Troponin I: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It inhibits F-actin-myosin interactions.Troponin T: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Troponin: One of the minor protein components of skeletal muscle. Its function is to serve as the calcium-binding component in the troponin-tropomyosin B-actin-myosin complex by conferring calcium sensitivity to the cross-linked actin and myosin filaments.Creatine Kinase: A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Creatine Kinase, MB Form: An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.Troponin C: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex of skeletal muscle. It is a calcium-binding protein.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Isoenzymes: Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Rats, Inbred WFProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Autonomic Nerve Block: Interruption of sympathetic pathways, by local injection of an anesthetic agent, at any of four levels: peripheral nerve block, sympathetic ganglion block, extradural block, and subarachnoid block.Tropomyosin: A protein found in the thin filaments of muscle fibers. It inhibits contraction of the muscle unless its position is modified by TROPONIN.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Immunoassay: A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Rats, Inbred LewHeart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Mice, Inbred C57BLMyoblasts, Cardiac: Precursor cells destined to differentiate into cardiac myocytes (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC).Cardiac Myosins: Myosin type II isoforms found in cardiac muscle.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II: A CALCIUM-independent subtype of nitric oxide synthase that may play a role in immune function. It is an inducible enzyme whose expression is transcriptionally regulated by a variety of CYTOKINES.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The restoration of the sequential order of contraction and relaxation of the HEART ATRIA and HEART VENTRICLES by atrio-biventricular pacing.Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Cardiac Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of patients with heart disorders.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Cardiac Electrophysiology: The study of the electrical activity and characteristics of the HEART; MYOCARDIUM; and CARDIOMYOCYTES.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.C-Reactive Protein: A plasma protein that circulates in increased amounts during inflammation and after tissue damage.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Isoproterenol: Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.Sarcomeres: The repeating contractile units of the MYOFIBRIL, delimited by Z bands along its length.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Atrial Natriuretic Factor: A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Mitochondria, Heart: The mitochondria of the myocardium.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Edema, Cardiac: Abnormal fluid retention by the body due to impaired cardiac function or heart failure. It is usually characterized by increase in venous and capillary pressure, and swollen legs when standing. It is different from the generalized edema caused by renal dysfunction (NEPHROTIC SYNDROME).Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine: A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Myocardial Reperfusion Injury: Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Sarcolemma: The excitable plasma membrane of a muscle cell. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Molecular Diagnostic Techniques: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Myosin Heavy Chains: The larger subunits of MYOSINS. The heavy chains have a molecular weight of about 230 kDa and each heavy chain is usually associated with a dissimilar pair of MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS. The heavy chains possess actin-binding and ATPase activity.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Myofibrils: The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Limit of Detection: Concentration or quantity that is derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Conductometry: Determination of the quantity of a material present in a mixture by measurement of its effect on the electrical conductivity of the mixture. (Webster, 3d ed)Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Adrenergic beta-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.Thermodilution: Measurement of blood flow based on induction at one point of the circulation of a known change in the intravascular heat content of flowing blood and detection of the resultant change in temperature at a point downstream.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Muscle Cells: Mature contractile cells, commonly known as myocytes, that form one of three kinds of muscle. The three types of muscle cells are skeletal (MUSCLE FIBERS, SKELETAL), cardiac (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC), and smooth (MYOCYTES, SMOOTH MUSCLE). They are derived from embryonic (precursor) muscle cells called MYOBLASTS.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.GATA4 Transcription Factor: A GATA transcription factor that is expressed in the MYOCARDIUM of developing heart and has been implicated in the differentiation of CARDIAC MYOCYTES. GATA4 is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION and regulates transcription of cardiac-specific genes.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of CARDIOMYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN5A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with a variety of CARDIAC DISEASES that result from loss of sodium channel function.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.
"Association of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I Concentration With Cardiac Outcomes in Patients With Suspected Acute ... "Rapid Rule-out of Acute Myocardial Infarction With a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Measurement Below the Limit of ... and the diagnostic accuracy of troponin testing is improving over time. One high-sensitivity cardiac troponin is able to rule ... CK-MB is not as specific as troponins for acute myocardial injury, and may be elevated with past cardiac surgery, inflammation ...
Cardiac troponin testing in the acute care setting: Ordering, reporting and high sensitivity assays - An update from the ... and position papers on current issues such as cardiac troponin testing. The organization's members meet with governments, both ...
"Predictive value of the high-sensitivity troponin T assay and the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index in ... Kucher N, Goldhaber SZ (2003). "Cardiac biomarkers for risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism". ... This phenomenon has a 77% sensitivity and a 94% specificity for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism in the setting of ... Not every person with a (suspected) pulmonary embolism requires an echocardiogram, but elevations in cardiac troponins or brain ...
