Splanchnic Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)End Stage Liver Disease: Final stage of a liver disease when the liver failure is irreversible and LIVER TRANSPLANTATION is needed.Hepatic Encephalopathy: A syndrome characterized by central nervous system dysfunction in association with LIVER FAILURE, including portal-systemic shunts. Clinical features include lethargy and CONFUSION (frequently progressing to COMA); ASTERIXIS; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; brisk oculovestibular reflexes; decorticate and decerebrate posturing; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and bilateral extensor plantar reflexes (see REFLEX, BABINSKI). ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY may demonstrate triphasic waves. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1117-20; Plum & Posner, Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma, 3rd ed, p222-5)Hyperammonemia: Elevated level of AMMONIA in the blood. It is a sign of defective CATABOLISM of AMINO ACIDS or ammonia to UREA.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Ballistocardiography: Technique of graphic representation of the movements of the body imparted by the ballistic forces (recoil and impact) associated with cardiac contraction and ejection of blood and with the deceleration of blood flow through the large blood vessels. These movements, quantitatively very minute, are translated by a pickup device (transducer) into an electrical potential which is suitably amplified and recorded on a conventional electrocardiograph or other recording machine.Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Ascites: Accumulation or retention of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Chylous Ascites: Presence of milky lymph (CHYLE) in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, with or without infection.Renal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Liver Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.Yawning: An involuntary deep INHALATION with the MOUTH open, often accompanied by the act of stretching.Physostigmine: A cholinesterase inhibitor that is rapidly absorbed through membranes. It can be applied topically to the conjunctiva. It also can cross the blood-brain barrier and is used when central nervous system effects are desired, as in the treatment of severe anticholinergic toxicity.Bemegride: A CNS stimulant that is used to induce convulsions in experimental animals. It has also been used as a respiratory stimulant and in the treatment of barbiturate overdose.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.New YorkProfessional Corporations: Legally authorized corporations owned and managed by one or more professionals (medical, dental, legal) in which the income is ascribed primarily to the professional activities of the owners or stockholders.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Gadiformes: An order of fish including the families Gadidae (cods), Macrouridae (grenadiers), and hakes. The large Gadidae family includes cod, haddock, whiting, and pollock.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Rehydration Solutions: Fluids restored to the body in order to maintain normal water-electrolyte balance.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Isotonic Solutions: Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Atrial Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the RIGHT ATRIUM.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Esophageal and Gastric Varices: Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).Portal System: A system of vessels in which blood, after passing through one capillary bed, is conveyed through a second set of capillaries before it returns to the systemic circulation. It pertains especially to the hepatic portal system.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Fructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.Glucose Transporter Type 5: A hexose transporter that mediates FRUCTOSE transport in SKELETAL MUSCLE and ADIPOCYTES and is responsible for luminal uptake of dietary fructose in the SMALL INTESTINE.GlycogenGlucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Liver Glycogen: Glycogen stored in the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)
splanchnic circulation. 15%. low. Flow increases during digestion. hepatic circulation. 15%. Part of portal venous system, so ... Name of circulation. % of cardiac output. Autoregulation. Perfusion. Comments pulmonary circulation. 100% (deoxygenated). ... skeletal muscular circulation. 17%[3]. Perfusion increases dramatically during exercise. cutaneous circulation. 2%[4]. over- ... cerebral circulation. 15%[2]. high. under-perfused. Fixed volume means intolerance of high pressure. Minimal ability to use ...
Splanchnic circulation. Online Medical Dictionary. URL: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/omd?splanchnic+circulation. Accessed ... The hepatic vein subsequently drains into the inferior vena cava. The hepatic artery provides 30 to 40% of the oxygen to the ... In human anatomy, the hepatic portal system is the system of veins comprising the hepatic portal vein and its tributaries. It ... "Review of Medical Physiology 22nd Edition." Hepatic portal system Kimball Pages, Hepatic portal system VIRTUAL Liver, an ...
It is characterized by hemodynamic changes in splanchnic, systemic and renal circulation. Splanchnic vasodilatation triggers ... in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), an improvement of hepatic encephalopathy grade and biochemical parameters. Nevertheless, ... On the other hand, a patient with a chronic hepatic disease can suffer an acute decompensation of liver function following a ... Other biological hepatic systems are Bioartificial Liver Support (BLSS)12 and Radial Flow Bioreactor (RFB).15 Detoxification ...
