Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Finches: Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.Singing: Modulation of human voice to produce sounds augmented by musical tonality and rhythm.Starlings: The family Sturnidae, in the order PASSERIFORMES. The starling family also includes mynahs and oxpeckers.High Vocal Center: Nucleus in the NEOSTRIATUM of bird brains that sends signals for song production and receives auditory input. In some adult SONGBIRDS, research has shown that the size of this nucleus changes seasonally and that it exhibits neurogenesis.Sparrows: The family Passeridae comprised of small, mainly brown and grey seed-eating birds with conical bills.Canaries: Any of several Old World finches of the genus Serinus.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Prosencephalon: The anterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain arising from the NEURAL TUBE. It subdivides to form DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary, 27th ed)Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Auditory Pathways: NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Basal Ganglia: Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Beak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Territoriality: Behavior in defense of an area against another individual or individuals primarily of the same species.Telencephalon: The anterior subdivision of the embryonic PROSENCEPHALON or the corresponding part of the adult prosencephalon that includes the cerebrum and associated structures.Ethology: The discipline pertaining to the study of animal behavior.Air Sacs: Thin-walled sacs or spaces which function as a part of the respiratory system in birds, fishes, insects, and mammals.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Amblycera: A suborder of chewing lice, in the order PHTHIRAPTERA, that are ectoparasites of poultry and some mammals.Mauritania: A republic in western Africa, southwest of ALGERIA and west of MALI. Its capital is Nouakchott.Parrots: BIRDS of the large family Psittacidae, widely distributed in tropical regions and having a distinctive stout, curved hooked bill. The family includes LOVEBIRDS; AMAZON PARROTS; conures; PARAKEETS; and many other kinds of parrots.Feathers: Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Molting: Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Parakeets: Common name for one of five species of small PARROTS, containing long tails.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Ischnocera: A suborder of chewing lice, in the order PHTHIRAPTERA, that are parasites of birds and mammals.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Fadrozole: A selective aromatase inhibitor effective in the treatment of estrogen-dependent disease including breast cancer.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Conjunctivitis, Bacterial: Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Neostriatum: The phylogenetically newer part of the CORPUS STRIATUM consisting of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and PUTAMEN. It is often called simply the striatum.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Haemosporida: An order of heteroxenous protozoa in which the macrogamete and microgamont develop independently. A conoid is usually absent.Stars, Celestial: Large bodies consisting of self-luminous gas held together by their own gravity. (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mycoplasma conjunctivae: A species of gram-negative bacteria causing CONJUNCTIVITIS and KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS in SHEEP and GOATS.Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Crows: Common name for the largest birds in the order PASSERIFORMES, family Corvidae. These omnivorous black birds comprise most of the species in the genus Corvus, along with ravens and jackdaws (which are often also referred to as crows).Vasotocin: A nonapeptide that contains the ring of OXYTOCIN and the side chain of ARG-VASOPRESSIN with the latter determining the specific recognition of hormone receptors. Vasotocin is the non-mammalian vasopressin-like hormone or antidiuretic hormone regulating water and salt metabolism.North America
  • 2019. Assessing the effect of seasonal agriculture on the condition and winter survival of a migratory songbird in Mexico. (sfu.ca)
  • Just out: #Metabarcoding to test if the riparian Neotropical migratory songbird, the Louisiana Waterthrush, expanded diet to compensate for losses of preferred aquatic prey taxa (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera) as a result of stream acidification. (peerj.com)
  • Young birds first produce highly variable but poorly structured song, and through tens or even hundreds of thousands of immature song productions over many weeks, they gradually develop a stable song that resembles the song of their tutor ( 4 - 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • A songbird is a bird belonging to the clade Passeri of the perching birds (Passeriformes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Songbirds form one of the two major lineages of extant perching birds, the other being the Tyranni which are most diverse in the Neotropics and absent from many parts of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • While almost all living birds give calls of some sort, well-developed songs are only given by a few lineages outside the songbirds. (wikipedia.org)
