Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.
Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.
"Dislocation is a traumatic injury wherein the normal articulation between two bones at a joint is disrupted, resulting in the complete separation of the bone ends and associated soft tissues from their usual position."
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.
Displacement of the HUMERUS from the SCAPULA.
Replacement of the hip joint.
General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.
Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Attachment of a bone in which its head and neck is rotated excessively backward.
Slippage of the FEMUR off the TIBIA.
The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).
Replacement for a hip joint.
The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.
The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
A particular type of FEMUR HEAD NECROSIS occurring in children, mainly male, with a course of four years or so.
Displacement of the PATELLA from the femoral groove.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.
Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)
Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Incomplete rupture of the zonule with the displaced lens remaining behind the pupil. In dislocation, or complete rupture, the lens is displaced forward into the anterior chamber or backward into the vitreous body. When congenital, this condition is known as ECTOPIA LENTIS.
The gliding joint formed by the outer extremity of the CLAVICLE and the inner margin of the acromion process of the SCAPULA.
A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.
Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.
The planned and carefully managed manual movement of the musculoskeletal system, extremities, and spine to produce increased motion. The term is sometimes used to denote a precise sequence of movements of a joint to determine the presence of disease or to reduce a dislocation. In the case of fractures, orthopedic manipulation can produce better position and alignment of the fracture. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p264)
Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.
Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.
Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.
A double gliding joint formed by the CLAVICLE, superior and lateral parts of the manubrium sterni at the clavicular notch, and the cartilage of the first rib.
The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.
Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.
The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.
The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.
The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.
Breaks in bones.
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
Developmental bone diseases are a category of skeletal disorders that arise from disturbances in the normal growth and development of bones, including abnormalities in size, shape, structure, or composition, which can lead to various musculoskeletal impairments and deformities.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.
Injuries involving the vertebral column.
The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.
Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.
Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.

Altered connective tissue in children with congenital dislocation of the hip. (1/505)

The umbilical cord was employed as a source of collagen in 10 children with congenital dislocation of hip. The amount of collagen and its solubility were measured in slices of the cords and in the umbilical veins and compared with the values in normal subjects. Both the amount of collagen and its solubility were decreased in children with congenital dislocation of the hip.  (+info)

Retroversion of the acetabulum. A cause of hip pain. (2/505)

We describe a little-known variety of hip dysplasia, termed 'acetabular retroversion', in which the alignment of the mouth of the acetabulum does not face the normal anterolateral direction, but inclines more posterolaterally. The condition may be part of a complex dysplasia or a single entity. Other than its retroversion, the acetabulum is sited normally on the side wall of the pelvis, and its articular surface is of normal extent and configuration. The retroverted orientation may give rise to problems of impingement between the femoral neck and anterior acetabular edge. We define the clinical and radiological parameters and discuss pathological changes which may occur in the untreated condition. A technique of management is proposed.  (+info)

Screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip. (3/505)

Screening programs relying primarily on physical examination techniques for the early detection and treatment of congenital hip abnormalities have not been as consistently successful as expected. Since the 1980s, increased attention has been given to ultrasound imaging of the hip in young infants (less than five months of age) as a possible tool for improving patient outcomes. Although ultrasound examination may not provide advantages over careful repeated physician examination for universal screening, a growing body of evidence indicates that ultrasound surveillance of mild abnormalities can reduce the need for bracing without worsening outcomes. Radiographic documentation of hip normality after the femoral nucleus of ossification has appeared (at three to five month of age) is still appropriate to rule out hip dysplasia.  (+info)

Colonna capsular arthroplasty: a 33-year follow-up of four patients. (4/505)

We evaluated the results of Colonna capsular arthroplasty in 4 patients with unilateral congenital dislocation of the hip. All of these patients were female, aged 10-14 years at the time of surgery, and 42-50 years at the time of follow-up. The most striking finding in this study was the good ability to walk. Although radiographs showed considerable joint degeneration, all of these patients had only mild to moderate pain in the hip.  (+info)

Nerve palsy after leg lengthening in total replacement arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip. (5/505)

We reviewed 508 consecutive total hip replacements in 370 patients with old developmental dysplasia of the hip, to relate the amount of leg lengthening to the incidence of nerve palsies after operation. There were eight nerve palsies (two femoral, six sciatic), two complete and six incomplete. We found no statistical correlation between the amount of lengthening and the incidence of nerve damage (p = 0.47), but in seven of the eight hips, the surgeon had rated the intervention as difficult because of previous surgery, severe deformity, a defect of the acetabular roof, or considerable flexion deformity. The correlation between difficulty and nerve palsy was significant (p = 0.041). We conclude that nerve injury is most commonly caused by direct or indirect mechanical trauma and not by limb lengthening on its own.  (+info)

Financial justification for routine ultrasound screening of the neonatal hip. (6/505)

We have analysed the patterns of management of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in Coventry over a period of 20 years during which three different screening policies were used. From 1976 to the end of 1985 we relied on clinical examination alone. The mean surgical cost for the treatment of DDH during this period was Pound Sterling 5110 per 1000 live births. This was reduced to Pound Sterling 3811 after the introduction of ultrasound for infants with known risk factors. Since June 1989 we have routinely scanned all infants at birth with a mean surgical cost of Pound Sterling 468 per 1000 live births. This reduction in cost is a result of the earlier detection of DDH with fewer children requiring surgery. In those who do, fewer and less invasive procedures are needed. The overall rate of treatment has not increased and regular review of patients managed in a Pavlik harness has allowed us to avoid the complication of avascular necrosis. When we add the cost of running the screening programme to the expense of treating the condition, the overall cost for the management of DDH is comparable for the different screening policies.  (+info)

Stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty. (7/505)

We reviewed 60 custom-made femoral components of two different lengths : 125 mm (group A) and 100 mm (group B), in order to investigate the relationship between stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in age, gender, height, body weight, canal flare index, or bowing angle of the femur. Postoperatively there was no statistical difference between the two groups in the proximal canal filling, but significant difference in the distal canal filling (75.5% vs 85.8% on the anteroposterior view and 76.0% vs 82.5% in the lateral view, P<0.001). The distal canal filling inversely correlated with the ratio of the proximal portion and the distal portion of the stem curvature on the lateral view (lateral curve ratio of the stem, P=0.002). We conclude that superior filling at both the proximal and the distal levels can be obtained by using 100-mm custom made components with a small lateral curve ratio.  (+info)

Avascular necrosis and the Aberdeen splint in developmental dysplasia of the hip. (8/505)

Between January 1987 and December 1988 there were 7575 births in the Swansea maternity unit. Of these 823 (10.9%) were considered to be at 'high risk' for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Static ultrasound examination was performed in each case and the results classified on the basis of the method of Graf. A total of 117 type III-IV hips in 83 infants was splinted using the Aberdeen splint. Radiographs of these hips were taken at six and 12 months. Hilgenreiner's measurements of the acetabular angle were made in all cases and the development of the femoral capital epiphysis was assessed by measuring the epiphyseal area. The effect of splintage on the acetabular angle and the epiphyseal area between the normal and abnormal splinted hips was compared. Radiographs of 16 normal infants (32 normal unsplinted hips) were used as a control group. This cohort has now been followed up for a minimum of nine years. There have been no complications as a result of splintage. The failure rate was 1.7% or 0.25 per 1000 live births. No statistical difference was found when comparing the effect of splintage on the acetabular angle and epiphyseal area between normal and abnormal splinted hips and normal unsplinted hips. Our study has shown that while the Aberdeen splint had a definite but small failure rate, it was safe in that it did not produce avascular necrosis. The current conventional view that a low rate of splintage is always best is therefore brought into question if the Aberdeen splint is chosen for the management of neonatal DDH.  (+info)

A hip dislocation is a medical emergency that occurs when the head of the femur (thighbone) slips out of its socket in the pelvis. This can happen due to high-energy trauma, such as a car accident or a severe fall. Hip dislocations can also occur in people with certain health conditions that make their hips more prone to displacement, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip.

There are two main types of hip dislocations: posterior and anterior. In a posterior dislocation, the femur head moves out of the back of the socket, which is the most common type. In an anterior dislocation, the femur head moves out of the front of the socket. Both types of hip dislocations can cause severe pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected leg.

Immediate medical attention is necessary for a hip dislocation to realign the bones and prevent further damage. Treatment typically involves sedation or anesthesia to relax the muscles around the joint, followed by a closed reduction procedure to gently guide the femur head back into the socket. In some cases, surgery may be required to repair any associated injuries, such as fractures or damaged ligaments. After treatment, physical therapy and rehabilitation are usually necessary to restore strength, mobility, and function to the affected hip joint.

Congenital hip dislocation, also known as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), is a condition where the hip joint fails to develop normally in utero or during early infancy. In a healthy hip, the head of the femur (thigh bone) fits snugly into the acetabulum (hip socket). However, in congenital hip dislocation, the femoral head is not held firmly in place within the acetabulum due to abnormal development or laxity of the ligaments that support the joint.

There are two types of congenital hip dislocations:

1. Teratologic dislocation: This type is present at birth and occurs due to abnormalities in the development of the hip joint during fetal growth. The femoral head may be completely outside the acetabulum or partially dislocated.

2. Developmental dysplasia: This type develops after birth, often within the first few months of life, as a result of ligamentous laxity and shallow acetabulum. In some cases, it can progress to a complete hip dislocation if left untreated.

Risk factors for congenital hip dislocation include family history, breech presentation during delivery, and female gender. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent long-term complications such as pain, limited mobility, and osteoarthritis. Treatment options may include bracing, closed reduction, or surgical intervention, depending on the severity and age of the child at diagnosis.

A dislocation is a condition in which a bone slips out of its normal position in a joint. This can happen as a result of trauma or injury, such as a fall or direct blow to the body. Dislocations can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, a dislocation may also damage surrounding tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

Dislocations are typically treated by reducing the dislocation, which means putting the bone back into its normal position. This is usually done with the help of medication to relieve pain and relaxation techniques to help the person stay still during the reduction. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or if the dislocation cannot be reduced through other methods. After the dislocation has been reduced, the joint may be immobilized with a splint or sling to allow it to heal properly.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you have a dislocation. If left untreated, a dislocation can lead to further complications, such as joint instability and chronic pain.

The hip joint, also known as the coxal joint, is a ball-and-socket type synovial joint that connects the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The "ball" is the head of the femur, while the "socket" is the acetabulum, a concave surface on the pelvic bone.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong fibrous capsule and is reinforced by several ligaments, including the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments. The joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation, and circumduction movements, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body.