... over troponin at 3-6 hours following chest pain onset. This sensitivity may be explained by the high concentration of H-FABP in ... "Novel biomarkers in early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction compared with cardiac troponin T". European Heart Journal. ... "Cloning and characterization of a novel cardiac-specific kinase that interacts specifically with cardiac troponin I". Journal ... "Cloning and characterization of a novel cardiac-specific kinase that interacts specifically with cardiac troponin I". Journal ...
This approach proved useful for dramatically enhancing the sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers (e.g. Troponin) detection directly ... Because of their high aspect ratio, nanowires are also uniquely suited to dielectrophoretic manipulation,[36][37][38] which ... from serum for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.[47] See also[edit]. *. Nanotechnology portal ... Due to the high aspect ratio, if the gate dielectric is wrapped around the nanowire channel, we can get good control of channel ...
Goldstein, Stuart L (Dec 2011). "Acute kidney injury biomarkers: renal angina and the need for a renal troponin I". BMC Med. 9 ... very high risk), 3 (high risk), and 1 (moderate risk). Clinical signs of injury are based on changes in estimated creatinine ... and the associated threshold for clinical signs of kidney dysfunction are akin to the cardiac angina paradigm to guide troponin ... After assessment for optimal sensitivity and specificity (Youden's J statistic), the renal angina index level derived as ...
The cardiac troponins T and I which are released within 4-6 hours of an attack of MI and remain elevated for up to 2 weeks, ... "Implications of the failure to identify high-risk electrocardiogram findings for the quality of care of patients with acute ... The use of additional ECG leads like right-sided leads V3R and V4R and posterior leads V7, V8, and V9 may improve sensitivity ... ECG and cardiac biomarkers suggest the likelihood of a problem. Cardiac markers or cardiac enzymes are proteins that leak out ...
Troponin is a late cardiac marker of ACS The aim of prognostic markers is to reflect different components of pathophysiology of ... Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate), low or high blood pressure ... In this study, the sensitivity was 65.2% and specificity was 44%. This particular study had an 8.4% prevalence of acute ... A blood test is generally performed for cardiac troponins twelve hours after onset of the pain. If this is positive, coronary ...
"Routine monitoring of cardiac biomarkers in high-risk patients after major surgery is therefore recommended." Although how ... What causes acute surgical pain to become persistent remains unclear. However, it seems likely to result from some combination ... In non-human species, there are distinct genetic characteristics that clearly influence anesthetic sensitivity. But until ... "Association between postoperative troponin levels and 30-day mortality among patients undergoing noncardiac surgery". JAMA. 307 ...
... whether the abnormality is due to low cardiac output with high systemic vascular resistance or high cardiac output with low ... Acute decompensated heart failure is a worsening of chronic heart failure symptoms which can result in acute respiratory ... In groups of symptomatic patients, a diagnostic odds ratio of 27 for BNP compares with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of ... In those with heart failure who worsen both a BNP and a troponin are recommended to help determine likely outcomes. ...
Jin JP, Huang QQ, Yeh HI, Lin JJ (Oct 1992). "Complete nucleotide sequence and structural organization of rat cardiac troponin ... Embryonic cTnT with more negative charge at the N-terminal region exerts higher calcium sensitivity of actomyosin ATPase ... This proteolytic modification of cTnT occurs in cardiac muscle in acute ischemia-reperfusion or pressure overload. The ... Cardiac TnT is the largest of the three troponin subunits (cTnT, troponin I (TnI), troponin C (TnC)) on the actin thin filament ...
Goldstein SL (2011). "Acute kidney injury biomarkers: renal angina and the need for a renal troponin I". BMC Med. 9: 135. doi: ... In the case of acute kidney injury (AKI), NGAL is secreted in high levels into the blood and urine within 2 hours of injury. ... "Urine NGAL predicts severity of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery: a prospective study". Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 3 (3): ... "Lipocalin 2-deficient mice exhibit increased sensitivity to Escherichia coli infection but not to ischemia-reperfusion injury ...
In patients presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), those in the highest quartile (above 35 ng/ml) have more than 3 ... "High-sensitivity ST2 for prediction of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure". Circ Heart Fail. 4 (2): 180-7. doi:10.1161/ ... highly sensitive troponin, GDF-15, and galectin-3. One study indicated that discrimination is independent of age, body mass ... The ST2 cardiac biomarker is a protein biomarker of cardiac stress encoded by the IL1RL1 gene. ST2 signals the presence and ...
