Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Veterinary Sports Medicine: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with PHYSICAL FITNESS of animals in sports (horse racing, dog racing, etc.) and the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries in animals.Chronology as Topic: The temporal sequence of events that have occurred.Plastocyanin: A copper-containing plant protein that is a fundamental link in the electron transport chain of green plants during the photosynthetic conversion of light energy by photophosphorylation into the potential energy of chemical bonds.Hydrogenase: An enzyme found in bacteria. It catalyzes the reduction of FERREDOXIN and other substances in the presence of molecular hydrogen and is involved in the electron transport of bacterial photosynthesis.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Cartilage Diseases: Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Chondroma: A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.TexasPlant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Disarticulation: Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hirschsprung Disease: Congenital MEGACOLON resulting from the absence of ganglion cells (aganglionosis) in a distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE. The aganglionic segment is permanently contracted thus causing dilatation proximal to it. In most cases, the aganglionic segment is within the RECTUM and SIGMOID COLON.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Track and Field: Sports performed on a track, field, or arena and including running events and other competitions, such as the pole vault, shot put, etc.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Corrosion: The gradual destruction of a metal or alloy due to oxidation or action of a chemical agent. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Vitallium: An alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and traces of other substances. It is used in dentures, certain surgical appliances, prostheses, implants, and instruments.Cobalt: A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Passiflora: A plant genus of the family Passifloraceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are vines with ornamental flowers and edible fruit.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Female Athlete Triad Syndrome: A condition of competitive female athletes in which there are interrelated problems of EATING DISORDERS; AMENORRHEA; and OSTEOPOROSIS.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.ShoesRunning: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.CaliforniaSpheniscidae: The sole family in the order Sphenisciformes, comprised of 17 species of penguins in six genera. They are flightless seabirds of the Southern Hemisphere, highly adapted for marine life.

Common peroneal nerve palsy: a clinical and electrophysiological review. (1/84)

In a series of 70 patients (75 cases of common peroneal nerve palsy) the common causes were trauma about the knee or about the hip, compression, and underlying neuropathy. A few palsies occurred spontaneously for no apparent reason. The prognosis was uniformly good in the compression group; recovery was delayed but usually satisfactory in patients who had suffered stretch injuries. In the acute stage, when clinical paralysis appears to be complete, electrophysiological studies are a useful guide to prognosis. They may also indicate an underlying neuropathy and they detect early evidence of recovery. The anatomical peculiarities of the common peroneal nerve are noted and aspects of the clinical picture, management, and prognosis of palsy are discussed.  (+info)

Spontaneous or traumatic premature closure of the tibial tubercle. (2/84)

A premature closure of the physis of the tibial tubercle in a young man has given rise to a shortening of the tibia, a patella alta and a reversed tibial slope of 20 degrees with clinical genu recurvatum. After a proximal open wedge tibial osteotomy all three postural deformities could be restored. The etiology of this complex deformity is discussed.  (+info)

Osteoarthritis and risk of falls, rates of bone loss, and osteoporotic fractures. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group. (3/84)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between osteoarthritis (OA), as defined by radiographic evidence and self report, and osteoporotic fractures, falls, and bone loss in a cohort of elderly white women. METHODS: A cohort of 5,552 elderly women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures was followed up prospectively for a mean of 7.4 years. Self-reported, physician-diagnosed OA was recorded at interview, and radiologic OA of the hip and hand were defined from pelvis and hand radiographs obtained at baseline by validated techniques. Prevalent and incident vertebral fractures were detected by vertebral morphometry, and data on incident fractures and falls were collected by postcard surveys; fractures were confirmed by radiography. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured on 2 occasions at the hip, lumbar spine, and calcaneus, and rates of bone loss were calculated. RESULTS: Women with radiographic hip OA had a reduced risk of recurrent falls in the first year (relative risk [RR] 0.7, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.5-0.95). However, those with self-reported OA had an increased risk of falls (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.5). Radiographic hip OA was associated with reduced bone loss in the femoral neck compared with controls (mean +/- SD -0.29+/-0.09%/year versus -0.51+/-0.03%/year; P = 0.018). However, radiographic hip OA showed nonsignificant trends toward increased bone loss at the calcaneus and lumbar spine. There was no significant association between self-reported OA or radiographic hand OA with bone loss. No definition of OA was associated with incident nonvertebral fracture, hip fracture, or vertebral fracture. CONCLUSION: Despite having increased BMD compared with controls, subjects with OA did not have a significantly reduced risk of osteoporotic fracture, although there was a trend toward a reduced risk of femoral neck fractures in subjects with severe radiographic OA. The failure of the observed increase in BMD to translate into a reduced fracture risk may be due, in part, to the number and type of falls sustained by subjects with OA. Patients with OA should not be considered to be at a lower risk of fracture than the general population. Physicians should be aware that a high BMD in patients with OA may be falsely reassuring.  (+info)

