Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.
Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.
Formation of stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT, usually in the KIDNEY; URINARY BLADDER; or the URETER.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.
Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.
The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
Infections with fungi of the genus ASPERGILLUS.
Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.
Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.

Changes in haematological parameters and iron metabolism associated with a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon. (1/1031)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate haematological variations and iron related changes in the serum of participants in a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon run. PARTICIPANTS: Seven male and two female participants in a 1600 km foot race. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from the participants before, after four and 11 days of running, and at the end of the event. Samples were analysed by standard methods for haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total red cell count, mean red cell volume, mean red cell haemoglobin, total white cell count and differential, platelets, reticulocytes, iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, percentage transferrin saturation, haptoglobin, and bilirubin and corrected for changes in plasma volume. RESULTS: The following variables decreased during the event (p < 0.05): haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean red cell volume, percentage lymphocytes, percentage monocytes, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, and percentage transferrin saturation. Increases (p < 0.05) were found in plasma volume, total red cell count (day 4 only), total white cell count, percentage and absolute numbers of neutrophils and reticulocytes, absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes (day 4 only), absolute numbers of eosinophils (day 11 and race end), absolute numbers of basophils (race end only), platelets, ferritin, haptoglobin, and bilirubin (day 4 only). CONCLUSION: Ultramarathon running is associated with a wide range of changes in haematological parameters, many of which are related to the normal acute phase response to injury. These should not be confused with indicators of disease.  (+info)

Phase II study of cisplatin and vinorelbine as first-line chemotherapy in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (2/1031)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the activity and toxicity of the combination of cisplatin (80 mg/m2 day 1) and vinorelbine (25 mg/m2 days 1 and 8) in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix that has not been previously treated with chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty patients with cervical cancer were enrolled onto this study (27 stage IB-III, 23 stage IVB-recurrent). A two-stage optimal Simon design was applied. Thirteen responders of 29 treated patients were required to proceed beyond the first stage, and 28 responders were needed overall. RESULTS: Hematologic toxicity was mild, with neutropenia being the most frequent side effect. Nonhematologic toxicity was frequent but never severe; one patient had grade 3 peripheral neurotoxicity. Objective responses were recorded for 32 patients (64%): 11 patients (22%) achieved a complete response (CR) and 21 patients (42%) achieved a partial response (PR). The response rate was 81.5% in patients with IB-III stage (25.9% CR rate) and 43.5% in patients with IVB-recurrent disease (17.4% CR rate). Responses were seen both in stage IVB patients (one CR and two PRs, for an overall rate of 37.5%) and in patients with recurrent disease (three CRs + four PRs, for an overall rate of 46.7%). CONCLUSION: The combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine is an active regimen in the treatment of patients with early-stage and advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity of this combination is mild.  (+info)

Phase II trial of paclitaxel and cisplatin in metastatic and recurrent carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (3/1031)

PURPOSE: Both paclitaxel and cisplatin have moderate activity in patients with metastatic or recurrent cancer of the cervix, and the combination of these two agents has shown activity and possible synergism in a variety of solid tumors. We administered this combination to patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer to evaluate its activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-four consecutive patients were treated on an outpatient basis with paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 administered intravenously over a 3-hour period followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m2 administered intravenously with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. The chemotherapy was administered every 3 weeks for a maximum of six courses. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (47%; 95% confidence interval, 30% to 65%) achieved an objective response, including five complete responses and 11 partial responses. Responses occurred in 28% of patients with disease within the radiation field only and in 57% of patients with disease involving other sites. The median duration of response was 5.5 months, and the median times to progression and survival for all patients were 5 and 9 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included anemia in 18% of patients and granulocytopenia in 15% of patients. Fifty-three percent of patients developed some degree of neurotoxicity; 21% of cases were grade 2 or worse. CONCLUSION: The combination of paclitaxel with cisplatin seems relatively well tolerated and moderately active in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. The significant incidence of neurotoxicity is of concern, and alternative methods of administration of the two agents could be evaluated. Then, further study of this combination, alone or with the addition of other active agents, is warranted.  (+info)

Combined irinotecan and oxaliplatin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in patients with advanced fluoropyrimidine/leucovorin-pretreated colorectal cancer. (4/1031)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of combined irinotecan and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced colorectal cancer pretreated with leucovorin-modulated fluoropyrimidines. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, who progressed while receiving or within 6 months after discontinuing palliative chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines/leucovorin, were enrolled onto this study. Treatment consisted of oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 on days 1 + 15 and irinotecan 80 mg/m2 on days 1 + 8 + 15 every 4 weeks. Depending on the absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) on the day of scheduled chemotherapeutic drug administration, a 5-day course of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) 5 microg/kg/d was given. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 42% for all 36 assessable patients (95% confidence interval, 26% to 59%), including two complete remissions (6%). Thirteen additional patients (36%) had stable disease, and only eight (22%) progressed. The median time to treatment failure was 7.5 months (range, 1 to 13.5+ months). After a median follow-up time of 14 months, 19 patients (53%) are still alive. Hematologic toxicity was commonly observed, although according to the ANC-adapted use of G-CSF (in 31 patients during 81 of 174 courses), it was generally mild: grade 3 and 4 granulocytopenia occurred in only five and two cases, respectively. The most frequent nonhematologic adverse reactions were nausea/emesis and diarrhea, which were rated severe in 17% and 19%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the combination of irinotecan and oxaliplatin with or without G-CSF has substantial antitumor activity in patients with progressive fluoropyrimidine/leucovorin-pretreated colorectal cancer. Overall toxicity was modest, with gastrointestinal symptoms constituting the dose-limiting side effects. Further evaluation of this regimen seems warranted.  (+info)