... the portal venous system for further processing and detoxification before returning to the systemic circulation via the hepatic ... with the upper part of each ganglion joined by the greater splanchnic nerve and the lower parts joined by the lesser splanchnic ... The neck tapers and connects to the biliary tract via the cystic duct, which then joins the common hepatic duct to form the ... Bile is collected and delivered through the common hepatic duct. This duct joins with the cystic duct to connect in a common ...
ET1 and 3 plasma conc in patients with cirrhosis: role of splanchnic and renal passage and liver function. Hepatology 1995;21: ... This leaves unmetabolized potentially toxic or vasoconstricting substances to reach and attack the pulmonary circulation. ... Histometrical investigations of the pulmonary artery in severe hepatic disease. J Pathol 1984; 143: 31. Swanson KL et al. ... More importantly, PGI2 (and not nitrous oxide) is also associated with an improvement in splanchnic perfusion and oxygenation. ...
... occurs when there is a fistula between a vessel of the splanchnic circulation and the intrahepatic or extrahepatic ... TAE involves the selective catheterization of a hepatic artery followed by embolic occlusion. Surgery is indicated when TAE has ... which is achieved either by surgical ligation of hepatic artery or by endoscopic embolisation. Endoscopic trans-arterial ...
At gradients greater than 10 mmHg, blood flow through the hepatic portal system is redirected from the liver into areas with ... This means that collateral circulation develops in the lower esophagus, abdominal wall, stomach, and rectum. The small blood ... they decrease both cardiac output by β1 blockade and splanchnic blood flow by blocking vasodilating β2 receptors at splanchnic ...
However, the effect of this is insufficient to counteract the mediators of vasodilation in the splanchnic circulation, leading ... the decompression of the high pressures in the portal circulation by placing a small stent between a portal and hepatic vein. ... blood vessels in the kidney circulation are constricted because of the dilation of blood vessels in the splanchnic circulation ... Type 2 HRS is thought to be part of a spectrum of illness associated with increased pressures in the portal vein circulation, ...
"Ascites - Hepatic and Biliary Disorders". Merck Manuals Professional Edition. May 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2017.. ... plays an important role in the production of ascites by raising capillary hydrostatic pressure within the splanchnic bed. ... Circulation. 112 (12): 154-235. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.167586. PMID 16160202.. ... Roughly, transudates are a result of increased pressure in the hepatic portal vein (,8 mmHg, usually around 20 mmHg[10]), e.g. ...
Budd-Chiari syndrome (thrombosis of the hepatic vein). *Thrombosis of the splanchnic venous system: *Mesenteric vein thrombosis ... "Circulation. 130 (13): 1062-71. doi:10.1161/circulationaha.114.008828. PMID 25156992.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k Kearon, C; Akl ... "Circulation. 124 (9): 996-7. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.048868. PMID 21875920.. *^ Abdul Sultan A, West J, Stephansson O, ...
... blood vessels in the kidney circulation are constricted because of the dilation of blood vessels in the splanchnic circulation ... the decompression of the high pressures in the portal circulation by placing a small stent between a portal and hepatic vein. ... the effect of this is insufficient to counteract the mediators of vasodilation in the splanchnic circulation, leading to ... Type 2 HRS is thought to be part of a spectrum of illness associated with increased pressures in the portal vein circulation, ...
Alterations in hemodynamics and hepatic and splanchnic circulation during laparoscopy in rats. , Surgical endoscopy , 10/1/2001 ... Alterations in hemodynamics and hepatic and splanchnic circulation during laparoscopy in rats. M Schäfer H Sägesser J Reichen L ... Schäfer M, Sägesser H, Reichen J, Krähenbühl L. Alterations in hemodynamics and hepatic and splanchnic circulation during ... Severe alterations in cardiovascular hemodynamics, and to hepatic and splanchnic circulation occur rapidly during CO2 ...
Physiology of the Splanchnic and Hepatic Circulations. Mehta, Gautam (et al.). Pages 77-90 ...
