysergide is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ergot alkaloids. It is primarily used for the prophylaxis (prevention) of migraine headaches. Methysergide works by narrowing blood vessels around the brain, which is thought to help prevent migraines.

The medical definition of Methysergide is:
A semisynthetic ergot alkaloid derivative used in the prophylaxis of migraine and cluster headaches. It has both agonist and antagonist properties at serotonin receptors, and its therapeutic effects are thought to be related to its ability to block the binding of serotonin to its receptors. However, methysergide can have serious side effects, including fibrotic reactions in various organs, such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys, so it is usually used only for short periods of time and under close medical supervision.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Cyclic peptides are a type of peptides in which the N-terminus and C-terminus of the peptide chain are linked to form a circular structure. This is in contrast to linear peptides, which have a straight peptide backbone with a free N-terminus and C-terminus. The cyclization of peptides can occur through various mechanisms, including the formation of an amide bond between the N-terminal amino group and the C-terminal carboxylic acid group (head-to-tail cyclization), or through the formation of a bond between side chain functional groups.

Cyclic peptides have unique structural and chemical properties that make them valuable in medical and therapeutic applications. For example, they are more resistant to degradation by enzymes compared to linear peptides, which can increase their stability and half-life in the body. Additionally, the cyclic structure allows for greater conformational rigidity, which can enhance their binding affinity and specificity to target molecules.

Cyclic peptides have been explored as potential therapeutics for a variety of diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. They have also been used as tools in basic research to study protein-protein interactions and cell signaling pathways.

Anti-ulcer agents are a class of medications that are used to treat and prevent ulcers in the gastrointestinal tract. These medications work by reducing the production of stomach acid, neutralizing stomach acid, or protecting the lining of the stomach and duodenum from damage caused by stomach acid.

There are several types of anti-ulcer agents, including:

1. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): These medications block the action of proton pumps in the stomach, which are responsible for producing stomach acid. PPIs include drugs such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole.
2. H-2 receptor antagonists: These medications block the action of histamine on the H-2 receptors in the stomach, reducing the production of stomach acid. Examples include ranitidine, famotidine, and cimetidine.
3. Antacids: These medications neutralize stomach acid and provide quick relief from symptoms such as heartburn and indigestion. Common antacids include calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and aluminum hydroxide.
4. Protective agents: These medications form a barrier between the stomach lining and stomach acid, protecting the lining from damage. Examples include sucralfate and misoprostol.

Anti-ulcer agents are used to treat conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is important to take these medications as directed by a healthcare provider, as they can have side effects and interactions with other medications.

The pylorus is the lower, narrow part of the stomach that connects to the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). It consists of the pyloric canal, which is a short muscular tube, and the pyloric sphincter, a circular muscle that controls the passage of food from the stomach into the duodenum. The pylorus regulates the entry of chyme (partially digested food) into the small intestine by adjusting the size and frequency of the muscular contractions that push the chyme through the pyloric sphincter. This process helps in further digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine.

Radiochemistry is not strictly a medical definition, but it is a term that is used in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the use of radioisotopes (radioactive isotopes) in chemical reactions. In nuclear medicine, radiochemists prepare and purify radioactive drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. These radiopharmaceuticals are used in various medical imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to diagnose and monitor diseases, or in targeted therapies to treat cancer. Radiochemistry requires a deep understanding of chemistry, radiochemistry, and radiation safety.

Purinergic P2X receptor antagonists are pharmaceutical agents that block the activation of P2X receptors, which are ligand-gated ion channels found in the cell membranes of various cell types, including excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells. These receptors are activated by extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and play important roles in a variety of physiological processes, including neurotransmission, pain perception, and inflammation.

P2X receptor antagonists work by binding to the receptor and preventing ATP from activating it, thereby blocking its downstream effects. These drugs have potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions, such as chronic pain, urinary incontinence, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, their development and use are still in the early stages of research, and more studies are needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and safety profiles.

Clonidine is an medication that belongs to a class of drugs called centrally acting alpha-agonist hypotensives. It works by stimulating certain receptors in the brain and lowering the heart rate, which results in decreased blood pressure. Clonidine is commonly used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but it can also be used for other purposes such as managing withdrawal symptoms from opioids or alcohol, treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and preventing migraines. It can be taken orally in the form of tablets or transdermally through a patch applied to the skin. As with any medication, clonidine should be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider.

**Prazosin** is an antihypertensive drug, which belongs to the class of medications called alpha-blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles in the blood vessels, which helps to lower blood pressure and improve blood flow. Prazosin is primarily used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), but it may also be used for the management of symptoms related to enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia).

In a medical definition context:

Prazosin: A selective α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, used in the treatment of hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. It acts by blocking the action of norepinephrine on the smooth muscle of blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation and decreased peripheral vascular resistance. This leads to a reduction in blood pressure and an improvement in urinary symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Ovalbumin is the major protein found in egg white, making up about 54-60% of its total protein content. It is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of around 45 kDa and has both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Ovalbumin is a single polypeptide chain consisting of 385 amino acids, including four disulfide bridges that contribute to its structure.

Ovalbumin is often used in research as a model antigen for studying immune responses and allergies. In its native form, ovalbumin is not allergenic; however, when it is denatured or degraded into smaller peptides through cooking or digestion, it can become an allergen for some individuals.

In addition to being a food allergen, ovalbumin has been used in various medical and research applications, such as vaccine development, immunological studies, and protein structure-function analysis.

Ketanserin is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called serotonin antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain, on certain types of receptors. Ketanserin is primarily used for its blood pressure-lowering effects and is also sometimes used off-label to treat anxiety disorders and alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

It's important to note that ketanserin is not approved by the FDA for use in the United States, but it may be available in other countries as a prescription medication. As with any medication, ketanserin should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider and should be taken exactly as prescribed.

Nootropic agents, also known as cognition enhancers or smart drugs, are substances that are believed to improve cognitive functions such as memory, motivation, creativity, and executive functions. The term "nootropic" is derived from the Greek words "nous," meaning mind, and "tropos," meaning a turn or bend.

Nootropics can be divided into several categories, including dietary supplements, prescription medications, and illicit substances. Some examples of nootropics include:

* Piracetam and other racetams
* Caffeine and other stimulants
* Nicotine and other cholinergic compounds
* Modafinil and other wakefulness-promoting agents
* Certain antidepressants, such as fluoxetine and bupropion
* Illicit substances, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) and amphetamines (Adderall), which are sometimes used off-label for cognitive enhancement.

It is important to note that while some nootropic agents have been shown to have cognitive benefits in certain studies, their effectiveness and safety are not fully understood. Additionally, the long-term use of some nootropics can have potential risks and side effects. Therefore, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement or medication regimen for cognitive enhancement.

Endothelium-dependent relaxing factors (EDRFs) are substances that are released by the endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. These factors cause relaxation of the smooth muscle in the vessel wall, leading to vasodilation and an increase in blood flow. One of the most well-known EDRFs is nitric oxide (NO), which is produced from the amino acid L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase. Other substances that have been identified as EDRFs include prostacyclin and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These factors play important roles in the regulation of vascular tone, blood pressure, and inflammation.

A muscarinic M3 receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is a subtype of muscarinic receptors, which are named after the muscarine mushroom alkaloid that can activate them.

The M3 receptor is widely expressed in various tissues and organs, including the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract, urinary bladder, respiratory system, and vasculature. When activated by acetylcholine or muscarinic agonists, it triggers a range of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to various physiological responses, such as smooth muscle contraction, glandular secretion, and modulation of neurotransmitter release.

The M3 receptor is known to couple primarily to the Gq/11 family of G proteins, which activate phospholipase C (PLC) and increase intracellular calcium levels. This leads to smooth muscle contraction and other downstream effects. The M3 receptor also interacts with other signaling pathways, such as those involving adenylyl cyclase, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and ion channels.

Dysregulation of muscarinic M3 receptors has been implicated in various diseases, including gastrointestinal disorders, overactive bladder syndrome, asthma, and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, selective modulation of this receptor subtype is a potential therapeutic strategy for these conditions.

Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to the neuropeptide substance P, which is a member of the tachykinin family. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and play important roles in various physiological functions, including pain transmission, neuroinflammation, and emesis (vomiting).

NK-1 receptors are activated by substance P, which binds to the receptor's extracellular domain and triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of various intracellular signaling pathways. This activation can ultimately result in the modulation of neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, and gene expression.

In addition to their role in normal physiological processes, NK-1 receptors have also been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including pain, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders. As such, NK-1 receptor antagonists have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Purinergic antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of purinergic receptors, which are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells that respond to purines such as ATP and ADP. These receptors play important roles in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, inflammation, and cell death.

Purinergic antagonists work by binding to these receptors and preventing them from being activated by purines. This can have a variety of effects depending on the specific receptor that is blocked. For example, some purinergic antagonists are used in the treatment of conditions such as chronic pain, depression, and Parkinson's disease because they block receptors that play a role in these conditions.

It's important to note that while purinergic antagonists can be useful therapeutically, they can also have side effects and potential risks. As with any medication, it's important to use them only under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Methamphetamine is a powerful, highly addictive central nervous system stimulant that affects brain chemistry, leading to mental and physical dependence. Its chemical formula is N-methylamphetamine, and it is structurally similar to amphetamine but has additional methyl group, which makes it more potent and longer-lasting.

