Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant: Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery. It is commonly used in the therapy of cancer.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Epirubicin: An anthracycline which is the 4'-epi-isomer of doxorubicin. The compound exerts its antitumor effects by interference with the synthesis and function of DNA.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Chemoradiotherapy: Treatment that combines chemotherapy with radiotherapy.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.DeoxycytidineSarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Neoplasm, Residual: Remnant of a tumor or cancer after primary, potentially curative therapy. (Dr. Daniel Masys, written communication)Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Anthracyclines: Organic compounds that have a tetrahydronaphthacenedione ring structure attached by a glycosidic linkage to the amino sugar daunosamine.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Nomograms: Graphical representation of a statistical model containing scales for calculating the prognostic weight of a value for each individual variable. Nomograms are instruments that can be used to predict outcomes using specific clinical parameters. They use ALGORITHMS that incorporate several variables to calculate the predicted probability that a patient will achieve a particular clinical endpoint.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cystectomy: Used for excision of the urinary bladder.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Esophagogastric Junction: The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.Mastectomy, Segmental: Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Biomarkers, Pharmacological: Measurable biological parameters that serve for drug development, safety and dosing (DRUG MONITORING).Prostatectomy: Complete or partial surgical removal of the prostate. Three primary approaches are commonly employed: suprapubic - removal through an incision above the pubis and through the urinary bladder; retropubic - as for suprapubic but without entering the urinary bladder; and transurethral (TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF PROSTATE).Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Leucovorin: The active metabolite of FOLIC ACID. Leucovorin is used principally as an antidote to FOLIC ACID ANTAGONISTS.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Osteosarcoma: A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Bridged Compounds: Cyclic hydrocarbons that contain multiple rings and share one or more atoms.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Nitriles: Organic compounds containing the -CN radical. The concept is distinguished from CYANIDES, which denotes inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Androgen Antagonists: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of androgens.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Multimodal Imaging: The use of combination of imaging techniques or platforms (e.g., MRI SCAN and PET SCAN) encompassing aspects of anatomical, functional, or molecular imaging methods.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Flutamide: An antiandrogen with about the same potency as cyproterone in rodent and canine species.TriazolesAntibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Carboplatin: An organoplatinum compound that possesses antineoplastic activity.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Ifosfamide: Positional isomer of CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE which is active as an alkylating agent and an immunosuppressive agent.Goserelin: A synthetic long-acting agonist of GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE. Goserelin is used in treatments of malignant NEOPLASMS of the prostate, uterine fibromas, and metastatic breast cancer.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Carcinoma, Transitional Cell: A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.
... gBRCAm HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, ... Olaparib maintenance therapy in patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed serous ovarian cancer: a preplanned retrospective ... 2014). "Olaparib maintenance therapy in patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed serous ovarian cancer: a preplanned ... Olaparib (AZD-2281, trade name Lynparza) is an FDA-approved targeted therapy for cancer, developed by scientists at the ...
HER2/neu, ER- and PR-state), recommended therapies and already performed (neoadjuvant) therapies, survival state, events ( ... Fick, E.-M, Anzeneder T., Katalinic A., Waldmann A.: Bisphosphonates and their Role in Therapy for Breast Cancer - Results from ... locoregional relapse, distant metastases, therapy course). (as of January 2014) Bonn: Evangelische Kliniken Bonn gGmbH, ...
HER2 positive (HER2+), and HER2 negative (HER2-). Cells with none of these receptors are called basal-like or triple negative. ... February 2001). "Computer program to assist in making decisions about adjuvant therapy for women with early breast cancer". J. ... As an additional example, a neoadjuvant clinical treatment program that included initial chemotherapy followed by surgery and ... HER2/neu status can be analyzed by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) assays. Some commentators prefer this approach, ...
"Gemcitabine + Nab-paclitaxel With LDE-225 (Hedgehog Inhibitor) as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma". ... "LDE225 in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Estrogen Receptor- and HER2-Negative Breast Cancer". ClinicalTrials.gov. National ... or those who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. Sonidegib is administered orally. Common side effects include ... LDE225 in the Treatment of Chronic or Accelerated Phase Myeloid Leukemia in Patients Who Developed Resistance to Prior Therapy ...