The hip joint is also supported by various muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas, and other hip flexors and extensors. These muscles provide stability and strength to the joint, allowing for weight-bearing activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a medical condition that affects the hip joint. It occurs when there is abnormal contact between the femoral head (the ball at the top of the thigh bone) and the acetabulum (the socket in the pelvis) during normal movement of the hip. This abnormal contact can cause damage to the cartilage and labrum (a ring of cartilage that helps to stabilize the hip joint) leading to pain, stiffness and decreased range of motion.

FAI is classified into two types: cam impingement and pincer impingement. Cam impingement occurs when there is an abnormal shape of the femoral head or neck, which leads to abnormal contact with the acetabulum during hip flexion and internal rotation. Pincer impingement occurs when there is overcoverage of the acetabulum, leading to abnormal contact with the femoral head or neck.

In some cases, both cam and pincer impingement can be present, which is referred to as mixed impingement. Symptoms of FAI may include hip pain, stiffness, limping, and reduced range of motion. Treatment options for FAI may include physical therapy, activity modification, medications, and in some cases, surgery.

Shoulder dislocation is a medical condition where the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) gets displaced from its normal position in the glenoid fossa of the scapula (shoulder blade). This can occur anteriorly, posteriorly, or inferiorly, with anterior dislocations being the most common. It is usually caused by trauma or forceful movement and can result in pain, swelling, bruising, and limited range of motion in the shoulder joint. Immediate medical attention is required to relocate the joint and prevent further damage.

Hip arthroplasty, also known as hip replacement surgery, is a medical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surfaces of the hip are removed and replaced with artificial components. These components typically include a metal or ceramic ball that replaces the head of the femur (thigh bone), and a polyethylene or ceramic socket that replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) in the pelvis.

The goal of hip arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function to the hip joint. This procedure is commonly performed in patients with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hip fractures, or other conditions that cause significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several types of hip replacement surgeries, including traditional total hip arthroplasty, partial (hemi) hip arthroplasty, and resurfacing hip arthroplasty. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and the extent of joint damage.

After surgery, patients typically require rehabilitation to regain strength, mobility, and function in the affected hip. With proper care and follow-up, most patients can expect significant pain relief and improved quality of life following hip arthroplasty.

Hip injuries refer to damages or harm caused to the hip joint or its surrounding structures, including bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as falls, accidents, sports-related activities, or degenerative conditions. Common hip injuries include fractures, dislocations, strains, sprains, bursitis, and labral tears. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, stiffness, limited mobility, and inability to bear weight on the affected leg. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

Orthopedic procedures are surgical or nonsurgical methods used to treat musculoskeletal conditions, including injuries, deformities, or diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. These procedures can range from simple splinting or casting to complex surgeries such as joint replacements, spinal fusions, or osteotomies (cutting and repositioning bones). The primary goal of orthopedic procedures is to restore function, reduce pain, and improve the quality of life for patients.

The femoral head is the rounded, ball-like top portion of the femur (thigh bone) that fits into the hip socket (acetabulum) to form the hip joint. It has a smooth, articular cartilage surface that allows for smooth and stable articulation with the pelvis. The femoral head is connected to the femoral neck, which is a narrower section of bone that angles downward and leads into the shaft of the femur. Together, the femoral head and neck provide stability and range of motion to the hip joint.

"Bone retroversion" is not a widely recognized medical term or concept with a specific definition. The term "retroversion" is used in anatomy to describe the position of an organ or structure when it is turned backward or inward. In relation to bones, retroversion typically describes the orientation of a bone or joint when it is angled or positioned in such a way that its posterior (back) aspect faces more anteriorly (toward the front).

However, I was unable to find a widely accepted medical definition for "bone retroversion" as a specific pathological or anatomical condition. It's possible that the term may be used in a more specialized context within certain medical subspecialties. If you have more context or information about where this term is being used, I may be able to provide a more precise answer.

Knee dislocation is a serious and uncommon orthopedic injury that occurs when the bones that form the knee joint (femur, tibia, and patella) are forced out of their normal position due to extreme trauma or force. This injury often requires immediate medical attention and reduction (repositioning) by a healthcare professional. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as compartment syndrome, nerve damage, and long-term joint instability. It's important to note that knee dislocation is different from a kneecap (patellar) dislocation, which involves the patella sliding out of its groove in the femur.

The acetabulum is the cup-shaped cavity in the pelvic bone (specifically, the os coxa) where the head of the femur bone articulates to form the hip joint. It provides a stable and flexible connection between the lower limb and the trunk, allowing for a wide range of movements such as flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, rotation, and circumduction. The acetabulum is lined with articular cartilage, which facilitates smooth and frictionless movement of the hip joint. Its stability is further enhanced by various ligaments, muscles, and the labrum, a fibrocartilaginous rim that deepens the socket and increases its contact area with the femoral head.

A hip prosthesis, also known as a total hip replacement, is a surgical implant designed to replace the damaged or diseased components of the human hip joint. The procedure involves replacing the femoral head (the ball at the top of the thigh bone) and the acetabulum (the socket in the pelvis) with artificial parts, typically made from materials such as metal, ceramic, or plastic.

The goal of a hip prosthesis is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function, allowing patients to return to their normal activities and enjoy an improved quality of life. The procedure is most commonly performed in individuals with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other degenerative conditions that have caused significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several different types of hip prostheses available, each with its own unique design and set of benefits and risks. The choice of prosthesis will depend on a variety of factors, including the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and specific medical needs. In general, however, all hip prostheses are designed to provide a durable, long-lasting solution for patients suffering from debilitating joint pain and stiffness.

In medical terms, the hip is a ball-and-socket joint where the rounded head of the femur (thigh bone) fits into the cup-shaped socket, also known as the acetabulum, of the pelvis. This joint allows for a wide range of movement in the lower extremities and supports the weight of the upper body during activities such as walking, running, and jumping. The hip joint is surrounded by strong ligaments, muscles, and tendons that provide stability and enable proper functioning.

Osteotomy is a surgical procedure in which a bone is cut to shorten, lengthen, or change its alignment. It is often performed to correct deformities or to realign bones that have been damaged by trauma or disease. The bone may be cut straight across (transverse osteotomy) or at an angle (oblique osteotomy). After the bone is cut, it can be realigned and held in place with pins, plates, or screws until it heals. This procedure is commonly performed on bones in the leg, such as the femur or tibia, but can also be done on other bones in the body.

A joint capsule is the fibrous sac that encloses a synovial joint, which is a type of joint characterized by the presence of a cavity filled with synovial fluid. The joint capsule provides stability and strength to the joint, while also allowing for a range of motion. It consists of two layers: an outer fibrous layer and an inner synovial membrane. The fibrous layer is made up of dense connective tissue that helps to stabilize the joint, while the synovial membrane produces synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and reduces friction during movement.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is a childhood hip disorder that occurs when the blood supply to the ball part of the thigh bone (femoral head) is disrupted. This causes the bone tissue to die, leading to its collapse and deformity. The femoral head then regenerates itself, but often not as round and smooth as it should be, which can lead to hip problems in later life.

The disease is named after three doctors who independently described it: Arthur Legg, Jacques Calve, and Georg Perthes. It typically affects children between the ages of 4 and 10, more commonly boys than girls. Symptoms may include limping, pain in the hip or knee, reduced range of motion in the hip, and muscle wasting. Treatment often involves rest, physical therapy, and sometimes surgery to realign or reshape the femoral head.

Patellar dislocation is a medical condition characterized by the displacement of the patella (kneecap) from its normal position in the femoral groove, which is a part of the femur (thighbone). This displacement usually occurs laterally, meaning that the patella moves toward the outer side of the knee.

Patellar dislocation can happen as a result of direct trauma or due to various factors that increase the laxity of the medial patellofemoral ligament and tightness of the lateral structures, leading to abnormal tracking of the patella. These factors include anatomical variations, muscle imbalances, genetic predisposition, or degenerative changes in the knee joint.

Dislocation of the patella can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty in moving the knee. In some cases, it might be associated with other injuries such as fractures or damage to the articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissues. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment, which may involve reduction, immobilization, physical therapy, bracing, or even surgery in severe cases.

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a degenerative joint disease that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of the hip joint. It is characterized by the progressive loss of cartilage, remodeling of bone, osteophyte formation (bone spurs), cysts, and mild to moderate inflammation. The degenerative process can lead to pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and crepitus (grating or crackling sound) during movement.

In the hip joint, OA typically affects the femoral head and acetabulum. As the articular cartilage wears away, the underlying bone becomes exposed and can lead to bone-on-bone contact, which is painful. The body responds by attempting to repair the damage through remodeling of the subchondral bone and formation of osteophytes. However, these changes can further limit joint mobility and exacerbate symptoms.

Risk factors for OA of the hip include age, obesity, genetics, previous joint injury or surgery, and repetitive stress on the joint. Treatment options may include pain management (such as NSAIDs, physical therapy, and injections), lifestyle modifications (such as weight loss and exercise), and, in severe cases, surgical intervention (such as hip replacement).

A hip fracture is a medical condition referring to a break in the upper part of the femur (thigh) bone, which forms the hip joint. The majority of hip fractures occur due to falls or direct trauma to the area. They are more common in older adults, particularly those with osteoporosis, a condition that weakens bones and makes them more prone to breaking. Hip fractures can significantly impact mobility and quality of life, often requiring surgical intervention and rehabilitation.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and maintain balance and posture. According to the Mayo Clinic, CP is caused by abnormal brain development or damage to the developing brain that affects a child's ability to control movement.

The symptoms of cerebral palsy can vary in severity and may include:

* Spasticity (stiff or tight muscles)
* Rigidity (resistance to passive movement)
* Poor coordination and balance
* Weakness or paralysis
* Tremors or involuntary movements
* Abnormal gait or difficulty walking
* Difficulty with fine motor skills, such as writing or using utensils
* Speech and language difficulties
* Vision, hearing, or swallowing problems

It's important to note that cerebral palsy is not a progressive condition, meaning that it does not worsen over time. However, the symptoms may change over time, and some individuals with CP may experience additional medical conditions as they age.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by brain damage that occurs before or during birth, but it can also be caused by brain injuries that occur in the first few years of life. Some possible causes of cerebral palsy include:

* Infections during pregnancy
* Lack of oxygen to the brain during delivery
* Traumatic head injury during birth
* Brain bleeding or stroke in the newborn period
* Genetic disorders
* Maternal illness or infection during pregnancy

There is no cure for cerebral palsy, but early intervention and treatment can help improve outcomes and quality of life. Treatment may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, medications to manage symptoms, surgery, and assistive devices such as braces or wheelchairs.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

The femur is the medical term for the thigh bone, which is the longest and strongest bone in the human body. It connects the hip bone to the knee joint and plays a crucial role in supporting the weight of the body and allowing movement during activities such as walking, running, and jumping. The femur is composed of a rounded head, a long shaft, and two condyles at the lower end that articulate with the tibia and patella to form the knee joint.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Traction, in medical terms, refers to the application of a pulling force to distract or align parts of the body, particularly bones, joints, or muscles, with the aim of immobilizing, reducing displacement, or realigning them. This is often achieved through the use of various devices such as tongs, pulleys, weights, or specialized traction tables. Traction may be applied manually or mechanically and can be continuous or intermittent, depending on the specific medical condition being treated. Common indications for traction include fractures, dislocations, spinal cord injuries, and certain neurological conditions.