Methamphetamine exists in various forms, including crystalline powder (commonly called "meth" or "crystal meth") and a rocklike form called "glass." It can be taken orally, snorted, smoked, or injected after being dissolved in water or alcohol.

Methamphetamine use leads to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter responsible for reward, motivation, and reinforcement, resulting in euphoria, alertness, and energy. Prolonged use can cause severe psychological and physiological harm, including addiction, psychosis, cardiovascular issues, dental problems (meth mouth), and cognitive impairments.

Avoidance learning is a type of conditioning in which an individual learns to act in a certain way to avoid experiencing an unpleasant or aversive stimulus. It is a form of learning that occurs when an organism changes its behavior to avoid a negative outcome or situation. This can be seen in both animals and humans, and it is often studied in the field of psychology and neuroscience.

In avoidance learning, the individual learns to associate a particular cue or stimulus with the unpleasant experience. Over time, they learn to perform an action to escape or avoid the cue, thereby preventing the negative outcome from occurring. For example, if a rat receives an electric shock every time it hears a certain tone, it may eventually learn to press a lever to turn off the tone and avoid the shock.

Avoidance learning can be adaptive in some situations, as it allows individuals to avoid dangerous or harmful stimuli. However, it can also become maladaptive if it leads to excessive fear or anxiety, or if it interferes with an individual's ability to function in daily life. For example, a person who has been attacked may develop a phobia of public places and avoid them altogether, even though this limits their ability to engage in social activities and live a normal life.

In summary, avoidance learning is a type of conditioning in which an individual learns to act in a certain way to avoid experiencing an unpleasant or aversive stimulus. It can be adaptive in some situations but can also become maladaptive if it leads to excessive fear or anxiety or interferes with daily functioning.

Tetrazoles are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a five-membered ring with four nitrogen atoms and one carbon atom. They have the chemical formula of C2H2N4. Tetrazoles are stable under normal conditions, but can decompose explosively when heated or subjected to strong shock.

In the context of medicinal chemistry, tetrazoles are sometimes used as bioisosteres for carboxylic acids, as they can mimic some of their chemical and biological properties. This has led to the development of several drugs that contain tetrazole rings, such as the antiviral drug tenofovir and the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib.

However, it's important to note that 'tetrazoles' is not a medical term per se, but rather a chemical term that can be used in the context of medicinal chemistry or pharmacology.

Aminopyrine is a type of medication known as a non-opioid analgesic, which is used to relieve pain and reduce fever. It is an antipyretic and analgesic drug that was widely used in the past, but its use has been limited or discontinued in many countries due to the risk of rare but serious side effects such as agranulocytosis (a severe decrease in white blood cells), which can make individuals more susceptible to infections.

Chemically, aminopyrine is an aromatic heterocyclic compound containing a pyridine ring substituted with an amino group and a phenyl group. It works by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that mediate pain and inflammation. By reducing prostaglandin levels, aminopyrine helps to alleviate pain and reduce fever.

It's important to note that due to its potential side effects, aminopyrine is not commonly used in modern medical practice, and other safer and more effective medications are available for pain relief and fever reduction.

Gastric acidity determination is a medical test used to measure the amount of acid in the stomach. This test is often performed to diagnose or monitor conditions such as gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. The test involves measuring the pH level of the stomach contents using a thin, flexible tube called a catheter that is passed through the nose and down into the stomach. In some cases, a small sample of stomach fluid may also be collected for further testing.

The normal range for gastric acidity is typically considered to be a pH level below 4. A higher pH level may indicate that the stomach is producing too little acid, while a lower pH level may suggest that it is producing too much. Based on the results of the test, healthcare providers can develop an appropriate treatment plan for the underlying condition causing abnormal gastric acidity.

Quinoxalines are not a medical term, but rather an organic chemical compound. They are a class of heterocyclic aromatic compounds made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. Quinoxalines have no specific medical relevance, but some of their derivatives have been synthesized and used in medicinal chemistry as antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. They are also used in the production of dyes and pigments.

Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by the hormone cholecystokinin. CCK is a peptide hormone that is released by cells in the duodenum in response to the presence of nutrients, particularly fat and protein. It has several physiological roles, including stimulating the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas, promoting the contraction of the gallbladder and relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi (which controls the flow of bile and pancreatic juice into the duodenum), and inhibiting gastric emptying.

There are two main types of CCK receptors, known as CCK-A and CCK-B receptors. CCK-A receptors are found in the pancreas, gallbladder, and gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate the effects of CCK on digestive enzyme secretion, gallbladder contraction, and gastric emptying. CCK-B receptors are found primarily in the brain, where they play a role in regulating appetite and satiety.

CCK receptors have been studied as potential targets for the development of drugs to treat various gastrointestinal disorders, such as pancreatitis, gallstones, and obesity. However, more research is needed to fully understand their roles and therapeutic potential.

Benzoxepins are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a benzene fused to a oxepine ring. They are not commonly used in medical context, but some benzoxepin derivatives have been studied for their potential pharmacological activities. For example, certain benzoxepin compounds have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties. However, it is important to note that these compounds are still in the early stages of research and development and have not yet been approved for medical use.

Oligopeptides are defined in medicine and biochemistry as short chains of amino acids, typically containing fewer than 20 amino acid residues. These small peptides are important components in various biological processes, such as serving as signaling molecules, enzyme inhibitors, or structural elements in some proteins. They can be found naturally in foods and may also be synthesized for use in medical research and therapeutic applications.

Patch-clamp techniques are a group of electrophysiological methods used to study ion channels and other electrical properties of cells. These techniques were developed by Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann, who were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1991 for their work. The basic principle of patch-clamp techniques involves creating a high resistance seal between a glass micropipette and the cell membrane, allowing for the measurement of current flowing through individual ion channels or groups of channels.

There are several different configurations of patch-clamp techniques, including:

1. Cell-attached configuration: In this configuration, the micropipette is attached to the outer surface of the cell membrane, and the current flowing across a single ion channel can be measured. This configuration allows for the study of the properties of individual channels in their native environment.
2. Whole-cell configuration: Here, the micropipette breaks through the cell membrane, creating a low resistance electrical connection between the pipette and the inside of the cell. This configuration allows for the measurement of the total current flowing across all ion channels in the cell membrane.
3. Inside-out configuration: In this configuration, the micropipette is pulled away from the cell after establishing a seal, resulting in the exposure of the inner surface of the cell membrane to the solution in the pipette. This configuration allows for the study of the properties of ion channels in isolation from other cellular components.
4. Outside-out configuration: Here, the micropipette is pulled away from the cell after establishing a seal, resulting in the exposure of the outer surface of the cell membrane to the solution in the pipette. This configuration allows for the study of the properties of ion channels in their native environment, but with the ability to control the composition of the extracellular solution.

Patch-clamp techniques have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of ion channel function and have contributed to numerous breakthroughs in neuroscience, pharmacology, and physiology.

Acetamides are organic compounds that contain an acetamide functional group, which is a combination of an acetyl group (-COCH3) and an amide functional group (-CONH2). The general structure of an acetamide is R-CO-NH-CH3, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Acetamides are found in various medications, including some pain relievers, muscle relaxants, and anticonvulsants. They can also be found in certain industrial chemicals and are used as intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of acetamides can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Chronic exposure has been linked to more serious health effects, including liver and kidney damage. Therefore, handling and use of acetamides should be done with appropriate safety precautions.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

Muscarinic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. They are found in various organ systems, including the nervous system, cardiovascular system, and respiratory system. Muscarinic receptors are activated by muscarine, a type of alkaloid found in certain mushrooms, and are classified into five subtypes (M1-M5) based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

Muscarinic receptors play an essential role in regulating various physiological functions, such as heart rate, smooth muscle contraction, glandular secretion, and cognitive processes. Activation of M1, M3, and M5 muscarinic receptors leads to the activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG), which increase intracellular calcium levels and activate protein kinase C (PKC). Activation of M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, reducing the production of cAMP and modulating ion channel activity.

In summary, muscarinic receptors are a type of GPCR that binds to acetylcholine and regulates various physiological functions in different organ systems. They are classified into five subtypes based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

Polyphloretin phosphate is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It appears to be a chemical compound that has been studied in the field of pharmacology and biochemistry, particularly for its potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as it is not a clinically used medication or a standard diagnostic term.

Polyphloretin phosphate is a derivative of polyphloretin, which is a polyphenolic compound found in the bark of trees such as apple and cherry. It has been suggested that this compound may have various health benefits due to its antioxidant properties, but more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish its safety and efficacy in clinical settings.

Benzodiazepines are a class of psychoactive drugs that possess anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, amnesic, sedative, hypnotic, and muscle relaxant properties. Benzodiazepinones are a subclass of benzodiazepines that share a specific chemical structure, characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine ring with an additional nitrogen-containing ring attached at the 2-position of the benzodiazepine ring.

Examples of benzodiazepinones include clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and flurazepam (Dalmane). These medications are commonly used in the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia, seizures, and muscle spasms. However, they can also cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms, so they should be prescribed with caution and under medical supervision.

Dopamine D2 receptor is a type of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the neurotransmitter dopamine. It is one of five subtypes of dopamine receptors (D1-D5) and is encoded by the gene DRD2. The activation of D2 receptors leads to a decrease in the activity of adenylyl cyclase, which results in reduced levels of cAMP and modulation of ion channels.

D2 receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and play important roles in various physiological functions, including motor control, reward processing, emotion regulation, and cognition. They are also involved in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, drug addiction, and Tourette syndrome.