Effects on the hepatic and splanchnic circulation. Acta anaesth. scand., Suppl. 75, 25 (1982)Google Scholar ... In: The circulation in anaesthesia. Applied physiology and pharmacology (ed. C. Prys-Roberts ), p. 441. Oxford, London, ... SONNTAG, H.: Actions of anesthetics on the coronary circulation in normal subjects and patients with ischemic heart disease. In ...
Splanchnic circulation 59 What is the vein that delivers blood from the liver to the body? ... Hepatic portal vein 30 How is the blood supply set up in the GI tract villus? What is the consequence of this if blood supply ...
June 1995 SURGICAL GRAND ROUND Splanchnic aneurysms WCS Meng, M Chan, WY Lau, AKC Li Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales ... Key words: Splanchnic circulation; Aneurysm; Splenic artery; Hepatic artery; Superior mesenteric artery; Embolisation; Ligation ... Splanchnic aneurysms are rare but lethal events. Three cases demonstrating different types of splanchnic aneurysms are ... The natural history, clinical presentation, investigations and modalities of treatment for splenic artery aneurysm, hepatic ...
splanchnic circulation. 15%. low. Flow increases during digestion. hepatic circulation. 15%. Part of portal venous system, so ... Name of circulation. % of cardiac output. Autoregulation. Perfusion. Comments pulmonary circulation. 100% (deoxygenated). ... skeletal muscular circulation. 17%[3]. Perfusion increases dramatically during exercise. cutaneous circulation. 2%[4]. over- ... cerebral circulation. 15%[2]. high. under-perfused. Fixed volume means intolerance of high pressure. Minimal ability to use ...
The ability of norepinephrine and hepatic nerves to mobilize blood from the hepatic and splanchnic reservoirs has been well ... Hepatic capacitance responses to changes in flow and hepatic venous pressure in dogs. Am J Physiol.. 1981;240:H18-H28. ... Hepatic circulation. In: Handbook of Physiology: The Gastrointestinal System I. Bethesda, Md: American Physiological Society; ... Hemodynamic and metabolic effects of hemorrhage in man, with particular reference to the splanchnic circulation. Circ Res.. ...
The Splanchnic Circulation in Cirrhosis (Jaine Bosch and Juan carlos Garcia-Ragán).. 13. Physiology of Hepatic Circulation in ... Alterations of Hepatic and Splanchnic Microvascular Exchange in Cirrhosis: Local Factors in the Formation of Ascites (Jens H. ... Preface to the Second Edition.Part 1. Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume and Renal and Splanchnic Circulation.. 1. ... Systemic and Splanchnic Hemo-dynamic Abnormalities in Cirrhosis.. 11. The Systemic Circulation in Cirrhosis (Søren Møller and ...
Splanchnic circulation. Online Medical Dictionary. URL: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/omd?splanchnic+circulation. Accessed ... The hepatic vein subsequently drains into the inferior vena cava. The hepatic artery provides 30 to 40% of the oxygen to the ... In human anatomy, the hepatic portal system is the system of veins comprising the hepatic portal vein and its tributaries. It ... "Review of Medical Physiology 22nd Edition." Hepatic portal system Kimball Pages, Hepatic portal system VIRTUAL Liver, an ...
The response of the hepatic circulation to various drugs is related to a number of diffierent hemodynamic factors: those which ... Effect of pitressin on the splanchnic circulation in man.Circulation 24:797, 1961.PubMedGoogle Scholar ... Bradley, S. E. "The hepatic Circulation." InHandbook of Physiology (Section 2: Circulation. Vol. II.) American Physiological ... Effect of ethyl alcohol on hepatic circulation, sulfobromphthalein clearance, and hepatic glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase ...
The Splanchnic Circulation: branches of arteries from abdominal aorta to digestive organs. Hepatic Portal Circulation: blood ...
... an intermediary between the splanchnic circulation and the portal system. They also cause the manifestations of hepatic ... This condition, known as hepatic lipidosis or hepatic steatosis, is well documented in published literature, and recognized as ... Force-feeding causes fat to rapidly accumulate in the ducks livers, inducing a disease called hepatic lipidosis. In a few ... The direct consequence of a chronic accumulation of lipids in the hepatic cell (steatosis) is the progressive appearance of ...
