Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Planets: Celestial bodies orbiting around the sun or other stars.Holy Roman Empire: Realm in central Europe consisting of a confederation of German and Italian territories under the suzerainty of an emperor and existing from the 9th or 10th century to 1806.Neurochemistry: The study of the composition, chemical structures, and chemical reactions of the NERVOUS SYSTEM or its components.Space Flight: Travel beyond the earth's atmosphere.Ottoman Empire: A sultanate comprised at various times of parts of EUROPE, ASIA, and AFRICA. Its period extends generally from 1301 to 1922.RNA, Chloroplast: Ribonucleic acid in chloroplasts having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.SyriaJordanPolitics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Civil Disorders: Deliberate and planned acts of unlawful behavior engaged in by aggrieved segments of the population in seeking social change.Tick Control: Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.Zambia: A republic in southern Africa, south of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and TANZANIA, and north of ZIMBABWE. Its capital is Lusaka. It was formerly called Northern Rhodesia.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)SingaporeSuperstitions: A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.Borneo: An island in the Malay Archipelago, east of Sumatra, north of Java, and west of Celebes. It is the third largest island in the world. Its name is a Portuguese alteration of BRUNEI, located on it. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p163; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p73)Indonesia: A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.PhilippinesDissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.SwedenDictionaries, MedicalComputer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Historiography: The writing of history; the principles, theory, and history of historical writing; the product of historical writing. (Webster, 3d ed)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Atlantic Islands: Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.Namibia: A republic in southern Africa, south of ANGOLA and west of BOTSWANA. Its capital is Windhoek.Saints: Persons officially recognized or acknowledged as pre-eminent for consecration, holiness, and piety, especially through canonization by a branch of the Christian church. (From Webster, 3d ed)Saint Lucia: An independent state in the West Indies. Its capital is Castries. It was probably discovered by Columbus in 1502 and first settled by the English in 1605. Contended for by the French and English in the 17th century, it was regarded as neutral in 1748 but changed hands many times in the wars of the 19th century. It became a self-governing state in association with Great Britain in 1967 and achieved independence in 1979. Columbus named it for the day on which he discovered it, the feast of St. Lucy, a Sicilian virgin martyr. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1051 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p477)Saint Kitts and Nevis: An independent federation of the Leeward Islands in the West Indies, consisting of Saint Christopher, Nevis, and Sombrero. Its capital is Basseterre. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493, settled by the British in 1625, the first of the Leeward Islands to be colonized by them. It was held jointly by the French and English 1628-1713, but returned to Great Britain by the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. It was held by the French 1782-83. Under the British for the next 200 years, it gained its independence in 1983. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1045; Embassy, telephone 202-686-2636)Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: A self-governing state of the Windward Islands in the West Indies, comprising Saint Vincent and the northern islets of the Grenadines. Its capital is Kingstown. It is one of the original homes of the Carib Indians supposed to have been sighted by Columbus in 1498. It was in English hands from 1627 till held by the French 1779-83. Saint Vincent subsequently became a British possession and, with other nearby British territories, was administered by the Governor of the Windward Islands till 1959. It attained a measure of independence in 1969 but achieved full independence as Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in 1979. Saint Vincent was the 4th century Spanish martyr on whose feast day Columbus discovered the island. Grenadines is derived from the Spanish kingdom of Granada. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1054 & The Europa World Year Book 1993, p2441)EuropeFalkland Islands: A British colony in the Atlantic Islands, comprising two principal islands, East Falkland and West Falkland. Its capital is Stanley. Discovered in 1592, it was not occupied until the French settled there briefly in 1764. Later the English settled there but were expelled by the Spanish in 1770. The Falklands were claimed by Argentina but were occupied in 1833 by the British who, after an April 1982 invasion by Argentina, regained them in June. The islands were named by British Captain John Strong in 1690 for the fifth Viscount Falkland who financed Strong's expedition. The Spanish name for the islands, Malvinas, is from the French Malouins, inhabitants of St. Malo who attempted to colonize the islands in 1764. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p389 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p182)Philately: Study of stamps or postal markings. It usually refers to the design and commemorative aspects of the stamp.DairyingFisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Catastrophic Illness: An acute or prolonged illness usually considered to be life-threatening or with the threat of serious residual disability. Treatment may be radical and is frequently costly.Dental Staff, Hospital: Dental personnel practicing in hospitals.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Eagles: Large members of the FALCONIFORMES order of birds, family Accipitridae, most especially the genera Aquila, Haliaeetus, Harpia, and Circaetus. They are characterized by their powerful talons, which carry long, curved, pointed claws and by their opposable hindtoe.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Communism: A totalitarian system of government in which a single authoritarian party controls state-owned means of production with the professed aim of establishing a classless society.Capitalism: A political and economic system characterized by individual rights, by private or corporate ownership of capital goods, and by prices, production, and the distribution of goods that are determined mainly by competition in a free market. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Political Systems: The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.