D2 receptors have two main subtypes: D2 short (D2S) and D2 long (D2L). The D2S subtype is primarily located in the presynaptic terminals and functions as an autoreceptor that regulates dopamine release, while the D2L subtype is mainly found in the postsynaptic neurons and modulates intracellular signaling pathways.

Antipsychotic drugs, which are used to treat schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, work by blocking D2 receptors. However, excessive blockade of these receptors can lead to side effects such as extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), tardive dyskinesia, and hyperprolactinemia. Therefore, the development of drugs that selectively target specific subtypes of dopamine receptors is an active area of research in the field of neuropsychopharmacology.

Stomach diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the stomach, a muscular sac located in the upper part of the abdomen and is responsible for storing and digesting food. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, indigestion, loss of appetite, and bloating. Some common stomach diseases include:

1. Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining that can cause pain, irritation, and ulcers.
2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A condition where stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing heartburn and damage to the esophageal lining.
3. Peptic ulcers: Open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach or duodenum, often caused by bacterial infections or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. Stomach cancer: Abnormal growth of cancerous cells in the stomach, which can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
5. Gastroparesis: A condition where the stomach muscles are weakened or paralyzed, leading to difficulty digesting food and emptying the stomach.
6. Functional dyspepsia: A chronic disorder characterized by symptoms such as pain, bloating, and fullness in the upper abdomen, without any identifiable cause.
7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A condition where eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, accumulate in the esophagus, causing inflammation and difficulty swallowing.
8. Stomal stenosis: Narrowing of the opening between the stomach and small intestine, often caused by scar tissue or surgical complications.
9. Hiatal hernia: A condition where a portion of the stomach protrudes through the diaphragm into the chest cavity, causing symptoms such as heartburn and difficulty swallowing.

These are just a few examples of stomach diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the stomach. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing these conditions and preventing complications.

Dioxanes are a group of chemical compounds that contain two oxygen atoms and four carbon atoms, linked together in a cyclic structure. The most common dioxane is called 1,4-dioxane, which is often used as a solvent or as a stabilizer in various industrial and consumer products, such as cosmetics, cleaning agents, and paint strippers.

In the medical field, 1,4-dioxane has been classified as a likely human carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Exposure to high levels of 1,4-dioxane has been linked to an increased risk of cancer in laboratory animals, and there is some evidence to suggest that it may also pose a cancer risk to humans.

It's worth noting that the use of 1,4-dioxane in cosmetics and other personal care products has been controversial, as some studies have found detectable levels of this chemical in these products. However, the levels of exposure from these sources are generally low, and it is unclear whether they pose a significant cancer risk to humans. Nonetheless, some organizations and experts have called for stricter regulations on the use of 1,4-dioxane in consumer products to minimize potential health risks.

Enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells are a type of neuroendocrine cell found in the stomach lining. They are located in the mucosa of the gastric glands and are responsible for producing and secreting hormones, such as histamine, that regulate gastric acid secretion. ECL cells are stimulated by the hormone gastrin, which is released by G cells in response to food intake or other stimuli. The histamine produced by ECL cells then acts on H2 receptors located on parietal cells, leading to the release of hydrochloric acid into the stomach.

ECL cells are named for their ability to take up and decarboxylate certain amines, such as serotonin and dopamine, which results in the formation of chromaffin granules that can be stained with chromium salts. These cells play an important role in regulating gastric acid secretion and are also involved in the development of some stomach disorders, such as gastrinomas and atrophic gastritis.

Prostaglandin E (PGE) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects. Prostaglandins are not actually hormones, but are similar to them in that they act as chemical messengers that have specific effects on certain cells.

Prostaglandin E is one of the most abundant prostaglandins in the body and has a variety of physiological functions. It is involved in the regulation of inflammation, pain perception, fever, and smooth muscle contraction. Prostaglandin E also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow, platelet aggregation, and gastric acid secretion.

Prostaglandin E is synthesized from arachidonic acid, which is released from cell membranes by the action of enzymes called phospholipases. Once formed, prostaglandin E binds to specific receptors on the surface of cells, leading to a variety of intracellular signaling events that ultimately result in changes in cell behavior.

Prostaglandin E is used medically in the treatment of several conditions, including dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), postpartum hemorrhage, and patent ductus arteriosus (a congenital heart defect). It is also used as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of kidney function.

Cannabinoid receptor antagonists are a class of compounds that bind to and block cannabinoid receptors, which are specialized proteins found on the surface of certain cells in the body. These receptors play an important role in regulating various physiological processes, including pain perception, appetite regulation, and memory formation.

There are two main types of cannabinoid receptors: CB1 receptors, which are primarily found in the brain and central nervous system, and CB2 receptors, which are mainly found in immune cells and other peripheral tissues.

Cannabinoid receptor antagonists work by preventing the activation of these receptors by natural cannabinoids such as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the main psychoactive component of marijuana. By blocking the effects of THC, cannabinoid receptor antagonists can be used to treat conditions that are exacerbated by THC, such as substance use disorders and psychosis.

One example of a cannabinoid receptor antagonist is rimonabant, which was approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but was later withdrawn from the market due to concerns about psychiatric side effects. Other cannabinoid receptor antagonists are currently being investigated for their potential therapeutic uses, including the treatment of pain, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

In medical terms, membranes refer to thin layers of tissue that cover or line various structures in the body. They are composed of connective tissue and epithelial cells, and they can be found lining the outer surface of the body, internal organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are several types of membranes in the human body, including:

1. Serous Membranes: These membranes line the inside of body cavities and cover the organs contained within them. They produce a lubricating fluid that reduces friction between the organ and the cavity wall. Examples include the pleura (lungs), pericardium (heart), and peritoneum (abdominal cavity).
2. Mucous Membranes: These membranes line the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts, as well as the inner surface of the eyelids and the nasal passages. They produce mucus to trap particles, bacteria, and other substances, which helps protect the body from infection.
3. Synovial Membranes: These membranes line the joint cavities and produce synovial fluid, which lubricates the joints and allows for smooth movement.
4. Meninges: These are three layers of membranes that cover and protect the brain and spinal cord. They include the dura mater (outermost layer), arachnoid mater (middle layer), and pia mater (innermost layer).
5. Amniotic Membrane: This is a thin, transparent membrane that surrounds and protects the fetus during pregnancy. It produces amniotic fluid, which provides a cushion for the developing baby and helps regulate its temperature.

A stomach ulcer, also known as a gastric ulcer, is a sore that forms in the lining of the stomach. It's caused by a breakdown in the mucous layer that protects the stomach from digestive juices, allowing acid to come into contact with the stomach lining and cause an ulcer. The most common causes are bacterial infection (usually by Helicobacter pylori) and long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Stomach ulcers may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, heartburn, and nausea. If left untreated, they can lead to more serious complications like internal bleeding, perforation, or obstruction.

Methylhistidines are not a medical condition or disease, but rather refer to a group of biochemical compounds that are derived from the amino acid histidine. Specifically, methylhistidines are formed when histidine undergoes methylation, which is the addition of a methyl group (-CH3) to the histidine molecule.

There are three main types of methylhistidines that are commonly studied: 1-methylhistidine, 2-methylhistidine, and 3-methylhistidine. These compounds can be found in various tissues and fluids throughout the body, including muscles, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

In the medical field, methylhistidines are often used as markers of muscle breakdown and turnover. For example, increased levels of 1-methylhistidine in the urine have been associated with muscle wasting and other conditions that cause muscle damage or degeneration, such as muscular dystrophy and kidney disease. Similarly, elevated levels of 3-methylhistidine have been observed in patients with certain neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

Overall, while methylhistidines are not a medical condition themselves, they can provide valuable insights into various physiological processes and disease states.

Dinoprostone is a prostaglandin E2 analog used in medical practice for the induction of labor and ripening of the cervix in pregnant women. It is available in various forms, including vaginal suppositories, gel, and tablets. Dinoprostone works by stimulating the contraction of uterine muscles and promoting cervical dilation, which helps in facilitating a successful delivery.

It's important to note that dinoprostone should only be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as its use is associated with certain risks and side effects, including uterine hyperstimulation, fetal distress, and maternal infection. The dosage and duration of treatment are carefully monitored to minimize these risks and ensure the safety of both the mother and the baby.

COS cells are a type of cell line that are commonly used in molecular biology and genetic research. The name "COS" is an acronym for "CV-1 in Origin," as these cells were originally derived from the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1. COS cells have been modified through genetic engineering to express high levels of a protein called SV40 large T antigen, which allows them to efficiently take up and replicate exogenous DNA.

There are several different types of COS cells that are commonly used in research, including COS-1, COS-3, and COS-7 cells. These cells are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, as well as for studies of gene expression, protein localization, and signal transduction.

It is important to note that while COS cells have been a valuable tool in scientific research, they are not without their limitations. For example, because they are derived from monkey kidney cells, there may be differences in the way that human genes are expressed or regulated in these cells compared to human cells. Additionally, because COS cells express SV40 large T antigen, they may have altered cell cycle regulation and other phenotypic changes that could affect experimental results. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the choice of cell line when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the body's immune response. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they can travel to different tissues and organs throughout the body. Eosinophils are characterized by their granules, which contain various proteins and enzymes that are toxic to parasites and can contribute to inflammation.

Eosinophils are typically associated with allergic reactions, asthma, and other inflammatory conditions. They can also be involved in the body's response to certain infections, particularly those caused by parasites such as worms. In some cases, elevated levels of eosinophils in the blood or tissues (a condition called eosinophilia) can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as a parasitic infection, autoimmune disorder, or cancer.

