Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Fats: The glyceryl esters of a fatty acid, or of a mixture of fatty acids. They are generally odorless, colorless, and tasteless if pure, but they may be flavored according to origin. Fats are insoluble in water, soluble in most organic solvents. They occur in animal and vegetable tissue and are generally obtained by boiling or by extraction under pressure. They are important in the diet (DIETARY FATS) as a source of energy. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Hemolymph: The blood/lymphlike nutrient fluid of some invertebrates.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Ecdysterone: A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysterone is the 20-hydroxylated ECDYSONE.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Manduca: A genus of sphinx or hawk moths of the family Sphingidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Vitellogenesis: The active production and accumulation of VITELLINS (egg yolk proteins) in the non-mammalian OOCYTES from circulating precursors, VITELLOGENINS. Vitellogenesis usually begins after the first MEIOSIS and is regulated by estrogenic hormones.Vitellogenins: Phospholipoglycoproteins produced in the fat body of egg-laying animals such as non-mammalian VERTEBRATES; ARTHROPODS; and others. Vitellogenins are secreted into the HEMOLYMPH, and taken into the OOCYTES by receptor-mediated ENDOCYTOSIS to form the major yolk proteins, VITELLINS. Vitellogenin production is under the regulation of steroid hormones, such as ESTRADIOL and JUVENILE HORMONES in insects.Bombyx: A genus of silkworm MOTHS in the family Bombycidae of the order LEPIDOPTERA. The family contains a single species, Bombyx mori from the Greek for silkworm + mulberry tree (on which it feeds). A native of Asia, it is sometimes reared in this country. It has long been raised for its SILK and after centuries of domestication it probably does not exist in nature. It is used extensively in experimental GENETICS. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p519)Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Fat Body: A nutritional reservoir of fatty tissue found mainly in insects and amphibians.Insect Hormones: Hormones secreted by insects. They influence their growth and development. Also synthetic substances that act like insect hormones.Juvenile Hormones: Compounds, either natural or synthetic, which block development of the growing insect.Pyrrolidonecarboxylic Acid: A cyclized derivative of L-GLUTAMIC ACID. Elevated blood levels may be associated with problems of GLUTAMINE or GLUTATHIONE metabolism.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Grasshoppers: Plant-eating orthopterans having hindlegs adapted for jumping. There are two main families: Acrididae and Romaleidae. Some of the more common genera are: Melanoplus, the most common grasshopper; Conocephalus, the eastern meadow grasshopper; and Pterophylla, the true katydid.Intra-Abdominal Fat: Fatty tissue inside the ABDOMINAL CAVITY, including visceral fat and retroperitoneal fat. It is the most metabolically active fat in the body and easily accessible for LIPOLYSIS. Increased visceral fat is associated with metabolic complications of OBESITY.Ecdysone: A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects.Subcutaneous Fat: Fatty tissue under the SKIN through out the body.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Body Fat Distribution: Deposits of ADIPOSE TISSUE throughout the body. The pattern of fat deposits in the body regions is an indicator of health status. Excess ABDOMINAL FAT increases health risks more than excess fat around the hips or thighs, therefore, WAIST-HIP RATIO is often used to determine health risks.Abdominal Fat: Fatty tissue in the region of the ABDOMEN. It includes the ABDOMINAL SUBCUTANEOUS FAT and the INTRA-ABDOMINAL FAT.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Embolism, Fat: Blocking of a blood vessel by fat deposits in the circulation. It is often seen after fractures of large bones or after administration of CORTICOSTEROIDS.GATA Transcription Factors: A family of transcription factors that contain two ZINC FINGER MOTIFS and bind to the DNA sequence (A/T)GATA(A/G).Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Ecdysteroids: Steroids that bring about MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysteroids include the endogenous insect hormones (ECDYSONE and ECDYSTERONE) and the insect-molting hormones found in plants, the phytoecdysteroids. Phytoecdysteroids are natural insecticides.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Fats, Unsaturated: Fats containing one or more double bonds, as from oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Polydnaviridae: A family of insect viruses isolated from endoparasitic hymenopteran insects belonging to the families Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The two genera are Ichnovirus and Bracovirus.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Molting: Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Methoprene: Juvenile hormone analog and insect growth regulator used to control insects by disrupting metamorphosis. Has been effective in controlling mosquito larvae.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Corpora Allata: Paired or fused ganglion-like bodies in the head of insects. The bodies secrete hormones important in the regulation of metamorphosis and the development of some adult tissues.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Egg Proteins: Proteins which are found in eggs (OVA) from any species.