The monarchy is hereditary. Daughters can inherit only if the monarch has no sons. The heir presumptive is Leonor, Princess of ... The Monarchy of Spain holds the constitutional head of state, which has no executive role, other than appointing officials, ...
Elections The monarchy is hereditary. The Governor General is appointed by the monarch on the advice of the Prime Minister for ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy, in which the Monarch is head of state. The country has a multi-party system in which many ... Type of government Westminster style federal parliamentary democracy within a constitutional monarchy. Capital Ottawa ...
Elections The monarchy is hereditary. The Governor-General is appointed according to tradition by the monarch on the advice of ... The politics of Barbados function within a framework of constitutional monarchy and a parliamentary government with strong ... Name Barbados Type of government Parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarchy. Capital Bridgetown. Administrative ... a convention that protects the monarchy. As long as the monarch is following the advice of her ministers, she is not held ...
Establishment of the Hereditary Monarchy, 1907. "Ministry of Finance - History". Government of Bhutan. Retrieved 2011-03-12. ...
The Merovingians were a hereditary monarchy. The Frankish kings adhered to the practice of partible inheritance: dividing their ... Chlothar had been the king at Paris for decades before becoming the king at Metz as well and the Merovingian monarchy was ever ... After the fall of Arbogastes, his son Arigius succeeded in establishing a hereditary countship at Trier and after the fall of ... While in later France the kingdom became hereditary, the kings of the later Holy Roman Empire proved unable to abolish the ...
Establishment of the Hereditary Monarchy, 1907. "History". Royal Bhutan Army online. Retrieved 2011-11-09. "Timeline: Bhutan". ...
... it established a hereditary constitutional monarchy. The Prussian king Frederick William IV refused to accept the imperial ... abolition of the monarchy, and separation of the Palatinate and Franconia from the Kingdom of Bavaria. On 3 May 1849, the May ...
Montenegro is now a constitutional hereditary monarchy. Legislative power is vested in parliament as well as in the prince. The ... It was a constitutional monarchy, but de facto absolutist. In Danilo I's Code, dated to 1855, he explicitly states that he is ... not right and that Montenegrin society still hadn't evolved enough to understand the significance of constitutional monarchy. ...
Soutik Biswas (2011-01-18). "Is India sliding into a hereditary monarchy?". BBC. BBC News. Retrieved 3 September 2011. Deo, ...
Salic law Imperial Household Law Hereditary monarchy. ... Other monarchies had few laws regulating royal life. In still ... Prevalent in European monarchies during the nineteenth century, few countries have house laws any longer, so that they are, as ... The house laws of the families of the Austrian and German emperors were not made public until after the fall of the monarchy in ... In the United Kingdom an example of this might be considered the custom whereby a wife shares in her husband's hereditary ...
Albania was designated as a hereditary constitutional monarchy. The power of legislation was entrusted to a National Assembly, ... Volume I, Albania and King Zog: Independence, republic and monarchy 1908-1939. I.B. Tauris. p. 56. ISBN 978-1-84511-013-0. ... ... of the National Assembly with power of legislation in Albania which was designed as hereditary constitutional monarchy. ...
The First Bulgarian Empire was a hereditary monarchy. The monarch was responsible for the issues of peace and war. He was the ...
Crown Prince of Sweden (1778-Present.) Hereditary Prince of Sweden (1544 - 1778) Swedish monarchy. ... and honours of the Swedish Crown sets out the many titles of the monarch of Sweden since the creation of hereditary monarchy of ...
The monarchy was hereditary, hence the term "dynast." It was utilized by Persia as a means of transmitting Persian policy. It ... It was not the Persian custom to grant hereditary satrapies; satrap was only a step in the cursus honorum. And finally, a ... Lycia prospered under a monarchy set up by the Persians. Subsequently the Lycians were verbose in stone, carving memorial, ... For closer attention to their conquered, the Persian government preferred to establish a client state, setting up a monarchy ...