Prosthesis failure is a term used to describe a situation where a prosthetic device, such as an artificial joint or limb, has stopped functioning or failed to meet its intended purpose. This can be due to various reasons, including mechanical failure, infection, loosening of the device, or a reaction to the materials used in the prosthesis.

Mechanical failure can occur due to wear and tear, manufacturing defects, or improper use of the prosthetic device. Infection can also lead to prosthesis failure, particularly in cases where the prosthesis is implanted inside the body. The immune system may react to the presence of the foreign material, leading to inflammation and infection.

Loosening of the prosthesis can also cause it to fail over time, as the device becomes less stable and eventually stops working properly. Additionally, some people may have a reaction to the materials used in the prosthesis, leading to tissue damage or other complications that can result in prosthesis failure.

In general, prosthesis failure can lead to decreased mobility, pain, and the need for additional surgeries or treatments to correct the problem. It is important for individuals with prosthetic devices to follow their healthcare provider's instructions carefully to minimize the risk of prosthesis failure and ensure that the device continues to function properly over time.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Lens subluxation, also known as lens dislocation or ectopia lentis, is a condition where the lens of the eye becomes partially or completely displaced from its normal position. The lens is held in place by tiny fibers called zonules, which can become weakened or broken due to various reasons such as genetic disorders (like Marfan syndrome, homocystinuria, and Weill-Marchesani syndrome), trauma, inflammation, or cataract surgery complications. This displacement can lead to symptoms like blurry vision, double vision, sensitivity to light, or the appearance of a shadow in the peripheral vision. In some cases, lens subluxation may not cause any noticeable symptoms and can be discovered during routine eye examinations. Treatment options depend on the severity and underlying cause of the subluxation and may include eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgical intervention to remove and replace the displaced lens with an intraocular lens (IOL).

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is the joint located between the acromion process of the scapula (shoulder blade) and the clavicle (collarbone). It allows for a small amount of movement between these two bones and participates in shoulder motion. Injuries to this joint, such as AC joint separations or sprains, are common and can occur due to falls, direct blows, or repetitive motions that cause the ligaments that support the AC joint to become stretched or torn.

The elbow joint, also known as the cubitus joint, is a hinge joint that connects the humerus bone of the upper arm to the radius and ulna bones of the forearm. It allows for flexion and extension movements of the forearm, as well as some degree of rotation. The main articulation occurs between the trochlea of the humerus and the trochlear notch of the ulna, while the radial head of the radius also contributes to the joint's stability and motion. Ligaments, muscles, and tendons surround and support the elbow joint, providing strength and protection during movement.

Joint instability is a condition characterized by the loss of normal joint function and increased risk of joint injury due to impaired integrity of the supporting structures, such as ligaments, muscles, or cartilage. This can result in excessive movement or laxity within the joint, leading to decreased stability and increased susceptibility to dislocations or subluxations. Joint instability may cause pain, swelling, and limited range of motion, and it can significantly impact a person's mobility and quality of life. It is often caused by trauma, degenerative conditions, or congenital abnormalities and may require medical intervention, such as physical therapy, bracing, or surgery, to restore joint stability.

Orthopedic manipulation is a hands-on technique that is used by healthcare professionals, such as orthopedic doctors, chiropractors, and physical therapists, to diagnose and treat muscle and joint disorders. This manual procedure involves moving the joints or soft tissues in a specific direction and amplitude with the aim of improving joint mobility, reducing pain, relieving muscle tension, and enhancing overall function.

Orthopedic manipulation can be performed on various parts of the body, including the spine, extremities, and cranial structures. It is often used as a complementary treatment alongside other therapeutic interventions, such as exercise, medication, or surgery, to manage a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions, including but not limited to:

* Back pain and stiffness
* Neck pain and stiffness
* Joint pain and inflammation
* Muscle spasms and tension
* Headaches and migraines
* Disc disorders
* Sprains and strains
* Postural dysfunctions

It is important to note that orthopedic manipulation should only be performed by trained and licensed healthcare professionals, as improper techniques can lead to injury or further damage. Patients should consult with their healthcare provider to determine if orthopedic manipulation is an appropriate treatment option for their specific condition.

A splint is a device used to support, protect, and immobilize injured body parts, such as bones, joints, or muscles. It can be made from various materials like plastic, metal, or fiberglass. Splints are often used to keep the injured area in a stable position, reducing pain, swelling, and further damage while the injury heals. They come in different shapes and sizes, tailored to fit specific body parts and injuries. A splint can be adjustable or custom-made, depending on the patient's needs. It is essential to follow healthcare professionals' instructions for using and caring for a splint to ensure proper healing and prevent complications.

Prosthesis design is a specialized field in medical device technology that involves creating and developing artificial substitutes to replace a missing body part, such as a limb, tooth, eye, or internal organ. The design process typically includes several stages: assessment of the patient's needs, selection of appropriate materials, creation of a prototype, testing and refinement, and final fabrication and fitting of the prosthesis.

The goal of prosthesis design is to create a device that functions as closely as possible to the natural body part it replaces, while also being comfortable, durable, and aesthetically pleasing for the patient. The design process may involve collaboration between medical professionals, engineers, and designers, and may take into account factors such as the patient's age, lifestyle, occupation, and overall health.

Prosthesis design can be highly complex, particularly for advanced devices such as robotic limbs or implantable organs. These devices often require sophisticated sensors, actuators, and control systems to mimic the natural functions of the body part they replace. As a result, prosthesis design is an active area of research and development in the medical field, with ongoing efforts to improve the functionality, comfort, and affordability of these devices for patients.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Femoral head necrosis, also known as avascular necrosis of the femoral head, is a medical condition that results from the interruption of blood flow to the femoral head, which is the rounded end of the thigh bone that fits into the hip joint. This lack of blood supply can cause the bone tissue to die, leading to the collapse of the femoral head and eventually resulting in hip joint damage or arthritis.

The condition can be caused by a variety of factors, including trauma, alcohol abuse, corticosteroid use, radiation therapy, and certain medical conditions such as sickle cell disease and lupus. Symptoms may include pain in the hip or groin, limited range of motion, and difficulty walking. Treatment options depend on the severity and progression of the necrosis and may include medication, physical therapy, or surgical intervention.

Articular ligaments, also known as fibrous ligaments, are bands of dense, fibrous connective tissue that connect and stabilize bones to each other at joints. They help to limit the range of motion of a joint and provide support, preventing excessive movement that could cause injury. Articular ligaments are composed mainly of collagen fibers arranged in a parallel pattern, making them strong and flexible. They have limited blood supply and few nerve endings, which makes them less prone to injury but also slower to heal if damaged. Examples of articular ligaments include the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the knee joint, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in the elbow joint.

A femoral neck fracture is a type of hip fracture that occurs in the narrow, vertical section of bone just below the ball of the femur (thigh bone) that connects to the hip socket. This area is called the femoral neck. Femoral neck fractures can be categorized into different types based on their location and the direction of the fractured bone.

These fractures are typically caused by high-energy trauma, such as car accidents or falls from significant heights, in younger individuals. However, in older adults, particularly those with osteoporosis, femoral neck fractures can also result from low-energy trauma, like a simple fall from standing height.

Femoral neck fractures are often serious and require prompt medical attention. Treatment usually involves surgery to realign and stabilize the broken bone fragments, followed by rehabilitation to help regain mobility and strength. Potential complications of femoral neck fractures include avascular necrosis (loss of blood flow to the femoral head), nonunion or malunion (improper healing), and osteoarthritis in the hip joint.

The sternoclavicular joint is the joint where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the sternum (breastbone). It is the only joint that connects the upper limb to the trunk of the body. This joint allows for movement in multiple directions, including elevation and depression of the shoulder, as well as some degree of protraction and retraction. The sternoclavicular joint is supported by several ligaments, which provide stability and strength to the joint.

The atlanto-axial joint is the joint between the first and second cervical vertebrae, also known as C1 (atlas) and C2 (axis). It consists of two separate joints: the median atlanto-axial joint, which is a pivot joint that allows for rotation of the head, and the paired lateral atlanto-axial joints, which are plane joints that allow for limited gliding movements.

The atlanto-axial joint is surrounded by several ligaments that provide stability and limit excessive movement. The transverse ligament, located on the anterior aspect of the joint, is particularly important as it prevents excessive movement of the atlas on the axis and helps to protect the spinal cord.

Abnormalities or injuries to the atlanto-axial joint can result in instability and potentially serious neurological complications.

Wrist injuries refer to damages or traumas affecting the structures of the wrist, including bones, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and cartilage. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as falls, accidents, sports-related impacts, or repetitive stress. Common types of wrist injuries include fractures (such as scaphoid fracture), sprains (like ligament tears), strains (involving muscles or tendons), dislocations, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, tenderness, bruising, limited mobility, and in severe cases, deformity or numbness. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

The Atlanto-Occipital Joint, also known as the AO joint or the craniocervical joint, is the articulation between the occiput (the base of the skull) and the atlas (the first cervical vertebra). This joint allows for movements such as nodding your head "yes" and tilting your head from side to side. It is a crucial joint in maintaining the alignment and stability of the head and neck.

The tarsal joints are a series of articulations in the foot that involve the bones of the hindfoot and midfoot. There are three main tarsal joints:

1. Talocrural joint (also known as the ankle joint): This is the joint between the talus bone of the lower leg and the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg, as well as the calcaneus bone of the foot. It allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements of the foot.
2. Subtalar joint: This is the joint between the talus bone and the calcaneus bone. It allows for inversion and eversion movements of the foot.
3. Tarsometatarsal joints (also known as the Lisfranc joint): These are the joints between the tarsal bones of the midfoot and the metatarsal bones of the forefoot. They allow for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the foot.