This subtype suggests a response to endocrine therapy. HER2-type, which are positive for over-expression of the HER2 receptor. ... pathologic after neoadjuvant therapy) may appear before the T and N letters. If the stage is based on clinical assessment using ... and targeted therapies). Local therapy is most efficacious in early stage breast cancer, while systemic therapy is generally ... therapy, and targeted therapy. Research is ongoing for the use of immunotherapy in breast cancer management. Management of ...
March 2015). "Systemic targeted therapy for her2-positive early female breast cancer: a systematic review of the evidence for ... it also used in the same combination as a neoadjuvant in early HER2-positive breast cancer. Side effects in more than half the ... Trastuzumab is another monoclonal antibody against HER2; its epitope is the domain where HER2 binds to another HER2 protein. ... HER2 positive breast cancer is caused by mutation that results in overexpression of HER2 in approximately 15-30% of breast ...
"Efficacy control of therapy using circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETC) as "Liquid Biopsy": trastuzumab in HER2/neu- ... for therapy monitoring during neoadjuvant (primary systemic) chemotherapy in breast cancer". Ann. Oncol. 18 (9): 1484-1492. doi ... For example, Herceptin is very effective in patients who are Her2 positive, but much less effective in patients who are Her2 ... Measuring the ratio of traditional CTC to apoptotic CTCs - from baseline to therapy - provides clues to a therapy's efficacy in ...
HER2/neu status) and risk of relapse. It is usually given either 3 weekly or weekly for a total duration of 1 year. Since ... Neoadjuvant chemotherapy given before surgery to shrink the size of a tumor Adjuvant chemotherapy given after surgery to reduce ... Combined therapies combining, for example, non-drug treatments with localized chemotherapy to limit toxocity and achieve better ... Prof Bartlett said that assessment for CEP17 could be easily carried out in the same FISH analysis as for HER2. [1] ...
He also recognizes the importance of de-escalating therapy in patients who can do just as well with less treatment. In ... Impact of the Addition of Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab to Neoadjuvant Once-per-Week Paclitaxel Followed by Dose-Dense ... "Aspirin in Preventing Recurrence of Cancer in Patients With Node Positive HER2 Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer After ... Adjuvant Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab for Node-Negative, HER2-Positive Breast Cancer. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015;372: ...
Standard therapy is a combination of limb-salvage orthopedic surgery when possible (or amputation in some cases) and a ... Other pathological factors such as the degree of p-glycoprotein, whether the tumor is cxcr4-positive, or Her2-positive are also ... Current standard treatment is to use neoadjuvant chemotherapy (chemotherapy given before surgery) followed by surgical ... the protocol used is an aggressive intra-arterial regimen that individualizes therapy based on arteriographic response. Three- ...
Chemotherapy or other types of therapy prior to surgery are called neoadjuvant therapy. Aspirin may reduce mortality from ... Jahanzeb M (August 2008). "Adjuvant trastuzumab therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer". Clin. Breast Cancer. 8 (4): 324-33. ... Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy[1]. Prognosis. Five-year survival rate ~85% (US, ... radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted therapy.[1] Types of surgery vary from breast-conserving surgery ...
... or Her2/neu. This makes it more difficult to treat since most hormone therapies target one of the three receptors, so triple- ... As a variation, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is very frequently used for triple-negative breast cancers. This allows for a higher ... "Successfully targeting triple negative breast cancer using combination therapy of Didox and Doxorubicin with reduced ... targeted therapies for triple-negative breast cancer. June 2016 Basu S, Chen W, Tchou J, Mavi A, Cermik T, Czerniecki B, ...
In particular, HER2 is overexpressed in 13-22% of patients with gastric cancer. Of note, HER2 overexpression in gastric ... Treatments may include some combination of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy. If treated late, ... Treated as for Stage I, sometimes with additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Stage III. Penetration to the third layer and more ... Radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy) may be used to treat stomach cancer, often as an adjuvant to chemotherapy and/or ...
... immune checkpoint blockade has been used successfully in metastatic cases and neoadjuvant therapy. Since cancer is a genetic ... HER2) from the EGFR family. Mutations often occur in the HER2 gene upon treatment with an inhibitor, with about 50% of patients ... During targeted therapy, oftentimes the target has modified itself and decreased its expression to the point that therapy is no ... Topoisomerase is a lucrative target for cancer therapy due to its critical role as an enzyme in DNA replication, and many ...