... a hereditary monarchy. According to traditional Skolian political theory the ruling body is absolute, therefore the Assembly is ... All Skolian noble houses have hereditary seats in the Assembly but only the Ruby Dynasty and the House of Majda have blocs of ... Ruby Pharaoh is the hereditary title of a reigning monarch. It dates back to the ancient Ruby Empire that was ruled by powerful ... This title is also hereditary but the Imperator can choose a successor from among several suitable candidates. If a member of ...
Hereditary monarchy was the prevailing form of government. Disputed succession and civil war was not uncommon. The sphere of ...
Some monarchies are non-hereditary. In an elective monarchy, the monarch is elected but otherwise serves as any other monarch. ... A form of government may in fact be hereditary without being considered monarchy, such as a family dictatorship. Monarchies ... while advocacy of monarchy is called monarchism. A principal advantage of hereditary monarchy is the immediate continuity of ... was elected and thereafter became a hereditary absolute monarchy. It became a constitutional monarchy in 2008. Tibet was a ...
1. Albania is a democratic, parliamentary and hereditary monarchy. 2. Albania is independent and indivisible, its integrity ...
It is a hereditary feudal monarchy ruled by a grey elven king or queen. The current monarch is Her Fey Majesty, Queen Yolande, ... The Kingdom of Furyondy is a hereditary feudal monarchy. The power of the kingship is limited by the Noble Council. Since 288 ... Sunndi's current state at that time was a feudal hereditary monarchy of eighteen counties ruled by Olvenking Hazendel from the ... The Duchy of Urnst is an independent feudal monarchy (theoretically owing fealty to the old Great Kingdom) with hereditary ...
Worden, Robert L.; Savada, Andrea Matles (ed.) (1991). "Chapter 6 - Bhutan: Establishment of the Hereditary Monarchy, 1907". ...
The emirate's political form is an absolutist, hereditary monarchy. The law is based mainly on the sharia. Head of state is HRH ... On the federal level, all emirates maintain their hereditary rulers who, as a group, form the federal Supreme Council of Rulers ...
Worden, Robert L. "Establishment of the Hereditary Monarchy, 1907". In Savada. Hannavy, John (2013). Encyclopedia of Nineteenth ... Instead, small independent monarchies began to develop by the early 9th century. Each was ruled by a deb (king), some of whom ... The main issue was not an end to or lessening of the power of the monarchy but "full freedom from Indian interference." Other ... Per the Constitution, the monarchy is given a leadership role in setting the direction for the government as long as the King ...
He founded the Fan Kingdom and established a hereditary monarchy. During the reign of the ninth king, Budegong, agriculture ...
Kingship becomes an institution through the institution of Hereditary monarchy. The king often, even in absolute monarchies, ... As these advisors and others outside the monarchy negotiated for power, constitutional monarchies emerged, which may be ... According to Aristotle, states are classified into monarchies, aristocracies, timocracies, democracies, oligarchies, and ... the monarchy is among the longest-lasting political institutions, dating as early as 2100 BC in Sumeria to the 21st century AD ...
Objections were many: legitimacy of hereditary monarchy had been vitiated. Violent, uneducated peasants and urban poor had ... In this time, the myth of the so-called hereditary enmity (German: Erbfeindschaft) came into being, according to which the ...
... would also follow the authority of the hereditary qalit "headman" of a tribe's particular section. ...
elections: the monarchy is hereditary; governor appointed by the monarch. Administrative divisions:. none (overseas territory ...
Monarchy List of hereditary monarchies Absolute monarchy Elective monarchy Family dictatorship Heir apparent Heir presumptive ... Elective monarchy can function as de facto hereditary monarchy. A specific type of elective monarchy known as tanistry limits ... A hereditary monarchy is one in which the crown or throne passes from one member of a royal family to another member of the ... Theoretically, when the king or queen of a hereditary monarchy dies or abdicates, the crown typically passes to the next ...
Elective hereditary monarchyEdit. Elective monarchy can function as de facto hereditary monarchy. A specific type of elective ... Emperor Naruhito is the hereditary monarch of Japan. The Japanese monarchy is the oldest continuous hereditary monarchy in the ... Hereditary monarchy is a form of government and succession of power in which the throne passes from one member of a ruling ... In most extant hereditary monarchies, the typical order of succession uses some form of primogeniture, but there exist other ...
A hereditary monarchy is the most common style of monarchy and is the form that is used by almost all of the worlds existing ... Under a hereditary monarchy, all the monarchs come from the same family, and the crown is passed down from one member to ... The following list is a list of hereditary monarchies and their current (as of 2008[update]) monarchs. NOTE: The table ... The hereditary system has the advantages of stability, continuity and predictability, as well as the internal stabilizing ...