Front-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with docetaxel and gemcitabine: a multicenter phase II trial. (5/1031)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the tolerance and efficacy of the combination of docetaxel and gemcitabine in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-one chemotherapy-naive patients with NSCLC were treated with gemcitabine 900 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8 and docetaxel 100 mg/m2 intravenously on day 8 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (150 microg/m2, subcutaneously) support from day 9 to day 15. Treatment was repeated every 3 weeks. RESULTS: The patients' median age was 64 years. The World Health Organization performance status was 0 to 1 in 39 patients and 2 in 12 patients. Fifteen patients (29%) had stage IIIB disease, and 36 (71%) had stage IV; histology was mainly squamous cell carcinoma (59%). A partial response was achieved in 19 patients (37.5%; 95% confidence interval, 24% to 50%); stable disease and progressive disease were each observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The median duration of response and the time to tumor progression were 5 and 6 months, respectively. The median survival was 13 months, and the actuarial 1-year survival was 50.7%. Grade 4 anemia and thrombocytopenia were rare (2%). Four patients (8%) developed grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, and all were complicated with fever; there was no treatment-related death. Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea occurred in three patients (6%), grade 2 or 3 neurotoxicity in four patients (8%), grade 2 or 3 asthenia in 10 patients (20%), and grade 2 or 3 edema in 10 patients (20%). CONCLUSION: The combination of docetaxel/gemcitabine is well tolerated, can be used for outpatients, and is active for the treatment of advanced NSCLC. This treatment merits further comparison with other cisplatin- or carboplatin-based combinations.  (+info)

Paclitaxel and carboplatin in the treatment of small-cell lung cancer patients resistant to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and etoposide: a non-cross-resistant schedule. (6/1031)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of paclitaxel and carboplatin (PC) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients resistant to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CDE). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a phase II study with PC in SCLC patients who relapsed within 3 months after first-line treatment with CDE. Paclitaxel administration (175 mg/m2 by a 3-hour intravenous infusion) was followed by a 30-minute infusion of carboplatin (area under the curve 7; Chatelut formula) once every 3 weeks for five cycles. Dexamethasone, clemastine, and ranitidine were standard premedication before every cycle. RESULTS: Included were 35 patients (median age, 59 years; 16 with limited disease and 19 with extensive disease; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of < or = 1; median time off treatment 6 weeks) who were previously treated with CDE (n = 33), oral etoposide (n = 2), and reinduction CDE (n = 15); only one patient had received three CDE treatments of five cycles. The CDE regimen was followed by local thoracic radiotherapy in seven patients. Hematologic toxicity of grade 3 or 4, for leukopenia was 27% and 6%, for thrombocytopenia 21% and 13%, and for anemia 17% and 0%, respectively, for a total of 132 cycles. Two patients had neutropenic fever; no toxic death occurred. Nonhematologic toxicity was paresthesia CTC grade 3, diarrhea grade 4, and myalgia grade 3 in one patient each. Reversible paresthesia (CTC grade 1 and 2) in toes and fingers was reported in 69% of patients. Thirty-four patients were assessable for response: complete response in two patients, partial response in 23 patients, stable disease in eight patients, and progressive disease in one patient (response rate, 73.5%; 95% confidence interval, 59% to 88%). One patient was found to have atypical carcinoid at pathologic review and was excluded. Median time to progression was 21 weeks (range, 3 to 40 weeks). Median survival was 31 weeks (range, 6 to 112 weeks). One-year survival was 9%. CONCLUSION: Second-line PC in CDE-resistant SCLC patients yields a high response rate and seems non-cross-resistant to CDE. Toxicity was mild in these poor-prognosis patients.  (+info)

Phase II trial of primary chemotherapy followed by reduced-dose radiation for CNS germ cell tumors. (7/1031)

PURPOSE: A prospective phase II study was initiated to assess the response rate, survival, and late effects of treatment in patients with newly diagnosed CNS germ cell tumors (GCT), using etoposide plus cisplatin followed by radiation therapy prescribed by extent of disease, histology, and response to chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventeen patients aged 8 to 24 years with histologically proven CNS GCT received etoposide (100 mg/m2/d) plus cisplatin (20 mg/m2/d) daily for 5 days every 3 weeks for four cycles, followed by radiation therapy. Nine patients had germinomas; eight had mixed GCT. Four patients (three with germinomas and one with mixed GCT) presented with leptomeningeal dissemination. RESULTS: Radiographically, 14 of 17 patients were assessable for response; 11 patients experienced complete regression, and three had major partial regression before radiation. Six of seven assessable patients with elevated CSF levels of alpha-fetoprotein or betahuman chorionic gonadotropin had normalization with chemotherapy alone; all normalized with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy. All 17 patients are alive without evidence of disease (median follow-up, 51 months). One patient developed a relapse in the spinal leptomeninges and was rendered free of disease with spinal radiation more than 5 years ago. One patient developed carotid stenosis requiring surgery. Thus far, only minimal long-term deterioration in neurocognitive function has been detected as a consequence of protocol treatment. CONCLUSION: Conventional-dose intravenous chemotherapy with etoposide and cisplatin can effect tumor regression in a high proportion of patients with CNS GCT, including those with leptomeningeal metastases. Acute and long-term toxicities are acceptable. Progression-free survival and overall survival are excellent.  (+info)

