Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Biopsy, Large-Core Needle: The use of needles usually larger than 14-gauge to remove tissue samples large enough to retain cellular architecture for pathology examination.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Papilloma, Intraductal: A small, often impalpable benign papilloma arising in a lactiferous duct and frequently causing bleeding from the nipple. (Stedman, 25th ed)Ultrasonography, Mammary: Use of ultrasound for imaging the breast. The most frequent application is the diagnosis of neoplasms of the female breast.Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Image-Guided Biopsy: Conducting a biopsy procedure with the aid of a MEDICAL IMAGING modality.Fibrocystic Breast Disease: A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Breast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Stereotaxic Techniques: Techniques used mostly during brain surgery which use a system of three-dimensional coordinates to locate the site to be operated on.Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Fibroadenoma: An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Histocytological Preparation Techniques: Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.Pathology, Surgical: A field of anatomical pathology in which living tissue is surgically removed for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.FloridaTomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Phyllodes Tumor: A type of connective tissue neoplasm typically arising from intralobular stroma of the breast. It is characterized by the rapid enlargement of an asymmetric firm mobile mass. Histologically, its leaf-like stromal clefts are lined by EPITHELIAL CELLS. Rare phyllodes tumor of the prostate is also known.Papilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Needle Sharing: Usage of a single needle among two or more people for injecting drugs. Needle sharing is a high-risk behavior for contracting infectious disease.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Viral Core Proteins: Proteins found mainly in icosahedral DNA and RNA viruses. They consist of proteins directly associated with the nucleic acid inside the NUCLEOCAPSID.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration: Conducting a fine needle biopsy with the aid of ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Syringes: Instruments used for injecting or withdrawing fluids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Neoplasm Seeding: The local implantation of tumor cells by contamination of instruments and surgical equipment during and after surgical resection, resulting in local growth of the cells and tumor formation.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Hepatitis B Core Antigens: The hepatitis B antigen within the core of the Dane particle, the infectious hepatitis virion.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cytodiagnosis: Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)Prostate: A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional: Minimally invasive procedures guided with the aid of magnetic resonance imaging to visualize tissue structures.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Thyroid Nodule: A small circumscribed mass in the THYROID GLAND that can be of neoplastic growth or non-neoplastic abnormality. It lacks a well-defined capsule or glandular architecture. Thyroid nodules are often benign but can be malignant. The growth of nodules can lead to a multinodular goiter (GOITER, NODULAR).Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Post-Dural Puncture Headache: A secondary headache disorder attributed to low CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure caused by SPINAL PUNCTURE, usually after dural or lumbar puncture.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Skin DiseasesMelanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Spinal Puncture: Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Papillomaviridae: A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A malignancy arising in uterine cervical epithelium and confined thereto, representing a continuum of histological changes ranging from well-differentiated CIN 1 (formerly, mild dysplasia) to severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, CIN 3. The lesion arises at the squamocolumnar cell junction at the transformation zone of the endocervical canal, with a variable tendency to develop invasive epidermoid carcinoma, a tendency that is enhanced by concomitant human papillomaviral infection. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Pinus sylvestris: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the source of pinosylvin. It is sometimes called Scotch pine or Scots pine, which is also a common name for other species of this genus.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Prostate-Specific Antigen: A glycoprotein that is a kallikrein-like serine proteinase and an esterase, produced by epithelial cells of both normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is an important marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Papillomavirus Infections: Neoplasms of the skin and mucous membranes caused by papillomaviruses. They are usually benign but some have a high risk for malignant progression.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Mediastinal Diseases: Disorders of the mediastinum, general or unspecified.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Frozen Sections: Thinly cut sections of frozen tissue specimens prepared with a cryostat or freezing microtome.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Tuberculosis, Lymph Node: Infection of the lymph nodes by tuberculosis. Tuberculous infection of the cervical lymph nodes is scrofula.Bronchoscopes: Endoscopes for the visualization of the interior of the bronchi.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Solitary Pulmonary Nodule: A single lung lesion that is characterized by a small round mass of tissue, usually less than 1 cm in diameter, and can be detected by chest radiography. A solitary pulmonary nodule can be associated with neoplasm, tuberculosis, cyst, or other anomalies in the lung, the CHEST WALL, or the PLEURA.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Gastroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.United StatesSurvival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Metaplasia: A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Injections, Jet: The injection of solutions into the skin by compressed air devices so that only the solution pierces the skin.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Mouth Mucosa: Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Fiber Optic Technology: The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Mouth DiseasesCeliac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Oct 2006). "Correlation between core biopsy and excisional biopsy in breast high-risk lesions". Am J Surg. 192 (4): 534-7. doi: ... needle) biopsy varies considerably from hospital-to-hospital (range 4-54%). In two large studies, the conversion of an ADH on ... "Atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosed at stereotaxic core biopsy of breast lesions: an indication for surgical biopsy". AJR Am ... the cells are arranged in an abnormal or atypical way. In the context of a core (needle) biopsy, ADH is considered an ...