Eosinophils are named for their staining properties - they readily take up eosin dye, which is why they appear pink or red under the microscope. They make up only about 1-6% of circulating white blood cells in healthy individuals, but their numbers can increase significantly in response to certain triggers.

Yohimbine is defined as an alkaloid derived from the bark of the Pausinystalia yohimbe tree, primarily found in Central Africa. It functions as a selective antagonist of α2-adrenergers, which results in increased noradrenaline levels and subsequent vasodilation, improved sexual dysfunction, and potentially increased energy and alertness.

It is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and as an aphrodisiac, but its efficacy and safety are still subjects of ongoing research and debate. It's important to note that yohimbine can have significant side effects, including anxiety, increased heart rate, and high blood pressure, and should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

A duodenal ulcer is a type of peptic ulcer that develops in the lining of the first part of the small intestine, called the duodenum. It is characterized by a break in the mucosal layer of the duodinal wall, leading to tissue damage and inflammation. Duodenal ulcers are often caused by an imbalance between digestive acid and mucus production, which can be exacerbated by factors such as bacterial infection (commonly with Helicobacter pylori), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, and stress. Symptoms may include gnawing or burning abdominal pain, often occurring a few hours after meals or during the night, bloating, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Complications can be severe, including bleeding, perforation, and obstruction of the duodenum. Diagnosis typically involves endoscopy, and treatment may include antibiotics (if H. pylori infection is present), acid-suppressing medications, lifestyle modifications, and potentially surgery in severe cases.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Bradykinin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds to and is activated by the peptide hormone bradykinin. There are two main types of bradykinin receptors, B1 and B2, which are distinguished by their pharmacological properties, distribution, and function.

Bradykinin Receptor B1 (B1R) is upregulated during tissue injury and inflammation, and it mediates pain, hyperalgesia, and vasodilation. The activation of B1R also promotes the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, contributing to the development of chronic inflammation.

Bradykinin Receptor B2 (B2R) is constitutively expressed in various tissues, including the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and nervous system. It mediates many of the physiological effects of bradykinin, such as vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and pain sensation. B2R also plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure, fluid balance, and tissue repair.

Both B1R and B2R are involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including inflammatory disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic pain conditions. Therefore, targeting these receptors with specific drugs has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for treating various medical conditions.

Bronchial spasm refers to a sudden constriction or tightening of the muscles in the bronchial tubes, which are the airways that lead to the lungs. This constriction can cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. Bronchial spasm is often associated with respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis. In these conditions, the airways are sensitive to various triggers such as allergens, irritants, or infections, which can cause the muscles in the airways to contract and narrow. This can make it difficult for air to flow in and out of the lungs, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing. Bronchial spasm can be treated with medications that help to relax the muscles in the airways and open up the airways, such as bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

Theophylline is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called methylxanthines. It is used in the management of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other conditions that cause narrowing of the airways in the lungs.

Theophylline works by relaxing the smooth muscle around the airways, which helps to open them up and make breathing easier. It also acts as a bronchodilator, increasing the flow of air into and out of the lungs. Additionally, theophylline has anti-inflammatory effects that can help reduce swelling in the airways and relieve symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

Theophylline is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by a healthcare provider, as the dosage may vary depending on individual factors such as age, weight, and liver function. Regular monitoring of blood levels of theophylline is also necessary to ensure safe and effective use of the medication.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Opioid receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) found in the cell membranes of certain neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. They bind to opioids, which are chemicals that can block pain signals and produce a sense of well-being. There are four main types of opioid receptors: mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin. These receptors play a role in the regulation of pain, reward, addiction, and other physiological functions. Activation of opioid receptors can lead to both therapeutic effects (such as pain relief) and adverse effects (such as respiratory depression and constipation).

Methoxamine is a synthetic, selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist used in scientific research and for therapeutic purposes. It has the ability to stimulate the α1 adrenergic receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow to the skin and extremities.

In a medical context, methoxamine is primarily used as an experimental drug or in research settings due to its specific pharmacological properties. It may be employed to investigate the role of α1-adrenergic receptors in various physiological processes or to temporarily counteract the hypotensive (low blood pressure) effects of certain medications, such as vasodilators or anesthetics.

It is important to note that methoxamine is not commonly used in routine clinical practice due to its strong vasoconstrictive properties and potential adverse effects on organ function if misused or improperly dosed.

Niacinamide, also known as nicotinamide, is a form of vitamin B3 (niacin). It is a water-soluble vitamin that is involved in energy production and DNA repair in the body. Niacinamide can be found in various foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, and cereal grains.

As a medical definition, niacinamide is a nutritional supplement and medication used to prevent or treat pellagra, a disease caused by niacin deficiency. It can also be used to improve skin conditions such as acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation, and has been studied for its potential benefits in treating diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease.

Niacinamide works by acting as a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a coenzyme involved in many cellular processes such as energy metabolism, DNA repair, and gene expression. Niacinamide has anti-inflammatory properties and can help regulate the immune system, making it useful for treating inflammatory skin conditions.

It is important to note that niacinamide should not be confused with niacin (also known as nicotinic acid), which is another form of vitamin B3 that has different effects on the body. Niacin can cause flushing and other side effects at higher doses, while niacinamide does not have these effects.

Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis (PCA) is a type of localized or cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction that occurs when an individual who has been sensitized to a particular antigen is injected with the antigen along with a dye (usually Evans blue) and subsequently intravenously administered with a foreign protein, such as horse serum, that contains antibodies (IgG) against the antigen. The IgG antibodies passively transfer to the sensitized individual and bind to the antigen at the site of injection, forming immune complexes. These immune complexes then activate the complement system, leading to the release of mediators such as histamine, which causes localized vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and extravasation of the dye into the surrounding tissues. As a result, a blue-colored wheal or skin blanching appears at the injection site, indicating a positive PCA reaction. This test is used to detect the presence of IgG antibodies in an individual's serum and to study the mechanisms of immune complex-mediated hypersensitivity reactions.

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of medications that work to reduce gastric acid production by blocking the action of proton pumps in the parietal cells of the stomach. These drugs are commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and other conditions where excessive stomach acid is a problem.

PPIs include several different medications such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, pantoprazole, and esomeprazole. They are usually taken orally, but some PPIs are also available in intravenous (IV) form for hospital use.

By inhibiting the action of proton pumps, PPIs reduce the amount of acid produced in the stomach, which can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing. They are generally considered safe and effective when used as directed, but long-term use may increase the risk of certain side effects, including bone fractures, vitamin B12 deficiency, and Clostridium difficile infection.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

GTP-binding protein alpha subunits, Gs, are a type of heterotrimeric G proteins that play a crucial role in the transmission of signals within cells. These proteins are composed of three subunits: alpha, beta, and gamma. The alpha subunit of Gs proteins (Gs-alpha) is responsible for activating adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that converts ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP), a secondary messenger involved in various cellular processes.

When a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is activated by an extracellular signal, it interacts with and activates the Gs protein. This activation causes the exchange of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to the alpha subunit with guanosine triphosphate (GTP). The GTP-bound Gs-alpha then dissociates from the beta-gamma subunits and interacts with adenylyl cyclase, activating it and leading to an increase in cAMP levels. This signaling cascade ultimately results in various cellular responses, such as changes in gene expression, metabolism, or cell growth and differentiation.

It is important to note that mutations in the GNAS gene, which encodes the Gs-alpha subunit, can lead to several endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, such as McCune-Albright syndrome, fibrous dysplasia, and various hormone-related diseases.

Omega-conotoxins are a group of peptides found in the venom of cone snails. They are characterized by their ability to block N-type voltage-gated calcium channels ( CaV2.2) in the nervous system. These toxins play a crucial role in the predatory behavior of cone snails, as they help to immobilize prey by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. In medical research, omega-conotoxins are used as tools to study neuronal function and are also being investigated for their potential therapeutic applications, particularly in the treatment of chronic pain.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

GABA-B receptor antagonists are pharmacological agents that block the activation of GABA-B receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors found in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, and it exerts its effects by binding to GABA-A and GABA-B receptors.

GABA-B receptor antagonists work by preventing GABA from binding to these receptors, thereby blocking the inhibitory effects of GABA. This can lead to increased neuronal excitability and can have various pharmacological effects depending on the specific receptor subtype and location in the body.

GABA-B receptor antagonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic use in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy, depression, anxiety, and substance abuse disorders. However, their clinical use is still not well established due to limited efficacy and potential side effects, including increased anxiety, agitation, and seizures.

Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are a class of medications that block the action of aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands. Aldosterone helps regulate sodium and potassium balance and blood pressure by binding to mineralocorticoid receptors in the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and brain.

When aldosterone binds to these receptors, it promotes sodium retention and potassium excretion, which can lead to an increase in blood volume and blood pressure. MRAs work by blocking the binding of aldosterone to its receptors, thereby preventing these effects.

MRAs are primarily used to treat heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. By reducing sodium retention and increasing potassium excretion, MRAs can help lower blood pressure, reduce fluid buildup in the body, and improve heart function. Examples of MRAs include spironolactone and eplerenone.