... is a member of the S100 family of proteins expressed in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle and brain, with highest density ... as well as reduced calcium sensitivity. However, S100A1-/- did not show the eventual cardiac hypertrophy or chamber dilation in ... Kiewitz, R; Acklin, C; Minder, E; Huber, PR; Schäfer, BW; Heizmann, CW (11 August 2000). "S100A1, a new marker for acute ... CKMB and troponin I. This injury-released, extracellular pool of S100A1 was investigated in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes and ...
More specifically, AL amyloidosis can be classified as stage I, II or III based on cardiac biomarkers like troponin and BNP. ... Treatment with high dose melphalan, a chemotherapy agent, followed by stem cell transplantation has showed promise in early ... By comparison, rectal biopsy has sensitivity of 74-94%. The type of the amyloid protein can be determined in various ways: the ... or with continuous overproduction of acute phase proteins in chronic inflammation (which can lead to AA amyloidosis). About 60 ...
... higher cardiac output, and dysfunctions of blood coagulation (where clotting may lead to organ failure). The drop in blood ... 46: Sepsis with Acute Organ Dysfunction". In Hall, Jesse B.; Schmidt, Gregory A.; Wood, Lawrence D.H. Principles of Critical ... The same review found the sensitivity of the test to be 77% and the specificity to be 79%. The authors suggested that ... manifest as a troponin leak (although not necessarily ischemic in nature) More specific definitions of end-organ dysfunction ...
Specifically, high cardiac output has been shown to cause enlargement of the left and right ventricle volumes, increased ... Immune cell functions are impaired following acute sessions of prolonged, high-intensity exercise, and some studies have found ... During these processes, the protein troponin increases in the bloodstream, indicating cardiac muscle cell death and increased ... It increases HDL cholesterol, insulin sensitivity, and exercise tolerance. Although there have been hundreds of studies on ...
"Protein kinase D is a novel mediator of cardiac troponin I phosphorylation and regulates myofilament function". Circulation ... and this leads to a reduction in calcium sensitivity of myofilaments, as well as accelerated crossbridge kinetics. Bis- ... suggesting that Telethonin may be involved in the mechanism underlying Coxsackievirus B3 infection in acute and chronic ... indicate that the C-terminus of Telethonin is critical for the dimerization of two Telethonin/Titin complexes into a higher ...
... from an unusually high starting rate. As of 2010, however, studies have shown that the incidence of sudden cardiac death, among ... "Long-term outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac troponin T gene". Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 5 ... Frequently the first signs that a cat has HCM are tachypnea/dyspnea due to heart failure or acute pain and paralysis due to ... This ensures that the test is not wasted on detecting other causes of ventricular hypertrophy (due to its low sensitivity), and ...
Lee YJ, Lee H, Park JS, Kim SJ, Cho YJ, Yoon HI, Lee JH, Lee CT, Park JS (Apr 2015). "Cardiac troponin I as a prognostic factor ... phosphorylation of Ser42/Ser44 by PKC increases Ca2+ sensitivity and decreases cardiac muscle relaxation. Ser5/Ser6, Tyr26, ... An increased level of serum cTnI also independently predicts poor prognosis of critically ill patients in the absence of acute ... "Binding of cardiac troponin-I147-163 induces a structural opening in human cardiac troponin-C". Biochemistry. 38 (26): 8289-98 ...
"Acute effects on insulin sensitivity and diurnal metabolic profiles of a high-sucrose compared with a high-starch diet" (PDF). ... Cardiac marker *Troponin test. *CPK-MB test. *Lactate dehydrogenase. *Myoglobin. *Glycogen phosphorylase isoenzyme BB ... High blood sugar[edit]. Main article: hyperglycemia. If blood sugar levels remain too high the body suppresses appetite over ... Because red blood cells (erythrocytes) have a higher concentration of protein (e.g., hemoglobin) than serum, serum has a higher ...
Cardiac biomarkersEdit. Prolonged exercise such as marathons can increase cardiac biomarkers such as troponin, B-type ... higher heart rates, lower stroke volumes and cardiac outputs, reduced skin blood flow, and higher systemic vascular resistance ... Rossen R, Kabat H, Anderson JP (1943). "Acute arrest of cerebral circulation in man". Arch Neurol Psychiat. 50 (5): 510-28. doi ... Likely due to this connection, weight loss from both exercise and diet tends to increase insulin sensitivity in the majority of ...
"The association between cortisol response to mental stress and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T plasma concentration in ... Avoidance of chronic stress (as opposed to acute stress) is associated with a slower loss of telomeres in most but not all ... A chronically high cortisol level compromises the immune system, causes cardiac damage/arterosclerosis and is associated with ... Positive self-perception of health has been correlated with higher well-being and reduced mortality in the elderly.[197][198] ...