Phase I trial of docetaxel with estramustine in androgen-independent prostate cancer. (8/1031)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the toxicity, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of docetaxel when combined with oral estramustine and dexamethasone in a phase I study in patients with progressive metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-four men were stratified into minimally pretreated (MPT) and extensively pretreated (EPT) groups. Estramustine 280 mg PO tid was administered 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals on days 1 through 5, with escalated doses of docetaxel from 40 to 80 mg/m2 on day 2. Treatment was repeated every 21 days. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients were assessable for toxicity and 33 for response. In the MPT patients, dose-limiting myelosuppression was reached at 80 mg/m2, with six patients experiencing grade 3/4 granulocytopenia. In EPT patients, escalation above 70 mg/m2 was not attempted. Fourteen MPT (70%) and six EPT (50%) patients had a > or = 50% decline in serum PSA on two consecutive measurements taken at least 2 weeks apart. The overall 50% PSA response rate was 63% (95% confidence interval [CI], 28% to 81%). Of the 18 patients with bidimensionally measurable disease, five (28%; 95% CI, 11% to 54%) achieved a partial response. At the time of entry onto the study, 15 patients required narcotic analgesics for bone pain; after treatment, eight (53%) discontinued their pain medications. The area under the curve for docetaxel increased linearly from 40 to 70 mg/m2. At 80 mg/m2, the measured area under the curve was 8.37 (standard deviation, 0.724), which was significantly higher than the previously reported values. CONCLUSION: The recommended phase II dose of docetaxel combined with estramustine is 70 mg/m2 in MPT patients and 60 mg/m2 in EPT patients. This combination is active in men with androgen-independent prostate cancer.  (+info)

Hematologic diseases, also known as hematological disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect the production, function, or destruction of blood cells or blood-related components, such as plasma. These diseases can affect erythrocytes (red blood cells), leukocytes (white blood cells), and platelets (thrombocytes), as well as clotting factors and hemoglobin.

Hematologic diseases can be broadly categorized into three main types:

1. Anemia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin, or hematocrit, leading to insufficient oxygen transport to tissues and organs. Examples include iron deficiency anemia, sickle cell anemia, and aplastic anemia.
2. Leukemia and other disorders of white blood cells: These conditions involve the abnormal production or function of leukocytes, which can lead to impaired immunity and increased susceptibility to infections. Examples include leukemias (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia), lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes.
3. Platelet and clotting disorders: These diseases affect the production or function of platelets and clotting factors, leading to abnormal bleeding or clotting tendencies. Examples include hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Hematologic diseases can have various causes, including genetic defects, infections, autoimmune processes, environmental factors, or malignancies. Proper diagnosis and management of these conditions often require the expertise of hematologists, who specialize in diagnosing and treating disorders related to blood and its components.

Hematologic neoplasms, also known as hematological malignancies, are a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and accumulation of abnormal blood cells or bone marrow cells. These disorders can originate from the myeloid or lymphoid cell lines, which give rise to various types of blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Hematologic neoplasms can be broadly classified into three categories:

1. Leukemias: These are cancers that primarily affect the bone marrow and blood-forming tissues. They result in an overproduction of abnormal white blood cells, which interfere with the normal functioning of the blood and immune system. There are several types of leukemia, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).
2. Lymphomas: These are cancers that develop from the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune system responsible for fighting infections. Lymphomas can affect lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and other organs. The two main types of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
3. Myelomas: These are cancers that arise from the plasma cells, a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies. Multiple myeloma is the most common type of myeloma, characterized by an excessive proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, leading to the production of abnormal amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulins (M proteins) and bone destruction.

Hematologic neoplasms can have various symptoms, such as fatigue, weakness, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, weight loss, swollen lymph nodes, and bone pain. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, imaging studies, and sometimes bone marrow biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the disease and may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

Urolithiasis is the formation of stones (calculi) in the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. These stones can be composed of various substances such as calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid, or struvite. The presence of urolithiasis can cause symptoms like severe pain in the back or side, nausea, vomiting, fever, and blood in the urine. The condition can be managed with medications, increased fluid intake, and in some cases, surgical intervention may be required to remove the stones.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

Aplastic anemia is a medical condition characterized by pancytopenia (a decrease in all three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets) due to the failure of bone marrow to produce new cells. It is called "aplastic" because the bone marrow becomes hypocellular or "aplastic," meaning it contains few or no blood-forming stem cells.

The condition can be acquired or inherited, with acquired aplastic anemia being more common. Acquired aplastic anemia can result from exposure to toxic chemicals, radiation, drugs, viral infections, or autoimmune disorders. Inherited forms of the disease include Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita.

Symptoms of aplastic anemia may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, frequent infections, and fever. Treatment options for aplastic anemia depend on the severity of the condition and its underlying cause. They may include blood transfusions, immunosuppressive therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of diverse bone marrow disorders characterized by dysplasia (abnormal development or maturation) of one or more types of blood cells or by ineffective hematopoiesis, resulting in cytopenias (lower than normal levels of one or more types of blood cells). MDS can be classified into various subtypes based on the number and type of cytopenias, the degree of dysplasia, the presence of ring sideroblasts, and cytogenetic abnormalities.

The condition primarily affects older adults, with a median age at diagnosis of around 70 years. MDS can evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in approximately 30-40% of cases. The pathophysiology of MDS involves genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities that lead to impaired differentiation and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, ultimately resulting in cytopenias and an increased risk of developing AML.

The diagnosis of MDS typically requires a bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, along with cytogenetic and molecular analyses to identify specific genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities. Treatment options for MDS depend on the subtype, severity of cytopenias, and individual patient factors. These may include supportive care measures, such as transfusions and growth factor therapy, or more aggressive treatments, such as chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a condition that can occur after an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), where the donated immune cells (graft) recognize the recipient's tissues (host) as foreign and attack them. This results in inflammation and damage to various organs, particularly the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver.

Acute GVHD typically occurs within 100 days of transplantation and is characterized by symptoms such as rash, diarrhea, and liver dysfunction. Chronic GVHD, on the other hand, can occur after 100 days or even years post-transplant and may present with a wider range of symptoms, including dry eyes and mouth, skin changes, lung involvement, and issues with mobility and flexibility in joints.

GVHD is a significant complication following allogeneic HSCT and can have a substantial impact on the patient's quality of life and overall prognosis. Preventative measures, such as immunosuppressive therapy, are often taken to reduce the risk of GVHD, but its management remains a challenge in transplant medicine.

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a medical procedure in which damaged or destroyed bone marrow is replaced with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. The main types of BMT are autologous, allogeneic, and umbilical cord blood transplantation.