The needle used in this procedure is slightly larger than the one used for a fine-needle biopsy because the procedure is ... Atypical lobular hyperplasia is associated with the greatest risk, approximately 5-fold and especially high relative risk of ... nonproliferative lesions have no increased risk. Proliferative lesions also have approximately a 2-fold risk. In particular, ... The core-needle biopsy is normally performed under local anesthesia and in a physician's office. ...
... high-energy photon therapy - high-grade lymphoma - high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion - high-risk cancer - highly ... needle biopsy - needle-localized biopsy - negative axillary lymph node - negative test result - nelarabine - nelfinavir ... core biopsy - corticosteroid - Corynebacterium granulosum - coumestan - coumestrol - CP-358,774 - CP-609,754 - CP-724,714 - ... large cell carcinoma - large granular lymphocyte - laryngectomy - laser surgery - laser therapy - LCIS - LDH - lectin - ...
Other options for biopsy include a core biopsy or vacuum-assisted breast biopsy, which are procedures in which a section of the ... Dietary factors which may increase risk include a high fat diet, high alcohol intake, and obesity-related high cholesterol ... F-18 FDG PET/CT: A breast cancer metastasis to the right scapula Needle breast biopsy. Elastography shows stiff cancer tissue ... Larger size, nodal spread, and metastasis have a larger stage number and a worse prognosis. The main stages are: Stage 0 is a ...
Small-cell lung carcinoma (microscopic view of a core needle biopsy). In small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), the cells contain ... High risk people are those age 55-74 who have smoked equivalent amount of a pack of cigarettes daily for 30 years including ... of lung cancers are large-cell carcinoma. These are so named because the cancer cells are large, with excess cytoplasm, large ... "Atypical pulmonary metastases: spectrum of radiologic findings". Radiographics. 21 (2): 403-417. doi:10.1148/radiographics. ...
For cases suspicious enough to proceed to biopsy, small biopsies can be obtained by core needle or bronchoscopy are commonly ... Consider CT at 3 months, PET-CT or biopsy High risk Optionally, CT after 12 months. CT after 6-12 months, then after 18-24 ... Cancerous lesions usually have a high metabolism on PET, as demonstrated by their high uptake of FDG (a radioactive sugar). ... Nodular density is used to distinguish larger lung tumors, smaller infiltrates or masses with other accompanying ...
... with high-risk lesions (epithelial atypia) diagnosed on needle core biopsy is not well defined. We aimed at assessing the ... Histological findings, including different forms of the atypical lesions and final histological outcome in the excision ... upgrade rate to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive carcinoma on the surgical excision specimen in a large cohort with ... Conclusions The upgrade rate for ADH diagnosed on needle core biopsy with RS is similar to that of ADH without RS and therefore ...
Using the method could spare patients with benign lesions from invasive surgeries while maintaining high sensitivity for ... breast lesions may upgrade to cancer. This knowledge can potentially help clinicians and low-risk patients decide whether ... Dartmouth researchers have developed and evaluated a machine learning approach of using patient core needle biopsy data to ... identify the risk that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) ... high risk for ADH upgrade to cancer based on core needle biopsy ...
Oct 2006). "Correlation between core biopsy and excisional biopsy in breast high-risk lesions". Am J Surg. 192 (4): 534-7. doi: ... needle) biopsy varies considerably from hospital-to-hospital (range 4-54%). In two large studies, the conversion of an ADH on ... "Atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosed at stereotaxic core biopsy of breast lesions: an indication for surgical biopsy". AJR Am ... the cells are arranged in an abnormal or atypical way. In the context of a core (needle) biopsy, ADH is considered an ...
