Polycythemia Vera: A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Hemochromatosis: A disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a triad of HEMOSIDEROSIS; LIVER CIRRHOSIS; and DIABETES MELLITUS. It is caused by massive iron deposits in parenchymal cells that may develop after a prolonged increase of iron absorption. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Polycythemia: An increase in the total red cell mass of the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bloodletting: Puncture of a vein to draw blood for therapeutic purposes. Bloodletting therapy has been used in Talmudic and Indian medicine since the medieval time, and was still practiced widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. Its modern counterpart is PHLEBOTOMY.Thrombocythemia, Essential: A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.Janus Kinase 2: A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Pipobroman: An antineoplastic agent that acts by alkylation.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Histocompatibility Antigens Class I: Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.Transferrin: An iron-binding beta1-globulin that is synthesized in the LIVER and secreted into the blood. It plays a central role in the transport of IRON throughout the circulation. A variety of transferrin isoforms exist in humans, including some that are considered markers for specific disease states.Erythroid Precursor Cells: The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.Hepcidins: Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Aloe: A plant genus of the family Aloeaceae, order Liliales (or Asphodelaceae, Asparagales in APG system) which is used medicinally. It contains anthraquinone glycosides such as aloin-emodin or aloe-emodin (EMODIN).Chelation Therapy: Therapy of heavy metal poisoning using agents which sequester the metal from organs or tissues and bind it firmly within the ring structure of a new compound which can be eliminated from the body.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Receptors, Thrombopoietin: Cell surface receptors that are specific for THROMBOPOIETIN. They signal through interaction with JANUS KINASES such as JANUS KINASE 2.Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: An autosomal dominant or acquired porphyria due to a deficiency of UROPORPHYRINOGEN DECARBOXYLASE in the LIVER. It is characterized by photosensitivity and cutaneous lesions with little or no neurologic symptoms. Type I is the acquired form and is strongly associated with liver diseases and hepatic toxicities caused by alcohol or estrogenic steroids. Type II is the familial form.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Receptors, Transferrin: Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind iron-bearing transferrin, are endocytosed with its ligand and then returned to the cell surface where transferrin without its iron is released.Mutation, Missense: A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.GPI-Linked Proteins: A subclass of lipid-linked proteins that contain a GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL LINKAGE which holds them to the CELL MEMBRANE.Receptors, Erythropoietin: Cell surface proteins that bind erythropoietin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Hydroxyurea: An antineoplastic agent that inhibits DNA synthesis through the inhibition of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary: The formation and development of blood cells outside the BONE MARROW, as in the SPLEEN; LIVER; or LYMPH NODES.Erythroid Cells: The series of cells in the red blood cell lineage at various stages of differentiation.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Iron Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of iron in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing, & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Budd-Chiari Syndrome: A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Deferoxamine: Natural product isolated from Streptomyces pilosus. It forms iron complexes and is used as a chelating agent, particularly in the mesylate form.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative: A myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorder characterized by myelodysplasia associated with bone marrow and peripheral blood patterns similar to CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA, but cytogenetically lacking a PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME or bcr/abl fusion gene (GENES, ABL).Chromosomes, Human, 19-20: The short, metacentric human chromosomes, called group F in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 19 and 20.Cation Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
Therapeutic phlebotomy refers to the drawing of a unit of blood in specific cases like hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, ... "Haemochromatosis". The Lancet. 388 (10045): 706-716. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(15)01315-x. Cook, Lynda S. "Therapeutic Phlebotomy ... Bloodletting is used today in the treatment of a few diseases, including hemochromatosis and polycythemia; however, these rare ... Phlebotomy (book). Bonnie K. Davis. 2001. ISBN 978-0-7668-2518-5. Retrieved 2009-07-12. "The Basis of Therapeutic Phlebotomy". ...
... which is used to treat conditions such as hereditary hemochromatosis or polycythemia vera. This blood is sometimes treated as a ... The process has similar risks to other forms of phlebotomy. Bruising of the arm from the needle insertion is the most common ... "Hereditary Hemochromatosis: Perspectives of Public Health, Medical Genetics, and Primary Care". CDC Office of Public Health ... Others, such as the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, accept blood from donors with hemochromatosis. It is a genetic disorder ...
Phlebotomy is a technique in which a needle is temporarily inserted into a vein to provide venous access for venous blood ... Polycythemia Vera * 2002 177216-overview Diseases & Conditions Diseases & Conditions Hemochromatosis * 2001 /viewarticle/934792 ... encoded search term (Phlebotomy) and Phlebotomy What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * Phlebotomy ... Syncope - Some patients manifest a vasovagal response during or just after phlebotomy; thus, phlebotomy in a patient with a ...