  • And even though some parrots (which are not songbirds) can be taught to repeat human speech, vocal mimicry among birds is almost completely restricted to songbirds, some of which (such as the lyrebirds or the aptly-named mockingbirds) excel in imitating the sounds of other birds or even environmental noises. (wikipedia.org)
  • The durable perching surface enables songbirds to perch comfortably, and the special circular perch design allows for numerous birds to eat at one time. (jedds.com)
  • Highly effective against roundworm, hairworm & tapeworm for cage & aviary birds. (jedds.com)
  • This has led to amazing song diversity among different groups of birds, so much diversity that many researchers now acknowledge that songbirds are on par with cetaceans in their ability to generate unique dialects. (treehugger.com)
  • The lab has a complete extracellular and intracellular in vivo electrophysiology recording facility, specifically designed for working with small birds and presenting them auditory stimuli in a highly controlled environment (funded by NSERC and Alberta Ingenuity) (right). (ualberta.ca)
  • This blend is filled with the same highly desired ingredients birds love, with none of the filler ingredients. (petco.com)
  • A few years ago, Jarvis and his colleagues made the surprising discovery that when a songbird, parrot or hummingbird is producing its learned vocalization, a set of seven similar structures in the birds' brains become active. (nwf.org)
  • Adult songbirds, meanwhile, rely on auditory feedback to maintain their song, and previous studies by Brainard have shown that if the birds are deaf, or receive garbled auditory feedback via a computer-based intervention, the fidelity of their song gradually deteriorates. (science20.com)
  • Background: Female promiscuity is highly variable among birds, and particularly among songbirds. (uio.no)
  • Ethyl parathion, an organophosphate insecticide, is highly toxic to birds and has caused numerous wildlife mortality incidents. (panna.org)
  • A legion of highly skilled volunteer ornithologists is helping a team of scientists to identify the best stopover sites for migrating birds in the southern coastal zone of Lake Ontario. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Even more startling, the virus was easily spread by North American mosquitoes, and it obliterated highly susceptible populations of Western Hemisphere birds, such as crows and many songbird species. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • This article shows an optimized procedure for imaging of the neural substrates of auditory stimulation in the songbird brain using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). (jove.com)
  • Energetic application of genomic resources to research using songbirds should help illuminate how complex neural and behavioral traits emerge and evolve. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All songbirds share a highly specialized neural system for learned vocal communication. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Research in the SNL is currently aimed at understanding the cognitive, perceptual, evolutionary, developmental, and neural bases underlying chickadees perception of the acoustic (vocal) categories (i.e., note-types, call types) contained in their calls and songs, as a first step towards a comprehensive understanding songbird acoustic communication. (ualberta.ca)
  • Work in our laboratory uses songbirds to study the neural bases of vocal production and sensorimotor integration. (upenn.edu)
  • For many decades, neuroscientists and evolutionary biologists have been interested in the mechanics and function of the songbirds' song system: the interconnected neural circuit that connects the auditory forebrain with the brainstem via song-specific control nuclei. (upenn.edu)
  • I will highlight some of the interactions between the song motor circuit and the respiratory system in male songbirds and discuss how the respiratory brainstem, through its bilateral bottom-up projections to thalamus, might play a key role in sending precisely timed signals that synchronize premotor activity in both hemispheres. (umd.edu)
  • In songbirds, the respiratory brainstem (RAm & PAm in figure 2), which shares many anatomical and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart (McLean et al. (upenn.edu)
  • Scientists conducting imaging studies have found that when people speak, parts of their brains' cerebrums that are similar to those of vocalizing songbirds, parrots and hummingbirds become active. (nwf.org)
  • We show that experimental exposure to singing in the post-breeding period provides a social cue that is used for habitat selection the following year by a migrant songbird, the black-throated blue warbler ( Dendroica caerulescens ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The Columbia Land Trust has created the East Cascades Oaks Partnership to both raise awareness of the highly threatened Oregon white oak habitat and engage stakeholders and the public in discussions about the science and management of this unique ecosystem in Oregon and Washington. (cornell.edu)