... imaging-guided core-needle biopsy performed with a titanium biopsy needle in a breast phantom.Eight 6-7-mm lesions were created ... had high-risk lesions at MRI-VABB, including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) (21/124, 16.9%), lobular neoplasia (40/124, 32.3 ... Freehand iMRI-guided large-gauge core needle biopsy: A new minimally invasive technique for diagnosis of enhancing breast ... 10 benign lesions [of which 5 cysts], 3 high-risk, and 3 in situ carcinomas) were included. Cysts and high-risk lesions were ...
... other studies have evaluated the breast core needle biopsy method to obtain breast tissue for biomarker analysis in high-risk ... The RPFNA is a method where no specific lesion is targeted; it instead assesses a large area of breast tissue to detect a field ... High risk was defined as having a 5-year Gail score of ,1.67% or a history of atypical hyperplasia (AH), lobular carcinoma, or ... High prevalence of premalignant lesions in prophylactically removed breasts from women at hereditary risk for breast cancer. J ...
The needle used in this procedure is slightly larger than the one used for a fine-needle biopsy because the procedure is ... Atypical lobular hyperplasia is associated with the greatest risk, approximately 5-fold and especially high relative risk of ... nonproliferative lesions have no increased risk. Proliferative lesions also have approximately a 2-fold risk. In particular, ... The core-needle biopsy is normally performed under local anesthesia and in a physicians office. ...
A new machine learning method can predict the likelihood that a high-risk type of breast lesion is cancerous, potentially ... are robust clinical differences between women at low versus high risk for ADH upgrade to cancer based on core needle biopsy ... Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a breast lesion associated with a four- to-five-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer ... They also plan on further validating their approach on large external datasets using state and national breast cancer ...
The patient underwent a second FNA one week later followed by an ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. Both the FNA and core ... Large atypical cells identified in his effusion were concerning for primary effusion lymphoma. Subsequent pleural biopsy ... but also melanocytic lesions, neural tumors, lymphoma and some epithelial neoplasms.[10‐11] A high incidence of smooth-muscle ... Patients infected with HIV are also at increased risk for fungal opportunistic infections. Several of these fungal infections ...
1] Breast lesions diagnosed as benign papillomas on core needle biopsy had a 6.3% risk of being malignant. [7] Central ... 3] It is classified as a high-risk precursor lesion due to its association with atypia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and ... Intraductal papilloma diagnosed on core biopsy can have surgical excisional upgrade to atypical ductal hyperplasia, DCIS, and ... 8] Intraductal papilloma can be found in both large ducts of the subareolar region and the terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU) ...
In addition, high-risk lesions including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), and lobular ... The stereotactic core biopsies were performed on a LoRad table with a SenoRx 11 Gauge vacuum-assisted core biopsy needle. The ... ultrasound and large core biopsy in the diagnostic evaluation of papillary breast lesions," Oncology, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 311- ... The biopsy methods included stereotactic core biopsy, ultrasound-guided core biopsy, and MRI-guided core biopsy. ...
... from patients with prior high-risk Pap test results (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion [HSIL], atypical squamous cells ... The number of core biopsy passes required for adequate next-generation sequencing is impacted by needle cut, needle gauge, and ... The biopsy-confirmed diagnoses were squamous cell carcinoma (n=7), benign (n=7), large cell lymphoma (n=2), ameloblastoma (n=2 ... Previous studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core-needle biopsy (CNB) for renal ...
A newly developed machine learning method could reduce the need for unnecessary surgery for some patients with atypical ductal ... surgical removal is recommended for all ADH cases found on core needle biopsies to determine if the lesion is cancerous. This ... The team plans to expand the scope of their model by including other high-risk breast lesions such as lobular neoplasia, ... They also plan to expand their using large external datasets such as national breast cancer registries. The research has ...
... are robust clinical differences between women at low versus high risk for ADH upgrade to cancer based on core needle biopsy ... they created a machine learning approach to identify the risk that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) breast lesions may upgrade ... It could also reduce the burden that large volumes of screening have on pathologists. The team is also partnering with global ... ADH is primarily found using mammography and identified on core needle biopsy. Currently, surgical removal is recommended for ...