S. E. Bradley writes on the splanchnic circulation, with emphasis on the development of knowledge of the hepatic circulation. ... Circulation of the Blood-Men and Ideas Edited by Alfred P. Fishman and Dickinson W. Richards (review) ... BOOK REVIEWS Circulation ofthe Blood-Men and Ideas. Edited by Alfred P. Fishman and Dickinson W. Richards. New York: Oxford ... Servetus walks out ofCournands chapter "Air and Blood" to discover the pulmonary circulation, later to die at the stake for ...
These patients may have reduced vascular tone and fail to mobilise pooled venous blood from the splanchnic circulation.3Failure ... to achieve prompt volume replacement may jeopardise renal and hepatic function, a major factor in the morbidity and mortality ...
... uniformly mixes with the other glucose that is already present in the splanchnic circulation before reaching the hepatic vein. ... Splanchnic extraction of tracer and splanchnic glucose uptake.. Splanchnic extraction of tracer (5.0 ± 0.8 vs. 7.7 ± 0.6%, P , ... We have previously reported that splanchnic glucose uptake, hepatic glycogen synthesis, and hepatic glucokinase activity are ... the rate of splanchnic (gut and hepatic) glucose extraction, and the rate of hepatic glucose production. ...
These shunts protect the venous drainage of the splanchnic organs but lead to loss of major regulatory roles of the liver. The ... The Hepatic circulation is unique among vascular beds. The most obvious unique features include the dual vascular supply; the ... The trigger for liver regeneration is dependent on hepatic hemodynamics so that chronic liver blood flow regulates liver cell ... In severe liver disease, the whole body circulation is reorganized, by forming portacaval shunts, to accommodate the increased ...
Next Document: Effects of a dobutamine-induced increase in splanchnic blood flow on hepatic metabolic activity in p.... ... Extracorporeal Circulation*. Hemodynamics. Humans. Middle Aged. Mitral Valve / surgery. Mitral Valve Insufficiency / ... in patients with MVD before and after induction of anesthesia and during and after surgery when extracorporeal circulation (ECC ...
Progression of portal hypertension results in splanchnic vasodilation and angiogenesis.. Genetics. No known genetic patterns ... Most commonly secondary to elevated hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG; the gradient between portal and central venous ... and hyperdynamic circulation ... 5 mm Hg that occurs in association with splanchnic ... Course is generally progressive, with risk of complications including acute variceal bleeding, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy ...
Hepatic fructose metabolism also differs from hepatic glucose metabolism in its regulation by insulin. Both glucose and ... which is likely due to changes in splanchnic handling of glucose in the post-exercise period. Splanchnic glucose output of an ... The rate of appearance of ingested glucose in the circulation appears to be limited by the capacity of intestinal transporters ... However, hepatic glucose metabolism is then regulated by insulin and the cellular energy status [5,25]. Insulin, ATP and ...
1972) Circulation times in the splanchnic and hepatic beds in alcoholic liver disease. Gastroenterology 63:102-111. ... free hepatic vein pressure. WHVP. wedge hepatic vein pressure. HVPG. hepatic venous pressure gradient. IAP. intra-abdominal ... FHVP, free hepatic vein pressure; WHVP, wedge hepatic vein pressure; HVPG, hepatic venous pressure gradient; IAP, intra- ... SPLANCHNIC HAEMODYNAMIC DATA. IAP and WHVP remained unchanged one hour after paracentesis while the girdle was inflated but a ...
Schäfer M, Sägesser H, Reichen J, Krähenbühl L. Alterations in hemodynamics and hepatic and splanchnic circulation during ... Pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not associated with compromised splanchnic circulation. Eur J Surg 1998; ... The use of diathermy which may induce thermal damage to hepatic parenchyma, or the use of anaesthetic medications some of which ... 4. Hashikura Y, Kawasaki S, Munakata Y, Hashimoto S, Hayashi K, Makuuchi M. Effects of peritoneal insufflation on hepatic and ...
We call this the splanchnic circulation. So, that means a clot in the hepatic vein or in the portal vein. So, veins that drain ...
There are some key differences in the vasoactive pathways and mediators in the hepatic and splanchnic circulations. The ... Propranolol+sorafenib causes a greater reduction in PP and the extent of portal-systemic shunting, splanchnic and hepatic ... Endothelial cells in the splanchnic circulation generate an exaggerated amount of vasodilator messengers including nitric oxide ... CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) expression in the splanchnic circulation was significantly reduced by ...