Jafri, SH; Mills, G (2011). "Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in lung cancer". Therapy. 8 (1): 23-31. doi:10.2217/thy.10.82. "Home ... Examples include the anti-HER2/neu antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) used in breast cancer, and the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab ... Cancer can be treated by surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy (including immunotherapy ... However, the survival advantages of neoadjuvant treatment in lung cancer are less clear. Radiation therapy (also called ...
... neoadjuvant therapy - neoplasia - neoplasm - nephrotomogram - nephrotoxic - nephroureterectomy - nerve block - nerve grafting ... HER2/neu - HER2/neu gene - herba scutellaria barbatae - hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome - hereditary ... unsealed internal radiation therapy-see radiation therapy - upper GI series - urachus - uracil - urea nitrogen-see blood urea ... hormone replacement therapy - hormone responsive - hormone therapy - Horner's syndrome - host cell - hot nodule - HPPH - HPV - ...
HER2/neu and KRAS. For advanced NSCLC, a combined chemotherapy treatment approach that includes cetuximab, an antibody that ... It is possible that RFA followed by radiation therapy has a survival benefit due to synergysm of the two mechanisms of cell ... neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and post-operatively (adjuvant chemotherapy). The most common types of NSCLC are squamous cell ... If patients have small, but inoperable tumors, they may undergo highly targeted, high intensity radiation therapy. New methods ...
Targeted therapyEdit. Recently, treatment with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) inhibitor, trastuzumab, has been ... Treated as for Stage I, sometimes with additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy.. *Stage III. Penetration to the third layer and ... radiation therapy and targeted therapy.[1][12] If treated late, palliative care may be advised.[2] Outcomes are often poor with ... HER2 is overexpressed in 13-22% of patients with gastric cancer.[71][75] Of note, HER2 overexpression in gastric neoplasia is ...
Importantly, the use of drugs (whether chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or targeted therapy) constitutes systemic therapy for ... Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is given prior to a local treatment such as surgery, and is designed to shrink the primary tumor.[3]: ... Cytotoxics and targeted therapies[edit]. Targeted therapies are a relatively new class of cancer drugs that can overcome many ... Hyperthermia therapy[edit]. Hyperthermia therapy is heat treatment for cancer that can be a powerful tool when used in ...
... , also known as adjunct therapy, add-on therapy, and adjuvant care, is therapy that is given in addition to the primary or initial therapy to maximize its effectiveness. The surgeries and complex treatment regimens used in cancer therapy have led the term to be used mainly to describe adjuvant cancer treatments. An example of such adjuvant therapy is the additional treatment usually given after surgery where all detectable disease has been removed, but where there remains a statistical risk of relapse due to the presence of undetected disease. If known disease is left behind following surgery, then further treatment is not technically adjuvant. An adjuvant agent modifies the effect of another agent, so adjuvant therapy modifies other therapy. ...
... (TME) is a standard technique for treatment of colorectal cancer, first described in 1982 by Professor Bill Heald at the UK's Basingstoke District Hospital. A significant length of the bowel around the tumour is removed, as is the surrounding tissue up to the plane between the mesorectum and the presacral fascia (Heald's "holy plane"). Dissection along this plane facilitates a straightforward dissection and preserves the sacral vessels and hypogastric nerves. It is possible to rejoin the two ends of the colon; however, most patients require a temporary ileostomy pouch to bypass the colon, allowing it to heal with less risk of perforation or leakage.[citation needed] TME has become the "gold standard" treatment for rectal cancer in the West. An occasional side effect of the operation is the formation and tangling of fibrous bands from near the site of the operation with other parts of the bowel. These can lead to bowel infarction if not operated on.[citation needed] TME ...
One alternative to mammography, Breast MRI or contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has shown substantial progress in the detection of breast cancer. Screening for malignancy in women with greater than 20% lifetime risk of breast cancer. Evaluate breast implants for rupture. Screening the contralateral breast for malignancy in women with known unilateral breast malignancy. Extent of disease and the presence of multifocality and multicentricity in patients with invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Evaluate response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The available literature suggests that the sensitivity of contrast-enhanced breast MRI in detection of cancer is considerably higher than that of either radiographic mammography or ultrasound and is generally reported to be in excess of 94%. The specificity (the confidence that a lesion is cancerous and not a false positive) is only fair ('modest'), (or ...