These joints play an important role in the stability and mobility of the foot, allowing for various movements during activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

The patella, also known as the kneecap, is a sesamoid bone located at the front of the knee joint. It is embedded in the tendon of the quadriceps muscle and serves to protect the knee joint and increase the leverage of the extensor mechanism, allowing for greater extension force of the lower leg. The patella moves within a groove on the femur called the trochlea during flexion and extension of the knee.

A bone fracture is a medical condition in which there is a partial or complete break in the continuity of a bone due to external or internal forces. Fractures can occur in any bone in the body and can vary in severity from a small crack to a shattered bone. The symptoms of a bone fracture typically include pain, swelling, bruising, deformity, and difficulty moving the affected limb. Treatment for a bone fracture may involve immobilization with a cast or splint, surgery to realign and stabilize the bone, or medication to manage pain and prevent infection. The specific treatment approach will depend on the location, type, and severity of the fracture.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

Developmental bone diseases are a group of medical conditions that affect the growth and development of bones. These diseases are present at birth or develop during childhood and adolescence, when bones are growing rapidly. They can result from genetic mutations, hormonal imbalances, or environmental factors such as poor nutrition.

Some examples of developmental bone diseases include:

1. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI): Also known as brittle bone disease, OI is a genetic disorder that affects the body's production of collagen, a protein necessary for healthy bones. People with OI have fragile bones that break easily and may also experience other symptoms such as blue sclerae (whites of the eyes), hearing loss, and joint laxity.
2. Achondroplasia: This is the most common form of dwarfism, caused by a genetic mutation that affects bone growth. People with achondroplasia have short limbs and a large head relative to their body size.
3. Rickets: A condition caused by vitamin D deficiency or an inability to absorb or use vitamin D properly. This leads to weak, soft bones that can bow or bend easily, particularly in children.
4. Fibrous dysplasia: A rare bone disorder where normal bone is replaced with fibrous tissue, leading to weakened bones and deformities.
5. Scoliosis: An abnormal curvature of the spine that can develop during childhood or adolescence. While not strictly a developmental bone disease, scoliosis can be caused by various underlying conditions such as cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, or spina bifida.

Treatment for developmental bone diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment may include medication, physical therapy, bracing, or surgery to correct deformities and improve function. Regular follow-up with a healthcare provider is essential to monitor growth, manage symptoms, and prevent complications.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

The ulna is one of the two long bones in the forearm, the other being the radius. It runs from the elbow to the wrist and is located on the medial side of the forearm, next to the bone called the humerus in the upper arm. The ulna plays a crucial role in the movement of the forearm and also serves as an attachment site for various muscles.

Spinal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur to the vertebral column, which houses and protects the spinal cord. These injuries can be caused by various factors such as trauma from accidents (motor vehicle, sports-related, falls, etc.), violence, or degenerative conditions like arthritis, disc herniation, or spinal stenosis.

Spinal injuries can result in bruising, fractures, dislocations, or compression of the vertebrae, which may then cause damage to the spinal cord and its surrounding tissues, nerves, and blood vessels. The severity of a spinal injury can range from mild, with temporary symptoms, to severe, resulting in permanent impairment or paralysis below the level of injury.

Symptoms of spinal injuries may include:
- Pain or stiffness in the neck or back
- Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the limbs
- Loss of bladder or bowel control
- Difficulty walking or maintaining balance
- Paralysis or loss of sensation below the level of injury
- In severe cases, respiratory problems and difficulty in breathing

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal injuries to prevent further damage and ensure proper treatment. Treatment options may include immobilization, surgery, medication, rehabilitation, and physical therapy.

Fracture fixation, internal, is a surgical procedure where a fractured bone is fixed using metal devices such as plates, screws, or rods that are implanted inside the body. This technique helps to maintain the alignment and stability of the broken bone while it heals. The implants may be temporarily or permanently left inside the body, depending on the nature and severity of the fracture. Internal fixation allows for early mobilization and rehabilitation, which can result in a faster recovery and improved functional outcome.

Surgical casts are medical devices used to immobilize and protect injured body parts, typically fractured or broken bones, during the healing process. They are usually made of plaster or fiberglass materials that harden when wet and conform to the shape of the affected area once applied. The purpose of a surgical cast is to restrict movement and provide stability to the injured site, allowing for proper alignment and healing of the bones.

The casting process involves first aligning the broken bone fragments into their correct positions, often through manual manipulation or surgical intervention. Once aligned, the cast material is applied in layers, with each layer being allowed to dry before adding the next. This creates a rigid structure that encases and supports the injured area. The cast must be kept dry during the healing process to prevent it from becoming weakened or damaged.

Surgical casts come in various shapes and sizes depending on the location and severity of the injury. They may also include additional components such as padding, Velcro straps, or window openings to allow for regular monitoring of the skin and underlying tissue. In some cases, removable splints or functional braces may be used instead of traditional casts, providing similar support while allowing for limited movement and easier adjustments.

It is essential to follow proper care instructions when wearing a surgical cast, including elevating the injured limb, avoiding excessive weight-bearing, and monitoring for signs of complications such as swelling, numbness, or infection. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider are necessary to ensure proper healing and adjust the cast if needed.

I'm not aware of a medical term called "bone wires." The term "wiring" is used in orthopedic surgery to describe the use of metal wire to hold bones or fractures in place during healing. However, I couldn't find any specific medical definition or term related to "bone wires." It may be a colloquialism, a term used in a specific context, or a term from science fiction. If you could provide more context about where you encountered this term, I might be able to give a more accurate answer.