In autologous BMT, the patient's own bone marrow is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who have undergone high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy their cancerous bone marrow.

In allogeneic BMT, bone marrow from a genetically matched donor is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood disorders who have failed other treatments.

Umbilical cord blood transplantation involves using stem cells from umbilical cord blood as a source of healthy bone marrow. This type of BMT is often used in children and adults who do not have a matched donor for allogeneic BMT.

The process of BMT typically involves several steps, including harvesting the bone marrow or stem cells from the donor, conditioning the patient's body to receive the new bone marrow or stem cells, transplanting the new bone marrow or stem cells into the patient's body, and monitoring the patient for signs of engraftment and complications.

BMT is a complex and potentially risky procedure that requires careful planning, preparation, and follow-up care. However, it can be a life-saving treatment for many patients with blood disorders or cancer.

An immunocompromised host refers to an individual who has a weakened or impaired immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and decreased ability to fight off pathogens. This condition can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developed during one's lifetime).

Acquired immunocompromised states may result from various factors such as medical treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunosuppressive drugs), infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS), chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, malnutrition, liver disease), or aging.

Immunocompromised hosts are at a higher risk for developing severe and life-threatening infections due to their reduced immune response. Therefore, they require special consideration when it comes to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases.

Homologous transplantation is a type of transplant surgery where organs or tissues are transferred between two genetically non-identical individuals of the same species. The term "homologous" refers to the similarity in structure and function of the donated organ or tissue to the recipient's own organ or tissue.

For example, a heart transplant from one human to another is an example of homologous transplantation because both organs are hearts and perform the same function. Similarly, a liver transplant, kidney transplant, lung transplant, and other types of organ transplants between individuals of the same species are also considered homologous transplantations.

Homologous transplantation is in contrast to heterologous or xenogeneic transplantation, where organs or tissues are transferred from one species to another, such as a pig heart transplanted into a human. Homologous transplantation is more commonly performed than heterologous transplantation due to the increased risk of rejection and other complications associated with xenogeneic transplants.

Aspergillosis is a medical condition that is caused by the infection of the Aspergillus fungi. This fungus is commonly found in decaying organic matter, such as leaf litter and compost piles, and can also be found in some indoor environments like air conditioning systems and old buildings with water damage.

There are several types of aspergillosis, including:

1. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA): This type of aspergillosis occurs when a person's immune system overreacts to the Aspergillus fungi, causing inflammation in the airways and lungs. ABPA is often seen in people with asthma or cystic fibrosis.
2. Invasive aspergillosis: This is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when the Aspergillus fungi invade the bloodstream and spread to other organs, such as the brain, heart, or kidneys. Invasive aspergillosis typically affects people with weakened immune systems, such as those undergoing chemotherapy or organ transplantation.
3. Aspergilloma: Also known as a "fungus ball," an aspergilloma is a growth of the Aspergillus fungi that forms in a preexisting lung cavity, such as one caused by previous lung disease or injury. While an aspergilloma itself is not typically harmful, it can cause symptoms like coughing up blood or chest pain if it grows too large or becomes infected.

Symptoms of aspergillosis can vary depending on the type and severity of the infection. Treatment may include antifungal medications, surgery to remove the fungal growth, or management of underlying conditions that increase the risk of infection.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a medical procedure where hematopoietic stem cells (immature cells that give rise to all blood cell types) are transplanted into a patient. This procedure is often used to treat various malignant and non-malignant disorders affecting the hematopoietic system, such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, aplastic anemia, inherited immune deficiency diseases, and certain genetic metabolic disorders.

The transplantation can be autologous (using the patient's own stem cells), allogeneic (using stem cells from a genetically matched donor, usually a sibling or unrelated volunteer), or syngeneic (using stem cells from an identical twin).

The process involves collecting hematopoietic stem cells, most commonly from the peripheral blood or bone marrow. The collected cells are then infused into the patient after the recipient's own hematopoietic system has been ablated (or destroyed) using high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. This allows the donor's stem cells to engraft, reconstitute, and restore the patient's hematopoietic system.

HSCT is a complex and potentially risky procedure with various complications, including graft-versus-host disease, infections, and organ damage. However, it offers the potential for cure or long-term remission in many patients with otherwise fatal diseases.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

Antifungal agents are a type of medication used to treat and prevent fungal infections. These agents work by targeting and disrupting the growth of fungi, which include yeasts, molds, and other types of fungi that can cause illness in humans.

There are several different classes of antifungal agents, including:

1. Azoles: These agents work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes. Examples of azole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole.
2. Echinocandins: These agents target the fungal cell wall, disrupting its synthesis and leading to fungal cell death. Examples of echinocandins include caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin.
3. Polyenes: These agents bind to ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane, creating pores that lead to fungal cell death. Examples of polyene antifungals include amphotericin B and nystatin.
4. Allylamines: These agents inhibit squalene epoxidase, a key enzyme in ergosterol synthesis. Examples of allylamine antifungals include terbinafine and naftifine.
5. Griseofulvin: This agent disrupts fungal cell division by binding to tubulin, a protein involved in fungal cell mitosis.

Antifungal agents can be administered topically, orally, or intravenously, depending on the severity and location of the infection. It is important to use antifungal agents only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or overuse can lead to resistance and make treatment more difficult.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. In AML, the immature cells, called blasts, in the bone marrow fail to mature into normal blood cells. Instead, these blasts accumulate and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and normal white blood cells (leukopenia).

AML is called "acute" because it can progress quickly and become severe within days or weeks without treatment. It is a type of myeloid leukemia, which means that it affects the myeloid cells in the bone marrow. Myeloid cells are a type of white blood cell that includes monocytes and granulocytes, which help fight infection and defend the body against foreign invaders.

In AML, the blasts can build up in the bone marrow and spread to other parts of the body, including the blood, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and brain. This can cause a variety of symptoms, such as fatigue, fever, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, and weight loss.