For monarchy in every instance is the Popery of government.. To the evil of monarchy we have added that of hereditary ... Wherefore, hereditary succession in the early ages of monarchy could not take place as a matter of claim, but as something ... Monarchy is ranked in scripture as one of the sins of the Jews, for which a curse in reserve is denounced against them. The ... In short, monarchy and succession have laid (not this or that kingdom only) but the world in blood and ashes. Tis a form of ...
Constitutional hereditary monarchy.. History. In biblical times, the country that is now Jordan contained the lands of Edom, ... groups in June 1991 meant political parties were permitted in exchange for acceptance of the constitution and the monarchy. ...
elections/appointments: none; the monarchy is hereditary; an Allegiance Council created by royal decree in October 2006 ... al-Qaida (AQ): aim(s): oppose the Saudi Islamic monarchy due to its cooperation with the US and the West, particularly US ... Islamic State of Iraq and ash-Sham (ISIS)-Saudi Arabia: aim(s): replace the Saudi Islamic monarchy with an Islamic state ... al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP): aim(s): ultimately overthrow the Saudi Islamic monarchy; eradicate US and Western ...
elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; high commissioner appointed by the monarch; premier indirectly elected by ... Note that for some countries more than one definition applies.): Absolute monarchy - a form of government where the monarch ...
Constitutional hereditary monarchy Currency Bahraini dinar (BHD) Area 710 km2 Population 1,046,814 (including 517,368 non- ... monarchy. Its economy depends to a small extent on Saudis interested in a little entertainment, not available in the strictly ...
Hereditary constitutional monarchy.. History. Polynesians have lived on Tonga for at least 3,000 years. The Dutch were the ... In the 1990s a movement began aimed at curtailing the powers of the monarchy, and the Tongan Pro-Democracy Movement (TPDM) has ... The government is largely controlled by the king, his nominees, and a small group of hereditary nobles. ...
hereditary constitutional monarchy Capital:. Nukualofa Administrative divisions:. 3 island groups; Haapai, Tongatapu, Vavau ... elections: none; the monarch is hereditary; prime minister and deputy prime minister appointed for life by the monarch cabinet: ... It became a constitutional monarchy in 1875 and a British protectorate in 1900. Tonga acquired its independence in 1970 and ...
elections: none; the monarchy is hereditary; following legislative elections, the leader of the majority party or the leader of ...
the monarchy is hereditary; governor appointed by the monarch; following legislative elections, the leader of the majority ... Government type: A description of the basic form of government (e.g., republic, constitutional monarchy, federal republic, ...
The Skolian Imperialate is ruled partly by the Assembly, an elected parliament; and by the Ruby Dynasty, a hereditary monarchy ... Ruby Pharaoh is the hereditary title of a reigning monarch. It dates back to the ancient Ruby Empire that was ruled by powerful ... All Skolian noble houses have hereditary seats in the Assembly but only the Ruby Dynasty and the House of Majda have blocs of ... This title is also hereditary but the Imperator can choose a successor from among several suitable candidates. If a member of ...
Athens eventually abolished hereditary monarchy. Kings became officials elected for a year. ... Their mixed constitution combined oligarchy, monarchy, democracy and communism. Male Spartans lived the lives of soldiers. They ... Political theory sprang from a variety of political experience with tyranny, monarchy, oligarchy, democracy and other ...
elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; prime minister appointed by the monarch. ... parliamentary constitutional monarchy. Capital. name: Damascus. geographic coordinates: 33 30 N, 36 18 E. time difference: UTC+ ...
elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; governor general appointed by the monarch; following legislative elections ...
federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy. note: all Peninsular Malaysian states have hereditary rulers (commonly referred ... elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; the House of Representatives approves a person for Prime Minister who must ... constitutional monarchy; note - interim military-affiliated government since May 2014. Capital. name: Kuala Lumpur; note - ... elections/appointments: king elected by and from the hereditary rulers of 9 states for a 5-year term; election is on a ...
elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; following legislative elections, the leader of the majority party or ...
elections/appointments: the monarchy is hereditary; prime minister appointed by the monarch ...
Hereditary monarchies run the greatest risk of all, for the king is apt to play the part of a tyrant, forgetting that he has ... 4. A fourth kind of monarchy, that of the Heroic times, was hereditary and legal, and was exercised over willing subjects. The ... Two more questions: 1. Should monarchy be hereditary? No, for the next generation may be quite ordinary persons, and yet the ... and when Aristotle says that of such monarchies some are hereditary and some elective, he appears to be making a logical ...
hereditary constitutional monarchy on a democratic and parliamentary basis Capital:. Vaduz Administrative divisions:. 11 ... elections: none; the monarch is hereditary; following legislative elections, the leader of the majority party in the Diet is ...