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Fat Necrosis: A condition in which the death of adipose tissue results in neutral fats being split into fatty acids and glycerol.Catechol Oxidase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction between catechol and oxygen to yield benzoquinone and water. It is a complex of copper-containing proteins that acts also on a variety of substituted catechols. EC 1.10.3.1.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Oviparity: The capability of producing eggs (OVA) from which young are hatched outside the body. While mostly referring to nonmammalian species, this does include MAMMALS of the order MONOTREMATA.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Joint DiseasesAbsorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.TriglyceridesRNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Lipolysis: The metabolic process of breaking down LIPIDS to release FREE FATTY ACIDS, the major oxidative fuel for the body. Lipolysis may involve dietary lipids in the DIGESTIVE TRACT, circulating lipids in the BLOOD, and stored lipids in the ADIPOSE TISSUE or the LIVER. A number of enzymes are involved in such lipid hydrolysis, such as LIPASE and LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE from various tissues.DiglyceridesCarrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal: Fatty tissue under the SKIN in the region of the ABDOMEN.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hip Contracture: Permanent fixation of the hip in primary positions, with limited passive or active motion at the hip joint. Locomotion is difficult and pain is sometimes present when the hip is in motion. It may be caused by trauma, infection, or poliomyelitis. (From Current Medical Information & Technology, 5th ed)Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Malpighian Tubules: Slender tubular or hairlike excretory structures found in insects. They emerge from the alimentary canal between the mesenteron (midgut) and the proctodeum (hindgut).RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Lipase: An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. It is produced by glands on the tongue and by the pancreas and initiates the digestion of dietary fats. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.3.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Blattellidae: A family of insects in the order Dictyoptera (COCKROACHES), including genera Blattella, Parcoblatta, and Symploce.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Rhodnius: A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Rhodnius prolixus is a vector for TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Boric Acids: Inorganic and organic derivatives of boric acid either B(OH)3 or, preferably H3BO3.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.Starvation: Lengthy and continuous deprivation of food. (Stedman, 25th ed)Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Tephritidae: A large family of fruit flies in the order DIPTERA, comprising over 4,500 species in about 100 genera. They have patterned wings and brightly colored bodies and are found predominantly in the tropical latitudes.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Stenella: A genus comprised of spinner, spotted, and striped DOLPHINS, in the family Delphinidae. Schools of Stenella, that may number in the thousands, often associate with schools of TUNA, and are thus vulnerable to accidental harvesting.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Houseflies: Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.Fat Substitutes: Compounds used in food or in food preparation to replace dietary fats. They may be carbohydrate-, protein-, or fat-based. Fat substitutes are usually lower in calories but provide the same texture as fats.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Spodoptera: A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Defensins: Family of antimicrobial peptides that have been identified in humans, animals, and plants. They are thought to play a role in host defenses against infections, inflammation, wound repair, and acquired immunity.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Ovary: The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.Gonads: The gamete-producing glands, OVARY or TESTIS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Octopamine: An alpha-adrenergic sympathomimetic amine, biosynthesized from tyramine in the CNS and platelets and also in invertebrate nervous systems. It is used to treat hypotension and as a cardiotonic. The natural D(-) form is more potent than the L(+) form in producing cardiovascular adrenergic responses. It is also a neurotransmitter in some invertebrates.Periplaneta: A genus in the family Blattidae containing several species, the most common being P. americana, the American cockroach.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Micrococcus luteus: A species of gram-positive, spherical bacteria whose organisms occur in tetrads and in irregular clusters of tetrads. The primary habitat is mammalian skin.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease: A particular type of FEMUR HEAD NECROSIS occurring in children, mainly male, with a course of four years or so.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Ovum: A mature haploid female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION.Yellow Fever: An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Receptors, Steroid: Proteins found usually in the cytoplasm or nucleus that specifically bind steroid hormones and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. The steroid receptor-steroid hormone complex regulates the transcription of specific genes.