... takes different approaches depending on physical and biological characteristics of the disease, as well as the age, over-all health and personal preferences of the patient. Treatment types can be classified into local therapy (surgery and radiotherapy) and systemic treatment (chemo-, endocrine, and targeted therapies). Local therapy is most efficacious in early stage breast cancer, while systemic therapy is generally justified in advanced and metastatic disease, or in diseases with specific phenotypes. Historically, breast cancer was treated with radical surgery alone. Advances in the understanding of the natural course of breast cancer as well as the development of systemic therapies allowed for the use of breast-conserving surgeries, however, the nomenclature of viewing non-surgical management from the viewpoint of the definitive surgery lends to two adjectives connected with treatment timelines: ...
... , also known as adjunct therapy, add-on therapy, and adjuvant care, is therapy that is given in addition to the primary or initial therapy to maximize its effectiveness. The surgeries and complex treatment regimens used in cancer therapy have led the term to be used mainly to describe adjuvant cancer treatments. An example of such adjuvant therapy is the additional treatment usually given after surgery where all detectable disease has been removed, but where there remains a statistical risk of relapse due to the presence of undetected disease. If known disease is left behind following surgery, then further treatment is not technically adjuvant. An adjuvant agent modifies the effect of another agent, so adjuvant therapy modifies other therapy. ...
A chemotherapy regimen is a regimen for chemotherapy, defining the drugs to be used, their dosage, the frequency and duration of treatments, and other considerations. In modern oncology, many regimens combine several chemotherapy drugs in combination chemotherapy. The majority of drugs used in cancer chemotherapy are cytostatic, many via cytotoxicity. A fundamental philosophy of medical oncology, including combination chemotherapy, is that different drugs work through different mechanisms, and that the results of using multiple drugs will be synergistic to some extent. Because they have different dose-limiting adverse effects, they can be given together at full doses in chemotherapy regimens.[1]. The first successful combination chemotherapy was MOPP, introduced in 1963 for lymphomas. The term "induction regimen" refers to a ...
... (often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a category of cancer treatment that uses one or more anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapeutic agents) as part of a standardized chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy may be given with a curative intent (which almost always involves combinations of drugs), or it may aim to prolong life or to reduce symptoms (palliative chemotherapy). Chemotherapy is one of the major categories of the medical discipline specifically devoted to pharmacotherapy for cancer, which is called medical oncology.. By common usage, the term chemotherapy has come to connote the use of rather non-specific intracellular poisons, especially related to inhibiting the process of cell division known as mitosis, and generally excludes agents that more selectively block extracellular growth signals (i.e. blockers of signal transduction). To avoid these ...
... takes different approaches depending on physical and biological characteristics of the disease, as well as the age, over-all health and personal preferences of the patient. Treatment types can be classified into local therapy (surgery and radiotherapy) and systemic treatment (chemo-, endocrine, and targeted therapies). Local therapy is most efficacious in early stage breast cancer, while systemic therapy is generally justified in advanced and metastatic disease, or in diseases with specific phenotypes. Historically, breast cancer was treated with radical surgery alone. Advances in the understanding of the natural course of breast cancer as well as the development of systemic therapies allowed for the use of breast-conserving surgeries, however, the nomenclature of viewing non-surgical management from the viewpoint of the definitive surgery lends to two adjectives connected with treatment timelines: ...
... is a peptide vaccine aimed at preventing or delaying the recurrence of breast cancer in cancer survivors who achieve remission after standard of care treatment (e.g., surgery, radiation, chemotherapy). The product's developer is the US biotechnology company Galena Biopharma. NeuVax is the E75 synthetic peptide initially isolated from HER2/neu proto-oncogene (being HER2/neu p366-379) combined with the immune adjuvant, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF from yeast). NeuVax in Phase II showed effectiveness in early-stage, node-positive breast cancer with low-to-intermediate HER-2 expression, where the five-year recurrence rate dropped from 26% to 6%. The vaccine is now in a Phase III study called PRESENT, short for (Prevention of Recurrence in Early-Stage Node-Positive Breast Cancer with Low to Intermediate HER2 Expression with NeuVax Treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier ...
In immunology, an adjuvant is a component that potentiates the immune responses to an antigen and/or modulates it towards the desired immune responses. The word "adjuvant" comes from the Latin word adiuvare, meaning to help or aid. "An immunologic adjuvant is defined as any substance that acts to accelerate, prolong, or enhance antigen-specific immune responses when used in combination with specific vaccine antigens." A magazine article about vaccine adjuvants in 2007 was headlined "Deciphering Immunology's Dirty Secret" to refer to the early days of vaccine manufacture, when significant variations in the effectiveness of different batches of the same vaccine were observed, correctly assumed to be due to contamination of the reaction vessels. However, it was soon found that more scrupulous attention to cleanliness actually seemed to reduce the effectiveness of the vaccines, and that the contaminants - "dirt" - actually enhanced the immune response. There are many known ...