A cannabinoid receptor, CB1, is a G protein-coupled receptor that is primarily found in the brain and central nervous system. It is one of the two main types of cannabinoid receptors, the other being CB2, and is activated by the endocannabinoid anandamide and the phytocannabinoid Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the primary psychoactive component of cannabis. The activation of CB1 receptors is responsible for many of the psychological effects of cannabis, including euphoria, altered sensory perception, and memory impairment. CB1 receptors are also found in peripheral tissues, such as the adipose tissue, liver, and muscles, where they play a role in regulating energy metabolism, appetite, and pain perception.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are a type of medication that binds to and activates adrenergic alpha receptors, which are found in the nervous system and other tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated naturally by chemicals called catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), that are released in response to stress or excitement.

When adrenergic alpha-agonists bind to these receptors, they mimic the effects of catecholamines and cause various physiological responses, such as vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased heart rate and force of heart contractions, and relaxation of smooth muscle in the airways.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), glaucoma, nasal congestion, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Examples of adrenergic alpha-agonists include phenylephrine, clonidine, and guanfacine.

It's important to note that adrenergic alpha-agonists can have both beneficial and harmful effects, depending on the specific medication, dosage, and individual patient factors. Therefore, they should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Sialglycoproteins are a type of glycoprotein that have sialic acid as the terminal sugar in their oligosaccharide chains. These complex molecules are abundant on the surface of many cell types and play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, and protection against proteolytic degradation.

The presence of sialic acid on the outermost part of these glycoproteins makes them negatively charged, which can affect their interaction with other molecules such as lectins, antibodies, and enzymes. Sialglycoproteins are also involved in the regulation of various physiological functions, including blood coagulation, inflammation, and immune response.

Abnormalities in sialglycoprotein expression or structure have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the biology of sialoglycoproteins is important for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

Vasopressin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by the hormone vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone or ADH). There are two main types of vasopressin receptors, V1 and V2.

V1 receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including vascular smooth muscle, heart, liver, and kidney. Activation of V1 receptors leads to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased heart rate and force of heart contractions, and release of glycogen from the liver.

V2 receptors are primarily found in the kidney's collecting ducts. When activated, they increase water permeability in the collecting ducts, allowing for the reabsorption of water into the bloodstream and reducing urine production. This helps to regulate fluid balance and maintain normal blood pressure.

Abnormalities in vasopressin receptor function can contribute to various medical conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, and kidney disease.

Neurokinin-2 (NK-2) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to and is activated by the neuropeptide substance P, which is a member of the tachykinin family. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and play important roles in various physiological functions, including pain transmission, smooth muscle contraction, and neuroinflammation.

NK-2 receptors are involved in the development of hyperalgesia (an increased sensitivity to pain) and allodynia (pain caused by a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain). They have also been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and neurodegenerative disorders.

NK-2 receptor antagonists have been developed and investigated for their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of various pain disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, and other medical conditions.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Purinergic P1 receptors are a type of G-protein coupled receptor that bind to nucleotides such as adenosine. These receptors are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including modulation of neurotransmitter release, cardiovascular function, and immune response. There are four subtypes of P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that have different signaling pathways and functions. Activation of these receptors can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition or stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, changes in intracellular calcium levels, and activation of various protein kinases. They play important roles in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, and immune system.

2-Amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) is a neurotransmitter receptor antagonist that is used in research to study the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors. These receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including learning and memory, and are also implicated in a number of neurological disorders. APV works by binding to the NMDA receptor and blocking its activity, which allows researchers to study the role of these receptors in different biological processes. It is not used as a therapeutic drug in humans.

Phentolamine is a non-selective alpha-blocker drug, which means it blocks both alpha-1 and alpha-2 receptors. It works by relaxing the muscle around blood vessels, which increases blood flow and lowers blood pressure. Phentolamine is used medically for various purposes, including the treatment of high blood pressure, the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytoma (a tumor that releases hormones causing high blood pressure), and as an antidote to prevent severe hypertension caused by certain medications or substances. It may also be used in diagnostic tests to determine if a patient's blood pressure is reactive to drugs, and it can be used during some surgical procedures to help lower the risk of hypertensive crises.

Phentolamine is available in two forms: an injectable solution and oral tablets. The injectable form is typically administered by healthcare professionals in a clinical setting, while the oral tablets are less commonly used due to their short duration of action and potential for causing severe drops in blood pressure. As with any medication, phentolamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and patients should follow their doctor's instructions carefully to minimize the risk of side effects and ensure the drug's effectiveness.

N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) is not a medication but a type of receptor, specifically a glutamate receptor, found in the post-synaptic membrane in the central nervous system. Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. NMDA receptors are involved in various functions such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. They also play a role in certain neurological disorders like epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic pain.

NMDA receptors are named after N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, a synthetic analog of the amino acid aspartic acid, which is a selective agonist for this type of receptor. An agonist is a substance that binds to a receptor and causes a response similar to that of the natural ligand (in this case, glutamate).

Cholinergic antagonists, also known as anticholinergics or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the nervous system. They achieve this by binding to and blocking the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and urinary bladder.

The blockade of these receptors results in a range of effects depending on the specific organ system involved. For example, cholinergic antagonists can cause mydriasis (dilation of the pupils), cycloplegia (paralysis of the ciliary muscle of the eye), tachycardia (rapid heart rate), reduced gastrointestinal motility and secretion, urinary retention, and respiratory tract smooth muscle relaxation.

Cholinergic antagonists are used in a variety of clinical settings, including the treatment of conditions such as Parkinson's disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, and urinary incontinence. Some common examples of cholinergic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and oxybutynin.

It's important to note that cholinergic antagonists can have significant side effects, particularly when used in high doses or in combination with other medications that affect the nervous system. These side effects can include confusion, memory impairment, hallucinations, delirium, and blurred vision. Therefore, it's essential to use these drugs under the close supervision of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic (pain reliever) derived from the opium poppy. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals and reducing the perception of pain. Morphine is used to treat moderate to severe pain, including pain associated with cancer, myocardial infarction, and other conditions. It can also be used as a sedative and cough suppressant.

Morphine has a high potential for abuse and dependence, and its use should be closely monitored by healthcare professionals. Common side effects of morphine include drowsiness, respiratory depression, constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Overdose can result in respiratory failure, coma, and death.

Endothelin-1 is a small peptide (21 amino acids) and a potent vasoconstrictor, which means it narrows blood vessels. It is primarily produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelin-1 plays a crucial role in regulating vascular tone, cell growth, and inflammation. Its dysregulation has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. It exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (ETA and ETB) on the surface of target cells.

Wakefulness is a state of consciousness in which an individual is alert and aware of their surroundings. It is characterized by the ability to perceive, process, and respond to stimuli in a purposeful manner. In a medical context, wakefulness is often assessed using measures such as the electroencephalogram (EEG) to evaluate brain activity patterns associated with consciousness.

Wakefulness is regulated by several interconnected neural networks that promote arousal and attention. These networks include the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which consists of a group of neurons located in the brainstem that project to the thalamus and cerebral cortex, as well as other regions involved in regulating arousal and attention, such as the basal forebrain and hypothalamus.

Disorders of wakefulness can result from various underlying conditions, including neurological disorders, sleep disorders, medication side effects, or other medical conditions that affect brain function. Examples of such disorders include narcolepsy, insomnia, hypersomnia, and various forms of encephalopathy or brain injury.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Bicuculline is a pharmacological agent that acts as a competitive antagonist at GABA-A receptors, which are inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system. By blocking the action of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) at these receptors, bicuculline can increase neuronal excitability and cause convulsions. It is used in research to study the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in various physiological processes and neurological disorders.

Opioid mu receptors, also known as mu-opioid receptors (MORs), are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to opioids, a class of chemicals that include both natural and synthetic painkillers. These receptors are found in the brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract, and play a key role in mediating the effects of opioid drugs such as morphine, heroin, and oxycodone.

MORs are involved in pain modulation, reward processing, respiratory depression, and physical dependence. Activation of MORs can lead to feelings of euphoria, decreased perception of pain, and slowed breathing. Prolonged activation of these receptors can also result in tolerance, where higher doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effect, and dependence, where withdrawal symptoms occur when the drug is discontinued.

MORs have three main subtypes: MOR-1, MOR-2, and MOR-3, with MOR-1 being the most widely studied and clinically relevant. Selective agonists for MOR-1, such as fentanyl and sufentanil, are commonly used in anesthesia and pain management. However, the abuse potential and risk of overdose associated with these drugs make them a significant public health concern.

Nifedipine is an antihypertensive and calcium channel blocker medication. It works by relaxing the muscles of the blood vessels, which helps to lower blood pressure and improve the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the heart. Nifedipine is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), angina (chest pain), and certain types of heart rhythm disorders.

In medical terms, nifedipine can be defined as: "A dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker that is used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, and Raynaud's phenomenon. It works by inhibiting the influx of calcium ions into vascular smooth muscle and cardiac muscle, which results in relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle and decreased workload on the heart."

Maze learning is not a medical term per se, but it is a concept that is often used in the field of neuroscience and psychology. It refers to the process by which an animal or human learns to navigate through a complex environment, such as a maze, in order to find its way to a goal or target.

Maze learning involves several cognitive processes, including spatial memory, learning, and problem-solving. As animals or humans navigate through the maze, they encode information about the location of the goal and the various landmarks within the environment. This information is then used to form a cognitive map that allows them to navigate more efficiently in subsequent trials.

Maze learning has been widely used as a tool for studying learning and memory processes in both animals and humans. For example, researchers may use maze learning tasks to investigate the effects of brain damage or disease on cognitive function, or to evaluate the efficacy of various drugs or interventions for improving cognitive performance.