Hip dysplasia (human) Barlow TG (1962). "Early diagnosis and treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip". The Journal of ... If the hip is dislocatable - that is, if the hip can be popped out of socket with this maneuver - the test is considered ... The Barlow maneuver is a physical examination performed on infants to screen for developmental dysplasia of the hip. It is ... The maneuver is easily performed by adducting the hip (bringing the thigh towards the midline) while applying pressure on the ...
... a sign of congenital dislocation of the hip. Trendelenburg's test: a test for varicose veins as well as a test to assess hip ... THE HIP", Fam's Musculoskeletal Examination and Joint Injection Techniques (Second Edition), Philadelphia: Mosby, pp. 45-63, ...
Die angeborene Luxation des Hüftgelenkes, 1900 - Congenital dislocation of the hip. "This article is based on a translation of ...
Dwyer NS (June 1987). "Congenital dislocation of the hip: to screen or not to screen". Archives of Disease in Childhood. 62 (6 ... It relocates the dislocation of the hip joint that has just been elicited by the Barlow maneuver. The Ortolani test is ... Specifically, the Ortolani test is positive when a posterior dislocation of the hip is reducible with this maneuver.[citation ... Congenital disorders of musculoskeletal system, Hip, Musculoskeletal examination, Pediatrics, Veterinary diagnosis, All stub ...
Crowe JF, Mani VJ, Ranawat CS (1979). "Total hip replacement in congenital dislocation and dysplasia of the hip". J Bone Joint ... "Hip subluxation and dislocation in cerebral palsy: Outcome of bone surgery in 21 hips" (PDF). Acta Orthop. Belg. Archived from ... It can be used to indicate hip dislocation. It is the horizontal distance (parallel to the Hilgenreiner Line) between the ... X-rays of hip dysplasia are one of the two main methods of medical imaging to diagnose hip dysplasia, the other one being ...
... this makes it difficult to detect congenital hip dislocation by X-raying. "In terms of comparative anatomy the human scapula ... The muscles of the hip are divided into a dorsal and a ventral group. The dorsal hip muscles are either inserted into the ... The pelvic girdle consists of the two hip bones. The hip bones are connected to each other anteriorly at the pubic symphysis, ... It presses the head of the femur into the acetabulum and flexes, medially rotates, and abducts the hip. The ventral hip muscles ...
Frances's congenital hip dislocation left her in constant pain, and often irritable. The couple's temperament and interests ...
Musculoskeletal abnormalities include pectus excavatum, scoliosis, and congenital joint dislocations including the hip. ... Congenital disorders of urinary system, Congenital disorders of musculoskeletal system, Rare syndromes, Medical triads, ... Prune belly syndrome is a congenital disorder of the urinary system, characterized by a triad of symptoms. The syndrome is ... Baird PA, MacDonald EC (1981). "An epidemiologic study of congenital malformations of the anterior abdominal wall in more than ...
Kutlu, Abdurrahman; Memik, Recep; Mutlu, Mahmut; Kutlu, Ruhusen; Arslan, Ahmet (1992). Congenital Dislocation of the Hip and ... To avoid hip dysplasia risk, the swaddle should be done in such a way that the baby is able to move his or her legs freely at ... Evaluation of risk factors in developmental dysplasia of the hip: results of infantile hip ultrasonography. In: The Turkish ... Chaarani, M.W.; Al Mahmeid, M.S.; Salman, A.M. (2002). Developmental dysplasia of the hip before and after increasing community ...
If the hip goes out of the socket it means it is dislocated, and the newborn has a congenital hip dislocation. The baby is laid ... Some sources prefer "developmental dysplasia of the hip" (DDH) to "congenital dislocation of the hip" (CDH), finding the latter ... decreased hip abduction, hip pain and in some cases hip labral tears. X-rays are used to confirm a diagnosis of hip dysplasia. ... Native Americans are more likely to have congenital hip dislocation than any of the other races. The risk for Native Americans ...
He was renowned for his treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip in children. His technique involved putting the patient ...
His MD thesis on congenital dislocation of the hip was awarded the Syme medal. Bruce had joined the Territorial Army as an ...
"Entry - 601450 - Dislocation of hip, congenital, with hyperextensibility of the fingers and facial dysmorphism - OMIM". omim. ... Additional findings include congenital heart defects, congenital knee dislocation, congenital inguinal hernia, and ... "A mother and three daughters with congenital dislocation of the hip and a characteristic facial appearance: a new syndrome?". ... is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder which is characterized by bilateral congenital hip dislocation, flattened mid- ...
Clothing was responsible for an increased incidence of congenital hip dislocation (CDH) in Japanese infants. By custom, a ... and Treatment of Congenital Dislocation of the Hip in Japan". Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research. 184 (184): 24-40. doi: ... "Prevention of the Development of the Typical Dislocation of the Hip". Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research. 126 (126): 167- ... "to avoid prolonged extension of the hips and knees of infants during the early postnatal period" led to a reduction in the ...
He made contributions in his research of congenital hip dislocation, torticollis, scoliosis and spinal tuberculosis. He is ...
The breed tends to have bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The breed can ... Other health ailments seen in the breed include thyroid and congenital heart defects. The breed tends to have a higher than ... thyroid dysfunction and congenital heart defects. American Pit Bull Terriers with dilute coat colors have not had a higher ... average incidence of hip dysplasia. Culling for performance has helped eliminate this problem and others such as patella ...
She has no arms (bilateral congenital upper extremity agenesis) and a hip dislocation as a birth defect. She was schooled in a ...
... which can lead to hip dislocation. They may be born with congenital vertebral anomalies; parts of the spine may be fused and ... Both infants had congenital hydronephrosis due to ureteropelvic junction stenosis, low muscle tone, developmental delay and ... Okamoto syndrome patients often have skeletal problems such as scoliosis or hip dysplasia, ... congenital hydronephrosis, and characteristic face". American Journal of Medical Genetics. 68 (3): 347-349. doi:10.1002/(SICI) ...
Salter developed a procedure to correct congenital dislocation of the hip, pioneered continuous passive motion for the ... to treat operatively congenital dislocation of hip. His textbook of orthopaedic surgery, Disorders and Injuries of the ...
... is characterized by severe joint hypermobility and congenital hip dislocation. Other common features include fragile, elastic ... It may lead to frequent joint subluxations (partial dislocations) and dislocations. In general, people with this variant have ... When a dislocation or subluxation does occur, muscle spasms and stress tend to occur, increasing pain and reducing the chances ... Scott DW (2008). "Congenital and hereditary skin diseases". Color Atlas of Farm Animal Dermatology. Wiley Online Library. p. 61 ...
He also conducted many studies evaluating the long-range results of treatments for congenital dislocation of the hip, clubfoot ... Ponseti, Ignacio (1996). Congenital Clubfoot: Fundamentals of Treatment. Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0- ... Göksan SB (2002). "[Treatment of congenital clubfoot with the Ponseti method]". Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc (in Turkish). 36 (4 ... Ponseti's other research focused on congenital and developmental bone and joint disorders, skeletal growth disorders in ...
... with special reference to congenital dislocation of the hip. University of Cambridge. Retrieved 1 June 2013. Gilbert-Barness, E ... It was only much later that she and others were to attribute the multiple congenital deformities, including the features of ... Peter M. Dunn (1968). The influence of the intrauterine environment in the causation of congenital postural deformities, ...
Due to a congenital dislocation of the hip joint, Migishi had a major operation during her infant times at a hospital in Nagoya ...
Treatment for dislocation of hip. L'arthrite déformante de la hanche, 1942 - Deforming arthritis of the hip. Un cas intéressant ... Le pronostic du pied bot congénital, 1908 - Prognostics for congenital club foot. Le "Genu valgum", 1912 - Genu valgum. ...
Musculoskeletal features may include congenital elbow dislocation and the limited ability of the feet to roll inwards while ... Those with this syndrome are also prone to hip dysplasia, and other joint abnormalities. An individual's symptoms vary due to ... When comparing 47,XXY and 48,XXXY, there is a greater risk for congenital malformations and more medical problems in those with ... Surgical treatments to correct joint problems, such as hip dysplasia are common, and are often successful alongside ...
Other signs and symptoms include short stature, bifid uvula, hip dislocation, scoliosis or kyphosis, or syndactyly. ... Gordon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 3, is a rare genetic disorder characterized by cleft palate and congenital ...
He was known for his work on congenital hip dislocation, scoliosis, skeletal tuberculosis and juvenile osteochondritis, and ... which he developed following a review of more than 12,000 congenital hip dislocations. Galeazzi fracture at eMedicine ...
Hip dysplasia also makes one more susceptible to hip dislocation. Hip dysplasia is a congenital condition in which the hip is ... Hip dislocations can also occur following a hip replacement or from a developmental abnormality known as hip dysplasia. Hip ... with abduction of the hip making a complex hip dislocation more likely, while adduction and flexion of the hip favors a simple ... A hip dislocation is when the thighbone (femur) separates from the hip bone (pelvis). Specifically it is when the ball-shaped ...
Agostino Paci he learns the theoretical and practical elements of the radical care of the congenital dislocation of the hip. In ... hip dysplasia, osteoarticular tuberculosis), expanding the known concepts of the time and innovating therapeutic measures: "He ...
At the time of her murder, Luxemburg was 47 years old and suffering from a congenital dislocation of the hip that caused her ... After being bed-bound with a hip problem at the age of five, she was left with a permanent limp. Although over time she became ... The autopsy explicitly noted an absence of hip damage and stated that there was no evidence that the legs were of different ...
... a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very ... Although most dislocations are caused by a blow, fall, or other trauma, ... Although most dislocations are caused by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is ... Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is in his 30s or ...
Congenital dislocation of hip with acetabuloplasty or iliac osteotomy, or shelf. Category:. 14 Major Procedure (pre-operative ...
Late reduction in congenital dislocation of the hip and the need for secondary surgery: radiologic predictors and confounding ... Late reduction in congenital dislocation of the hip and the need for secondary surgery: radiologic predictors and confounding ... Late reduction in congenital dislocation of the hip and the need for secondary surgery: radiologic predictors and confounding ... Background: Despite early recognition and appropriate treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip, there are a number of ...
... dislocation of the hipKirschner wire,migration,congenita! dislocation of the hip ... Migration of Kirschner wires following iliac osteotomy in treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip A report of three ... Keywords : Kirschner wire, migration, congenita! dislocation of the hipKirschner wire, congenita! dislocation of the hip ... Risk factors for mortality and survival rates in elderly patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture By: Aslan, Ahmet ...
... per my reading perhaps better described now as congenital hip disease, specifically high congenital dislocation) and being held ... He is aware of my hip stuff but I showed him a picture of my 2018 hip X-ray on my phone and his reaction was along the line of ... Backstory: my right hip has been messed up since I was born. Its essentially dislocated (severe hip dysplasia, ... and not make my hip more garbage for days/weeks after-and hopefully in turn delay hip replacement as long as possible. ...
p,A study of the incidence of congenital dislocatation of the hip among Indians of Northern Saskatchewan - diagnosis, ... A study of the incidence of congenital dislocatation of the hip among Indians of Northern Saskatchewan - diagnosis, ...
Know the causes, symptoms and diagnosis of congenital hip dislocation or developmental dysplasia of the hip. ... of the hip is that there is a dislocation in the hip joint of a new born baby or there is a possibility of dislocation. ... The meaning of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia ... What is Congenital Hip Dislocation or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?. The meaning of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or ...
Although the diagnosis of the common posterior hip dislocation may often be straightforward, the emergent diagnosis and ... reduction of the dislocation, especially in light of multiply traumatically injured trauma patient, can be challenging. ... Traumatic dislocations of the hip are an orthopedic emergency. ... Congenital dislocation of the hip also occurs and is termed ... Anterior hip dislocations have been reported to account for approximately 5-10% of all hip dislocations. Of all anterior hip ...
Congenital hip dislocation; severe generalized joint hypermobility; recurrent subluxations. Skin hyperextensibility with easy ... without the occurrence of iatrogenic dislocations. The study, which included 16 hips and had a mean follow-up period of 45 ... Bar-Yosef O, Polak-Charcon S, Hoffman C, Feldman ZP, Frydman M, Kuint J. Multiple congenital skull fractures as a presentation ... Recurrent joint dislocations and subluxations of shoulder, patella, and temporomandibular joints; chronic joint pain; limb pain ...
... results of total hip arthroplasty with a cemented custom-designed swan-neck femoral component for congenital dislocation or ... results of total hip arthroplasty with a cemented custom-designed swan-neck femoral component for congenital dislocation or ...