Comparison of quantitative ultrasound in the human calcaneus with mechanical failure loads of the hip and spine. (4/84)

OBJECTIVE: Quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus is used clinically for evaluating bone fracture risk, but its association with the mechanical properties at other skeletal sites is not well characterized. The objective was therefore to determine its predictive ability of the mechanical failure loads of the proximal femur and lumbar spine. METHOD: In 45 human cadavers (29 males and 16 females, aged 82.5 +/- 9.6 years), we determined the speed of sound, broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) and the empirical stiffness index, using a commercial quantitative ultrasound scanner. The proximal femora and the fourth vertebral body were excised and loaded to failure in a testing machine. RESULTS: Femoral failure loads ranged from 933 to 7000 N and those of the vertebrae from 1000 to 7867 N, their correlation being 0.51 in females and -0.08 in males. Forty percent of the variability of femoral, but only 24% of the variability of the vertebral fracture loads could be predicted with calcaneal speed of sound. In the femur, a combination of speed of sound and BUA improved the prediction (r2 = 50-60%), but not in the spine. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides experimental evidence that calcaneal quantitative ultrasound is capable of predicting mechanical failure at other skeletal sites and has potential to identify patients at risk from osteoporotic fracture. The different association of quantitative ultrasound with femoral and vertebral failure may result from the influence of the cortical bone and a higher microstructure-related similarity of the calcaneus and the femur.  (+info)

Factors associated with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in Hong Kong Chinese: obesity, joint injury, and occupational activities. (5/84)

In 1998, a case-control study was conducted in Hong Kong on hospital patients with osteoarthritis of the hip (n = 138) and osteoarthritis of the knee (n = 658). Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited consecutively from general practice clinics in the same region. The following three risk factors were found to be associated with osteoarthritis of both the hip and the knee: first, a history of joint injury: for osteoarthritis of the hip, the odds ratio = 25.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.5, 181) in men and 43.3 (95% CI: 11.7, 161) in women; for osteoarthritis of the knee, the odds ratio = 12.1 (95% CI: 3.4, 42.5) in men and 7.6 (95% CI: 3.8, 15.2) in women; second, climbing stairs frequently: for osteoarthritis of the hip, the odds ratio = 12.5 (95% CI: 1.5, 104.3) in men and 2.3 (95% CI: 0.6, 8.1) in women; for osteoarthritis of the knee, the odds ratio = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.0, 6.4) in men and 5.1 (95% CI: 2.5, 10.2) in women; third, lifting heavy weight frequently: for osteoarthritis of the hip, the odds ratio = 3.1 (95% CI: 0.7, 14.3) in men and 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1, 5.3) in women; for osteoarthritis of the knee, the odds ratio = 5.4 (95% CI: 2.4, 12.4) in men and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2, 3.1) in women. In addition, subjects whose height and weight were in the highest quartile were at increased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, respectively (p < 0.05).  (+info)

Arterial injury and massive blood loss: a case report of management of pelvic gunshot injury with femoro-subscrotal-femoral bypass and 116 units of blood. (6/84)

A case of massive shotgun injury to the left thigh and hip is reported. The patient received 116 units of blood, and a femoro-subscrotal-femoral vein graft was employed to save the left leg. A Teflon wool blood transfusion filter, used from the beginning of therapy, was believed to have been a major factor in preventing significant pulmonary complications.  (+info)

The incidence and pattern of knee injury associated with dislocation of the hip. (7/84)