The Endothelin B (ETB) receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. ETB receptors are expressed in various tissues, including vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. When endothelin binds to the ETB receptor, it can cause both vasodilation and vasoconstriction, depending on the location of the receptor. In endothelial cells, activation of ETB receptors leads to the production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator. However, in vascular smooth muscle cells, activation of ETB receptors can cause vasoconstriction by increasing intracellular calcium levels.

ETB receptors have also been implicated in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including cardiovascular function, kidney function, and neurotransmission. In the cardiovascular system, ETB receptors play a role in regulating blood pressure and vascular remodeling. In the kidneys, they are involved in the regulation of sodium and water balance. Additionally, ETB receptors have been implicated in the development of pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease.

Overall, Endothelin B receptors play a critical role in regulating various physiological processes, and their dysregulation has been associated with several pathological conditions.

A reflex is an automatic, involuntary and rapid response to a stimulus that occurs without conscious intention. In the context of physiology and neurology, it's a basic mechanism that involves the transmission of nerve impulses between neurons, resulting in a muscle contraction or glandular secretion.

Reflexes are important for maintaining homeostasis, protecting the body from harm, and coordinating movements. They can be tested clinically to assess the integrity of the nervous system, such as the knee-j jerk reflex, which tests the function of the L3-L4 spinal nerve roots and the sensitivity of the stretch reflex arc.

Hydrochloric acid, also known as muriatic acid, is not a substance that is typically found within the human body. It is a strong mineral acid with the chemical formula HCl. In a medical context, it might be mentioned in relation to gastric acid, which helps digest food in the stomach. Gastric acid is composed of hydrochloric acid, potassium chloride and sodium chloride dissolved in water. The pH of hydrochloric acid is very low (1-2) due to its high concentration of H+ ions, making it a strong acid. However, it's important to note that the term 'hydrochloric acid' does not directly refer to a component of human bodily fluids or tissues.