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalInsulin Antagonists: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or action of insulin.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Body Constitution: The physical characteristics of the body, including the mode of performance of functions, the activity of metabolic processes, the manner and degree of reactions to stimuli, and power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.Amino Acid Transport Systems: Cellular proteins and protein complexes that transport amino acids across biological membranes.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Nucleopolyhedrovirus: A genus of the family BACULOVIRIDAE, subfamily Eubaculovirinae, characterized by the formation of crystalline, polyhedral occlusion bodies in the host cell nucleus. The type species is Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Skinfold Thickness: The measurement of subcutaneous fat located directly beneath the skin by grasping a fold of skin and subcutaneous fat between the thumb and forefinger and pulling it away from the underlying muscle tissue. The thickness of the double layer of skin and subcutaneous tissue is then read with a caliper. The five most frequently measured sites are the upper arm, below the scapula, above the hip bone, the abdomen, and the thigh. Its application is the determination of relative fatness, of changes in physical conditioning programs, and of the percentage of body fat in desirable body weight. (From McArdle, et al., Exercise Physiology, 2d ed, p496-8)Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Diet, Fat-Restricted: A diet that contains limited amounts of fat with less than 30% of calories from all fats and less than 10% from saturated fat. Such a diet is used in control of HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. (From Bondy et al, Metabolic Control and Disease, 8th ed, pp468-70; Dorland, 27th ed)Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.HexosephosphatesLeptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Fat Emulsions, Intravenous: Emulsions of fats or lipids used primarily in parenteral feeding.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
... wider hips, and a higher body fat percentage. In other species, the differences may be more extreme, such as differences in ... Sex differences in humans include, generally, a larger size and more body hair in men; women have breasts, ...
Midsection - should be broad enough to create taper from the hips to the shoulders. Faults -Rolls of fat. Cut severely for ... General Type Body - This is a full-arched breed, but not one taken to extremes. The body is to be of medium length, with width ... Marking color is to shade rapidly to a rich cream body color. The entire body is to be a creamy color, with white undercolor. ... Body surface color is to be lighter than the point color to give the proper contrast. Eyes- Brown. Frosted Pearl - Color is to ...
Fat-body prejudice appears as young as early childhood and continues into adult years. The problem of negative body-image ... These features include a figure where there is more fat distribution in the hip and thigh area, and vary between different ... During the Renaissance era, blonde hair and fatter bodies were idealized. Victorian women were highly body conscious. They wore ... White, Michele (2009). "Networked bodies and extended corporealities: Theorizing the relationship between the body, embodiment ...
I melted the fat to fry with, and some parts I pickled. Once I put the parts through a meat grinder and made dumplings. I saved ... When the bus drove, I warmed my hands on the woman's body and stripped her naked. I cut the corpse's breast into strips, ... removed the ovaries, separated the pelvis and hips; I then folded these pieces into a backpack and carried them home. ... But it was tough, and cook it for a long time had its own fat. The meat of this woman took me a month to eat. The first time I ...
It is covered by a layer of fat, which is covered by the mons pubis. It is divisible into a body, a superior ramus and an ... Right hip bone. External surface. Right hip bone. Internal surface. Plan of ossification of the hip bone. Symphysis pubis ... The left and right hip bones join at the pubic symphysis. The pubis is the lower limit of the suprapubic region. The body forms ... Left hip-joint, opened by removing the floor of the acetabulum from within the pelvis. The arteries of the male pelvis. Pelvis ...
The typically female (or gynecoid) pattern of body fat distribution around the hips, thighs, and buttocks is subcutaneous fat, ... A body fat meter is a widely available tool used to measure the percentage of fat in the human body. Different meters use ... They tend to under-read body fat percentage. In contrast with clinical tools, one relatively inexpensive type of body fat meter ... a method to measure body fat percentage. Body Volume Index - a method to measure abdominal volume and abdominal fat. Blubber - ...
... estrogen also widens the pelvis and increases the amount of body fat in hips, thighs, buttocks, and breasts. Estrogen also ... more subcutaneous fat and fat deposits, mainly around the buttocks, thighs, and hips Labia minora, the inner lips of the vulva ... Widening of hips; lower waist to hip ratio than adult males Elbows that hyperextend 5-8° more than male adults Face is more ... Growth of body hair, including underarm, abdominal, chest hair and pubic hair. Loss of scalp hair due to androgenic alopecia ...