"The association between cortisol response to mental stress and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T plasma concentration in ... Avoidance of chronic stress (as opposed to acute stress) is associated with a slower loss of telomeres in most but not all ... A chronically high cortisol level compromises the immune system, causes cardiac damage/arterosclerosis and is associated with ... The cause is lens hardening by decreasing levels of α-crystallin, a process which may be sped up by higher temperatures. Around ...
... higher cardiac output, and disorders in blood-clotting that may lead to organ failure.[15] ... Lungs: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (PaO2/FiO2 ratio, 300), different ratio in pediatric acute respiratory ... These factors include local patterns of bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics, whether the infection is thought to be a hospital ... manifest as a troponin leak (although not necessarily ischemic in nature) ...
... is a cardiac and skeletal muscle protein useful in the laboratory diagnosis of heart attack. It occurs in different plasma concentration but the same circumstances as troponin T - either test can be performed for confirmation of cardiac muscle damage and laboratories usually offer one test or the other. Troponin I is a part of the troponin protein complex, where it binds to actin in thin myofilaments to hold the actin-tropomyosin complex in place. Because of it, myosin cannot bind actin in relaxed muscle. When calcium binds to the troponin C it causes conformational changes which lead to dislocation of troponin I and finally tropomyosin leaves the binding site for myosin on actin leading to contraction of muscle. The letter I is given due to its inhibitory character. The tissue specific subtypes are: Slow-twitch skeletal muscle isoform troponin I, TNNI1 (1q31.3, 191042) Fast-twitch skeletal muscle isoform troponin I, TNNI2 (11p15.5, ...
Troponin I, slow skeletal muscle is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TNNI1 gene. It is a tissue-specific subtype of troponin I, which in turn is a part of the troponin complex. Gene TNNI1, troponin I type 1 (skeletal muscle, slow), also known as TNN1 and SSTNI, is located at 1q31.3 in the human chromosomal genome, encoding the slow twitch skeletal muscle isoform of troponin I (ssTnI), the inhibitory subunit of the troponin complex in striated muscle myofilaments. Human TNNI1 spans 12.5 kilobases in the genomic DNA and contains 9 exons and 8 introns. Exon 2 to exon 8 contain the coding sequences, encoding a protein of 21.7 kDa consisting of 187 amino acids including the first methionine with an isoelectric point (pI) of 9.59. Three homologous genes have evolved in vertebrates, encoding three muscle type-specific isoforms of TnI. In mammals, the amino acid sequence of ssTnI is highly conserved. Mouse and bovine ssTnI each differs from human ssTnI in only four amino acids, and rhesus ...
Troponin I, cardiac muscle is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TNNI3 gene. It is a tissue-specific subtype of troponin I, which in turn is a part of the troponin complex. The TNNI3 gene encoding cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is located at 19q13.4 in the human chromosomal genome. Human cTnI is a 24 kDa protein consisting of 210 amino acids with isoelectric point (pI) of 9.87. cTnI is exclusively expressed in adult cardiac muscle. cTnI has diverged from the skeletal muscle isoforms of TnI (slow TnI and fast TnI) mainly with a unique N-terminal extension. The amino acid sequence of cTnI is strongly conserved among mammalian species (Fig. 1). On the other hand, the N-terminal extension of cTnI has significantly different structures among mammal, amphibian and fish. TNNI3 is expressed as a heart specific gene. Early embryonic heart expresses solely slow skeletal muscle TnI. cTnI begins to express in mouse ...
The ST2 cardiac biomarker is a protein biomarker of cardiac stress encoded by the IL1RL1 gene. ST2 signals the presence and severity of adverse cardiac remodeling and tissue fibrosis, which occurs in response to myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, or worsening heart failure. ST2 provides prognostic information that is independent of other cardiac biomarkers such as BNP, NT-proBNP, highly sensitive troponin, GDF-15, and galectin-3. One study indicated that discrimination is independent of age, body mass index, history of heart failure, anemia and impaired renal failure or sex. ST2 is a member of the interleukin 1 receptor family. The ST2 protein has two isoforms and is directly implicated in the progression of cardiac disease: a soluble form (referred to as soluble ST2 or sST2) and a ...
... s are biomarkers measured to evaluate heart function. They are often discussed in the context of myocardial infarction, but other conditions can lead to an elevation in cardiac marker level. Most of the early markers identified were enzymes, and as a result, the term "cardiac enzymes" is sometimes used. However, not all of the markers currently used are enzymes. For example, in formal usage, troponin would not be listed as a cardiac enzyme. Measuring cardiac biomarkers can be a step toward making a diagnosis for a condition. Whereas cardiac imaging often confirms a diagnosis, simpler and less expensive cardiac biomarker measurements can advise a physician whether more complicated or invasive procedures are warranted. In many cases medical societies advise doctors to make biomarker measurements an initial ...