Traditionalists believe Japans imperial institution is the worlds oldest hereditary monarchy. Eighth-century chronicles say ... Here are some key facts about Japans monarchy. - ...
Monarchies were generally hereditary; yet a right of the nation to interfere, and alter the succession, is admitted. The right ... It is thus agreed on all hands, that, as one of the archons, his hereditary title of his estates, vassals, and government was ... The suitors deny the sceptre to be hereditary; and Telemachus himself is doubtful: he threatens indeed to call a council or ... The right of primogeniture was favoured by popular opinion, as well as hereditary descent, because the family was the family of ...
The grand duchy is a constitutional monarchy with hereditary succession. Executive power authority lies with the grand duke, ... constitutional monarchy with one legislative house (Chamber of Deputies [60])2. Head of state. Grand Duke: Henri. Head of ... a 21-member body of unelected citizens appointed by the Grand Duke plus the hereditary Grand Duke) serves in an advisory ...
  • Americans could secure their future and that of their children only by declaring their independence and founding a new government whose authority rested on the people alone, with no king or other hereditary rulers. (encyclopedia.com)
  • David Flint uses a book entitled Twilight of the Elites to reaffirm the importance of hereditary monarchy - an institution that's elitist by design. (theguardian.com)
  • It is thus agreed on all hands, that, as one of the archons, his hereditary title of his estates, vassals, and government was indisputable. (constitution.org)
  • It is a complex diarchic one with two distinct but interrelated sets of institutions - those of the Swazi nation (the monarchy and its key advisory institutions, the Liqoqo, Libandla, and Tinkhundla) and of the Swazi government, comprising cabinet, parliament, and the judiciary. (freedomhouse.org)
  • Of the various forms of government which have prevailed in the world," wrote historian Edward Gibbon, "a hereditary monarchy seems to present the fairest scope for ridicule. (pe.com)
  • Two Treatises of Government is a work of political philosophy that outlined a concept foreign to the American people who, at the time, were still under English monarchy. (audible.com)
  • The hereditary system has the advantages of stability, continuity and predictability, as well as the internal stabilizing factors of family affection and loyalty. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the sultan's lavish 60th birthday celebration in July 2006-part of his policy of promoting loyalty to the monarchy-he announced that all civil servants and members of the security forces would receive an accelerated, incremental pay raise for the first time in 22 years. (freedomhouse.org)
  • A state of emergency was declared (which persists today, more than 30 years later), a detention-without-trial provision was introduced, parliament was dissolved, and all political parties, even the pro-monarchy Imbokodvo Movement, were banned. (freedomhouse.org)
  • A hereditary monarchy is one in which the crown or throne passes from one member of a royal family to another member of the same family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Do yourself a favor and save what you can: Leave the throne to the awful next incumbent that the hereditary principle has mandated for it. (null.org)
  • Therefore, to concede to the Swazi people the right freely to organize themselves politically would necessitate an ideological paradigm shift on the part of the monarchy as well as open up the possibility of an effective challenge to its continued political and economic dominance. (freedomhouse.org)
  • There was hardly anything in Great Britain which political thinkers on the continent of Europe in the eighteenth century admired more than its limited monarchy. (history.org.uk)
  • They insisted upon the sacramental character of hereditary monarchy, in order to protect themselves against a recurrence of political and social disorder, of rule by the army, the saints, or even the levellers. (history.org.uk)
  • In exactly the same way as a medieval princeling, he [the Dalai Lama] makes the claim not just that Tibet should be independent of Chinese hegemony---a "perfectly good" demand, if I may render it into everyday English---but that he himself is a hereditary king appointed by heaven itself. (blogspot.com)
  • later on in his life, he said that he would push for reforms to get rid of 'monarchy' that people have heavily criticized him of even though he was not responsible for the actions of previous dalai lamas. (blogspot.com)
  • The problem in the Netherlands is that from left to right, people are overwhelmingly still in favour of the monarchy. (patheos.com)
  • Alexander's true master plan is to establish the Papacy as a hereditary monarchy across the heart of Italy - for father and son to rule the world. (apple.com)
  • Carthage was originally settled by Phoenician colonists from modern-day Jordan, but unlike the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians turned their back on monarchy and became a republic in the seventh century BC. (listverse.com)