... estrogen also widens the pelvis and increases the amount of body fat in hips, thighs, buttocks, and breasts. Estrogen also ... Changed distribution in weight and fat; more subcutaneous fat and fat deposits, mainly around the buttocks, thighs, and hips ... Coarsening or rigidity of skin texture due to less subcutaneous fat. *Higher waist-to-hip ratio than prepubescent or adult ... Lower body fat percentage than prepubescent or adult females or prepubescent males, on average ...
Body contouring is the removal of this excess skin and fat from numerous areas of the body, restoring the appearance of skin ... Areas which are commonly focused on by patients are the Thighs, Hips, arms, abdomen, buttocks, inner knee, back, calves, face ... Lipoplasty also referred to as liposuction is the removal of deposits of fat around specific areas of the body with the goal to ... The most common reason behind one's choice to undergo cosmetic surgery is due to dissatisfaction with their body image. Body ...
"Abdominal fat and what to do about it". "Why men store fat in bellies, women on hips". The Times Of India. 2011-01-03. ... Estrogen increases fat storage in the body, which results in more fat stored in the female body. Body fat percentage ... Anthropometry Body image Body type Body volume index Dad bods Female body shape Human gait (walking style etc.) Human physical ... Body shape is affected by body fat distribution, which is correlated to current levels of sex hormones. Muscles and fat ...
Central obesity Waist-hip ratio Body mass index (BMI) Body volume index Body fat percentage Index of Central Obesity Iribarren ... Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) is a measure of visceral obesity, the amount of fat in the gut region. SAD is the distance ... An article in Annals of Neurology links visceral fat to lower brain volume. A related measurement is Supine Abdominal Height ( ... "Visceral fat is associated with lower brain volume in healthy middle-aged adults". Annals of Neurology. 68: 136-44. doi:10.1002 ...
Other measurements of fat distribution include the waist-hip ratio and body fat percentage. Normal weight obesity is a ... Body fat percentage is total body fat expressed as a percentage of total body weight. There is no generally accepted definition ... intra-abdominal body fat is related to negative health outcomes independent of total body fat. Intra-abdominal or visceral fat ... Body fat percentage can be estimated from a person's BMI by the following formula: body fat percentage = 1.2 × BMI + 0.23 × age ...
The outer thigh and buttock can be lifted through a hip-to-hip incision across the back, above the buttocks. Nonsurgical body ... Jalian, HR; Avram, MM (2012). "Body contouring: The skinny on noninvasive fat removal" (PDF). Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine ... Hurwitz, Dennis J. Total Body Lift: Reshaping the Breasts, Chest, Arms, Thighs, Hips. Waist, Abdomen & Knees after Weight Loss ... Body contouring is a procedure that alters the shape of the human body. It includes procedures that eliminate or reduce excess ...
Hip circumference (R = 0.602) and height (R = −0.524) are strongly correlated with percentage of body fat. Comparing BAI with " ... is a method of measuring the amount of body fat in humans. The BAI is calculated without using body weight, unlike the body ... Stated advantages of the BAI are that it approximates body fat percentage, while the widely used BMI is known to be of limited ... New Method of Calculating Body Fat Unlikely to Replace BMI Is the new BAI better than the old BMI? López AA, Cespedes ML, ...
As lipedema progresses, patients become increasingly heavy in the lower body. The additional, expanding fat cells interfere ... disproportionate hips, stomach or buttocks. ... In 2008, the Fat Disorders Research Society, Inc. was formed to ... gynoid fat) is a hallmark of lipedema. As the swelling continues and spreads from lower extremities to other parts of the body ... Lipedema is a disorder where there is enlargement of both legs due to deposits of fat under the skin. Typically it gets worse ...
... females tend to have proportionally wider and thicker buttocks due to higher subcutaneous fat and proportionally wider hips. In ... Arse or ass, arsehole or asshole, and (butt-)hole: a pars pro toto (strictly only the actual body cavity and directly adjoining ... Waist-hip ratio. References. Notes. *^ Hennig, Jean-Luc (1995). The rear view: A brief and elegant history of bottoms through ... Butt: the common term for a pair of buttocks in the US (singular, as one body-part; cognate but neither its root nor an ...
With Modic type 2 changes the marrow is substituted by visceral fat, the same kind of fat we have on our hips and bellies. ... These changes are situated in both the body of the vertebrae and in the end plate of the neighboring disc. In 20% of the ... But other areas like knee or hip pain do a lot better when it comes to diagnosing the exact reasons for the pain. The low ... In Modic type 1 there is vascular development in the vertebral body, with findings of inflammation and edema, but no trabecular ...