Troponin C, also known as TN-C or TnC, is a protein that resides in the troponin complex on actin thin filaments of striated muscle (cardiac, fast-twitch skeletal, or slow-twitch skeletal) and is responsible for binding calcium to activate muscle contraction. Troponin C is encoded by the TNNC1 gene in humans for both cardiac and slow skeletal muscle. Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is a 161-amino acid protein organized into two domains: the regulatory N-terminal domain (cNTnC, residues 1-86), the structural C-terminal domain (cCTnC, residues 93-161), and a flexible linker connecting the two domains (residues 87-92). Each domain contains two EF-hands, Ca2+-binding helix-loop-helix motifs exemplified by proteins like parvalbumin. and calmodulin. In cCTnC the two EF-hand motifs constitute two high affinity Ca2+-binding sites. that are occupied at all physiologically relevant calcium concentrations. ...
... is a cardiac and skeletal muscle protein useful in the laboratory diagnosis of heart attack. It occurs in different plasma concentration but the same circumstances as troponin T - either test can be performed for confirmation of cardiac muscle damage and laboratories usually offer one test or the other. Troponin I is a part of the troponin protein complex, where it binds to actin in thin myofilaments to hold the actin-tropomyosin complex in place. Because of it, myosin cannot bind actin in relaxed muscle. When calcium binds to the troponin C it causes conformational changes which lead to dislocation of troponin I and finally tropomyosin leaves the binding site for myosin on actin leading to contraction of muscle. The letter I is given due to its inhibitory character. The tissue specific subtypes are: Slow-twitch skeletal muscle isoform troponin I, TNNI1 (1q31.3, 191042) Fast-twitch skeletal muscle isoform troponin I, TNNI2 (11p15.5, ...
Troponin C, also known as TN-C or TnC, is a protein that resides in the troponin complex on actin thin filaments of striated muscle (cardiac, fast-twitch skeletal, or slow-twitch skeletal) and is responsible for binding calcium to activate muscle contraction. Troponin C is encoded by the TNNC1 gene in humans for both cardiac and slow skeletal muscle. Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is a 161-amino acid protein organized into two domains: the regulatory N-terminal domain (cNTnC, residues 1-86), the structural C-terminal domain (cCTnC, residues 93-161), and a flexible linker connecting the two domains (residues 87-92). Each domain contains two EF-hands, Ca2+-binding helix-loop-helix motifs exemplified by proteins like parvalbumin. and calmodulin. In cCTnC the two EF-hand motifs constitute two high affinity Ca2+-binding sites. that are occupied at all physiologically relevant calcium concentrations. ...
... (hFABP) also known as mammary-derived growth inhibitor is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FABP3 gene. The HADHB gene is located on chromosome 1, with its specific location being 1p33-p32. The gene contains 5 exons. HADHB encodes a 51.2 kDa protein that is composed of 133 amino acids; 124 peptides have been observed through mass spectrometry data. Heart-type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein (H-FABP) is a small cytoplasmic protein (15 kDa) released from cardiac myocytes following an ischemic episode. Like the nine other distinct FABPs that have been identified, H-FABP is involved in active fatty acid metabolism where it transports fatty acids from the cell membrane to mitochondria for oxidation. See FABP3 for biochemical details. The intracellular fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) belongs to a multigene family. FABPs are divided into at least three distinct types, namely the hepatic-, intestinal- and cardiac-type. They form 14-15 ...
The ST2 cardiac biomarker is a protein biomarker of cardiac stress encoded by the IL1RL1 gene. ST2 signals the presence and severity of adverse cardiac remodeling and tissue fibrosis, which occurs in response to myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, or worsening heart failure. ST2 provides prognostic information that is independent of other cardiac biomarkers such as BNP, NT-proBNP, highly sensitive troponin, GDF-15, and galectin-3. One study indicated that discrimination is independent of age, body mass index, history of heart failure, anemia and impaired renal failure or sex. ST2 is a member of the interleukin 1 receptor family. The ST2 protein has two isoforms and is directly implicated in the progression of cardiac disease: a soluble form (referred to as soluble ST2 or sST2) and a ...