AML is typically treated with a combination of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or stem cell transplantation. The specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including the patient's age, overall health, and the type and stage of the leukemia.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Transplantation conditioning, also known as preparative regimen or immunoablative therapy, refers to the use of various treatments prior to transplantation of cells, tissues or organs. The main goal of transplantation conditioning is to suppress the recipient's immune system, allowing for successful engraftment and minimizing the risk of rejection of the donor tissue.

There are two primary types of transplantation conditioning: myeloablative and non-myeloablative.

1. Myeloablative conditioning is a more intensive regimen that involves the use of high-dose chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. This approach eliminates not only immune cells but also stem cells in the bone marrow, requiring the recipient to receive a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from the donor to reconstitute their blood and immune system.
2. Non-myeloablative conditioning is a less intensive regimen that primarily targets immune cells while sparing the stem cells in the bone marrow. This approach allows for mixed chimerism, where both recipient and donor immune cells coexist, reducing the risk of severe complications associated with myeloablative conditioning.

The choice between these two types of transplantation conditioning depends on various factors, including the type of transplant, patient's age, overall health, and comorbidities. Both approaches carry risks and benefits, and the decision should be made carefully by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals in consultation with the patient.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Hematologic diseases are disorders which primarily affect the blood & blood-forming organs. Hematologic diseases include rare ... Rh disease (Rh D) ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn Anti-Kell hemolytic disease of the newborn Rhesus c hemolytic disease of ... also known as Christmas disease) Hemophilia C Von Willebrand disease Disseminated intravascular coagulation Protein S ... hematologic.niddk.nih.gov/info/index.htm (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ...
The Hematologic Diseases Information Service is a part of the NIDDK's Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases. ... The Hematologic Diseases Information Service is an information dissemination service of the National Institute of Diabetes and ... Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health, which is part of the U.S. ... http://hematologic.niddk.nih.gov/ v t e (Articles lacking sources from July 2019, All articles lacking sources, All stub ...
"Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease". Blood. 109 (2): 412-421. doi:10.1182/blood-2006-07-031104. PMC 1785098. PMID ... Autosplenectomy caused by sickle cell anemia or hyposplenism in coeliac disease In patients with obstructive liver disease, ... Alpha-thalassemia and beta-thalassemia Hemoglobin C Disease Iron deficiency anemia Post-splenectomy: A major function of the ... Target cells may appear in association with the following conditions: Liver disease: Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT ...
Halfdanarson, T. R.; Litzow, M. R.; Murray, J. A. (15 January 2007). "Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease". Blood. 109 ... Due to underlying diseases that destroy the spleen (autosplenectomy), e.g. sickle-cell disease. Celiac disease: unknown ... Functional asplenia occurs when splenic tissue is present but does not work well (e.g. sickle-cell disease, polysplenia) -such ... Ferguson, Anne; Hutton, MargaretM.; Maxwell, J.D.; Murray, D. (January 1970). "Adult Cœlicac Diseases in Hyposplenic Patients ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... The disease is regarded as a uniformly genetic disease although the genes causing it have not been identified in ~30% of cases ... D218Y: familial disease similar to but more severe that the disease cause by G209S and D218G mutations. R216W: characterized by ... and the disease caused by R216W and R216Q mutations in GATA1. The GATA1 mutation-related disease resembles the one caused by ...
"GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/blood-2016-09-687889. PMC 5391620. PMID ... Diseases of veins, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes, Lymphatic vessel diseases). ... Venous and Lymphatic Disease". In Brunicardi FC, Andersen DK, Billiar TR, Dunn DL, Hunter JG, Matthews JB, Pollock RE (eds.). ... "Lymphatic filariasis: the disease and its control. Fifth report of the WHO Expert Committee on Filariasis". World Health ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... MonoMAC was first described by Vihn and colleagues in 2010 as an autosomal dominant familial disease. One year later, Dickinson ... Bowen disease of the vulva, and multiple Epstein-Barr virus(+) leiomyosarcoma. Patients may also develop pulmonary alveolar ... for the many diverse presentations of a genetic disorder that groups these presentations together into a single disease termed ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... reflecting the disease's neoplastic nature. Other diseases in this category are juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, atypical CML ... For this reason, many disease entities in these groups show a great deal of heterogeneity. In 2001, the WHO Classification of ... The treatment of CMML remains challenging due to the lack of clinical trials investigating the disease as its own clinical ...
Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Ginsburg, David (2012-07-05). "The COPII pathway and hematologic disease". Blood. 120 (1 ... These results suggest that enhanced ER stress response is likely part of the molecular mechanism of the human disease. There is ... as the loss of selected copies often results in a genetic disease. The mammalian repertoire consists of two SAR1 paralogs, ... Rare diseases, Vesicular transport proteins, Congenital disorders, Neurodevelopmental disorders). ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... By 1900, leukemia was viewed as a family of diseases as opposed to a single disease. By 1947, Boston pathologist Sidney Farber ... medications used to kill leukemia cells Cancer-related fatigue Hematologic diseases, the large class of blood-related disorders ... The disease is restricted to individuals with Down syndrome or genetic changes similar to those in Down syndrome, develops in a ...