... acts as a highly selective antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor. The Ki values for the H1 receptor are ... Simons FE, Simons KJ (May 1999). "Clinical pharmacology of new histamine H1 receptor antagonists". Clinical Pharmacokinetics. ... "Comparative anticholinergic activities of 10 histamine H1 receptor antagonists in two functional models". European Journal of ... Because the symptoms of itching and redness in these conditions are caused by histamine acting on the H1 receptor, blocking ...
... is a histamine H1-receptor antagonist. It has anticholinergic and antipruritic effects. Astemizole is rapidly ... H1 receptor antagonists, HERG blocker, Janssen Pharmaceutica, Phenol ethers, Piperidines, Withdrawn drugs). ... absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and competitively binds to histamine H1 receptor sites in the gastrointestinal tract, ... This suppresses the formation of edema and pruritus (caused by histamine). Despite some earlier reports that astemizole does ...
It is a H1 histamine receptor antagonist. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2010, under ... Alcaftadine is an antagonist at three of the histamine receptors (1, 2 and 4). The main indication for Alcaftadine is for ... H1 receptor antagonists, Mast cell stabilizers, AbbVie brands, Ophthalmology drugs). ... This effect on histamine receptors seems to show lower rates of itching, eosinophil recruitment and redness after exposure to ...
ISBN 0-444-52166-6. Lapa G, Mathews T, Harp J, Budygin E, Jones S (2005). "Diphenylpyraline, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist ... H1 receptor antagonists, Piperidines, Diphenylmethanol ethers, Stimulants, All stub articles, Respiratory system drug stubs). ...
... is a histamine antagonist, specifically an H1-antagonist. The maleic acid salt of the levorotatory isomer is sold ... H1 receptor antagonists, Chlorobenzenes, 2-Pyridyl compounds, Ethers, All stub articles, Respiratory system drug stubs). ...
"Comparative anticholinergic activities of 10 histamine H1 receptor antagonists in two functional models". European Journal of ... D2 antagonists, Ethers, H1 receptor antagonists, Chlorcyclizines, Sedatives, Serotonin receptor antagonists, Wikipedia medicine ... "Evaluation of histamine H1-, H2-, and H3-receptor ligands at the human histamine H4 receptor: identification of 4- ... Hydroxyzine's predominant mechanism of action is as a potent and selective histamine H1 receptor inverse agonist. This action ...
Oishi R, Shishido S, Yamori M, Saeki K (February 1994). "Comparison of the effects of eleven histamine H1-receptor antagonists ... Sharma A, Hamelin BA (April 2003). "Classic histamine H1 receptor antagonists: a critical review of their metabolic and ... "Potentiation of L-dopa-induced behavioral excitement by histamine H1-receptor antagonists in mice". Japanese Journal of ... or H1 receptor antagonist. It has little to no anticholinergic activity, with 180-fold selectivity for the H1 receptor over the ...
... works by acting as an antagonist of histamine H1 receptors. It also functions as a moderately effective ... H1 receptor antagonists, Muscarinic antagonists, Bromoarenes, 2-Pyridyl compounds, Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors ...
Subdivisions of histamine antagonists include H1 receptor antagonists, H2 receptor antagonists, and H3 receptor antagonists. ... Examples include histamine receptor agonists and histamine receptor antagonists (or antihistamines). ... Histaminergic means "working on the histamine system", and histaminic means "related to histamine". A histaminergic agent (or ... drug) is a chemical which functions to directly modulate the histamine system in the body or brain. ...
H1-antihistamines can be either neutral receptor antagonists or inverse agonists. Normally, histamine binds to the H1 receptor ... H1-antihistamines work by binding to histamine H1 receptors in mast cells, smooth muscle, and endothelium in the body as well ... H1-antihistamines refer to compounds that inhibit the activity of the H1 receptor. Since the H1 receptor exhibits constitutive ... like H1-antihistamines, exist as inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. They act on H2 histamine receptors found mainly in ...
Histamine: imipramine is an antagonist of the histamine H1 receptors. BDNF: BDNF is implicated in neurogenesis in the ... Glycine receptor antagonists, H1 receptor antagonists, Muscarinic antagonists, Nicotinic antagonists, Novartis brands, ... Appl H, Holzammer T, Dove S, Haen E, Strasser A, Seifert R (February 2012). "Interactions of recombinant human histamine H₁R, ... histamine, and cholinergic receptors. Imipramine was discovered in 1951 and was introduced for medical use in 1957. It was the ...
... is an antihistamine, or an antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor. A study found that dexchlorpheniramine ... H1 receptor antagonists, Muscarinic antagonists, 2-Pyridyl compounds, All stub articles, Respiratory system drug stubs). ...
... is a piperazine derivative with histamine H1-receptor antagonist (antihistamine) activity. The precise mechanism of ... H1 receptor antagonists, Wikipedia medicine articles ready to translate, World Health Organization essential medicines). ...
... is a selective histamine H1 antagonist. It binds to the histamine H1 receptor, thus blocking the action of ... Clemastine, also known as meclastin, is a first-generation H1 histamine antagonist (antihistamine) with anticholinergic ... Antihistamines act by competitively binding to H1-receptor sites, thus blocking the binding of endogenous histamine. ... Effects of histamine (which are countered by antihistamines) include: Increased capillary permeability Increased capillary ...
... or antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor. It is a prodrug, generally completely metabolized to the active form fexofenadine ... H1 receptor antagonists, Hepatotoxins, HERG blocker, Peripherally selective drugs, Piperidines, Prodrugs, Secondary alcohols, ...
... acts primarily as an antagonist or inverse agonist of the histamine H1 receptor. This action is responsible for its ... Krystal AD, Richelson E, Roth T (August 2013). "Review of the histamine system and the clinical effects of H1 antagonists: ... H1 receptor antagonists, Hypnotics, Muscarinic antagonists, 2-Pyridyl compounds, Sedatives, Dimethylamino compounds). ... an inverse agonist of the histamine H1 receptor-and to a lesser extent an anticholinergic-specifically an antagonist of the ...
February 1998). "Oxidation of histamine H1 antagonist mequitazine is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 2D6 in human liver microsomes ... Mequitazine (trade name Primalan) is an H1 antagonist and anticholinergic of the phenothiazine chemical class. It is used to ... H1 receptor antagonists, Muscarinic antagonists, Phenothiazines, Quinuclidines). ...
... a new selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist: receptor selectivity and in vitro antihistaminic activity". Drugs in R&D. 6 ( ... Bilastine binds to guinea-pig cerebellar histamine H1-receptors (Ki=44 nM) and to human recombinant histamine H1-receptors (Ki= ... a new selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist: receptor selectivity and in vitro antihistaminic activity". Drugs in R&D. 6 ( ... It is a second-generation antihistamine and takes effect by selectively inhibiting the histamine H1 receptor, preventing these ...
... long-acting histamine antagonist with selective peripheral H1 receptor antagonist activity. It further blocks the receptors of ... January 1997). "Rupatadine, a new potent, orally active dual antagonist of histamine and platelet-activating factor (PAF)". The ... H1 receptor antagonists, Pyridines, Piperidines, Chloroarenes, Benzocycloheptapyridines, Peripherally selective drugs). ... Rupatadine is a second generation antihistamine and platelet-activating factor antagonist used to treat allergies. It was ...
... acts as a selective antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor, thus stabilizing mast cells and inhibiting histamine ... H1 receptor antagonists, Mast cell stabilizers, Muscarinic antagonists, Novartis brands, Oxygen heterocycles, Wikipedia ... These drugs are mast cell stabilizers, which work by preventing the release of histamine and therefore prevent or control ...
Often this allows prodrugs to be activated and absorbed, as in the case of the histamine H1-receptor antagonist terfenadine. ... Katoh M, Nakajima M, Yamazaki H, Yokoi T (October 2000). "Inhibitory potencies of 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium antagonists to P- ...
It is a direct H1-receptor antagonist that inhibits the release of histamine from mast cells. The ophthalmic formulation has ... H1 receptor antagonists, Leukotriene antagonists, Mast cell stabilizers, Piperidines, 2-Pyridyl compounds, Peripherally ... and olopatadine on histamine-induced wheal-and flare-response, sedation, and psychomotor performance". Clinical and ...
It is used in the synthesis of modafinil and the benzhydryl group is present in the structure of many histamine H1 antagonists ...
Avoiding rapid infusion of protamine sulfate and pre-treating at-risk patients with histamine receptor antagonists (H1 and H2) ...
... is a phenothiazine derivative which acts as a histamine antagonist at the H1 subtype. First described in 1951, it was never ... H1 receptor antagonists, All stub articles, Respiratory system drug stubs). ...
Krystal AD, Richelson E, Roth T (August 2013). "Review of the histamine system and the clinical effects of H1 antagonists: ... Diphenhydramine, while traditionally known as an antagonist, acts primarily as an inverse agonist of the histamine H1 receptor ... H1 receptor antagonists, Hypnotics, Local anesthetics, Muscarinic antagonists, Oneirogens, Sedatives, Serotonin reuptake ... Histamine, Bradykinin, and Their Antagonists". In Brunton L (ed.). Goodman & Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics ...
... originally classified as antagonists of histamine H1 receptors have been reclassified as inverse agonists. Many antagonists are ... For example, histamine lowers arterial pressure through vasodilation at the histamine H1 receptor, while adrenaline raises ... As for non-competitive antagonists and irreversible antagonists in functional assays with irreversible competitive antagonist ... is an uncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor. Silent antagonists are competitive receptor antagonists that have zero ...
H1 antagonists, also called H1 blockers, are a class of medications that block the action of histamine at the H1 receptor, ... Virtually all H1-antihistamines function as inverse agonists at the histamine H1-receptor, as opposed to neutral antagonists, ... the histamine can react with local or widespread tissues through histamine receptors.[citation needed] Histamine, acting on H1- ... The newer, second-generation H1-antihistamines are far more selective for peripheral histamine H1-receptors and have a better ...
H1 histamine receptor antagonists) are effective in many conditions, including motion sickness, morning sickness in pregnancy, ... is an antidepressant that also has antiemetic effects it is also a potent histamine H1 receptor antagonist, Ki=1.6 nM. ... Metoclopramide NK1 receptor antagonist Aprepitant (Emend) is a commercially available NK1 receptor antagonist Casopitant is an ... H1 receptors in central areas include area postrema and vomiting center in the vestibular nucleus. Also, many of the ...
... chloral hydrate and some histamine H1 antagonists, common recreational drugs such as ethanol, cocaine, and less common ...
Histamine receptor antagonists H1-receptor antagonist Histamine H2-receptor Histamine H3-receptor Histamine H4-receptor GRCh38 ... Histamine may play a role in penile erection. Histamine H1 receptors are activated by endogenous histamine, which is released ... "Histamine and histamine-receptor antagonists modify gene expression and biosynthesis of interferon gamma in peripheral human ... they are more properly described as H1-antihistamines rather than H1-receptor antagonists.15 Cará AM, Lopes-Martins RA, Antunes ...
US-4665078-A chemical patent summary.
Histamine H1 Antagonists [D27.505.519.625.375.425.400]. *Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating [D27.505.519.625.375.425. ... Histamine H1 Antagonists [D27.505.696.577.375.425.400]. *Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating [D27.505.696.577.375.425. ... "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" by people in this website by year, and whether "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating ... "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, ...
Hydroxyzine, a piperazine antihistamine structurally related to buclizine, cyclizine, and meclizine, is used to treat histamine ... Hydroxyzines active metabolite, cetirizine, is also used as an H1-antagonist. ...
Hydroxyzine, a piperazine antihistamine structurally related to buclizine, cyclizine, and meclizine, is used to treat histamine ... Hydroxyzines active metabolite, cetirizine, is also used as an H1-antagonist. ...
Histamine H1 Antagonists / pharmacokinetics * Humans * Male * Middle Aged * Organic Anion Transporters / antagonists & ...
Cetirizine acts as a highly selective antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor. The Ki values for the H1 receptor are ... Simons FE, Simons KJ (May 1999). "Clinical pharmacology of new histamine H1 receptor antagonists". Clinical Pharmacokinetics. ... "Comparative anticholinergic activities of 10 histamine H1 receptor antagonists in two functional models". European Journal of ... Because the symptoms of itching and redness in these conditions are caused by histamine acting on the H1 receptor, blocking ...
Histamine-1 (H1) antagonists *Avoid centrally acting H1 antagonists.. *Pitolisant increases histamine levels in the brain; ... therefore, H1 antagonists that cross the blood-brain barrier may reduce pitolisant effectiveness. ...
Acyclovir (); Diphenhydramine (); Fluconazole (); H1 Histamine Antagonist (); IL-2 (Interleukin-2); LN-145 (); MESNA (); ...
Second-generation histamine H1-receptor antagonist. Competes with histamine on effector cells in the gastrointestinal tract, ... It competitively blocks histamine from binding to H1 receptors. It is used for symptomatic relief of symptoms caused by release ... These agents act by competitive inhibition of histamine at the H1 receptor. This mediates the wheal and flare reactions, ... This is a first-generation antihistamine with anticholinergic effects that binds to H1 receptors in the CNS and the body. ...
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating / therapeutic use * Humans * Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects ...
Histamine. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists. *Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.. *Pharmacotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis ...
1986) Effects of H1- and H2-histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on sleep and wakefulness in the rat. J Neural Transm 66 ... 1994) The selective histamine H1-receptor agonist 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine increases waking in the rat. Eur ... whereas H1 antagonists increase sleep (Monti et al., 1986, 1994; Lin et al., 1988). Histamine is also involved in the control ... Histamine has also been shown to play a role in the regulation of sleep and feeding. Therefore, we studied the relationship ...