Troponin I, slow skeletal muscle is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TNNI1 gene. It is a tissue-specific subtype of troponin I, which in turn is a part of the troponin complex. Gene TNNI1, troponin I type 1 (skeletal muscle, slow), also known as TNN1 and SSTNI, is located at 1q31.3 in the human chromosomal genome, encoding the slow twitch skeletal muscle isoform of troponin I (ssTnI), the inhibitory subunit of the troponin complex in striated muscle myofilaments. Human TNNI1 spans 12.5 kilobases in the genomic DNA and contains 9 exons and 8 introns. Exon 2 to exon 8 contain the coding sequences, encoding a protein of 21.7 kDa consisting of 187 amino acids including the first methionine with an isoelectric point (pI) of 9.59. Three homologous genes have evolved in vertebrates, encoding three muscle type-specific isoforms of TnI. In mammals, the amino acid sequence of ssTnI is highly conserved. Mouse and bovine ssTnI each differs from human ssTnI in only four amino acids, and rhesus ...
Troponin I, cardiac muscle is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TNNI3 gene. It is a tissue-specific subtype of troponin I, which in turn is a part of the troponin complex. The TNNI3 gene encoding cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is located at 19q13.4 in the human chromosomal genome. Human cTnI is a 24 kDa protein consisting of 210 amino acids with isoelectric point (pI) of 9.87. cTnI is exclusively expressed in adult cardiac muscle. cTnI has diverged from the skeletal muscle isoforms of TnI (slow TnI and fast TnI) mainly with a unique N-terminal extension. The amino acid sequence of cTnI is strongly conserved among mammalian species (Fig. 1). On the other hand, the N-terminal extension of cTnI has significantly different structures among mammal, amphibian and fish. TNNI3 is expressed as a heart specific gene. Early embryonic heart expresses solely slow skeletal muscle TnI. cTnI begins to express in mouse ...
Plastin-2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the LCP1 gene. Plastins are a family of actin-binding proteins that are conserved throughout eukaryote evolution and expressed in most tissues of higher eukaryotes. In humans, two ubiquitous plastin isoforms (L and T) have been identified. Plastin 1 (otherwise known as fimbrin) is a third distinct plastin isoform which is specifically expressed at high levels in the small intestine. The L isoform is expressed only in hemopoietic cell lineages, while the T isoform has been found in all other normal cells of solid tissues that have replicative potential (fibroblasts, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, melanocytes, etc.). However, L-plastin has been found in many types of malignant human cells of non-hemopoietic origin suggesting that its expression is induced accompanying tumorigenesis in solid tissues. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000136167 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000021998 - Ensembl, ...
2. Analytical Characteristics of High Sensitivity Troponin Assays. The high sensitivity troponin T assay has a sensitivity of 3 ... How to Use High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponins in Acute Cardiac Care?. H. Katus,1 J. Searle,2 and E. Giannitsis1 ... K. Thygesen, J. Mair, E. Giannitsis et al., "How to use high-sensitivity cardiac troponins in acute cardiac care," European ... high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in acute coronary syndrome and in patients with increased troponin in the absence of acute ...
The clinical need for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for acute coronary syndromes and the role for serial testing.. ... However, use of a high-sensitivity troponin assay will also result in detection of more patients who have cardiac necrosis due ... Cardiac troponin is the biomarker of choice for the serologic diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes. International cardiology ... Therefore, there is a need to develop troponin assays with higher sensitivity, which cannot be achieved while also improving ...
High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay. The Siemens Atellica IM High Sensitivity Troponin I assay (Siemens Healthineers) is ... How to use high-sensitivity cardiac troponins in acute cardiac care. Eur Heart J 2012;33:2252-7.doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs154 ... Association of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin i concentration with cardiac outcomes in patients with suspected acute ... Here, we evaluate the diagnostic performance of a novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay (Atellica IM high-sensitivity ...
Risk Stratification in Patients With Acute Chest Pain Using Three High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays. Jul 08, 2013 Share ... Risk Stratification in Patients With Acute Chest Pain Using Three High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays ... What is the early and long-term prognostic accuracy of three novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays in ... in a blinded fashion in 1,117 unselected patients with acute chest pain. Patients were followed up at 2 years regarding ...
Impact Of Markedly Elevated Initial High -Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T On Prediction Of Acute Myocardial Infarction In Chest ... Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Identifiers. URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-307044DOI: 10.1016/S0735-1097(15)60133-4ISI: ...
Keywords: high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T ; acute heart failure Cite As: Felker, G. M., Mentz, R. J., Teerlink, J. R., ... Serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement in acute heart failure: insights from the RELAX-AHF study. Felker, G. ... Serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement in acute heart failure: insights from the RELAX-AHF study. Login ... Serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement in acute heart failure: insights from the RELAX-AHF study. European ...