"The COPII pathway and hematologic disease". Blood. 120 (1): 31-8. doi:10.1182/blood-2012-01-292086. PMC 3390960. PMID 22586181 ... Using positional cloning, the gene was identified as the disease gene leading to combined deficiency of factor V-factor VIII, a ... 2003). "Mannose binding lectin polymorphisms as a disease-modulating factor in women with systemic lupus erythematosus from ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... PAP is one of the rare lung diseases currently being studied by the Rare Lung Diseases Consortium. The consortium is part of ... 2020, rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/pulmonary-alveolar-proteinosis/. Whitsett JA, Wert SE, Weaver TE (2015). "Diseases of ... Rare diseases, Congenital defects of phagocyte number, function, or both, Autoimmune diseases). ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... Cases of the disease not associated with mediastinal germ cell tumors occur in adults who as a group have older median age ... List of hematologic conditions Hahn AW, Li B, Prouet P, Giri S, Pathak R, Martin MG (January 2016). "Acute megakaryocytic ... These children should bear one or more of the genetic aberrations associated with the disease but not the inactivating GATA1 ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease an inherited neurological disorder with delayed onset that can affect the ears as well as other ... Toxoplasmosis, a parasitic disease affecting 23% of the population in the U.S., can cause sensorineural deafness to the fetus ... It can help identify conductive hearing loss due to disease of the middle ear or eardrum from other kinds of hearing loss ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... The trial had 8 disease-free survivors and obtained an overall survival 76 months with a range of 18 to 95 months. An NIH ... In about 70% of the cases, the inactivating GATA2 mutations found in Familial MDS/AML are associated with advanced disease and ... Congenital neutropenia refers to an assorted group of diseases that share a common set of signs and symptoms, viz., neutropenia ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... The disease in Down syndrome occurs in ~10% of individuals who previously had TMD. During the interval between TMD and the ... The diseases also causes a reduction in the maturation of erythroblasts to circulating red blood cells and, consequently, mild ... Transient myeloproliferative disease develops and may be of concern in fetuses. Features in a review of 39 reported fetal cases ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-2110. doi:10.1182/ ... Kostmann disease, SCN3, is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, but the commonest subtype of Kostmann syndrome, SCN1, is ... Kostmann disease is a form of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), specifically type 3 (SCN3), which is a rare autosomal ... Diseases are excluded that overtly affect multiple systems rather than impacting myelopoiesis most prominently. Thus SCN ...
Crispino JD, Horwitz MS (April 2017). "GATA factor mutations in hematologic disease". Blood. 129 (15): 2103-10. doi:10.1182/ ... The disease is restricted to individuals with Down syndrome or genetic changes similar to those in Down syndrome, develops ... Transient myeloproliferative disease is the abnormal proliferation of a clone of noncancerous megakaryoblasts in the liver and ... Also, congenital diseases such as congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA I through IV) have been recognized, Pearson's ...
... hematologic and neoplastic diseases such as leukemia or bony tumors; and other connective tissue diseases (such as systemic ... Rarely, metabolic diseases, such as Farber disease may also mimic JIA. Patients with Farber disease typically have subcutaneous ... The disease appears to be more common in girls, and is most common in Caucasians. The cause of JIA, as the word "idiopathic" ... There are disease-related factors, which relate to the inflammatory process, and anatomical or biomechanical changes that are ...
Rosai-Dorfman disease Immunoblast List of hematologic conditions Swerdlow, S.H.; Campo, E.; Harris, N.L.; Jaffe, E.S.; Pileri, ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Siegert W, Nerl C, Agthe A, ... There are several clinical trials that offer treatment options that can fight the disease. Stem cell transplantation is the ... or that the disease has a premalignant subtype. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is observed in the majority of cases, being ...
Von Willebrand disease List of hematologic conditions Bouchard, Philippe (December 2011). "Current and future medical ...
... inflammatory diseases, and viral infections. Hyperactive apoptosis can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, hematologic diseases ... Allergy and autoimmune diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Genetic factors: Such as Down's syndrome and ... Ames, BN; Shigenaga, MK; Hagen, TM (September 1993). "Oxidants, antioxidants, and the degenerative diseases of aging". Proc. ... Inhibition of apoptosis can result in a number of cancers, autoimmune diseases, ...
"Antibody Response to COVID-19 Vaccination in Adults With Hematologic Malignant Disease". JAMA Oncology. 7 (11): 1714-1716. doi: ... In the typical disease course for hepatitis B, the individual will first seroconvert for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). ... Infectious Diseases. 21 (2): e26-e35. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30773-8. PMC 7837315. PMID 33125914. Long QX, Liu BZ, Deng HJ, ... Some studies have disputed the link between concentrations of antibodies of either IgM or IgG and the severity of the disease ...
Transfusion Support in Patients with Hematologic Disease: Transfusions in Special Clinical Circumstances. 57 (2): 39-50. doi: ... sickle cell disease. leukemia. aplastic anemia. myelodysplastic syndrome. Hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying molecule in a red ... Frequent blood transfusions may be given to many patients, such as those with thalassemia, sickle cell disease, leukemia, ... Interrelations between Essential Metal Ions and Human Diseases. Metal Ions in Life Sciences. Vol. 13. Springer. pp. 229-294. ...
She had over 125 publications on hematologic diseases in international medical journals, as well as being coauthor of many ... She worked on many hematologic diseases, including leukemias, anemias, and Behçet's syndrome. She was also a visiting physician ...
Hereditary elliptocytosis Sickle-cell disease List of hematologic conditions Wrong, O; Bruce, LJ; Unwin, RJ; Toye, AM; Tanner, ... there is a clinically significant reduction in both disease severity and prevalence of malaria in those with SAO. Because of ...
List of cutaneous conditions Hematologic disease List of cancer types "Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia". St. Jude Children's ... "Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases Treatment - National Cancer Institute". 2003-09-24. Tiu R. V.; Sekeres M. A. (2014 ... Niemeyer C. M. (2014). "RAS diseases in children". Haematologica. 99 (11): 1653-1662. doi:10.3324/haematol.2014.114595. PMC ... The differential diagnosis list includes infectious diseases like Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 6, ...
EF may also affect individuals with hematologic disease such as leukemia and lymphoma. It may also affect otherwise normal ... The name eosinophilic folliculitis refers to the predominant immune cells associated with the disease (eosinophils) and the ... Teraki, Y; Nishikawa, T (2005). "Skin diseases described in Japan 2004". Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft. 3 ... Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Ofuji, S; Ogino, A; Horio, T; Oseko, T; ...