This body type is also known as "apple shaped", as opposed to "pear shaped", in which fat is deposited on the hips and buttocks ... on fat in that area of the body, or on the body's distribution of body fat. The same logic applies to sit-ups and belly fat. ... intra-abdominal body fat is related to negative health outcomes independent of total body fat. Intra-abdominal or visceral fat ... When comparing the body fat of men and women it is seen that men have close to twice the visceral fat as that of pre-menopausal ...
... widening of the hips, and female fat distribution. Conversely, androgens are responsible for pubic and body hair growth, as ... Fat cells produce estrogen as well. In females, synthesis of estrogens starts in theca interna cells in the ovary, by the ... Structural Mediate formation of female secondary sex characteristics Accelerate metabolism Increase fat store Stimulate ... fat deposition Fluid balance Salt (sodium) and water retention Increase cortisol, SHBG Gastrointestinal tract Reduce bowel ...
Because men have less body fat than women, their hips do not grow bigger. Some bones like those in the jaw and shoulders grow ... Body growth[change , change source]. Because of more hormones in the body, girls start to have more fat in their breasts, ... This is thought to be because their bodies use up the food that they eat faster. This causes them to have less body fat, so ... abdomen, hips and thighs. At the age of ten years, the average girl has 6% more body fat than the average boy, but by the end ...
... if the body accepts the fat-tissue graft, it is replaced with new fat tissue, if the fat-graft dies it is replaced by fibrous ... hip-thigh) areas. There was a 4.9 per cent incidence of seromas, despite incision-wound suction catheters and compression ... The study Fat Grafting to the Breast Revisited: Safety and Efficacy (2007) reported successful transferences of body fat to the ... Meanwhile, through a separate incision to the fat-tissue harvest site, saline solution was injected to dilute the body fat, and ...
This type of training also decreases waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio(WRH), and the sum of skin folds on the body. This ... method of training may be more effective at inducing fat loss than simply training at a moderate intensity for the same ... 2014). "Effects of 16-week high intensity interval training using upper and lower body ergometers on aerobic fitness and ... corresponding to increased capacity for whole body and skeletal muscle lipid oxidation and enhanced peripheral vascular ...
... hip) region and hindlimbs proportional to body size.[16] ... these spines would have been covered in skin or fat tissue and ... Baryonyx was found with scales of the prehistoric fish Scheenstia in its body cavity, and these were abraded, hypothetically by ... Many genera had unusually tall neural spines on their vertebrae, which supported sails or humps of skin or fat tissue. ... Therrien, François; Henderson, Donald M. (2007-03-12). "My theropod is bigger than yours … or not: estimating body size from ...
Since body fat can be measured in several ways, statistics on the epidemiology of obesity vary between sources. While BMI is ... the most basic and commonly used indicator of obesity, other measures include waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, skinfold ... Lauren Streib (February 8, 2007). "World's Fattest Countries". Forbes. Retrieved 2009-02-12. "Body section (Overweight and ... Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2, and in June 2013 the American Medical ...
It is defined by body mass index (BMI) and further evaluated in terms of fat distribution via the waist-hip ratio and total ... BMI is closely related to both percentage body fat and total body fat. In children, a healthy weight varies with age and sex. ... Increases in body fat alter the body's response to insulin, potentially leading to insulin resistance. Increased fat also ... Chiolero A, Faeh D, Paccaud F, Cornuz J (1 April 2008). "Consequences of smoking for body weight, body fat distribution, and ...
Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese descent, 60-80% of cases in those of European ... a high waist-hip ratio is often present.[13] Smoking appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.[33] A lack of sleep has ... decreases body fat content and decreases blood lipid levels, and these effects are evident even without weight loss.[93] ... with saturated fats and trans fatty acids increasing the risk, and polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat decreasing the risk. ...
Body-fat percentage. Body-fat percentage is calculated by weighing a persons total fat, and dividing it by their weight. ... Breast cancer: Body fat, not weight, poses major risk Recent evidence backs a surprising finding: women with high body fat ... It underestimates body fat content in obese or overweight people. *It overestimates body fat content in muscular or lean ... Measuring body fat. Calipers are often used to measure body fat, but they are not always accurate. ...