Ninety-Minute vs 3-h Performance of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays for Predicting Hospitalization for Acute Coronary ... Ninety-Minute vs 3-h Performance of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays for Predicting Hospitalization for Acute Coronary ... Home News Scientific Publications Ninety-Minute vs 3-h Performance of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays for Predicting ...
ACS = acute coronary syndrome; ADP = accelerated diagnostic pathway; cTn = cardiac troponin; ECG = electrocardiogram; ED = ... High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT). hs-cTnT ,5 ng/l. hs-cTnT 0 h ,12 ng/lAND1-h change ,3 ng/l. n.a.. hs-cTnT 0 h ... High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI). hs-cTnI 0 h ,2-5 ng/l. hs-cTnI 0 h ,5 ng/lAND1-h change ,2 ng/l. hs-cTnI 0 h ≤6 ... High-sensitivity Cardiac Troponin The clinical assessment, even combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG), is not sufficient to ...
Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I to Rule Out Acute Myocardial Infarction. December 23, 2017 Comments Off ... This study examined the performance of single high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) measurement strategies to rule out ... The goals of the study were to determine 1) negative predictive value (NPV) and sensitivity for the diagnosis of acute ... For hs-cTnI,LoD (27%), the NPV and sensitivity for acute myocardial infarction were 99.6% (95% confidence interval 98.9%-100%) ...
... is common during Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) and associated with increased mortality. ... A high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentration above the 99th percentile (i.e. 14 ng/L) ... Distribution of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T. The distribution of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT, left ... A high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentration above the 99th percentile (i.e. 14 ng/L) is common during Acute ...
high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T; TRAPID-AMI, High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Assay for Rapid Rule-out of Acute ... How to use high-sensitivity cardiac troponins in acute cardiac care. Eur Heart J 2012;33:2252-7. ... high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in acute coronary syndrome and in patients with increased troponin in the absence of acute ... One-hour rule-out and rule-in of acute myocardial infarction using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T. Arch Intern Med 2012; ...
Acute effects of conventional and extended hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on high-sensitivity cardiac troponins. E.P. ... Acute effects of conventional and extended hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on high-sensitivity cardiac troponins. Clinical ... Acute effects of conventional and extended hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on high-sensitivity cardiac troponins. / ... title = "Acute effects of conventional and extended hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on high-sensitivity cardiac troponins", ...
The GRACE scores performance in predicting in-hospital and 1-year outcome in the era of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin ... The GRACE scores performance in predicting in-hospital and 1-year outcome in the era of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin ... The GRACE scores performance in predicting in-hospital and 1-year outcome in the era of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin ...
... assays promise better diagnostic accuracy for acute myocardial infarction, allowing earlier and more effective treatment for ... Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovas Care 2014;3:313-6.. 8. Shah ASV, Anand A, Sandoval Y, et al. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin at ... High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays promise better diagnostic accuracy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), ... Home // ... // Clinical Laboratory News // CLN Articles // Implementing High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays ...
High-STEACS investigators. . High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I at presentation in patients with suspected acute coronary ... Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I to Rule Out Acute Myocardial Infarction. Am J Med2017;130:1076-1083.e1. doi:doi: ... Rapid Rule-Out of Acute Myocardial Injury Using a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I Measurement. Clin Chem2017;63:369- ... Early dynamic change in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in the investigation of acute myocardial infarction. Clin Chem2011; ...
Myocardial infarction (acute): Early rule out using high-sensitivity troponin tests (Elecsys Troponin T high-sensitive, ... New generation cardiac CT scanners (Aquilion ONE, Brilliance iCT, Discovery CT750 HD and Somatom Definition Flash) for cardiac ... Early rule out using high-sensitivity troponin tests (Elecsys Troponin T high-sensitive, ARCHITECT STAT High Sensitive Troponin ... High-sensitivity troponin for the early rule out of acute myocardial infarction In development [GID-DG10035] Expected ...
The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) elevation, to identify ... Acute MI is likely underdiagnosed in acute ischemic stroke patients. Dynamic changes in troponin levels seem to be related to ... Patients diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (MI) within the last 7 days before admission or during hospitalization were ... Both dynamic relative change (p = 0.026) and absolute change (p = 0.032) in hs-cTnT were significantly associated with higher ...
High Sensitivity Troponin T Rules Out Acute Cardiac Insufficiency Trial)",. abstract = "BACKGROUND: Identifying low-risk acute ... TACIT (High Sensitivity Troponin T Rules Out Acute Cardiac Insufficiency Trial). Peter S. Pang, Gregory J. Fermann, Benton R. ... TACIT (High Sensitivity Troponin T Rules Out Acute Cardiac Insufficiency Trial). / Pang, Peter S.; Fermann, Gregory J.; Hunter ... TACIT (High Sensitivity Troponin T Rules Out Acute Cardiac Insufficiency Trial). Circulation. Heart failure. 2019 Jul 1;12(7): ...