Make research projects and school reports about Phlebotomy easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... Phlebotomy that is part of treatment (therapeutic phlebotomy) is performed to treat polycythemia vera, a condition that causes ... Phlebotomy for treatment of hemochromatosis typically involves removing a unit of blood-250 mg of iron-once a week. Phlebotomy ... Phlebotomy that is part of treatment (therapeutic phlebotomy) is performed to treat polycythemia vera, a condition that causes ...
Treated w/ phlebotomy or myelotoxic drugs. Polycythemia vera 91 X-linked bleeding disorder secondary to clotting factor ... Treated by phlebotomy. Signs/symptoms - bronze pigmentation of skin, diabetes, hepatomegaly, eventually cardiac failure. ... Number of erythrocytes per cubic millimeter of blood; important in the evaluation of anemia or polycythemia. ... Hemochromatosis 90 General increase in red blood cells (erythremia) resulting in hyperviscosity. More common in men. Signs/ ...
It is used in treating hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera and in infants born with elevated hematocrits. The definition... ... A definition of the medical term "phlebotomy" is presented. It refers to the surgical opening of a vein to withdraw blood. The ...
... and polycythemia vera, the possibility of treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis with PTG-300 as a hormone replacement therapy ... Current treatments for hereditary hemochromatosis, including periodic phlebotomy, can be a significant burden to patients, ... polycythemia vera (PV) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). Hepcidin is a natural peptide hormone that regulates iron ... polycythemia vera and hereditary hemochromatosis. PTG-200 is an oral, gut-restricted interleukin-23 receptor specific ...
What is therapeutic phlebotomy? Meaning of therapeutic phlebotomy medical term. What does therapeutic phlebotomy mean? ... Looking for online definition of therapeutic phlebotomy in the Medical Dictionary? therapeutic phlebotomy explanation free. ... Fibrinogen levels in Polycythemia Vera patients and hematocrit target for performing a therapeutic phlebotomy in southwest ... Hemochromatosis Patient Renal Patient Cause of overload Increased iron Multiple transfusions absorption or parenteral iron ...
Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec(TM)) reduces phlebotomy requirements in polycythemia vera. Silver, R.T. Leukemia (2003) [Pubmed] ... Phlebotomy increases cadmium uptake in hemochromatosis. Akesson, A., Stål, P., Vahter, M. Environ. Health Perspect. (2000) [ ... Increased incidence of acute leukemia in polycythemia vera associated with chlorambucil therapy. Berk, P.D., Goldberg, J.D., ... Nontransferrin-bound iron in plasma from hemochromatosis patients: effect of phlebotomy therapy. Aruoma, O.I., Bomford, A., ...
What is arterial blood sample phlebotomy? Meaning of arterial blood sample phlebotomy medical term. What does arterial blood ... Looking for online definition of arterial blood sample phlebotomy in the Medical Dictionary? arterial blood sample phlebotomy ... Phlebotomy that is part of treatment (therapeutic phlebotomy) is performed to treat polycythemia vera, a condition that causes ... Phlebotomy for treatment of hemochromatosis typically involves removing a unit of blood-or 250 mg of iron-once a week. ...
Therapeutic phlebotomy refers to the drawing of a unit of blood in specific cases like hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, ... "Haemochromatosis". The Lancet. 388 (10045): 706-716. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(15)01315-x. Cook, Lynda S. "Therapeutic Phlebotomy ... Bloodletting is used today in the treatment of a few diseases, including hemochromatosis and polycythemia; however, these rare ... Phlebotomy (book). Bonnie K. Davis. 2001. ISBN 978-0-7668-2518-5. Retrieved 2009-07-12. "The Basis of Therapeutic Phlebotomy". ...
... which is used to treat conditions such as hereditary hemochromatosis or polycythemia vera. This blood is sometimes treated as a ... The process has similar risks to other forms of phlebotomy. Bruising of the arm from the needle insertion is the most common ... "Hereditary Hemochromatosis: Perspectives of Public Health, Medical Genetics, and Primary Care". CDC Office of Public Health ... Others, such as the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, accept blood from donors with hemochromatosis. It is a genetic disorder ...
... hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda. ... Phlebotomy. The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for ... circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA. ...
... such as Hemochromatosis and non-Hemochromatosis (polycythemia vera, erythrocytosis, and other conditions that abnormally ... Therapeutic Phlebotomy Expand Content. REASON FOR PROCEDURE:. Therapeutic phlebotomy is ordered by doctors at periodic ... Removal of blood from the body is called phlebotomy. The removed blood will be disposed. ... Exchange and Therapeutic Phlebotomy. Below you can find detailed descriptions of each including reasons a patient might need a ...
... such as polycythemia vera (in which the bone marrow produces excess red/white blood cells) and haemochromatosis (iron overload ... In modern medicine, bloodletting is known as phlebotomy and is used in a few, very specific circumstances, ...