Orthopaedics, Pediatric, Sports Medicine, Clubfoot, Congenital Hip Dysplasia, Pediatric Hip Disorders, Gait Disorders, ... Thirty-four patients had clinically unstable hips; 266 had clinically stable hips and were screened by ultrasound. Sixty-four ... Thirty-four patients had clinically unstable hips; 266 had clinically stable hips and were screened by ultrasound. Sixty-four ... Thirty-four patients had clinically unstable hips; 266 had clinically stable hips and were screened by ultrasound. Sixty-four ...
Joint laxity was more common in normal children with an internally centred arc of hip rotation than in normal children with a ... The children with congenitally dislocated hips had significantly more joint laxity than did the control group and significantly ... more of them had an internally centred arc of hip rotation. We suggest that the lax joint capsule fails to mould away the ... We measured the range of rotation in both hips of 397 normal children and in the unaffected hip of 135 children with unilateral ...
Hip dysplasia (human) Barlow TG (1962). "Early diagnosis and treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip". The Journal of ... If the hip is dislocatable - that is, if the hip can be popped out of socket with this maneuver - the test is considered ... The Barlow maneuver is a physical examination performed on infants to screen for developmental dysplasia of the hip. It is ... The maneuver is easily performed by adducting the hip (bringing the thigh towards the midline) while applying pressure on the ...
... is a dislocation of the hip joint that is present at birth. The condition is found in babies or young children. ... Developmental dislocation of the hip joint; Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital ... Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a dislocation of the hip joint that is present at birth. The condition is found in ... Congenital and developmental abnormalities of the hip and pelvis. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, eds. Campbells Operative Orthopaedics ...
Developmental dislocation of the hip joint; Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital ... Developmental hip dislocation varies in the degree of malformation. The hip may be all the way out of the joint or the ... Ultrasound of the hip is the most important imaging study and will demonstrate hip deformity. A hip X-ray (joint X-ray) is ... There are several maneuvers that can detect a dislocated hip or a hip that is able to be dislocated. ...
... congenital anomalies of upper and lower extremities; developmental dysplasia and dislocation of hip; benign and malignant bone ... Developmental dysplasia of the hip; diagnosis and management of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis; diagnosis and management of ... fractures and dislocations; approach to the traumatic injuries; osteoarthritis and musculoskeletal tumors; hip and knee ... Developmental dysplasia of the hip; diagnosis and management of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis; diagnosis and management of ...
Congenital dysplasia and dislocation of the hip : Proven and new procedures in diagnostics and therapy.] ... Background: As developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is the most common congenital muskuloskeletal anomaly, it seems ... Congenital joint stiffness (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita; AMC; amyoplasia) and congenital or acquired muscle spasticity ( ... Increased hip adduction moments, particularly during PSw, might be, on the one hand, the result of prolonged stance phase ( ...
congenital hip dislocation; mild to moderate delays. Listed: Jun 2019. **** I am eligible for a $5000 Older Child Grant ****. ... His hip joint and both lower limb joints were deformed and he is continuing to receive the rehabilitation treatment. Weston is ... congenital scoliosis, club feet and poor peripheral circulation of both lower limbs, right inguinal hernia, mild anemia ... Frankie was born with a congenital heart disease (complex single atrium, single ventricle) and when we visited with him in late ...
Congenital diseases (types, symptoms, management). Developmental dislocation of the hip joint (types, symptoms, management, ... Hip arthroplasty (materials, bone cement, types, procedures, physioterapy after the operation, complications). Knee ...
There is also increased risk of congenital hip dislocation.. Investigations and treatment. Karyotyping is needed for the ...
Practice Information Age groups you are accepting new hip dysplasia patients: Infants and children, Adolescents Contact ... Congenital Dislocation of the Hip. D. Tonnis, Thieme-Stratton, Inc. 1982Weinstein SL: Natural History of CDH and Hip Dysplasia ... The Medial Approach in Congenital Dislocated Hip. International Symposium on Congenital Dislocated Hips, Jerusalem, Israel. ... Orthopaedics 13:221-227, February 1990 PMID: 2308882Weinstein SL: Congenital Hip Dislocation: Long Range Problems, Residual ...
Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; clubfeet (equinovarus or equinovalgus ... Hip dislocation in individuals with Larsen syndrome usually requires operative reduction. Scoliosis and clubfeet are managed in ... of an affected infant has the potential to be complicated by extended breech presentation due to dislocation of the hips and ... AOI and AOIII are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and clubfeet. AOI is ...
Innate Immunity in the Development of Connective Tissue Dysplasia: Pilot Study in Children with Congenital Hip Dislocation ( ...
congenital diarrhea 7 with exudative enteropathy Congenital Dislocation of Hip, with Hyperextensibility of Fingers and Facial ... congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy of cornea Congenital Hypoplastic Anemia with Multiple Congenital Anomalies/Mental ... congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia + congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract syndrome with or without hearing ... congenital muscular dystrophy due to integrin alpha-7 deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy with cataracts and intellectual ...
Some people say that chiropractic care helps with hip pain, but there is limited evidence to support this. People should not ... sometimes causing partial dislocation of the hip. Hip dysplasia is often a congenital condition. ... Hip dysplasia: In a person with hip dysplasia, the hip socket does not fully contain the thigh bone, ... What to know about hip labrum surgery. Hip arthroscopy surgery is the most common procedure for hip labrum damage or tears. ...
Congenital dislocation of the hip and its relation to swaddling used in Turkey. J Pediatr Orthop 1992;12:598-602. ... Prime factors in the etiology of congenital dislocation of the hip. J Bone Joint Surg Br 1963;45:268-83. ... Twenty years experience of selective secondary ultrasound screening for congenital dislocation of the hip. Arch Dis Child 2012; ... The mechanical cause of congenital dislocation of the hip joint. Acta Orthop Scand 1993;64:303-4. ...
Hip disorders. *Dislocation of the hip - congenital. *Hip disorders - Other / type not known ... The latest data also shows that Musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis, joint pain and hip disorders increased by 24,122 ...
EDS7A is marked by bilateral congenital hip dislocation, hyperlaxity of the joints, and recurrent partial dislocations. ...
Hip dislocation can also be caused by congenital condition and head dysplasia. ... Direct force trauma to the thigh is the most common cause of hip dislocation. ... The 3 main types of hip dislocation are (1) traumatic dislocation of a previously normal hip, (2) dislocation of a prosthetic ... to the thigh is the most common cause of hip dislocation. Hip dislocation can also be caused by congenital condition and ...
  • Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is in his 30s or 40s. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Background: Despite early recognition and appropriate treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip, there are a number of cases that subsequently require further surgery to prevent progressive dysplasia, instability, and eventual early osteoarthritis. (soton.ac.uk)
  • It's essentially dislocated (severe hip dysplasia, per my reading perhaps better described now as congenital hip disease, specifically high congenital dislocation) and being held in place by scar tissue as I understand it, with other structure-y issues compounding this. (kerriontheprairies.com)
  • The meaning of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip is that there is a dislocation in the hip joint of a new born baby or there is a possibility of dislocation. (epainassist.com)
  • Out of 600 girls, one is affected with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip and out of 3,000 boys one is affected. (epainassist.com)
  • The determinant of the mode of treatment for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip depends on the age of the child when they are diagnosed. (epainassist.com)
  • Developmental dysplasia of the hip is another name attributed to this condition. (epainassist.com)
  • Out of every 1,000 newborns, one will have congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip according to the American Family Physician. (epainassist.com)
  • It is very common for some newborns to have congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. (epainassist.com)
  • Several factors including nationality, race, sex, and others affect the frequency of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip requiring treatment. (epainassist.com)
  • 3 2-3 children in every one thousand will have congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip needing treatment. (epainassist.com)
  • Is Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Caused by Something that Happen in the Course of Pregnancy or when Delivering? (epainassist.com)
  • No. there is no known reason of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip during pregnancy or delivery. (epainassist.com)
  • Can the Diagnosis of Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip be done Prenatally? (epainassist.com)
  • No. Diagnostic tests are not available during pregnancy for the prediction of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip nor can the detection be done on the ultrasound. (epainassist.com)
  • Despite, being able to develop after birth, congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip is more or less a birth condition. (epainassist.com)
  • Is it Important to See Pediatric Orthopedist Vs. a General Orthopedist if my Child has Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip? (epainassist.com)
  • Pediatric orthopedist is the most preferred to be consulted for a baby who is diagnosed with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. (epainassist.com)
  • Regardless of the skills to treat muscle skeleton disorders that involve bones, general orthopedists may be lacking the experience to deal with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. (epainassist.com)
  • Congenital dislocation of the hip also occurs and is termed developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). (medscape.com)
  • The Barlow maneuver is a physical examination performed on infants to screen for developmental dysplasia of the hip. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hip dysplasia (human) Barlow TG (1962). (wikipedia.org)
  • Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a dislocation of the hip joint that is present at birth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pediatric health care providers routinely screen all newborns and infants for hip dysplasia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If hip dysplasia is found in the first few months of life, it can almost always be treated successfully with a positioning device (bracing). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hip dysplasia that is found after early infancy may lead to a worse outcome and may need more complex surgery to fix the problem. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Untreated, hip dysplasia will lead to arthritis and deterioration of the hip, which can be severely debilitating. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is in their 30's or 40's. (health.am)
  • D. Tonnis, Thieme-Stratton, Inc. 1982Weinstein SL: Natural History of CDH and Hip Dysplasia. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • 225:62-76, December 1987 PMID: 3315382Weinstein SL: Anteromedial Approach to Reduction for Congenital Hip Dysplasia. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics 3:134-140, April 1993Malvitz T, Weinstein SL: Congenital Hip Dysplasia: Review of 152 Closed Reductions with 31 Year Follow-up. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 76A: 1777-1792, December 1994 PMID: 7989383Morcuende JA, Weinstein SL: New Developments in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Current Problems in Problems in Pediatrics 24:335-343, 1994 PMID: 7867374Albinana J, Morcuende JA, Weinstein SL: Radiologic Pelvic Asymmetry in Unilateral Late Diagnosed Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 338:79-85, 1997 PMID: 9170365Kim HW, Weinstein SL: Developmental Hip Dysplasia: Early Recognition. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine 15:70-81, 1998Kim HW, Morcuende JA, Dolan LA, Weinstein SL: Acetabular Development in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Complicated by Lateral Growth Disturbance of the Capital Femoral Epiphysis. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • In a person with hip dysplasia, the hip socket does not fully contain the thigh bone, sometimes causing partial dislocation of the hip. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hip dysplasia is often a congenital condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In Norway, hip dysplasia accounted for 20% of patients requiring total hip replacement younger than 40 years and 87% were women. (bmj.com)
  • Neonatal ultrasound hip examination will show that approximately 20% of hips have dysplasia or acetabular growth retardation. (bmj.com)
  • 9 In most cases this resolves spontaneously but these hips may be vulnerable to continuing dysplasia if suitable postnatal mechanical factors are not applied. (bmj.com)
  • 10 Swaddling forces the hips into extension and adduction and predisposes to dysplasia. (bmj.com)
  • 12 , 13 A recent animal study 14 however, provided new insight into the mechanism of induction of hip dysplasia by swaddling. (bmj.com)
