Tuberculosis, Hepatic: Infection of the LIVER with species of MYCOBACTERIUM, most often MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS. It is characterized by localized small tuberculous miliary lesions or tumor-like mass (TUBERCULOMA), and abnormalities in liver function tests.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Bartonella henselae: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY). This organism can also be a cause of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Angiomatosis, Bacillary: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, bone, brain, and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often seen in AIDS patients and other IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOSTS.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Perinatology: The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cat-Scratch Disease: A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.Bartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.EuropeCommunity-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Myotonia Congenita: Inherited myotonic disorders with early childhood onset MYOTONIA. Muscular hypertrophy is common and myotonia may impair ambulation and other movements. It is classified as Thomsen (autosomal dominant) or Becker (autosomal recessive) generalized myotonia mainly based on the inheritance pattern. Becker type is also clinically more severe. An autosomal dominant variant with milder symptoms and later onset is known as myotonia levior. Mutations in the voltage-dependent skeletal muscle chloride channel are associated with the disorders.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Hyperglycemia: Abnormally high BLOOD GLUCOSE level.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Cholestasis, Intrahepatic: Impairment of bile flow due to injury to the HEPATOCYTES; BILE CANALICULI; or the intrahepatic bile ducts (BILE DUCTS, INTRAHEPATIC).Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Hepatitis C: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.Hepatitis C, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans that is caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS lasting six months or more. Chronic hepatitis C can lead to LIVER CIRRHOSIS.Hepatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER with ongoing hepatocellular injury for 6 months or more, characterized by NECROSIS of HEPATOCYTES and inflammatory cell (LEUKOCYTES) infiltration. Chronic hepatitis can be caused by viruses, medications, autoimmune diseases, and other unknown factors.Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Esophageal and Gastric Varices: Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Algeria: A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Receptors, LDL: Receptors on the plasma membrane of nonhepatic cells that specifically bind LDL. The receptors are localized in specialized regions called coated pits. Hypercholesteremia is caused by an allelic genetic defect of three types: 1, receptors do not bind to LDL; 2, there is reduced binding of LDL; and 3, there is normal binding but no internalization of LDL. In consequence, entry of cholesterol esters into the cell is impaired and the intracellular feedback by cholesterol on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase is lacking.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Taurine: A conditionally essential nutrient, important during mammalian development. It is present in milk but is isolated mostly from ox bile and strongly conjugates bile acids.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.
  • The dominant hepatic lesions measure about 2.0 x 2.4 x 2.6 cm (AP x T x CC) at segment II, 2.2 x 2.2 x 2.0 cm at segment IVB and 2.1 x 2.2 x 2.1 cm at segment VI. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Plain and contrast-enhanced images show multiple hepatic nodules with peripheral areas of low attenuation and central calcifications ( target sign ). (radiopaedia.org)
  • Appreciably elevated hepatic iron concentrations were associated with heavy iron deposition in both hepatocytes and macrophages, and either portal fibrosis or cirrhosis. (bmj.com)
  • 3 Several studies have provided convincing evidence that African iron overload causes cirrhosis, 4 5 and there may also be aetiological associations with hepatocellular carcinoma, 6-9 tuberculosis, 6 and other infections. (bmj.com)
  • Liver function tests at this time did not reveal any evidence of decompensated cirrhosis, with no associated hepatic encephalopathy. (ispub.com)
  • Congestive causes of splenomegaly include: liver cirrhosis (most common), thrombosis or obstruction of the portal, hepatic, or splenic veins, and heart failure. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • We report the case of a 52 year old man diagnosed with PML without history of or risk factors for immunocompromise, with absolute number of CD4 + T cells below the lower limit of normal but not meeting criteria for idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia (ICL), who was subsequently found to have evidence of hepatic cirrhosis of unclear etiology. (omicsonline.org)