One study reported the safe performance of ultrasonographically guided 18-gauge core needle biopsy in 51 hemangiomas ranging in ... 23] With delayed imaging, the lesion may completely "fill in." [24] However, complete enhancement might not occur in large ... Liver biopsy. Percutaneous biopsy of a hepatic hemangioma carries an increased risk of hemorrhage. Liver biopsy is ... Sensitivity for hemangiomas greater than 2 cm in diameter is reported to be as high as 82%, with a specificity of up to 100%. [ ...
... or 6 lateral peripheral zone samples for a 12-biopsy scheme; 18-core biopsy protocols are also used, especially for larger ... High risk (44.4%) for nodal involvement - Patients with 4-6 cores positive for Gleason 4+3 disease or greater ... Precursor lesions to carcinoma may include prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and atypical small acinar proliferation ( ... T1c - Tumor identified by needle biopsy (because of elevated PSA level); tumors found in 1 or both lobes by needle biopsy but ...
... of high-risk findings at needle biopsy and rates of upgrade to malignancy at surgical excision were compared across lesion ... qualitative features of atypical ductal hyperplasia on core biopsy such as suspicion for ductal carcinoma in situ may help ... the use of a larger 9-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy needle does not decrease the upgrade rate of ADH. Our frequency of ... High-risk lesions (atypical ductal hyperplasia and lobular neoplasia) showed significantly lower ADCs than other benign lesions ...
Correlation between core biopsy and excisional biopsy in breast high-risk lesions. Am J Surg. 2006;192:534-537. http://dx.doi. ... and allows better characterisation of breast lesions than conventional core-needle biopsy by employing larger gauge needles, ... Risk of upgrade of atypical ductal hyperplasia after stereotactic breast biopsy: Effects of number of foci and complete removal ... 10 Vacuum-assisted biopsy is currently preferred to core-needle biopsy, especially for subclinical lesions and lesions ...
July 29, 2014: Management of Papillary Lesions of the Breast: Can Larger Core Needle Biopsy Samples Identify Patients Who May ... 28, 2012Definitive Diagnosis for High-Risk Breast Lesions....IPET. *Aug. 21, 2012Comparisons of Outcomes of Breast Conserving ... February 24, 2015: Skin Self-Examinations and Visual Identification of Atypical Nevi: Comparing Individual and Crowdsourcing ... June 21, 2016: Incidence of Breast Cancer in Patients with Pure Flat Epithelial Atypia Diagnosed at Core-Needle Biopsy of the ...
... from definition and diagnosis through risk factors and treatments. Authored by Dr. Halle C.F. Moore of the Cleveland Clinic. ... Often, a core needle biopsy is done as the initial test to diagnose the breast cancer, although fine needle aspiration biopsy ... or when risk for metastatic disease is felt to be relatively high such as when the primary tumor is large or when axillary ... These lesions may have characteristic features on diagnostic imaging such as ultrasound; however, a biopsy may be necessary to ...
Preoperative core needle biopsy (image-guided) has an accuracy of 73%. Histology demonstrates different variants: well- ... Chemotherapy is considered for intermediate- to high-grade malignancy if lesions are retroperitoneal or stage 3 or higher. ... Risk factors for liposarcoma are summarized in Table I. .. Table I.. Risk factors for liposarcoma. Subtype. Develops when. ... some consider lipoblasts as a marker when differentiating the lesion from an atypical lipoma); myxoid type (uniform round to ...
Dartmouth researchers have found a machine learning method that can predict the likelihood that a high-risk type of breast ... lesion is cancerous, potentially saving some women from unnecessary surgeries and overtreatment ... are robust clinical differences between women at low versus high risk for ADH upgrade to cancer based on core needle biopsy ... LEBANON, NH - Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a breast lesion associated with a four- to five-fold increase in the risk of ...
FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION BIOPSY OF HURTHLE CELL LESIONS Hurthle cells of the thyroid in cytologic specimens appear as large ... The term atypical Hurthle cell adenoma or indeterminate Hurthle cell tumor is used to describe lesions with atypical features ... The C allele of the GNB3 C825T polymorphism of the G protein beta3-subunit is associated with an increased risk for the ... Psammoma bodies in epithelial cells or in the thyroid interstitium should alert the pathologist to the high probability of ...