Tips for Losing Body Belly Thigh and Hip Fat. Index list of documents, papers, and peer reviewed publications : DW#CAT2-0T7-440 ... Reference Title: "Weight Loss: Tips for Losing Body Belly Thigh and Hip Fat", Source: Losing Weight. Abstract: Disabled World ... Weight Loss: Tips for Losing Body Belly Thigh and Hip Fat Document List. Although some of these documents from our Losing ... Tips for Losing Body Belly Thigh and Hip Fat - DW#CAT2-0T7-440 - containing 18 documents and publications as of 2020-07-13. ...
This calculator is used to find the proportion of fat stored on your waist and hip. ... Waist-to-hip ratio is the ratio of your waist circumference to your hip circumference. ... Waist-to-hip ratio - Body Fat Calculation. Waist-to-hip ratio is the ratio of your waist circumference to your hip ... This calculator is used to find the proportion of fat stored on your waist and hip. Persons with extra body weight are having ...
... adding curves to the lower body, adding shape and definition to the lower body, lower body training, reducing and slimming the ... Filed Under: Legs Butt Thighs Hips 2 Glute and Leg Squat Training Issues That Mess With Your Lower Body Results. February 12, ... The top five key elements that are essential to you changing your lower body and creating shapely, thin, toned legs, hips, butt ... Lower Body Training - Shape Define and Sculpt Your Lower Body. June 6, 2012. By Mandy Gibbons ...
Filed Under: Legs Butt Thighs Hips Thigh Toning Exercise: Top Five Things You Must Know To Change to Your Lower Body. November ... Filed Under: Legs Butt Thighs Hips Tagged With: target trouble areas. A Mother of Three Gets Her Hot Body & High Spirit ... Wouldnt it be great if you could get rid of that excess fat on your stomach or tighten up those hips and thighs? How many ... Filed Under: Legs Butt Thighs Hips Tagged With: thigh toning exercises. Leg, Butt, Hip and Thighs: Thigh Cellulite. November 16 ...
... body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with hs-CRP in a Taiwanese population. A total of ... This study compared the association of percent body fat mass (%FM), ... and cannot distinguish body fat from fat-free mass. Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of regional fat distribution, whereas ... FM: percent body fat mass; BMI: body mass index; WHR: waist-to-hip ratio; WC: waist circumference, AUC: area under curve. ...
Tips To Melt Thigh and Butt Fat Faster Than Ever Before. simply prescribe you several leg exercises and whalla, PERFECT LEGS.. ... putting your body weight onto the standing, right leg.. Hint If you have a chair (and your glutes), youre good to go. How. ... about hip-width apart. Place your hands about shoulder-width apart. Line up the creases of your wrists under your shoulders. ... How to Lose Fat on the Hips, Thighs and Buttocks. Tone up, firm up and burn fat from your tummy, hips, thighs and bottom with ...
... these muscles is critical to success and enjoyment with running and how to build and maintain strength with a few common hip- ... HIIT Upper Body Workout: Try this Fat-Blasting Workout. Weight Lifting for Weight Loss. 7 Core Stability Exercises. Carb ... and the risk for injury is recognized to increase with weak hip abductor and hip extensor muscles. The primary hip abductor ... Whereas weak hip abductor muscles can lead to diminished balance during running, weak hip extensor muscles are known to ...
... there is very little data examining how the adipokines leptin and adiponectin relate to CVD risk factors such as body fat ... Adiponectin concentrations in men were predicted (30.2%) by HDL-C, total cholesterol, hip circumference and BF% while in women ... Using stepwise forward multiple regression, a model including TC/HDL-C ratio, WHR, BF%, hip circumference and waist ... percentage (BF%), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and the apoB/apoA1 ratio in Asian Indian men and women living in Canada. A cross- ...
... nutrition with body fat news, facts, tips, & other information. Educate yourself about body fat & help yourself and others live ... Not All Body Fat Is Bad: Heres What You Need to Know. ... What Exercise Burns Fat Around the Waist & Hips?. Joel ... How Long Does It Take for Excess Calories to Turn to Body Fat?. ... Ways for Women to Lose Body Fat & Get Body Muscle. Andrea Boldt ... What Is the Optimal Body Fat Percentage for a 50-Year-Old Woman?. ...