... and precision of the different commercially available troponin assays vary considerably. These differences are related to a ... Novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. Heart. 2018 Nov 15. [ ... The clinical need for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for acute coronary syndromes and the role for serial testing. Am ... acute MI cutoffs. (The WHO cutoffs define acute MI using CK-MB and report troponin levels as either a higher "acute MI level" ...
... high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in acute coronary syndrome and in patients with increased troponin in the absence of acute ... acute myocardial infarction; LoB, limit of blank; hs-cTnT, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T; LoD, limit of detection; ECG, ... High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Concentrations below the Limit of Detection to Exclude Acute Myocardial Infarction: A ... Combining presentation high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I and glucose measurements to rule-out an acute myocardial infarction ...
Combining presentation high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I and glucose measurements to rule-out an acute myocardial infarction ...
High-sensitivity cardiac troponin in the distinction of acute myocardial infarction from acute cardiac noncoronary artery ... 15 High-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays, which allow measurement of even low concentrations of cardiac troponin with high ... How to use high-sensitivity cardiac troponins in acute cardiac care. Eur Heart J 2012; 33:2252-7. ... Measurement of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T. Blood samples for determination of cardiac troponin T levels were collected ...
How to use high-sensitivity cardiac troponins in acute cardiac care. European Heart Journal, 33(18), 2252-2257. doi: 10.1093/ ... Comparing the diagnostic values of circulating microRNAs and cardiac troponin T in patients with acute myocardial infarction. ... High levels of circulating endothelial microparticles in patients with acute coronary syndromes. American Heart Journal, 145(6 ... A subset of circulating microRNAs are predictive for cardiac death after discharge for acute myocardial infarction. Biochemical ...
TACIT (High Sensitivity Troponin T Rules Out Acute Cardiac Insufficiency Trial).. Pang PS, Fermann GJ, Hunter BR, Levy PD, Lane ... Acute penoscrotal and soft tissue swelling with cutaneous plaques.. Kearney N, Harnett C, Keohane J, Thorne J, Feighery C, ... Is plasma renin activity associated with worse outcomes in acute heart failure? A secondary analysis from the BLAST-AHF trial. ... Effectiveness of oral rotavirus vaccination in England against rotavirus-confirmed and all-cause acute gastroenteritis. ...
Risk stratification in patients with acute chest pain using three high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays. Several high- ... Risk stratification in patients with acute chest pain using three high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays. Full Text available ... High-sensitivity cardiac Troponin I (hs-cTnI) Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Heart Failure Acute ... Early Discharge of Chest Pain Patients Guidelines recommend a 0-hour/1-hour high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) ...
  • For novel cardiac markers to be clinically useful in diagnosing acute coronary syndromes, they need to show their incremental utility beyond that of existing markers, with therapeutic implications designed to improve patient care. (cmaj.ca)
  • FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher disease activity, disability, comorbidity, and poor quality of life contribute to reductions in alcohol use among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online March 20 in Arthritis Care & Research . (doctorslounge.com)
  • Patients who have experienced cerebral ischaemic events are at high risk for recurrent ischaemia 1 and other cardiovascular events. (bmj.com)
  • Troponin I and cardiovascular risk prediction in the general population: the BiomarCaRE consortium. (springer.com)
  • There's a recognition that we need to develop better ways of identifying inflammatory patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease," Skeoch said in presenting the results at the annual meeting of the British Society for Rheumatology . (medpagetoday.com)
  • In addition, patients in the highest tertile of hs-TnI had a sixfold increased risk for cardiovascular death compared with the lowest tertile (HR 6.19, 95% CI 2.39 to 16.01). (medpagetoday.com)
  • In this analysis we've shown that baseline troponin levels do predict cardiovascular death in inflammatory arthritis, and this association was independent of traditional risk factors," Skeoch said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The chronic-phase TMAO level independently predicted future cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio for 0.1 increase in log chronic-phase TMAO level: 1.343, 95% confidence interval 1.122-1.636, P = 0.001), but the acute-phase TMAO level did not. (nature.com)
  • We hypothesized that TMAO levels change after secondary preventive therapies for STEMI and that chronic-phase TMAO levels are more important than acute-phase levels in preventing secondary cardiovascular events. (nature.com)
  • The second aim was to compare the impact of the acute-phase and chronic-phase TMAO levels on coronary plaque progression and cardiovascular events in patients after STEMI. (nature.com)