Punch biopsies are useful in the work-up of cutaneous neoplasms, pigmented lesions, inflammatory lesions and chronic skin ... to 4-mm cylindrical core of tissue sample. Stretching the skin perpendicular to the lines of least skin tension before incision ... Punch biopsy is considered the primary technique for obtaining diagnostic full-thickness skin specimens. It requires basic ... Skin biopsy is one of the most important diagnostic tests for skin disorders. ...
A core needle biopsy (CNB) was performed and demonstrated the presence of a nonatypical vascular lesion interpreted as a benign ... with an initial diagnosis on core biopsy of an atypical vascular lesion and was again treated using mastectomy and radiations. ... and reactive spindle cell proliferative lesion [4, 15]. Large-core macrobiopsies might be useful to improve diagnosis prior to ... As with any cancer type, margins status is a major risk factor for recurrence [17]. It is why some authors recommend adjuvant ...
Lobular Neoplasia and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia on Core Biopsy: Current Surgical Management Recommendations. Jennifer M. Racz ... Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Is it High Enough to Justify Bilateral Mastectomy?. ... Challenging Atypical Breast Lesions Including Flat Epithelial Atypia, Radial Scar, and Intraductal Papilloma. Jennifer M. Racz ... Positive Ultrasound-guided Lymph Node Needle Biopsy in Breast Cancer may not Mandate Axillary Lymph Node Dissection. Christine ...
  • The primary end point was change in the histopathologic grade on repeat biopsy of the same sites at the end of 6 months. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Query 2 identified 823 men with a repeat biopsy after the initial negative index biopsy within the study period. (ahdbonline.com)
  • Evaluation of the impact on physician behavior demonstrated a general trend toward the earlier detection of prostate cancer on repeat biopsy by an average of 2.5 months and a coincident increase in cancer detection rates for urologists using the deletion assay in their rebiopsy decision-making process. (ahdbonline.com)
  • Finally, the cohort of 132 men who had PCMT and repeat biopsy was compared with the published data supporting PCMT's ability to predict rebiopsy outcome. (ahdbonline.com)
  • Methods: The annual distribution, entity constitute, clinical finding, gross feature, morphologic change, affiliate study and repeat biopsy diagnosis of 1 013 cases of lymph node CNB diagnosed at West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2009 to December 2015 were investigated. (bvsalud.org)
  • ASAP has a 38%,(81) 42%,(82, 83) 45%,(76) or 60% (79) predictive value for cancer on repeat biopsy, at least equal to that of PIN. (bostwicklaboratories.com)
  • Repeat biopsy should be considered, sampling multiple sites of the prostate. (bostwicklaboratories.com)
  • In one study, a false-negative result underwent repeat biopsy due to the progression of suspicious imaging findings [ 21 ]. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • Surgical pathology of the excised lesions was compared with initial core biopsy pathology results. (hindawi.com)
  • To review the pathologic conditions associated with Hurthle cells in the thyroid and to discuss pathology of thyroid lesions associated with oncocytic cytology. (redorbit.com)
  • Routine biopsy of skin rashes is not recommended because the commonly reported nonspecific pathology result rarely alters clinical management. (aafp.org)
  • Among them: Dr. I-Tien Yeh, previously Director of the Core Pathology lab for the Cancer Research and Therapy Center at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and Dr. Fattaneh Tavassoli, Professor of Pathology, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine. (rochester.edu)
  • Since 2011, the Prostate Core Mitomic Test (PCMT), which quantifies a 3.4-kb mitochondrial DNA deletion strongly associated with prostate cancer, has been used by more than 50 urology practices accessing pathology services through our laboratory in New Jersey. (ahdbonline.com)
  • Determining imaging-pathology concordance after US-guided biopsy is essential for validating the biopsy result and providing appropriate management. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • However, the success of an imaging-guided breast biopsy depends not only on the biopsy technique, but also on determining imaging-pathology concordance and appropriate post-biopsy management for patients after the procedure. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • In this article, we briefly review the published results of US-guided breast biopsy, discuss aspects to consider when establishing imaging-pathology concordance, describe the possible categories of imaging-pathology correlations, and briefly discuss the appropriate post-biopsy management for each category, along with selected images. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • With the help of their pathology colleagues, clinicians continued to make useful revisions to the technique, such as the use of significantly smaller needles (22-25 gauge). (glowm.com)