... nutrition with weight and body fat news, facts, tips, & other information. Educate yourself about weight and body fat & help ... Not All Body Fat Is Bad: Heres What You Need to Know. ... This Top Model Doesnt Care What Fat Shamers Have to Say. Body ... How Much Body Fat Should a 12-year-old Have?. Body Fat ... How to Determine Body Composition by Height and Wrist Size. ... What to Eat if You Want 7 Percent Body Fat. Body Fat ... The Chemical in Breakfast Cereal That Could Be Making You Fat. ...
Hip Steroid Injections Can Increase Osteonecrosis. Diabetes Combined With Obesity Linked to Cancer ... Having higher body fat levels is associated with shorter telomere length, and weight loss was associated with an increase in ... The researchers used a previously published Yale weight-loss intervention study called LEAN to examine how body fat and weight ... Our results indicate that having higher body fat levels is associated with shorter telomere length, and weight loss was ...
... proportion of muscle to fat and racial differences. ... Hip Steroid Injections Can Increase Osteonecrosis. Greater ... Body Mass Index Body mass index (BMI) is a simple tool that is generally used to estimate the total amount of body fat. ... While body mass index (BMI) is the popular measure used by health experts for body fat content, researchers at Perelman School ... Cholesterol Bulimia Nervosa BMI Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Ideal Body Weight Body Mass Index Cholesterol - The Enigma ...
Americans want to put their best face and body forward. ... reduction to harvesting fat to enhance other parts of the body ... Patients Use Own Fat to Fill and Sculpt From body fat reduction to harvesting fat to enhance other parts of the body, the data ... Hip Steroid Injections Can Increase Osteonecrosis. Smoke-Free Laws Reduce New Cases of Lung Cancer. ... Non-invasive fat reduction procedures that use special technology to "freeze" fat without surgery increased 5%. - Non-invasive ...
Still, getting too fat (more than 30 percent body fat in females and 25 percent in males) is associated with increased risk of ... This increase appears to result from a lower female basal fat oxidation rate (a measure of the use of fat to fuel the body at ... This general acceleration in body fat accumulation, particularly sex-specific fat, is attributed mostly to changes in female ... increase in body fat. But after about eight years of age, girls begin gaining fat mass at a greater rate than boys do. ...
Body Fat. · Chest · Waist. · Hip. · Upper arm. · Thigh. · Five Custom Values. With your approval, BMI, weight, body fat and ... By entering your body measurements and your weight, BMI (Body Mass Index) and WHR (Waist to Hip Ratio) is calculated and ... New value Body Fat Percentage (check your settings). · A few design updates ... The body fat value will now saved correctly into the Health App. ... I found a new body tracker app yesterday that unfortunately I ...
The pain, especially of the knee and hip joints is so excruciating, people have been known to commit suicide. It is common ... Reduce Body Fat with CLA Supplement 5 Tips to Create Killer Website ... What exactly happens when the human body is put on a near starvation diet is not clear. What is clear, however, is that during ... The patient is put on a diet so low in calorific value that the body starts believing that it is dying of starvation. ...
Learn what body types are prone to health problems. ... Your body shape isnt just something to squeeze into clothes. ... It combines a slimmer "ectomorph" upper body with an "endomorph" lower body. People with this shape have extra fat in the hip ... But it doesnt measure body fat directly or tell you where in your body the fat tends to live. ... is linked to more health problems than lower-body fat. One study found that in some cases fat in the hips and thighs was linked ...
... and other steps you can take to tone your hips, build strength, and get rid of hip fat. ... Are you looking for ways to lose hip fat? Learn about exercises, workouts, ... Other ways to lose hip fat. Exercise is a great tool to help you build lean muscle mass and decrease body fat. Its also one of ... Having less fat and stronger lower body muscles may give your hips a leaner, more sculpted appearance. Plus, having more muscle ...
... , Weight Watchers Calculator , Waist to Hip Ratio Calculator ... This Body Fat Calculator can be used to estimate your total body fat based on your size. To get the best results, measure to ... Body Weight Calculators. Body Mass Index/BMI Calculator , Basal Metabolic Rate/BMR Calculator , ... All Health Calculators > Body Weight Calculators. Body Fat Calculator. Body Fat Percentage: ...