Pull-ups can be done with a supinated, neutral, or pronated grip (often called "chin-ups", "hammer grip pull-ups", and "pull-ups", respectively). Grips may match each other or be different (mixed grip). Grips may also rotate throughout the movement, such as by doing them on rings, rotating handles (false grip) or pull up handles. The range of motion used by trainers can vary. The fullest possible range is with straight arms overhead (elbow directly above shoulder), to pulling when the arms are at the sides (elbow directly below shoulder). People sometimes only train portions, such as avoiding locking out the arms at the bottom, or stopping when the head/chin/neck touch the bar. Positions within the range are also trained isometrically, as in flexed-arm and straight-arm hangs for time. The width of the grip may also differ. When grabbing and holding the bar during the pull-up, the hands can be apart at shoulder-width, or wider, or narrower enough to touch each other. This may ...
... is cancer arising from the esophagus-the food pipe that runs between the throat and the stomach. Symptoms often include difficulty in swallowing and weight loss. Other symptoms may include pain when swallowing, a hoarse voice, enlarged lymph nodes ("glands") around the collarbone, a dry cough, and possibly coughing up or vomiting blood. The two main sub-types of the disease are esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (often abbreviated to ESCC), which is more common in the developing world, and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), which is more common in the developed world. A number of less common types also occur. Squamous-cell carcinoma arises from the epithelial cells that line the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma arises from glandular cells present in the lower third of the esophagus, often where they have already transformed to intestinal cell type (a condition known as Barrett's esophagus). Causes of the squamous-cell type include tobacco, alcohol, very hot drinks, poor diet, ...
... (TME) is a standard technique for treatment of colorectal cancer, first described in 1982 by Professor Bill Heald at the UK's Basingstoke District Hospital. A significant length of the bowel around the tumour is removed, as is the surrounding tissue up to the plane between the mesorectum and the presacral fascia (Heald's "holy plane"). Dissection along this plane facilitates a straightforward dissection and preserves the sacral vessels and hypogastric nerves. It is possible to rejoin the two ends of the colon; however, most patients require a temporary ileostomy pouch to bypass the colon, allowing it to heal with less risk of perforation or leakage.[citation needed] TME has become the "gold standard" treatment for rectal cancer in the West. An occasional side effect of the operation is the formation and tangling of fibrous bands from near the site of the operation with other parts of the bowel. These can lead to bowel infarction if not operated on.[citation needed] TME ...
... mutation profile of Chinese HER2-positive breast cancers and genetic predictors of responses to Neoadjuvant anti-HER2 therapy. ... mutation profile of Chinese HER2-positive breast cancers and genetic predictors of responses to Neoadjuvant anti-HER2 therapy. ... mutation profile of Chinese HER2-positive breast cancers and genetic predictors of responses to Neoadjuvant anti-HER2 therapy. ... mutation profile of Chinese HER2-positive breast cancers and genetic predictors of responses to Neoadjuvant anti-HER2 therapy. ...
In view of this, we aimed to investigate the clinical value of obesity in BC patients treated with anti-HER2 therapies in the ... or obese at baseline and with HR-positive primary BC appeared less likely to achieve pCR after neo-adjuvant anti-HER2 therapies ... This finding paves the way to future research in targeting the interplay between HER2/HR signaling and metabolism. ... Di Cosimo, S., Porcu, L., Agbor-tarh, D. et al. Effect of body mass index on response to neo-adjuvant therapy in HER2-positive ...
Interestingly, most (81.8%) HER2-enriched tumors changed to non-HER2-enriched, whereas most luminal A samples maintained the ... HER2-enriched was associated with higher pCR rates compared to non-HER2-enriched subtypes (65% vs 31%; OR=4.07, 95% CI 1.65- ... PAM50 HER2-enriched subtype predicts pCR beyond HR status following trastuzumab-based chemotherapy in HER2-positive disease. ... PAM50 HER2-enriched subtype predicts pCR beyond HR status following trastuzumab-based chemotherapy in HER2-positive disease. ...