Young characterized the subsequent hematologic manifestations in patients with sickle cell disease immune deficient individuals ... Viruses As Agents of Haematological Disease. London: Baillière Tindall, 1995. Calado RT, Young NS. Telomere diseases. N Engl J ... Somatic Mutations in "Benign" Disease. N Engl J Med. 2021 May 27;384(21):2039-2052[6] Danazol Treatment for Telomere Diseases. ... Telomere diseases. N Engl J Med. 2009 Dec 10;361(24):2353-65[4] Young NS. Aplastic Anemia. N Engl J Med. 2018 Oct 25;379(17): ...
"Cytochrome P450 2J2 is highly expressed in hematologic malignant diseases and promotes tumor cell growth". Journal of ... of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and certain types inflammation-related kidney diseases including chronic kidney disease, ... renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, and polycystic kidney disease. The protective role of EETs in these animal model diseases ... Furthermore, coronary artery disease patients who had lower levels of EETs/14,15-di-ETE ratios exhibited evidence of a poorer ...
Hematologic diseases are disorders which primarily affect the blood & blood-forming organs. Hematologic diseases include rare ... Rh disease (Rh D) ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn Anti-Kell hemolytic disease of the newborn Rhesus c hemolytic disease of ... also known as Christmas disease) Hemophilia C Von Willebrand disease Disseminated intravascular coagulation Protein S ... hematologic.niddk.nih.gov/info/index.htm (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ...
... peripheral arterial occlusive disease [PAOD]). Claudication occurs during physical activity and is relieved after a short rest. ... is one of the most common manifestations of peripheral vascular disease caused by atherosclerosis ( ... Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Procedures performed during acute admission for peripheral arterial disease in US from ... AHA/ACC Guideline on Lower-Extremity Peripheral Arterial Disease. *SVS Guidelines on Atherosclerotic Occlusive Disease of Lower ...
Inonotosis in Patient with Hematologic Malignancy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(1):180-182. doi:10.3201/eid2401.171265 ... should be added to the list of microorganisms causing invasive fungal disease in neutropenic patients with hematologic ... Recognizing filamentous basidiomycetes as agents of human disease: A review. Med Mycol. 2014;52:782-97. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Invasive disease caused by Inonotus spp. (Phellinus tropicalis and P. undulatus) in humans has been described in 1 patient with ...
Solitary oral lesions may be part of a multisystem disease, and oral/periodontal disease may also be an early sign of disease ... Chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease impacts many systems of the body. The coagulation pathway is one such system. The ... Kawasaki disease has replaced rheumatic fever as the primary cause of childhood heart disease in the United States. Children ... Other granulomatous diseases must be excluded, such as Wegener granulomatosis, Crohn disease, syphilis, or tuberculosis. [28, ...
Solitary oral lesions may be part of a multisystem disease, and oral/periodontal disease may also be an early sign of disease ... Chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease impacts many systems of the body. The coagulation pathway is one such system. The ... Kawasaki disease has replaced rheumatic fever as the primary cause of childhood heart disease in the United States. Children ... Other granulomatous diseases must be excluded, such as Wegener granulomatosis, Crohn disease, syphilis, or tuberculosis. [28, ...
Blood diseases of infancy and childhood : in the tradition of C. H. Smith / editor, Denis R. Miller ; associate editor, Robert ...
... and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in Hematologic Malignancies ... Supp Table 5 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in ... Supp Table 5 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, ...
Hematologic Diseases / chemically induced* * Hospitalization* * Humans * Leukopenia / chemically induced * Longitudinal Studies ...
Pharmacogenomics and hematologic diseases. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and ...
... digestive diseases, nutrition and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child ... and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov. ... conducts and supports research on diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; ...
... digestive diseases, nutrition and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of ... NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Journal. Nature Medicine. Keywords. * /Applied sciences ... Led by researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the study compared the ... About the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK): The NIDDK, a component of the National ...
Adaptive Biotechnologies Announces Translational Collaboration with Takeda to Measure Minimal Residual Disease with Its ... Assay Across Its Hematologic Malignancy Pipeline. By: Adaptive Biotechnologies via GlobeNewswire ... We believe the adaptive immune system is natures most finely tuned diagnostic and therapeutic for most diseases, but the ... Our commercial products and clinical pipeline enable the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of diseases such as cancer, ...
... and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in Hematologic Malignancies ... Early Prevention of Cardiometabolic Disease Group * OxSOCRATES Remote Exercise Pilot Study (REP) ... Supp Table 3 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in ... Supp Table 3 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, ...
... and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in Hematologic Malignancies ... Supp Table 1 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, and Validation of Therapeutic Targets in ... Supp Table 1 from Human Bone Marrow Organoids for Disease Modeling, Discovery, ...
Unusual pulmonary mycoses in patients with hematologic disease [French]. Rev Pneumol Clin 1998;54:253--7. ... Tissue handling in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and other human spongiform encephalopathies (prion diseases). ... Nosocomial outbreak of Legionnaires disease: molecular epidemiology and disease control measures. Infect Control 1987;8:53--8 ... epidemiologic link with disease and evaluation of a method for control of nosocomial Legionnaires disease and Pittsburgh ...
Program Director: Division of Kidney, Urologic, & Hematologic Diseases Health Equity; Health Services Research; Dissemination ... End-Stage Renal Disease. The mechanisms and pathophysiology of kidney failure and the progression of chronic kidney disease to ... Chronic Kidney Disease. The mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying kidney disease and its progression. ... My responsibilities also involve the scientific and programmatic management of studies of chronic kidney disease, including ...
Hematologic Disease Diagnostics Remains Attractive Market for Testing Suppliers. February 1, 2004 ...
Molecular genetics, Cytogenetics, Hearing loss, Mitochondrial disease, Hematologic neoplasms. Publications Publications. * {{ ... and passionate about answering the complex diagnostic questions regarding the influence of genetics in human disease. Her ...