Materials and methods: Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR), weight and percentage of body fat (BF ... The association of body weight, body fatness and body fat distribution with osteoarthritis of the knee: data from the Baltimore ... body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR) and percentage of body fat (BF%). Even though these measures ... Body weight, body mass index, and incident symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and knee. Epidemiology 1999;10:161-6. ...
... papaya that have the ability to break down fat cells in the body and thereby increase the rate of reduction of fats in the body ... Exercises For Hip, Lower Back Fat Reduction - Paleo and Ketogenic Diet. A fruit diet for weight reduction would include fruits ... Best Sources of Protein , Daily Protein Requirement , Lean Body Diet. It is advisable to consume protein that is low in fat, ... gestational diabetes diet plan - Exercises For Hip, Lower Back Fat Reduction - Paleo and Ketogenic Diet. ...
Celebrity Body on a Budget [Cornel Chin, Rob Price] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Even in times as tough ... low levels of body fat. The goal is to increase stamina and muscle mass.. Endomorphs have bigger bones, larger thighs and hips. ... the three main body types. i.e.. Ectomorphs have long torsos, slim hips and shoulders.. The ectomorph loses weight easily and ... With Celebrity Body on a Budget, you can still achieve that drop dead gorgeous celebrity body you have always admired and ...
BMI, body mass index; BMR, basal metabolic rate; FAI, free androgen index; FFM, fat free mass; HC, HIP circumference; SHBH, sex ... Body fat (%)a 46.7 ± 3.5. 47.1 ± 3.4. 0.6 (3.2). 46.8 ± 6.2. 47.6 ± 5.9*. 1.1 (3.8). ... Fat mass (kg)a 48.9 ± 11.0. 48.6 ± 11.0. −0.7 ± 4.9**. 52.3 ± 10.9. 53.7 ± 18.3*. 3.2 ± 5.0. ... Hip circumference (cm). 121.6 ± 11.5. 119.2 ± 11.4*. −2.0 ± 3.2**. 124.1 ± 17.4. 125.3 ± 16.7*. 1.1 ± 1.9. ...
Association between percentage body fat (%BF) and risk of hip fracture amongst participants of the EPIC-Norfolk study. Fitted ... Fat mass was calculated as body weight minus fat-free mass. Percentage body fat (%BF) was fat mass expressed as percentage of ... Fat mass is a component of total body weight and one of the indices of obesity. Body fat mass and bone mineral density (BMD) ... according to percentage body fat quartiles in the EPIC-Norfolk study. Percentage body fat. P- value. ...
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note that BMI can be useful as a screening tool , but it does not diagnose the body fatness or health of an individual. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • VFT receives a flood of requests for information addressing lower body workouts - especially from women… However it seems the men are now putting up their hands and saying "hey how about us, we've got plenty of questions on leg workouts for men! (virtualfitnesstrainer.com)
  • Nutrients are essentially chemicals that the body requires in order to grow as well as build and repair tissue. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Estrogen increases breast tissue and fat on the hips. (nationalpost.com)
  • Our favorite approach to revising these scars involves liposuction of the surrounding area, subcision to break up that scar tissue, and then fat transfer below and around the scar to create a smooth contour. (reflectionscenter.com)
  • Progesterone cream must be used cautiously when applied to skin as progesterone is highly fat soluble and will accumulate in fat tissue, thereby disrupting adrenal hormones such as DHEA, cortisol, and testosterone. (mercola.com)
  • For the record, an ectomorph is lean and lanky, with a body made up of comparatively more skin and nerve tissue than the other two types. (deseretnews.com)
  • An endomorph is chubby, with a body characterized by more fat tissue. (deseretnews.com)
  • However, it is entirely possible for an underweight person to be endomorphic in terms of body tissue type. (deseretnews.com)
  • The plastic surgery which rejuvenates the labia by lifting and/or injecting fat or filler into the area, increased by 39% in 2016, with more than 12,000 procedures. (medindia.net)
  • 1. The right lower body exercises can be performed in just under 30 minutes a day, without weights or gym machines. (virtualfitnesstrainer.com)
  • Who doesn't have that bit of time in their schedule to have a fantastic lower body of which they are proud? (virtualfitnesstrainer.com)
  • LegLuxe.com offers stylish legwear, activewear and shapewear designed to support, reenergize and revitalize the entire lower body. (prweb.com)
  • Shape, slim, and tone your entire lower body. (swapadvd.com)