A retrospective survey of 135 posterior dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the hip was carried out in order to define the pattern of associated knee injuries. Thirty-five patients had sustained a significant injury to the knee, of which twenty-five were clearly attributable to a direct blow on the front of the knee (fractured patella, traumatic chondromalacia, fractures of femoral and tibial condyles) and ten were compatible with valgus, varus or rotational forces (medial, lateral and cruciate ligament tears). The second type of injury has not been widely recognised but it is important that it should not be overlooked.  (+info)

Late open reduction of traumatic dislocation of the hip. Report of three cases. (8/84)

Three patients were reviewed seven, eight and fourteen years after delayed open reduction of traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip. The delay between injury and operation varied from twenty-eight to ninety-three days. At the time of review symptoms were minimal or absent, and in all cases the injured hip was clinically normal. Radiological examination showed loss of articular cartilage in one hip and trabecular changes in the bone of all three. On the basis of these three results the traditional pessimism about prognosis in such cases may not be justified.  (+info)

  • Groin/hip injuries occur frequently in the athletic population, particularly in sports requiring kicking, twisting, turning and rapid acceleration and deceleration. (physiospot.com)
  • Chronic hip, buttock and groin pain make up 10% of all attendances to sports medicine centres. (physiospot.com)
  • The objective of this systematic review was to identify and examine the evidence for groin/hip injury risk factors in FBS. (physiospot.com)
  • Studies were included if they met the inclusion criteria and investigated one or more risk factors with relation to the incidence of groin/hip injuries in FBS. (physiospot.com)
  • Results demonstrated that previous groin/hip injury was the most prominent risk factor, identified across four studies (OR range from 2.6 (95% CI 1.1 to 6.11) to 7.3, (p=0.001)), followed by older age (OR 0.9, p=0.05) and weak adductor muscles (OR 4.28, 95% CI 1.31 to 14.0, p=0.02) each identified in two studies. (physiospot.com)
  • This study identified 11 significant risk factors for groin/hip injury for FBS players. (physiospot.com)
  • The most prominent risk factor observed was previous groin/hip injury. (physiospot.com)
  • Future research should include a prospective study of a group of FBS players to confirm a connection between the risk factors identified and development of groin/hip injuries. (physiospot.com)
  • Ryan J, DeBurca N, Mc Creesh K. Risk factors for groin/hip injuries in field-based sports: a systematic review. (physiospot.com)
  • For more information about Hip Groin Disorders, click on below tabs. (drmichaelfleischman.com)
  • Typically, you will experience considerable pain in your hip or groin. (ricelawmd.com)
  • The next day, Celtics coach Brad Stevens reiterated to reporters that Thomas had suffered a knee injury, with no mention of a hip tear. (espn.com)
  • After two games on the sidelines with what the team called a knee injury, Thomas returned to the court and averaged 27.8 points per game for the rest of the regular season, leading the Celtics to the Eastern Conference's No. 1 seed for the first time since the 2007-08 championship campaign. (espn.com)
  • So when a chronic injury to my hip really slowed me down, my team at the Penn Center for the Female Athlete went the distance to get me back on track. (pennmedicine.org)
  • There's something wrong with my hip," Radford told reporters following a practice session here Tuesday in which he fell several times. (thestar.com)
  • Kevin Armstrong of the New York Daily News reports that Cromartie was icing his hip after practice on Tuesday, and that coach Rex Ryan downplayed the condition in his daily press conference. (bolttalk.com)
  • Dr. Domb and his team at Hinsdale Orthopaedics have been trained regarding the highest excellence in the hip physical exam, imaging techniques and performing diagnostic injections under ultrasound guidance. (americanhipinstitute.org)
  • According to the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), there are more than 200,000 hip replacement procedures performed every year. (walchlaw.com)
  • While it's possible a workplace hip injury was the result of a sudden, traumatic impact or accident, the more common hip injury happens because of overexertion and repetitive motion from years of work-related tasks that take a gradual toll. (gerberholderlaw.com)