None of these conditions should be confused with polycythemia vera (PV), which is not an iron disorder, but a condition where ... Individuals with DIOS are helped by phlebotomy, diet and exercise. The FeGGT test is helpful in determining the iron status and ... Some of the genetic disorders that result in iron overload include are hereditary hemochromatosis (all types), African iron ... When a patients hemoglobin is too low for phlebotomy, iron reduction will likely require iron-chelation, which is the removal ...
Polycythemia vera, is definitely the best analogous code for hemochromatosis. Because of his regular phlebotomies, he would ... Code 7704: Polycythemia vera is the opposite of anemia. Instead of having too few red blood cells, the bone marrow produces too ... Proposed- Code 7704: Polycythemia vera is the opposite of anemia. Instead of having too few red blood cells, the bone marrow ... Polycythemia vera is not curable but can be treated. If it requires a peripheral blood or bone marrow stem-cell transplant, ...
Currently, therapeutic phlebotomy is approved for three main indications: haemochromatosis, polycythaemia vera and porphyria ... phlebotomy also had a preventive role. In present day medicine, phlebotomy can be performed in physicians offices, at a blood ... Phlebotomy, known also as bloodletting or venesection, is a major therapeutic procedure that has been performed by physicians ... Therapeutic phlebotomy has long been considered the treatment of choice in most patients with PCT; hydroxychloroquine is the ...
Hemochromatosis, iron toxicity and polycythemia vera are certain medical conditions which can be treated using this method. ... The Purpose of Phlebotomy. Phlebotomy is used in multiple circumstances which have been briefly described below:. * To collect ... Phlebotomy is the medical term that is used to describe the procedure involved in collecting blood from a patients body. In ... Phlebotomy Training is extremely important when it comes to learning certain medical practices and procedures, which pave the ...
... secondary polycythaemia from smoking or testosterone use, and polycythaemia vera. ... Therapeutic phlebotomy Therapeutic phlebotomy refers to the practice of donating blood to assist with the management of medical ... Common causes for these conditions include hereditary haemochromatosis, ... Subsequent therapeutic phlebotomies may take place at other clinic sites provided the donor is able to tolerate the phlebotomy ...
Hemochromatosis. *Polycythemia Vera. *Secondary Polycythemia. Cellular Therapies. Mononuclear cells (MNC) provide the starting ... Red Cell Reduction by Phlebotomy. Procedure Overview. Red Blood Cell Reduction by Phlebotomy is a procedure that removes Red ...
Look for polycythemia or erythremia polycythemia or polycythemia vera in any medical book or medical search engine like webmd. ... Also look under hemochromatosis . Blood has to be removed to keep the iron levels under control. Otherwise the excess iron ... We use regular blood donor kits for our phlebotomy patients -- a big improvement over the leeches of times gone by! (Not sure ... My girlfriends daughter was DX 4 years ago with hemochromatosis, went on to have a successful pregancy and beautiful baby girl ...
Therapeutic phlebotomy refers to the drawing of a unit of blood in specific cases like hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, ...
... polycythemia-vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle and cell disease.. If you have question on the procedures, please call (045 ... Phlebotomy. Phlebotomy is done by taking a blood from circulatory system via incision or venoclygis as part of treatment ... regimen for some blood disorders such as hemochromatosis, ...
... we examined the therapeutic effects and use of phlebotomy as the recommended treatment for hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, ...
None of these conditions should be confused with polycythemia vera (PV), which is not an iron disorder, but… ... Individuals with DIOS are helped by phlebotomy, diet and exercise. The FeGGT test is helpful in determining the iron status and ... Some of the genetic disorders that result in iron overload include are hereditary hemochromatosis (all types), African iron ...
Therapeutic phlebotomy refers to the drawing of a unit of blood in specific cases like hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, ... Bloodletting is used today in the treatment of a few diseases, including hemochromatosis and polycythemia;[36] however, these ... Phlebotomy[edit]. Today it is well established that bloodletting is not effective for most diseases. Indeed, it is mostly ... In most cases, phlebotomy now refers to the removal of small quantities of blood for diagnostic purposes. However, in the case ...
  • The endpoints of this proof-of-concept study include change in TSAT and serum iron levels, reductions in phlebotomy requirements, and an assessment of participant-reported outcomes (SF-36 survey). (prnewswire.com)
  • Dublin, July 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Polycythemia Vera Market Insights, Epidemiology, and Market Forecast-2030" drug pipelines has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. (yahoo.com)
  • It also helps to understand the Polycythemia Vera clinical trial details, expressive pharmacological action, agreements and collaborations, approval and patent details, advantages and disadvantages of each included drug and the latest news and press releases. (yahoo.com)