  • This is only the eighth case published of hepatic cirrhosis as the main identifiable risk factor for the development of PML and informs the ongoing discussion on mechanisms of moderate immunocompromise sufficient to allow for occurrence of this disease. (omicsonline.org)
  • Diseases of the colon may include anything from distension of the splenic flexure of the colon as in cases of irritable bowel syndrome to colonic cancer. (doctorslounge.com)
  • Cytology and AFB smear and culture may be sent routinely, depending on the health system, or only when the pretest probability is high enough (i.e., exposure to tuberculosis [TB], a known cancer or mass, unexplained bloody ascites, etc. (infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com)
  • Splenic emboli requiring splenectomy was predicted by a >20 mm valve vegetation (OR = 1.37, 1.056-1.77) and WBC >12000 cells/mm (OR = 5.58, 1.2-26.3). (bvsalud.org)
  • However, in patients with a known malignancy or symptoms attributable to possible splenic pathology, the incidentally discovered splenic lesion may be more significant. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • This study aimed at evaluating the applicability of POCUS for diagnosing EPTB in HIV-positive and HIV-negative presumptive tuberculosis (TB) patients in India, a country of moderate relative TB and HIV burden. (ajtmh.org)
  • Out of 65 patients with endoscopic abnormality, 41 (62.12%) had tuberculosis, 10 (15.16%) had malignancy. (japi.org)
  • RESULTS: There were 126 patients identified with traumatic splenic injury, with male to female ratio three to one. (bvsalud.org)
  • Patients with splenic emboli had excellent mid-term outcome following discharge (100% survival at 4-years). (bvsalud.org)
  • Splenic tuberculosis, however, can be part of military tuberculosis in immunocompromised patients. (bjmp.org)
  • Although rare cases of splenic tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients have been described in the past. (bjmp.org)
  • Although the prevalence of tuberculosis decreased quickly worldwide after the widespread use of anti-tuberculosis drugs in the 1940s, the incidence rates have increased in the recent years owing to government complacency regarding the tuberculosis problem, inadequate public health measures, HIV coinfection, intravenous drug abuse, multidrug resistance, and an increased number of immunocompromised patients ( 1 ). (archcid.com)
  • Leadership] Chevron has revealed that it is spending over $5 million (about N1.9 billion) to support the federal government's fight against tuberculosis, malaria and HIV in the country since 2017. (medworm.com)
  • Many non-neoplastic and neoplastic conditions may mimic PC, such as tuberculosis, splenosis implant, peritoneal lymphomatosis, pseudomyxoma peritonei and primary peritoneal mesothelioma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenosis is a rare condition that results from autotransplantation of splenic tissue into abnormal sites, such as the peritoneal cavity, thoracic cavity, subcutaneous tissue, and pericardium. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Plain and contrast-enhanced images show multiple hepatic nodules with peripheral areas of low attenuation and central calcifications ( target sign ). (radiopaedia.org)
  • INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to study radiological assessment, management and outcome of traumatic splenic injury over 15 years in a UK district general hospital. (bvsalud.org)
  • Records were reviewed for demographics, vital observations, documentation of American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading of splenic injury, subsequent management and outcomes. (bvsalud.org)
  • DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: AAST grade reporting of splenic injury has remained sub-optimal over 15 years. (bvsalud.org)
  • Combined intrathoracic and intraperitoneal splenosis after splenic injury: case report and review of the literature. (biomedsearch.com)
  • There was no history of cough and expectoration, no past history of tuberculosis and he was not an alcoholic or a smoker. (scielo.br)
  • Only 1 case of M. tuberculosis belonging to SIT 52 that caused tuberculous meningitis was reported in a human in Thailand ( 10 ), but that case was not related to the case reported here. (cdc.gov)
  • Pseudocysts are much more common, representing 80% of all splenic cysts. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Abdominal CT scan revealed an inhomogeneous solid mass (13×9×7 cm) originating from the tail of the pancreas with splenic and gastric invasion as well as several pancreatic cysts. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Flow splenic v. Portal v. Pressure rises from a squatting undergoes powerful plantarflexion of the bones of formation of larger, asymptomatic cysts is should not keep going out again. (puc.edu)
  • Dachman AH, Ros PR, Marari PJ et al (1986) Nonparasitic splenic cysts: a report of 52 cases with radiologic-pathologic correlation. (springer.com)
  • Ross ME, Ellwood R, Yang S et al (1977) Epidermoid splenic cysts. (springer.com)
  • In the mangabey reported here, fulminant tuberculosis was diagnosed within 1 week after it arrived in Thailand, during the 21-day quarantine period. (cdc.gov)