Effect of BMI on Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer. Breast Cancer Research. ... Effect of Body Mass Index on Response to Neo-Adjuvant Therapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: An Exploratory Analysis of the ... Sacituzumab Govitecan in Previously Treated Hormone Receptor-Positive/HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Ann. Oncol · ... Management of Advanced Melanoma After Progression on Anti-PD1 Therapy Interview · November 30, 2020 ...
Comparative effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer : A network meta-analysis. / Nagayama, Aiko; ... Comparative effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer: A network meta-analysis. Journal of the ... Comparative effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer : A network meta-analysis. In: Journal of the ... Comparative effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer: A network meta-analysis. ...
Patients treated more recently were more likely to have received neoadjuvant HER2-directed therapy for HER2-positive tumors ( ... Patients treated more recently were more likely to have received neoadjuvant HER2-directed therapy for HER2-positive tumors ( ... Patients treated more recently were more likely to have received neoadjuvant HER2-directed therapy for HER2-positive tumors ( ... Patients treated more recently were more likely to have received neoadjuvant HER2-directed therapy for HER2-positive tumors ( ...
Received prior treatment, including chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, biologic therapy, radiation or surgery with the exception ... Neoadjuvant Setting. Early Breast Cancer. PK. Phase 3. Trastuzumab. Herceptin. HER2 Positive. ... A Study Of PF-05280014 Or Trastuzumab Plus Taxotere® And Carboplatin In HER2 Positive Breast Cancer In The Neoadjuvant Setting ... in patients with operable HER2 positive, breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. The hypothesis to be tested in this study is ...
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is sometimes paired with anthracyclines, such as daunorubicin, doxorubicin, and epirubicin, to treat ... 2014). Anthracycline-free neoadjuvant therapy induces pathological complete responses by exploiting immune proficiency in HER2+ ... Anthracycline-Free Neoadjuvant Regimen Induces Response for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients @media screen and (max-width: ... This study confirms that an anthracycline-free neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen for patients with locally advanced HER2- ...
Single-agent-targeted therapy trials are feasible in BRCA+ patients. Given the rapid rate of accrual, profound response and ... HER2-negative primary tumors were eligible. Study participants underwent a pretreatment biopsy, 2 months of talazoparib, off- ... Volumetric changes in tumor size were determined by ultrasound at 1 and 2 months of therapy. Success was defined as 20 patients ... This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of enrolling breast cancer patients on a single-agent-targeted therapy ...
HER2 negative. ER/PR negative. carboplatin. radiation therapy. paclitaxel. neoadjuvant. stage II breast cancer. stage III ... Any concurrent chemotherapy, IP, biologic, or hormonal therapy for cancer treatment. Concurrent use of hormonal therapy for non ... Experimental: Chemo + Durvalumab + Radiation Therapy Arm B: Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Durvalumab + Radiation Therapy ... Has received prior therapy with an anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, or anti PD L2 agent or with an agent directed to another stimulatory ...
Versus T-DM1 Initiated in Patients with HER2 Positive Early Breast Cancer at High Risk After Neo-adjuvant Therapy. 11/2/2020 ... Versus T-DM1 Initiated in Patients with HER2 Positive Early Breast Cancer at High Risk After Neo-adjuvant Therapy ... Only HER2-directed medicine to demonstrate significant improvement in overall survival compared to chemotherapy for previously ... ENHERTU (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) Granted Priority Review in the US For the Treatment of HER2-positive Metastatic ...
Neoadjuvant therapy and sentinel lymph node biopsy in HER2-positive breast cancer patients: results from the PEONY trial. Xiao ... The prognostic value of HER2 status and efficacy of anti-HER2 therapy in patients with HR-positive mucinous breast cancer: a ... Quantitative digital imaging analysis of HER2 immunohistochemistry predicts the response to anti-HER2 neoadjuvant chemotherapy ... Neu im Fachgebiet Onkologie 04.12.2020 , Mammakarzinom , Nachrichten Zirkulierende Tumor-DNA sagt Therapieerfolg beim ...
Neoadjuvant Therapy for HER2-positive Breast Cancer. Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials ...
An Exploratory Study of Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Hormone Receptor-Positive HER2-Negative Node-Negative Breast Cancer ... A Randomized Phase III Double Blinded Placebo Controlled Trial of Aspirin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive HER2 Negative ... Comparing Radiation Plus Antibody Therapy to Radiation Plus Immune Therapy in People With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who ... either radiation therapy and docetaxel or radiation therapy, cetuximab, and docetaxel) to find out which is better. ...