  • In response, we developed a core set of genomic tools and a novel collaborative strategy to probe gene expression in diverse songbird species and natural contexts. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We produced a spotted cDNA microarray with 20,160 addresses representing 17,214 non-redundant products of an estimated 11,500-15,000 genes, validating it by analysis of immediate-early gene (zenk) gene activation following song exposure and by demonstrating effective cross hybridization to genomic DNAs of other songbird species in the Passerida Parvorder. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here we performed a comparative analysis of 48 avian genomes to identify genomic features that are unique to songbirds, as well as an initial assessment of function by investigating their tissue distribution and predicted protein domain structure. (duke.edu)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals novel genes unique to songbirds, including some that may subserve their unique vocal control system, substantially improves the quality of Zebra finch genome annotations, and contributes to a better understanding of how genomic features may have evolved in conjunction with the emergence of the songbird lineage. (duke.edu)
  • In songbirds, different sex hormone activities are based on divergent genomic regulatory mechanisms. (mpg.de)
  • Given the gradual development of vocal patterns during song learning, it has been widely believed, for songbirds just as for babbling infants or young pianists, that motor output during learning directly reflects the progress of learning. (pnas.org)
  • The young song is also highly variable. (pnas.org)
  • However, a study published in 2013 has shown that all cognitive ability may not be directly related to the song repertoire of a songbird. (wikipedia.org)
  • Song repertoire can be attributed to male songbirds as it is one of the main mechanisms of courtship. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mate choice in female songbirds is a significant realm of study as song abilities are continuously evolving. (wikipedia.org)
  • Especially songbirds, which learn their song from a tutor, provide an excellent and widely used model system for sensorimotor learning and human speech acquisition ( Doupe & Kuhl 1999 ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • We demonstrate that a strong settlement response was elicited because post-breeding song at a site is highly correlated with reproductive success. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • In a finding that once again displays the power of the female, UCSF neuroscientists have discovered that teenage male songbirds, still working to perfect their song, improve their performance in the presence of a female bird. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Adolescent male songbirds, which are just becoming sexually mature, usually sing undirected song, which at that stage is highly variable and immature and sounds like vocal practice. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The primary objective of this work is to use the highly stereotyped zebra finch (Figure 1) song to investigate how the brainstem might shape the generation of higher-order motor commands. (upenn.edu)
  • Recent work in the lab (Lewandowski and Schmidt, 2011) observed pesisten fast gamma oscillations (90 - 150 Hz) of local field potentials and of single neuron firing following song production in a forebrain sensorimotor nucleus, nucleus Interface (NIf) in songbirds. (upenn.edu)
  • This work has predominantly focused on how the song system allows male songbirds to learn and produce song. (upenn.edu)
  • We couldn't have had a successful 2019 without the help of our loyal customers like YOU so we are giving back with the help of special sponsors like Brome Bird Care , HummBug , Songbird Essentials , and MANY more! (songbirdstation.com)
  • Andrew Wilson of Gettysburg College and his colleagues tested the feasibility of combining bioacoustic monitoring and UAVs to survey songbird populations (see YouTube abstract ). (plos.org)
  • In a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances , researchers from Gettysburg College test this technology for monitoring songbird populations. (plos.org)
  • Most songbirds head south for the winter, as food supplies disappear, returning to breed in the spring, when booming insect populations can satisfy clamoring broods. (pbs.org)
  • According to Waud, as much as 85 percent of deaths in migratory bird populations occur while bird are flying en route to their wintering or breeding grounds. (bio-medicine.org)
  • RESULTS: Using BLAT alignments and gene synteny analysis, we curated a large set of Ensembl gene models that were annotated as novel or duplicated in the most commonly studied songbird, the Zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and then extended this analysis to 47 additional avian and 4 non-avian genomes. (duke.edu)
  • We identified 10 novel genes uniquely present in songbird genomes. (duke.edu)
  • Flycatchers, for example, belong to the same order as songbirds-Passeriformes-yet no flycatcher species tested so far displays the trait. (nwf.org)