This unchanged splanchnic resistance was ascribed to a combination of arteriolar dilatation and hepatic venoconstriction, and ... rather than a pooling of blood in the splanchnic circulation. The decrease in the splanchnic cell percentage was about the same ... The venoconstriction in the hepatic circulation and probably also that in the other circuits contributed to a reduction in ... After the subcutaneous injection of histamine (3 mg/kg), changes in splanchnic and systemic circulation were studied in ...
... nonspecific production of NO significantly increases in the splanchnic circulation [6]. Of note, activated hepatic stellate ... b The hepatic sinus diameter changed after the cells were treated with 40 mg AICAR for 15 min. c The number of opened hepatic ... Chronic AICAR treatment could also alleviate PHT and had a good impact on systemic and splanchnic circulation. We believe that ... Unbalanced vasoactive factors in the hepatic sinusoid and splanchnic circulatory system are considered the main contributors to ...
  • Recent research has defined many of the mediators and mechanisms involved in this angiogenic process, linking the central roles of hepatic stellate cells and endothelial cells. (elsevier.es)
  • In vitro experiments showed that the gene expression levels of TGF-b, a-SMA, and collagen 1 in primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were significantly decreased after AICAR treatment. (springer.com)
  • This has both a fixed component due to fibrotic disruption of the architecture and a dynamic component due to changes in the contractility of the hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts in the hepatic sinusoids ( 11 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • However, there are many primary disorders of the hepatic vasculature, and these are the focus of this chapter. (abdominalkey.com)
  • The direct consequence of a chronic accumulation of lipids in the hepatic cell (steatosis) is the progressive appearance of secondary necrotic phenomena which, at the end of their evolution, will cause a generalized fibrosis of this organ. (aldf.org)
  • Anti-hepatic fibrosis effect of chronic aleglitazar treatment was accompanied by anti-angiogenesis effects in the mesentery area. (eurekalert.org)
  • The hepatic fibrosis (A, 20x) was assessed by Sirus red staining, whereas mesenteric angiogenesis. (eurekalert.org)
  • We have found that a newly developed PPARα/γ agonist, aleglitazar, is able to suppress the inflammation, angiogenesis, tissue damage, and fibrosis associated with cirrhosis in the splanchnic, intestinal, as well as the hepatic circulations of cirrhotic rats with PH syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • Conclusion: Transient alterations of hepatic enzymes are frequently observed after uneventful laparoscopic cholecystectomy, presumably attributed to the elevated intraabdominal pressure of the pneumoperitoneum. (ispub.com)
  • Hepatic Acute and chronic rejection -- 12. (stanford.edu)
  • Acute and subacute presentations (days to weeks) are characterized by shortness of breath at rest and/or with exertion, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and right upper quadrant discomfort due to acute hepatic congestion (right heart failure). (statpearls.com)
  • Pubmed ID: 12095126 The production of monoethylglycine xylidide (MEGX) from lidocaine is thought to be dependent on hepatic blood flow. (jove.com)
  • In this situation, however, localized or more general mechanical compression may also contribute to hepatic damage, depending on the severity of outflow obstruction. (abdominalkey.com)
  • The development of knowledge of the hepatic vasculature is presented from a historical perspective with modern concepts summarized based on the perspective of the author's four decades of devotion to this most marvelous of organs. (nih.gov)
  • Constriction of that vasculature decreases flow through the splanchnic organs and tissues, and sequesters blood upstream, decreasing the VR and CO . (oatext.com)
  • The aims of this study were: (a) to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for splanchnic vein thrombosis in cirrhotic patients awaiting transplantation and (b) to assess the usefulness of anticoagulation. (bmj.com)
  • Unfortunately, standard coagulation tests are unreliable when stratifying bleeding or thrombotic risk in cirrhosis and may not be applicable in cirrhotic patients as they would in those with normal hepatic function [1,5- (oatext.com)
  • The natural history, clinical presentation, investigations and modalities of treatment for splenic artery aneurysm, hepatic artery aneurysm, and superior mesenteric artery aneurysm are discussed. (hkmj.org)
  • this decrease is most likely secondary to release of local hepatic vasodilatory substances. (medscape.com)