Multimodal therapy is the standard of care for locally advanced tumors and neoadjuvant therapy may help improve respectability ... In addition, emerging novel therapies, such as HER2 inhibitors and immunotherapy, are available for unresectable or metast.... ... Emerging Therapies in Thoracic Malignancies -Immunotherapy, Targeted Therapy, and T-Cell Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer ... Topics will include various neoadjuvant therapies, trimodality versus bimodality therapy, and outcomes for salvage ...
... difference in overall survival or disease-free survival between patients with operable breast cancer randomized to neoadjuvant ... Neratinib after trastuzumab-based adjuvant therapy in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer (ExteNET): a multicentre, ... Drugs & Diseases , Oncology , Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer Q&A What is the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the ... 5-year analysis of neoadjuvant pertuzumab and trastuzumab in patients with locally advanced, inflammatory, or early-stage HER2- ...
HER2)-negative primary breast cancer samples from patients who underwent standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. … ... As a complement of the previous study on Morita Therapy, that is, the training therapy for Shinkeishitsu (Nervosität), ... p,[Purpose] Three complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies: "Judo therapy", "acupuncture and moxibustion", and " ... therapy was developed recently, and its effect is similar to that of exercise. … This therapy may be an alternative or ...
A randomized phase II study of eribulin/cyclophosphamide or docetaxel/cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy in operable HER2- ... Comparing neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel vs paclitaxel both followed by anthracycline regimens in women with ERBB2/HER2-negative ... Mono-therapy) (19, 21, 23, 26-29), Group B (PD-1/PD-L1 vs. Chemotherapy) (14, 20, 22, 24, 30), Group C (PD-1/PD-L1+ ... During the course of anti-tumor therapy, whether it is chemotherapy or targeted therapy drugs (1-5), peripheral neuropathy is ...
Neoadjuvant Therapy for HER2-positive Breast Cancer. Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials ... A Novel Multiple Tyrosine-kinase Targeted Agent to Explore the Future Perspectives of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy for the Treatment ...
RNA Sequencing to Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Anti-HER2 Therapy: A Secondary Analysis of the NeoALTTO Randomized Clinical ... CD73 Promotes Resistance to HER2/ErbB2 Antibody Therapy.. Authors:. Martin Turcotte David Allard Deepak Mittal Yacine Bareche ... Neoadjuvant neratinib promotes ferroptosis and inhibits brain metastasis in a novel syngeneic model of spontaneous HER2 breast ... Long-term Pooled Safety Analysis of Palbociclib in Combination With Endocrine Therapy for HR+/HER2- Advanced Breast Cancer.. ...
... have high rates of pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant systemic therapy (43-67%). Patients treated with neoadjuvant ... HER2-positive breast cancers, about 15 - 20% of breast cancers, are generally more aggressive, respond less to hormone therapy ... trials and the need to develop a more complete understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to HER2-directed therapies. Read ... Prior studies have suggested that it may be feasible to omit surgery but were not performed using current systemic therapy ...
... hematological toxicity resulting from previous adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy. *Radiographic evidence of central nervous ... Previous approved or investigative anti-HER2 agents in any breast cancer treatment setting, except trastuzumab and/or lapatinib ... Disease-free interval from completion of adjuvant or neoadjuvant systemic non-hormonal treatment to recurrent disease of less ... Change From Baseline in Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) Questionnaire Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, ...
ER/PR+ and Her-2 nonreactive. She received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant ... Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Compared to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage IIIB/C and IV Breast Cancer Patients. *. ... 12, Pages 1148: A Novel 4-Gene Score to Predict Survival, Distant Metastasis and Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Breast ... Neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.. Authors: Mangone L, Mancuso P, Tagliabue G, Filiberti RA, Carrozzi G, Iacovacci S, ...
HER2/neu negative. *Has not received prior systemic anti-cancer therapy for their advanced carcinoma (systemic therapy received ... in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting does not count). Inclusion Criteria - All Participants:. *Histologically- or ... Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) negative, or, if HER2/neu positive, must have previously received ... Prior chemotherapy, targeted small molecule therapy, or radiation therapy within 2 weeks prior to study Day 1 or who has not ...