  • The present study investigated the concordance between Gleason scores assigned to prostate biopsy specimens by outside pathologists and a urological pathology expert, and determined the risk of upgrading between opinion‑matched Gleason grade group (GGG) 1 biopsy specimens and radical prostatectomy specimens. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Patients whose original biopsy specimens from outside hospitals were reviewed by a urological pathology expert Okayama University Hospital were included. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Breast tumor risk factors include contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, lifetime estrogen exposure, and family history. (statpearls.com)
  • Bone scans, computerized tomography scans of chest, abdomen and pelvis and/or positron emission tomography scans may be performed when symptoms are present, initial laboratory evaluation is abnormal, or when risk for metastatic disease is felt to be relatively high such as when the primary tumor is large or when axillary lymph nodes are involved. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • A growing large deep tumor on extremities, very rarely in skin. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • The limited available data do suggest that younger age, ER-positive tumor, and use of only tamoxifen as therapy afford significant CBC risk reduction at 5 years of follow-up. (cancernetwork.com)
  • The detection of PSA as a tumor marker made the screening process easier, but unfortunately led to many unnecessary biopsies on the grounds of the increased serum levels of this marker [3,4, (urotoday.com)
  • Esta clasificación del tumor phyllodes de mama es precisamente relevante en su clínica. (bvsalud.org)
  • Si bien la recurrencia local del tumor phyllodes puede ocurrir en todos los grados, la metástasis se limita principalmente a casos malignos y pocos casos limítrofes, por lo general siendo estos dos últimos los que presentan un peor pronóstico de la enfermedad. (bvsalud.org)
  • Esta revisión del tumor phyllodes de mama permite orientar a toda la comunidad médica, con base en la evidencia más reciente, a diagnosticar y así poder manejar esta patología, evitando sus complicaciones. (bvsalud.org)
  • Material y Métodos: Mujer de 32 años diagnosticada de un tumor Phyllodes maligno en mama derecha sometida en otro centro a cirugía conservadora con colocación de expansor y a dos tumorectomías posteriores por recidiva local. (bvsalud.org)
  • Resultados: Se realizó exéresis del tumor (remanente de tejido mamario y músculo pectoral mayor) y retirada del expansor con reconstrucción mamaria con colgajo de dorsal ancho en el mismo tiempo quirúrgico. (bvsalud.org)
  • Conclusiones: El tumor Phyllodes maligno es una entidad poco frecuente y cuyo manejo terapéutico se basa en la resección quirúrgica con márgenes. (bvsalud.org)
  • Histologic sections of the core needle biopsy showed that the tumor formed a papillary structure, and we diagnosed papillary thyroid carcinoma. (bioscientifica.com)
  • Core needle biopsy was performed, and histologic sections of the core needle biopsy that was performed after regrowth of the tumor showed that individual cancer cells had large, irregular nuclei, and necrosis was also observed. (bioscientifica.com)
  • Finally, initial concerns over tracking and subsequent seeding of tumor cells within the needle tract have been quieted by the extraordinarily low incidence of such occurrences over the course of literally tens of thousands of aspirate biopsies in the past 50 years. (glowm.com)
  • Non-small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid tumor, large cell neuroendocrine tumor, lymphoma, extragonadal germ-cell tumor, sarcoma, and metastatic tumor spread to the lung from another primary location, such as colon/rectum, head/neck, and kidney can mimic SCLC. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The most common symptom is nipple discharge Oct 27, 2008 · 'Systematic scanning of the breast shows small hypoechoic circumscribed benign appearing nodules at the external aspect of the left breast at 2:00 that measures 5 by 3 by 6 mm.No irregular solid lesions are demonstrated at either breast. (beyondgoodbye.co.uk)
  • Pathologists describe cells as well differentiated (low grade), moderately differentiated (intermediate grade), and poorly differentiated (high grade). (kenaustinlist.com)
  • 4 Surgeons were encouraged to perform these procedures, largely because of pathologists' concerns that open incisional biopsy might lead to early metastases. (glowm.com)