  • Swaddling that commenced later after birth produced dysplasia but not dislocation. (bmj.com)
  • Hip dislocation can also be caused by congenital condition and acetabular or femoral head dysplasia. (amfs.com)
  • The 3 main types of hip dislocation are (1) traumatic dislocation of a previously normal hip, (2) dislocation of a prosthetic hip, and (3) developmental dysplasia of the hip resulting in spontaneous and often chronic dislocation. (amfs.com)
  • And what we're looking for is that there's no evidence of dislocation of those hips, which happens in a condition known as developmental hip dysplasia. (futurelearn.com)
  • Is hip dysplasia in my newborn something to worry about? (theconversation.com)
  • Dysplasia of the hips is more likely where they baby has less space - like when they come out upside down (breech). (theconversation.com)
  • Developmental dysplasia of the hip, sometimes termed congenital dysplasia or dislocation of the hip, is a chronic condition present from early childhood which can cause permanent disability if not identified and treated early . (theconversation.com)
  • Hip dysplasia affects up to 10 people in every 1,000 , and is characterised by underdevelopment of the hip bones (dysplasia). (theconversation.com)
  • In hip dysplasia, the socket component (acetabulum) is underdeveloped, so the ball component is not well fixed in the socket. (theconversation.com)
  • Anything that reduces or prevents movement of the hip joint increases the risk of hip dysplasia . (theconversation.com)
  • Being breech (bottom instead of head first) at delivery and tight swaddling during early childhood also increase the risk of hip dysplasia. (theconversation.com)
  • Babies who have someone in their immediate family with hip dysplasia are more likely to be affected . (theconversation.com)
  • There are usually no symptoms of hip dysplasia at birth, as babies are not able to walk or crawl. (theconversation.com)
  • Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. (bvsalud.org)
  • Congenital and developmental abnormalities of the hip and pelvis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Congenital abnormalities of the upper and lower extremities and spine. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This occurs when abnormalities of the thigh bone, hip socket, or both cause abnormal contact during hip motion. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The role of abnormalities in the distal pathway of cholesterol synthesis in the Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limb Defects (CHILD) syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Congenital Zika virus infection can cause microcephaly and severe brain abnormalities. (cdc.gov)
  • As more information about the associated clinical syndrome becomes available, the phenotype is expanding to include other, sometimes less severe features, such as brain abnormalities without congenital microcephaly. (cdc.gov)
  • All infants had brain abnormalities on neuroimaging consistent with congenital Zika syndrome, including decreased brain volume, ventriculomegaly, subcortical calcifications, and cortical malformations. (cdc.gov)
  • These findings provide evidence that among infants with prenatal exposure to Zika virus, the absence of microcephaly at birth does not exclude congenital Zika virus infection or the presence of Zika-related brain and other abnormalities. (cdc.gov)
  • Early neuroimaging might identify brain abnormalities related to congenital Zika infection even among infants with a normal head circumference ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Introduction to Congenital Craniofacial and Musculoskeletal Abnormalities Craniofacial and musculoskeletal abnormalities are common among children. (msdmanuals.com)
  • [3] Complications may include aortic dissection , joint dislocations , scoliosis , chronic pain , or early osteoarthritis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics 15:753-762, November-December 1995 PMID: 854360Weinstein SL: Pediatric Hip Disorders in Turek's Orthopaedics, Editors Weinstein SL and Buckwalter JA. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • DDH is one of the most common congenital disorders and has considerable socioeconomic implications particularly in relation to late onset osteoarthritis. (bmj.com)
  • The latest data also shows that Musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis, joint pain and hip disorders increased by 24,122 to 956,701 between January and April. (nottinghampost.com)
  • Other common conditions that can lead to postoperative dislocations include laxity or soft-tissue incompetence surrounding the hip joint (ie, revision), incorrect positioning of prosthetic components, and neuromuscular disorders (eg, Parkinson disease). (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita refers to a group of rare congenital disorders characterized by multiple joint contractures present at birth. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Congenital disorders or suffering from certain medical conditions as a child can increase the risk of developing OA later on in life, especially of the hip. (lu.se)
  • Even when comparing the agreed with Member States ( 1 ), and congenital and genetic highest income countries of the Region to countries in disorders (CGDs) remain important public health problems western Europe, it is clear that the Region has higher CGD related to maternal and child health, communicable diseases, prevalence rates ( 4 ). (who.int)
  • WHO defines congenital disorders, also known as birth without disability. (who.int)
  • The hip is a ball and socket joint with the ball (called the femoral head) coming from the top part of the femur (thigh bone) and the socket (called the acetabulum) coming from the pelvis. (health.am)
  • The hip may be all the way out of the joint or the acetabulum may simply be a little shallow. (health.am)
  • Anterior dislocation of the hip occurs from a direct blow to the posterior aspect of the hip or, more commonly, from a force applied to an abducted leg that levers the hip anteriorly out of the acetabulum. (amfs.com)
  • The third type of hip dislocation is a central dislocation in which a direct impact to the lateral aspect of the hip forces the hip centrally through the acetabulum into the pelvis. (amfs.com)
  • You'll feel that slip out of the hip socket or the acetabulum, and that indicates dislocatable hip. (futurelearn.com)
  • And what you will hear, if this is a positive manoeuvre, is an audible clunk as the head of the femur clicks back into the hip socket, or the acetabulum. (futurelearn.com)
  • Reorientation of the acetabulum to normalize load transfer or avert femoroacetabular pincer impingement to prevent osteoarthritis of the hip. (nih.gov)
  • High dislocation of hip, secondary acetabulum, increased misalignment on functional X‑ray, high-grade mobility restriction. (nih.gov)
  • The relationship of the femoral head to the acetabulum is used to classify the dislocation. (medscape.com)
  • An anterior dislocation is most commonly caused by a hyperextension force against an abducted leg that levers the femoral head out of the acetabulum. (medscape.com)
  • This radiograph demonstrates osteoarthritis of the right hip, including the finding of sclerosis at the superior aspect of the acetabulum. (medscape.com)
  • Although the diagnosis of common posterior hip dislocation is often straightforward, emergent diagnosis and reduction of the dislocation, especially in light of the multiply injured trauma patient, can be challenging. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic dislocations can be described as being anterior, posterior, or central. (amfs.com)
  • Posterior dislocations account of more than 90% of dislocations and occur when the knee and hip are flexed and a posterior force is applied at the knee. (amfs.com)
  • Posterior hip dislocations occur typically during MVAs, especially head-on collisions, when the knees of the front-seat occupant strike the dashboard. (amfs.com)
  • If the leg is struck while in an adducted position, a posterior dislocation may result. (amfs.com)
  • Vascular injury is relatively rare with posterior dislocations compared with anterior dislocations, but it may result in local hematoma formation. (amfs.com)
  • Hip dislocations are commonly classified according to the direction of dislocation of the femoral head, either anterior or posterior, and are treated with specific techniques for reduction. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Posterior hip dislocations are the most common type and are reduced by placing longitudinal traction with internal rotation on the hip. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Because the anterior ligaments are stronger, trauma to the hip commonly presents as a posterior dislocation when discovered (90% of cases). (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Congenital dislocations result from the physiologic position of the fetus in utero pressed against the abdominal wall of the mother, with the additional component of the posterior force acting against a dysplastic hip joint in flexion. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • 4 In the typical scenario, the patient is sitting with the hip in flexion, and upon impact, the thigh hits the dashboard, sending a posteriorly directed force to the joint and causing a posterior dislocation. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Posterior dislocations comprise approximately 80-90% of hip dislocations caused by MVCs. (medscape.com)
  • A posterior dislocation is shown in the image below. (medscape.com)
  • Right posterior hip dislocation in a young woman following a high-speed motor vehicle collision (MVC). (medscape.com)
  • Less commonly, an anterior force against the posterior femoral neck or head can produce this dislocation pattern. (medscape.com)
  • Posterior hip dislocations are more common than anterior ones and account for almost 90% of hip dislocations. (medscape.com)
  • Hip dislocation has been noted to be one of the most common complications of total hip arthroplasty. (medscape.com)
  • Most studies have found the incidence of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) to be approximately 2-5%, with the almost three fourths of those dislocations occurring in the first 6 weeks after surgery. (medscape.com)
  • The maneuver is easily performed by adducting the hip (bringing the thigh towards the midline) while applying pressure on the knee, directing the force posteriorly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient typically relates a history of great force applied to a flexed knee and hip. (amfs.com)
  • The affected limb is shortened, adducted, and internally rotated, with the hip and knee held in slight flexion. (amfs.com)
  • I treat orthopaedic problems such as congenital anomalies, foot deformities, knee and overuse injuries, hip dislocations, and gait problems. (stanfordchildrens.org)
  • Today, actually, hip and knee arthroplasty is the most common type of surgery performed at Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, involving around 20% of the patients. (ior.it)
  • If the leg is extended and the knee is locked, force can be transmitted from the floorboard though the entire lower and upper leg to the hip joint. (medscape.com)
  • Anterior knee dislocation with hyperextension is rare at birth but requires emergency treatment. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Genetic heritage as a risk factor accounts for approximately 40% of all knee OA and 60% of all hip and hand OA. (lu.se)
  • Excess body weight puts a lot of pressure on the body's knee and hip joints. (lu.se)
  • Certain occupations put an increased amount of pressure on the knee, hip, and back joints that can cause severe problems later in life. (lu.se)
  • Traumatic dislocations of the hip are an orthopedic emergency. (medscape.com)
  • Putti is credited with organizing and developing the Rizzoli institute (the foundation of the Rizzoli Workshop in 1914 and the "Codivilla" heliotherapy institute in Cortina d'Ampezzo in 1923), besides making advances in orthopaedic research (innovations in the field of the treatment of ankylosis, congenital hip dislocation, post-traumatic deformities, lengthening of the limbs, etc. (ior.it)
  • The focus of this article is on traumatic dislocations. (medscape.com)
  • Motor vehicle crashes (MVC) account for two thirds of traumatic hip dislocations, but falls from height are also a significant cause, whereas sport injuries are a less common cause. (medscape.com)
  • 7.0%) births had congenital anomalies, There were 16 (14.7%) infants with of which 39 (72.2%) were in first-cousin congenital heart disease (4.53/1000 live marriages and 15 (27.8%) were in second- births). (who.int)
  • Another infant had congenital inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus with congenital bony anomalies of the ipsilateral extremities. (medscape.com)
  • If the leg is in neutral or an abducted position when struck, an anterior dislocation or fracture/dislocation may occur. (amfs.com)
  • This is a fracture-dislocation. (amfs.com)
  • A central dislocation is always a fracture-dislocation. (medscape.com)
  • Fracture-dislocation of the right hip. (medscape.com)
  • A study of the incidence of congenital dislocatation of the hip among Indians of Northern Saskatchewan - diagnosis, complication and treatment. (wellcomecollection.org)
  • A high incidence of hip dislocation was reported in Navajo Indians who strapped their infants to a board. (bmj.com)
  • To assess the possibility of clinical presentations that do not include congenital microcephaly, a retrospective assessment of 13 infants from the Brazilian states of Pernambuco and Ceará with normal head size at birth and laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection was conducted. (cdc.gov)
  • The head of the femur is generally the "ball" in the ball and socket joint of the hip. (kerriontheprairies.com)
  • Abnormality in the hip joint formation in the early growth stages of the fetus, results in a child having unstable hip on birth, which causes congenital hip dislocation (CHD). (epainassist.com)
  • Dislocation of the ball-and-socket joint on the hip will occur sometimes. (epainassist.com)
  • The hip is a modified ball-and-socket joint. (medscape.com)
  • The hip is bolstered by a fibrous joint capsule, the ischiofemoral ligament, and many strong muscles of the upper thigh and gluteal region. (medscape.com)