Histamine H1-receptor antagonist; competes with histamine on effector cells in the gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels and ...
Diphenhydramine is a H1-histamine receptor antagonist. Diphenhydramine is categorized as an antihistaminic; sedative, hypnotic. ...
... is a selective histamine H1-receptor antagonist for topical ophthalmic use. Each mL contains 0.54 mg levocabastine ... selective histamine H1-antagonist. ,!--Structure ,structure=* LIVOSTIN™ 0.05% (levocabastine hydrochloride ophthalmic ... DrugProjectFormSinglePage ,authorTag=,!--Overview{{RB}} ,genericName=Levocabastine ,aOrAn=a ,drugClass=histamine [[H1- ... receptor antagonist]] ,indicationType=treatment ,indication=seasonal [[allergic conjunctivitis]]. ,adverseReactions=stinging ...
Inhibitory effect of terfenadine, a selective H1 histamine antagonist, on alcoholic beverage-induced bronchoconstriction in ...
Diphenhydramine belongs to a group of drugs called Histamine H1 Antagonists (antihistamine). It works by blocking the action of ... histamine and allergy symptoms, but is also known to cause sleepiness and drowsiness. ...
Brompheniramine maleate is a histamine antagonist, specifically an H1-receptor- blocking agent belonging to the alkylamine ... Antihistamines appear to compete with histamine for receptor sites on effector cells. Brompheniramine also has anticholinergic ...
Hydroxyzine A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and ... 14-16-26-17-15-25/h1-10,24-25H,11H2,(H,26,27)(H,28,29);1-9,21,25H,10-17H2/f/h26,28H; ... histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an ...
Histamine H1 receptor * 3rze - human histamine H1 receptor with an antagonist doxepin. ... The H1 receptor is a histamine receptor belonging to the family of rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors. The H1 receptor ... Histamine. . Histamine receptors. Allergy symptoms are mostly caused by the release of histamine in response to allergens. The ... Many allergy drugs are anti-histamines, in that they bind to the histamine receptor but do not cause the conformational change ...
These may include a steroid, a histamine-1 (H1) receptor antagonist (such as diphenhydramine/Benadryl), and an antipyretic ( ...
histamine H1 receptor antagonist Emedastine is an orally active, selective and high affinity histamine H1 receptor antagonist ... Ranitidine is a potent, selective and orally active histamine H2-receptor antagonist with an IC50 of 3.3 μM that inhibits ... DL-AP5 is the racemic version of the selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. Learn More ... Avacopan (CCX168) is an orally administered and selective C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist. Learn More ...
Claritin-D belongs to a group of drugs called Histamine H1 Antagonists (antihistamine), and nasal decongestants. Antihistamines ... work by blocking the action of histamine, which is known to trigger allergy symptoms. Nasal decongestants work by narrowing the ...
Marzanatti M, Monopoli A, Trampus M, Ongini E (1989), Effects of nonsedating histamine H1-antagonists on EEG activity and ... Finally, experimental agents like CEE-03-310 (a selective dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist in Phase II development) have ...
... in Guinea Pig Ventricular Myocytes and Lengthening of Cardiac Repolarization in Man by the Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist ... Atypical Neuroleptics Enhance Histamine Turnover in Brain Via 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A Receptor Blockade S. Morisset, U. G. Sahm, ... SR 144528, an Antagonist for the Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptor that Behaves as an Inverse Agonist Marielle Portier, Murielle ... Electrophysiological Comparison of 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A Receptor Antagonists on Dorsal Raphe Cell Firing Lynn P. Martin, David ...
Histamine H1-receptor antagonist. Form:. Free Base. GLOBALLY HARMONIZED SYSTEM (GHS). Pictograms. ...
Histamine H1 antagonist, inhibits vascular permeability and release of histamine and other mediators involved in allergic ...
We studied the effects of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists on down regulation of contact sensitivity (CS) to ... Two H1 antagonists did not affect the down regulation of CS induced by either tolerance or burning. The differential ... PREVENTION OF SUPPRESSED CELL-MEDIATED-IMMUNITY IN BURNED MICE WITH HISTAMINE-2 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST DRUGS JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ... THE EFFECT OF HISTAMINE-RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS ON SPECIFIC AND NONSPECIFIC SUPPRESSION OF EXPERIMENTAL CONTACT SENSITIVITY ...
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating (MeSH) * Humans (MeSH) * Infant (MeSH) * Male (MeSH) ...
  • HISTAKIND M 10/120MG TABLET is a combination of Fexofenadine and Montelukast which belongs to the group of medicines called Histamine H1 receptor blockers and Leukotriene receptor antagonists respectively. (netmeds.com)
  • Accordingly, there is still a need for improved M 3 receptor antagonists that would have an appropriate pharmacological profile, for example in term of potency, pharmacokinetics or duration of action. (justia.com)
  • In this context, the present invention relates to novel M 3 receptor antagonists. (justia.com)
  • There is a need for M 3 receptor antagonists that would have a pharmacological profile suitable for an administration by the inhalation route. (justia.com)
  • The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists segment holds the largest market share during the forecast period. (verifiedmarketresearch.com)
  • The degree of sleepiness that occurs is generally less than with first-generation antihistamines because second-generation antihistamines are more selective for the H1 receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • PET studies with antihistamines have found that brain H1 receptor occupancy of more than 50% is associated with a high prevalence of somnolence and cognitive decline, whereas brain H1 receptor occupancy of less than 20% is considered to be non-sedative. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brompheniramine maleate is a histamine antagonist, specifically an H1-receptor- blocking agent belonging to the alkylamine class of antihistamines. (nih.gov)
  • Antihistamines appear to compete with histamine for receptor sites on effector cells. (nih.gov)
  • Antihistamines work by blocking the action of histamine, which is known to trigger allergy symptoms. (rxwiki.com)
  • Diphenhydramine is a H1-histamine receptor antagonist. (chemindustry.com)
  • Diphenhydramine belongs to a group of drugs called Histamine H1 Antagonists (antihistamine). (rxwiki.com)
  • These may include a steroid, a histamine-1 (H1) receptor antagonist (such as diphenhydramine/Benadryl), and an antipyretic (such as acetaminophen/Tylenol). (oncolink.org)
  • HISTAKIND M 10/120MG TABLET reduces the unpleasant symptoms of allergic rhinitis, where fexofenadine acts by antagonizing the effects of histamine (a substance that cause allergic reaction) on the surface of cells and montelukast acts by blocking the leukotriene receptor, thus leading to a relaxation in smooth muscle, which in turn decreases swelling and inflammation in the airways. (netmeds.com)
  • A class of non-sedating drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM), thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. (childrensmercy.org)
  • The medication works by blocking histamine H1 receptors, mostly outside the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the symptoms of itching and redness in these conditions are caused by histamine acting on the H1 receptor, blocking those receptors temporarily relieves those symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cetirizine has 600-fold or greater selectivity for the H1 receptor over a wide variety of other sites, including muscarinic acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, and α-adrenergic receptors, among many others. (wikipedia.org)
  • The drug shows 20,000-fold or greater selectivity for the H1 receptor over the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and hence does not exhibit anticholinergic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a first-generation antihistamine with anticholinergic effects that binds to H1 receptors in the CNS and the body. (medscape.com)
  • It competitively blocks histamine from binding to H1 receptors. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, olanzapine significantly increased hepatic histamine H1 receptors, while O + B co-treatment significantly reversed them to normal levels. (edu.au)
  • This study provided the first evidence that betahistine could act on hepatic H1 receptors via modulation of AMPKα-SREBP-1 and PPARα-dependent pathways to ameliorate olanzapine-induced dyslipidemia in rats. (edu.au)
  • As a consequence of the wide distribution of muscarinic receptors in the body, significant systemic exposure to muscarinic antagonists is associated with effects such as dry mouth, constipation, mydriasis, urinary retention (all predominantly mediated via blockade of M 3 receptors) and tachycardia (mediated by blockade of M 2 receptors). (justia.com)
  • It is controlled by histamine (H1), muscarinic, and serotonin (5-HT3) receptors and is activated by either one of four trigger zones: Vestibular nuclei, Cerebral cortex, Gastrointestinal tract, and Chemoreceptor. (verifiedmarketresearch.com)
  • Olopatadine is a selective histamine H1 antagonist and mast cell stabilizer that works by attenuating inflammatory and allergic reactions. (drugbank.com)
  • Bilastine is a selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist (Ki = 64nM) Label . (drugbank.com)
  • Hydroxyzine's active metabolite, cetirizine, is also used as an H 1 -antagonist. (pharmacycode.com)
  • Compared to other second-generation anti-histamines, cetirizine can cause drowsiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cetirizine acts as a highly selective antagonist of the histamine H1 receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ki values for the H1 receptor are approximately 6 nM for cetirizine, 3 nM for levocetirizine, and 100 nM for dextrocetirizine, indicating that the levorotatory enantiomer is the main active form. (wikipedia.org)
  • A positron emission tomography (PET) study found that brain occupancy of the H1 receptor was 12.6% for 10 mg cetirizine, 25.2% for 20 mg cetirizine, and 67.6% for 30 mg hydroxyzine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In accordance, H1 receptor occupancy correlated well with subjective sleepiness for 30 mg hydroxyzine but there was no correlation for 10 or 20 mg cetirizine. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, brain penetration and brain H1 receptor occupancy by cetirizine are dose-dependent, and in accordance, while cetirizine at doses of 5 to 10 mg have been reported to be non-sedating or mildly sedating, a higher dose of 20 mg has been found to induce significant drowsiness in other studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rationale: The effect of Cetirizine, a selective H1-receptor antagonist, was studied in the Brown Norway rat (BNR) model of trimellitic anhydride (TMA) early and late phase allergic asthma. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydroxyzine, a piperazine antihistamine structurally related to buclizine, cyclizine, and meclizine, is used to treat histamine-mediated pruritus or pruritus due to allergy, nausea and vomiting, and, in combination with an opiate agonist, anxiolytic pain. (pharmacycode.com)
  • Bilastine is a novel new-generation antihistamine that is highly selective for the H1 histamine receptor, has a rapid onset and prolonged duration of action. (drugbank.com)
  • Competes with histamine on effector cells in the gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels, and respiratory tract. (medscape.com)
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (childrensmercy.org)
  • During allergic response mast cells undergo degranulation which releases histamine and other subastances. (drugbank.com)
  • By binding to and preventing activation of the H1 receptor, bilastine reduces the development of allergic symptoms due to the release of histamine from mast cells. (drugbank.com)
  • Hydroxyzine A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. (scitoys.com)
  • Bilastine is a peripheral histamine H1-antagonist used to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic spontaneous urticaria. (drugbank.com)
  • Ranitidine is a potent, selective and orally active histamine H2-receptor antagonist with an IC50 of 3.3 μM that inhibits gastric secretion. (adooq.com)
  • It is used for symptomatic relief of symptoms caused by release of histamine in allergic reactions. (medscape.com)
  • It works by blocking the action of histamine and allergy symptoms, but is also known to cause sleepiness and drowsiness. (rxwiki.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" by people in this website by year, and whether "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating" by people in Profiles. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Felodipine is a 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist and calcium channel protein inhibitor. (adooq.com)
  • In contrast, astemizole acts as a histamine H1 receptor (H1R1) antagonist to activate T cells in a non-specific, DC-independent fashion. (bmj.com)
  • A commonly reported side-effect following inhaled administration of therapeutic dose of the current, clinically used non-selective muscarinic antagonists is dry-mouth and while this is reported as only mild in intensity it does limit the dose of inhaled agent given. (justia.com)
  • These agents act by competitive inhibition of histamine at the H1 receptor. (medscape.com)
  • Olopatadine works by blocking the effects of histamine, which is a primary inflammatory mediator that causes inflammatory and. (drugbank.com)
  • Both animal and clinical studies have shown that co-treatment with betahistine (a histamine H1 receptor agonist/H3 receptor antagonist) is effective in controlling olanzapine-induced weight gain. (edu.au)
  • These antagonists are utilized for the treatment of nausea and vomiting, unusually caused by radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or postoperatively. (verifiedmarketresearch.com)
  • Conclusions: The data suggest that the H-1 histamine receptor does not play a major role in the EAR, but is involved in LAR physiological response in the BNR TMA allergic asthma model. (cdc.gov)
  • Immunocytochemical studies show that the histamine and orexin neurons are often located very close to each other. (jneurosci.org)
  • These include serum tryptase , chromogranin A , plasma prostaglandin D2, histamine, heparin , a variety of random and 24-hour urinary prostaglandins, and urinary leukotriene E4. (medscape.com)
  • Histamine has also been shown to play a role in the regulation of sleep and feeding. (jneurosci.org)