  • Although it has no role in hip movement, it does have a small artery within that supplies blood to a part of the femoral head. (nickfrischmd.com)
Hip Injuries | Hip Disorders | MedlinePlus
Hip Injuries | Hip Disorders | MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov)
10 Questions to Evaluate Your Body's Limitations & Avoid Yoga Injuries - Yoga Journal
10 Questions to Evaluate Your Body's Limitations & Avoid Yoga Injuries - Yoga Journal (yogajournal.com)
Health Information in Arabic (العربية): MedlinePlus
Health Information in Arabic (العربية): MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov)
Tips For Runners with Osteoarthritis | Livestrong.com
Tips For Runners with Osteoarthritis | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
Common Tennis Conditions
Common Tennis Conditions (emoryhealthcare.org)
Sports Injuries Affecting Children - Sportsinjuryclinic.net
Sports Injuries Affecting Children - Sportsinjuryclinic.net (sportsinjuryclinic.net)
40 Male Health Concerns to Watch Out For After 40 | Best Life
40 Male Health Concerns to Watch Out For After 40 | Best Life (bestlifeonline.com)
Tour de France 2017 : Stage 13 As It Happened | Cyclingnews
Tour de France 2017 : Stage 13 As It Happened | Cyclingnews (cyclingnews.com)
Reporter finds Trump Jr. after he ditched Secret Service to go hunting - Business Insider
Reporter finds Trump Jr. after he ditched Secret Service to go hunting - Business Insider (businessinsider.com)
Walmart is going after Amazon's store of the future - Business Insider
Walmart is going after Amazon's store of the future - Business Insider (businessinsider.com)
Toxic air is harming people in China - BI
Toxic air is harming people in China - BI (businessinsider.com)
Luther Strange, Jeff Flake, Dean Heller at risk of losing primaries - Business Insider
Luther Strange, Jeff Flake, Dean Heller at risk of losing primaries - Business Insider (businessinsider.com)
Trump tears into Bernie Sanders' single-payer health plan - BI
Trump tears into Bernie Sanders' single-payer health plan - BI (businessinsider.com)
What Injuries & Conditions Affect the Hips & Pelvis? | HSS
What Injuries & Conditions Affect the Hips & Pelvis? | HSS (hss.edu)
Common Injuries in Sport - Knee, Thigh and Hip Tickets, Tue, 19 Sep 2017 at 19:00 | Eventbrite
Common Injuries in Sport - Knee, Thigh and Hip Tickets, Tue, 19 Sep 2017 at 19:00 | Eventbrite (eventbrite.co.uk)
FREE Non-Surgical Knee Pain Elimination Lunch Seminar - San Jose, CA Tickets, Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 11:30 AM | Eventbrite
FREE Non-Surgical Knee Pain Elimination Lunch Seminar - San Jose, CA Tickets, Tue, Nov 13, 2018 at 11:30 AM | Eventbrite (eventbrite.com)
Sports Medicine and Sports Injury - San Diego - Scripps Health
Sports Medicine and Sports Injury - San Diego - Scripps Health (scripps.org)
January 2005 - Volume 15 - Issue 1 : Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
January 2005 - Volume 15 - Issue 1 : Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine (journals.lww.com)
Are Frog Squats the Best Way to Work Out Your Lower Body? | Livestrong.com
Are Frog Squats the Best Way to Work Out Your Lower Body? | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
Developmental Dysplasia of the Hips (DDH) | HubPages
Developmental Dysplasia of the Hips (DDH) | HubPages (hubpages.com)
Tyrolean Hound Breed Information, Characteristics & Heath Problems | DogZone.com
Tyrolean Hound Breed Information, Characteristics & Heath Problems | DogZone.com (dogzone.com)
NFL Star Player Injuries - Business Insider
NFL Star Player Injuries - Business Insider (businessinsider.com)
NFL Star Player Injuries - Business Insider
NFL Star Player Injuries - Business Insider (businessinsider.com)
Eloy Jimenez not worried about his hip but admits frustration with rookie-year injuries
Eloy Jimenez not worried about his hip but admits frustration with rookie-year injuries (news.yahoo.com)
Eric Smith suffers left knee, hip injuries in preseason opener - ProFootballTalk
Eric Smith suffers left knee, hip injuries in preseason opener - ProFootballTalk (profootballtalk.nbcsports.com)
Pet Parent Resources | ASPCA® Pet Health Insurance
Pet Parent Resources | ASPCA® Pet Health Insurance (aspcapetinsurance.com)
LOVE YOUR BODY  | HubPages
LOVE YOUR BODY | HubPages (hubpages.com)
What Big Pharma Doesn't Want You To Know About Prozac | HubPages
What Big Pharma Doesn't Want You To Know About Prozac | HubPages (hubpages.com)