  • Joint laxity and hip rotation in normal children and in those with congenital dislocation of the hip. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Joint laxity was more common in normal children with an internally centred arc of hip rotation than in normal children with a neutral or an externally rotated arc. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The children with congenitally dislocated hips had significantly more joint laxity than did the control group and significantly more of them had an internally centred arc of hip rotation. (ox.ac.uk)
  • An x-ray of the hip joint may help diagnose the condition in older infants and children. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This device will most often hold the hip joint in place while the child grows. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In a few cases, surgery is needed to put the hip back in joint. (medlineplus.gov)
  • DDH is a malformation of the hip joint found in babies or young children. (health.am)
  • A hip X-ray (joint X-ray) is helpful in older infants and children. (health.am)
  • Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 78A: 1048-1055, 1996 PMID: 8698722Morcuende JA, Meyer MD, Dolan LA, Weinstein SL: Long Term Outcome After Open Reduction Through an Anteromedial Approach in Congenital Dislocation of the Hip. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Energy is transmitted along the femoral shaft to the hip joint. (amfs.com)
  • It may lead to frequent joint subluxations (partial dislocations) and dislocations. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a newborn infant, most of the hip joint is cartilage, which is soft and may contribute to the laxity of the joint. (theconversation.com)
  • This may be felt as a looseness of the joint, or hips which do not stay in the joint (dislocate) when moved . (theconversation.com)
  • Other signs may include an asymmetry of the buttock creases or leg lengths (due to one hip not being fully located in the joint). (theconversation.com)
  • Throughout the '60s and '70s, Rizzoli followed the scientific and healthcare progress made in orthopedics, characterized firstly by the introduction of cemented hip joint arthroplasty (Charlney, 1960) and the stabilization and diffusion of the principles of rigid bone fixation (Müller, Allgöver and Willenegger, 1963). (ior.it)
  • The hip is a ball-and-socket joint that is inherently stable because of its bony geometry and strong ligaments, allowing it to resist significant increases in mechanical stress. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • The VRO - hero of newborn babies with a dislocated hip. (pediatric-orthopedics.com)
  • Estudio cualitativo realizado en un hospital causing the adoption of the newborn by relatives of the universitario en el sur de Brasil, en el primer semestre family nucleus or their institutionalization due to lack of de 2014. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this review, the types, causes, and treatment modalities of hip dislocation are discussed and illustrated, with particular emphasis on the assessment, treatment, and complications of dislocations following total hip replacement. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Patients with hip dislocations must receive careful diagnostic workup, and the treating physician must be well versed in the different ways to treat the injury and possible complications. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Developmental hip dislocation varies in the degree of malformation. (health.am)
  • Frequently, osteoarthritis at the hip is a bilateral finding, but it may occur unilaterally in an individual who has a previous history of hip trauma that was confined to that one side. (medscape.com)
  • The AP pelvis plain radiograph was used to measure the height of dislocation, as described by Tonnis, and monitor Acetabular index, and ossific nucleus width and height postreduction. (soton.ac.uk)
  • In these videos, Dr. Elizabeth Forster demonstrates to how to conduct an assessment of the newborn's pelvis, hips and limbs. (futurelearn.com)
  • The next part of your examination of the pelvis is to check the baby's hips. (futurelearn.com)
  • Delivery of an affected infant has the potential to be complicated by extended breech presentation due to dislocation of the hips and knees. (nih.gov)
  • Hip dislocation has been produced in experimental animals by immobilisation of the hips and knees in extension. (bmj.com)
  • And so, in this case, once you flex the hips and knees, then you abduct or move apart the baby's legs. (futurelearn.com)
  • During rapid deceleration, the knees strike the dashboard and transmit the force through the femur to the hip. (medscape.com)
  • Those with occupations that require a lot of heavy lifting are at greater risk of developing OA of the knees, hips, hands, shoulders, and back. (lu.se)
  • Direct force trauma (minor or major force) to the thigh is the most common cause of hip dislocation. (amfs.com)
  • Ultrasound of the hip is used in younger infants to confirm the problem. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is normal for infants to have hip flexion contractures which averages 28° at birth and decreases to 19° at 6 weeks and 7° at 3 months. (bmj.com)
  • Therefore we carried all infants with congenital malformations. (who.int)
  • Although infants with congenital Zika virus infection who have a normal head size have been described in large series, sufficient description of the features of congenital Zika syndrome in these infants has not been available. (cdc.gov)
  • This report of a series of 13 infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection with normal head size at birth includes the findings from extensive imaging, neurologic, ophthalmologic, auditory, and orthopedic examinations. (cdc.gov)
  • Thirteen infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection and normal head size (less than or equal to 2 standard deviations [SD] below the mean for sex and gestational age) at birth (during October 2015-January 2016) are included in this report. (cdc.gov)
  • An X-ray is less useful in younger infants as the hips still contain a large proportion of cartilage , which is not so well seen on X-ray. (theconversation.com)
  • Bolland, Benjamin J. , Wahed, Abdul , Al-Hallao, Sariyah , Culliford, D.J. and Clarke, Nicholas M.P. (2010) Late reduction in congenital dislocation of the hip and the need for secondary surgery: radiologic predictors and confounding variables. (soton.ac.uk)
  • Journal of Orthopaedic Research 8:504-513, 1990 PMID: 2355290Weinstein SL, Birch J.G.: Closed Versus Open Reduction of Congenital Dislocation in Patients Under 2 Years of Age. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 281:69-75, August 1992 PMID: 1499230Weinstein SL: Anteromedial Approach to the Reduction of Developmental Dislocation of the Hip. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Hip dislocation in individuals with Larsen syndrome usually requires operative reduction. (nih.gov)
  • A hip dislocation requires immediate pain management, full medical screening examination, and reduction of the dislocation within 6 hours. (amfs.com)
  • Bigelow first described closed treatment of a dislocated hip in 1870, and since then many reduction techniques have been proposed. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Anterior hip dislocation is commonly reduced by inline traction and external rotation, with an assistant pushing on the femoral head or pulling the femur laterally to assist reduction. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Patients with a hip dislocation will be in severe pain. (medscape.com)
  • One infant had inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus with congenital dislocation of the ipsilateral hip and Fallot tetralogy of the heart. (medscape.com)
  • Ipsilateral hip dislocation often coexists. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Although most dislocations are caused by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Founded thanks to a donation by the surgeon and philanthropist Francesco Rizzoli , the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute was inaugurated in 1896 with the aim of setting up an institute for treating rickets and congenital deformities in general. (ior.it)
  • High-energy blunt force trauma is the most common cause, although prosthetic hip joints may dislocate with much less force. (medscape.com)
  • A high index of suspicion for hip dislocation must be present whenever a patient who is involved in a major trauma such as a motor vehicle accident, a significant fall, or a sports-related injury is assessed. (medscape.com)
  • Frequently, patients are victims of multiple trauma and may not pinpoint hip pain as a result of altered mental status or distracting injuries. (medscape.com)
  • Children may have a hip dislocation due to relatively minor trauma. (amfs.com)
  • Conversely, the physical findings of a hip dislocation may be overlooked on initial resuscitation of a patient with trauma, especially an unconscious one. (amfs.com)
  • The secondary trauma survey should include an assessment of the hips and other large joints. (amfs.com)
  • Dislocation of the hip is a well-described event that occurs in conjunction with high-energy trauma or postoperatively after total hip replacement. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • 3 An understanding of the vasculature is important because trauma to the hip can displace the femoral head and interrupt the blood supply, leading to avascular necrosis (AVN). (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • This may be associated with laxity (looseness) or even dislocation of the hip joints . (theconversation.com)
  • At these examinations, clinicians feel for laxity of the hip joints. (theconversation.com)
  • US of the hips is usually appropriate for the initial imaging of children younger than 4 mo with physical findings of DDH at initial imaging. (medscape.com)
  • Israeli Journal of Medical Science, 16:272-279, 1980 PMID: 7390774Ishii Y, Weinstein SL, Ponseti IV: Correlation Between Arthrograms and Operative Findings in Congenital Dislocation of the Hip. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • We measured the range of rotation in both hips of 397 normal children and in the unaffected hip of 135 children with unilateral congenital dislocation of the hip. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Greater force is required to dislocate an adult's hip than a child's hip. (amfs.com)
  • Prosthetic hips can dislocate as well, particularly as they age, or as a consequence of improper surgery or rehabilitation. (amfs.com)
  • Anterior dislocations and central fracture-dislocations account for less than 10% of hip dislocations. (medscape.com)
  • Strategies in Orthopaedic Surgery, Vol. 6, No. 4, May 1987Hadley NA, Brown TD, Weinstein SL: The Relationship Between Contact Stress Elevations and Long Term Outcome of Congenital Hip Dislocation. (hipdysplasia.org)
  • Many patients with hip dislocation have multiple injuries that may take precedence in the resuscitation sequence. (amfs.com)
  • The leg is externally rotated, abducted, and extended at the hip. (amfs.com)
  • In some places, you need to actually complete an education programme to perform a hip assessment and be accredited in performing those manoeuvres. (futurelearn.com)
  • the modified Harris hip score 87.6 ± 13.9 and the International hip outcome tool (iHOT)-12 78.2 ± 20.3 points. (nih.gov)
  • Patients with a total hip replacement may present differently. (medscape.com)
  • In total, 34 patients (37 hips) were followed up for 20.4 ± 10.3 months. (nih.gov)
  • Results: After 134 OR's, 24 hips (19%, 95% CI: 16-23%) later required a pelvic osteotomy compared with 59 out of 104 hips (58%, 95% CI: 49-68%) in the CR cohort. (soton.ac.uk)
  • Solomon defines epidermal nevus syndrome as a sporadic neurocutaneous linkage of congenital ectodermal defects in the skin, brain, eyes, and/or skeleton. (medscape.com)
  • Contact your provider if you suspect that your child's hip is not properly positioned. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects. (medscape.com)
  • US of the hips is usually appropriate for children younger than 6 mo with a known diagnosis of DDH during nonoperative surveillance imaging in harness. (medscape.com)
  • 4 , 11 The most common acquired dislocation is hip dislocation that occurs within the first 3 months following total hip replacement. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Ultrasonography (US) of the hips is usually appropriate for the initial imaging of children between the ages of 4 wk and 4 mo with an equivocal physical examination or risk factors shown for DDH. (medscape.com)
  • All the neonates had a thorough physical to the general knowledge about the pre- examination at birth and in the first 24 hours disposing factors and different patterns of of life by a paediatric resident and/or an congenital malformations. (who.int)
  • Methods: All cases of congenital dislocation of the hip that presented late or had failed conservative treatment with subsequent late OR versus CR, that were carried out during 1988 to 2003, by the lead surgeon were included. (soton.ac.uk)
  • There are several methods to detect a dislocated hip or a hip that is able to be dislocated. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If the hip is dislocatable - that is, if the hip can be popped out of socket with this maneuver - the test is considered positive. (wikipedia.org)
  • In normal hip development, the ball component grows faster than the socket . (theconversation.com)
  • This means that the hip is more prone to dislocation, where the ball slides out of the socket. (theconversation.com)
  • An X-ray may be used in older children or adults to demonstrate the underdeveloped socket of the hip. (theconversation.com)
  • A hip that is truly dislocated in an infant should be detected at birth, but some cases are mild and symptoms may not develop until after birth, which is why multiple exams are recommended. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hip dislocation occurred predominately if swaddling commenced at birth but prolonged swaddling produced a greater rate of dislocation. (bmj.com)
  • Most babies with slightly lax hips at birth usually resolve by six weeks without any treatment . (theconversation.com)
  • 3 , 7-10 The majority of native hip dislocations result from motor vehicle collisions. (ochsnerjournal.org)
  • Read more to learn about how chiropractic manipulation can help hip pain, what to expect from a session, and the risks associated with the practice. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • was champ of baby hips and so sent into battle with spastic dystonia [which takes perfectly normal hips and over time grinds them down and pulls them apart]. (pediatric-orthopedics.com)