  • Here we examine the relationships between female promiscuity and a broad set of predictor variables in a comprehensive data set (N = 202 species) of Passerides songbirds, which is a highly diversified infraorder of the Passeriformes exhibiting significant variation in female promiscuity. (uio.no)
  • BACKGROUND: Songbirds (oscine Passeriformes) are among the most diverse and successful vertebrate groups, comprising almost half of all known bird species. (duke.edu)
  • 1997 -- Outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 are reported in poultry at farms and wet markets in Hong Kong. (rferl.org)
  • 2017. Apparent annual survival estimates of tropical songbirds better reflect life history variation when based on intensive field methods. (coopunits.org)
  • 2017. Proximate effects of temperature versus evolved intrinsic constraints for embryonic development times among temperate and tropical songbirds. (coopunits.org)
  • In songbirds (brown thrashers, Toxostoma rufum , and cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis ), direct observations of the biomechanical effects of contraction largely confirm the functions of the intrinsic syringeal muscles proposed from indirect studies. (biologists.org)
  • Many neuroscientists have thought that the nervous system simply didn't have the ability to control movement at a highly precise level," says lead author Evren Tumer, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of senior author Michael Brainard, PhD, UCSF assistant professor of physiology. (science20.com)
  • Cardinals, along with other songbirds, are among the few kinds of animals that learn the vocalizations they make. (nwf.org)
  • According to Jarvis and other scientists, baby songbirds learn to sing much like human infants learn to speak. (nwf.org)
  • Like most people, who after adolescence have difficulty learning foreign languages, most songbirds lose the ability to learn new melodies after they reach maturity. (nwf.org)
  • The main animal model used is songbirds, one of the few vertebrate groups that evolved the ability to learn vocalizations. (duke.edu)
  • By sorting large numbers of environmental stimuli, such as songbird vocalizations, into categories rather than memorizing each new instance, animals can adapt quickly to newly encountered stimuli. (ualberta.ca)
  • Unlike many other songbird species, which migrate to warmer climates for the winter, the cardinal endures the winter cold, sustaining itself by foraging on the ground, sometimes in groups, for seeds. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Highly self-motivated individuals will find the job very rewarding and enjoy exploring the ecology of White-headed, Black-backed, and Lewis s Woodpeckers, and cavity nesting species in general Qualifications: Applicants must be pursuing or have acquired a college degree in wildlife biology, zoology, ecology, or related field, and will depend on the position. (msu.edu)
  • The cardinal, named for its vivid red plumage, is a common songbird species found in the North American deciduous forest. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Reportedly, this is the first study to show that imidacloprid ( neonicotinoid ) and chlorpyrifos (organophosphate) - which are two of the most widely-used insecticides - are toxic to seed-eating songbirds. (inhabitat.com)
  • Although neonicotinoids were thought to have a lower toxicity to vertebrates, it actually proved to be more harmful to these songbirds than the older organophosphate chemicals. (inhabitat.com)
  • To stimulate use of these resources by the songbird research community and to maintain consistent technical standards, we devised a "Community Collaboration" mechanism whereby individual birdsong researchers develop experiments and provide tissues, but a single individual in the community is responsible for all RNA extractions, labelling and microarray hybridizations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • During times of courtship, it is said that male songbirds increase their repertoire by mimicking other species songs. (wikipedia.org)
  • But you'll see the point as soon as a hawk flies over: The male of each pair sorties after the intruding predator, which is soon dealing with a half-dozen or more shrieking, pecking, highly incensed blackbirds. (mvtimes.com)
  • There are plenty of famous examples of this, from prairie dogs clicking to alarm others of predators to male songbirds singing for a mate. (dictionary.com)
  • A tiny songbird washed in faded olive-green, the male shows a hint of crimson atop of his head - hardly a ruby crown. (birdnote.org)
  • These results constitute a previously undocumented, but highly parsimonious mechanism for the inadvertent transfer of reproductive (public) information from successful breeders to dispersers. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Evolution of female promiscuity in Passerides songbirds. (uio.no)
  • Sperm head abnormalities are more frequent in songbirds with more helical sperm: A possible trade-off in sperm evolution. (uio.no)
  • It focuses on the Hooded Warbler, a songbird that spends a brief summer nesting in the forests of eastern North America before migrating south to winter along the Caribbean coast from southern Mexico to Panama. (phys.org)