Molecular profiling of the residual disease of triple-negative breast cancers after neoadjuvant chemotherapy identifies ... and in HER2-amplified tumors, where it may stabilize HER2 and limit the efficacy of HER2-targeted therapies (19-21). Moreover, ... We evaluated the response to S63845 alone or in combination with conventional therapy (docetaxel or anti-HER2 therapies) in ... B and C) SK-BR-3 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of S63845 and docetaxel (B), or HER2-targeted therapies ...
  • In an Italian phase II study reported in The Lancet Oncology, Gianni et al found that neoadjuvant therapy with the RB1 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance), estrogen receptor (ER) inhibitor fulvestrant (Faslodex), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) inhibitors trastuzumab (Herceptin) and pertuzumab (Perjeta) reduced Ki67 expression in patients with HER2-positive, ER-positive breast cancer. (ascopost.com)
  • Patients who have residual invasive breast cancer after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy have a worse prognosis than those who have no residual cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The focus of this study is to identify particular microRNA (miRNA) signatures in exosomes derived from plasma of 435 human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative (TN) subtypes of breast cancer (BC). (beds.ac.uk)
  • Breast cancer (BC) comprises several subtypes that are in clinical routine defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind Study Comparing the Efficacy, Safety, and Immunogenicity of SB3 (Trastuzumab Biosimilar) and Reference Trastuzumab in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Therapy for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Early Breast Cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The objective of this study is to assess efficacy and safety of radium 223 dichloride in subjects with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative hormone receptor positive breast cancer with bone metastases treated with exemestane and everolimus. (centerwatch.com)
  • Hormone receptor positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) is the most common biologic subtype of breast cancer. (scirp.org)
  • The prognostic and predictive importance of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and its signaling pathways created a need to expand this oversimplified and somewhat "old-school" paradigm, and elucidated intrinsic subtypes[1,and other possible targets. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Frequency of breast cancers with respect to the status of estrogen receptor (ER), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and progesterone receptor (PR). (ed.ac.uk)
  • Pertuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody which targets the extracellular human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein (HER2) dimerization domain. (drugs.com)
  • Comparison of central laboratory assessments of ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67 by IHC/FISH and the corresponding mRNAs (ESR1, PGR, ERBB2, and MKi67) by RT-qPCR on an automated, broadly deployed diagnostic platform. (nih.gov)
  • Overexpression of HER-2/ neu (c-erbB2) is associated with increased risk of recurrent disease in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and a poorer prognosis in node-positive breast cancer. (aacrjournals.org)
  • HER2 (ERBB2 or HER2/neu) is a tyrosine-kinase increasing cell proliferation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Laé M, Couturier J, Oudard S, Radvanyi F, Beuzeboc P, Vieillefond A (2010) Assessing HER2 gene amplification as a potential target for therapy in invasive urothelial bladder cancer with a standardized methodology: results in 1005 patients. (springer.com)
  • In 15% to 20% of breast cancer cases, Her2 is overexpressed as a consequence of gene amplification ( 2 - 4 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Any ER or PR but HER2 positive defined as 3+ staining intensity (on a scale of 0 to 3) by means of IHC analysis OR gene amplification on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ratio ≥ 2.0. (mayo.edu)
  • The aim of this study was to analyze the expression/amplification of HER2 in EAC in correlation to clinicopathological data to verify its prognostic impact. (biomedcentral.com)
  • LCCC1214 is a randomized, multiarm, multicenter, open-label window trial designed to explore the kinome response in Stage I-IV HER2 positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients scheduled to undergo definitive surgery (either lumpectomy, mastectomy or surgical resection of oligometastatic disease). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Reconstruction is often done immediately after lumpectomy or mastectomy, but it may be performed later on, especially in cases where radiation therapy follows lumpectomy or mastectomy. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Has received prior therapy with an anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, or anti PD L2 agent or with an agent directed to another stimulatory or co-inhibitory T-cell receptor (e.g. (providence.org)
  • In BT474 cell lines, HKI-272 effectively repressed phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt signal transduction pathways, whereas trastuzumab failed to completely inhibit HER2 receptor phosphorylation or downstream signaling events. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In the HER2/receptor-positive subgroup, pCR occurred in 6.3% of patients with PIK3CA mutations versus 29.9% of patients with wild-type PIK3CA ( P =0.006). (medpagetoday.com)
  • TEAM IIa: Six months of neoadjuvant therapy with exemestane is superior to three months with respect to the rate of downsizing in post-menopausal women with oestrogen receptor (ER) positive (more than 50% of tumour cells positive) primary breast cancer. (isrctn.com)