Allison Taylor: Improving Access of Care for Under-presented Patients with Hematologic Diseases February 19, 2024. ... The mission of the division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy is to promote health and improve lives by ... The Duke Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy is internationally recognized for its novel approaches to ... Stefanie Sarantopoulos Named Division Chief of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy December 5, 2023. ...
Small R01s for Clinical Trials Targeting Diseases within the Mission of NIDDK (R01 Clinical Trial Required) PAS-20-160. NIDDK ... Division of Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) ... digestive diseases, nutritional disorders, and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. This FOA will support 3- ... Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). ...
Endocrine System Diseases. 1. 2020. 248. 0.040. Why? Hematologic Diseases. 1. 2020. 498. 0.040. Why? ...
Immunologic Diseases, Langerhans-Cell Histiocytosis, Hematologic Diseases ... Graft-Versus Host Disease (GVHD). The ATG will help to deplete the donor stem cells of the. type of cells that can cause GVHD ... whose disease is ACTIVE but STABLE, or NON-ACTIVE/QUIESCENT as defined in Appendix V. of the study protocol.. - Patients with ... Disease. status must be ACTIVE but STABLE, or NON-ACTIVE/QUIESCENT as defined in Appendix V.. It is cautioned that many ...
Clinical manifestations of EPP are photosensitivity, insignificant hematologic abnormalities, and liver disease. [22] The ... The name refers to the color of the urine that may occur during an attack of one form of the disease, porphyria cutanea tarda. ... Diseases & Conditions Porphyria Overview * 2003/viewarticle/clinical-overview-oral-selective-estrogen-receptor-degraders- ... AIP is an autosomal dominant disease that results from defects in the enzyme porphobilinogen-deaminase. [9, 10, 11, 12] ...
Other blood diseases (hematologic dyscrasias), such as thalassemia and multiple myeloma. The most common associated diagnosis ... Blood-related diseases might contribute to priapism - usually ischemic priapism, when blood isnt able to flow out of the penis ... Priapism most commonly affects males in their 30s and older, but can begin in childhood for males with sickle cell disease. ... Treatment for an underlying condition, such as sickle cell disease, that might have caused priapism ...
Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Paraproteinemias. Blood Protein Disorders. Hematologic Diseases. Hemorrhagic ... PFS is defined as the time from the date of randomization to the date of disease progression (as assessed by IMWG criteria) or ... The MySIm-Q is a disease-specific PRO assessment complementary to the EORTC-QLQ-C30. It includes 17 items resulting in a ... Immune System Diseases. Lenalidomide. Immunologic Factors. Physiological Effects of Drugs. Angiogenesis Inhibitors. ...
Categories: Hematologic Diseases Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People ...
kg), history of heart disease, history of hematologic/oncologic disease, history of respiratory disease, history of renal ... Hematologic/oncologic diseases, receiving continuous infusion of vasoactive drugs at the time of CA, the duration of CPR, and ... The mortality rate was higher among patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases, a finding that had been reported in other ... The factors related to in-hospital mortality were hematologic/oncologic diseases, continuous infusion of vasoactive drugs prior ...
6. Zhou J, Sun H, Zhang Y. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic diseases. 3ed. Beijing: Science Press ( ... 2Immunotherapy Research Center for Hematologic Diseases of Hubei Province, Wuhan, Hubei, China ... "Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hematologic Diseases" (6).. 2.3 Observation indicators. (1)Comparison of clinical ... Patients with other hematologic diseases or other systemic tumors.. We gathered all detailed information including clinical ...
Forma well-positioned with $441 million in cash to progress programs in rare hematologic diseases and cancers ... prostate cancer and other rare hematologic diseases and cancers, will hold a virtual R&D Day today to provide a comprehensive ... development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to transform the lives of patients with rare hematologic diseases and ... Expanding etavopivat development in 2022 with Phase II trial exploring transfusion burden across sickle cell disease (SCD), ...
Addison Disease. *Asthma. *Brain Edema. *Hematologic Diseases. *Nasal Polyps. *Nausea. *Neoplasms. *Rhinitis, Allergic, ...
  • should be added to the list of microorganisms causing invasive fungal disease in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. (cdc.gov)
  • The clonoSEQ Assay is the first and only next-generation sequencing-based MRD test authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for MRD assessment in lymphoid malignancies and is highly accurate, sensitive, and standardized compared to other technologies used for disease burden assessment. (malvern-online.com)
  • Innovative technology plays a critical role in informing our clinical development plans as we look to bring effective new medicines to patients with hematologic malignancies," said Christine Ward, Head, Precision and Translational Medicine, Oncology Therapeutic Area Unit (OTAU) at Takeda. (malvern-online.com)
  • The Duke Division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy is internationally recognized for its novel approaches to treating leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, and other life threatening diseases through integrated, innovative, and holistic patient care, research, and education. (duke.edu)
  • The mission of the division of Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy is to promote health and improve lives by preventing, diagnosing, and treating blood cancer and other life threatening diseases through integrated, innovative, and holistic patient care, education, and research. (duke.edu)
  • The clonoSEQ Assay is the first and only FDA-cleared in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test service to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) in bone marrow from patients with multiple myeloma (MM) or B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and blood or bone marrow from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). (malvern-online.com)
  • and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Hematologic diseases are disorders which primarily affect the blood & blood-forming organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematologic diseases include rare genetic disorders, anemia, HIV, sickle cell disease & complications from chemotherapy or transfusions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • Simvastatin reduces cardiovascular heart disease mortality and morbidity (eg, nonfatal MI or stroke and revascularization procedures) in high-risk patients (ie, those with existing coronary heart disease, diabetes, peripheral vessel disease, or a history of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease). (medscape.com)
  • Oral manifestations can prove crucial in diagnosis and usually parallel the intestinal disease course. (medscape.com)
  • Applications for clinical trials submitted under this FOA should have clearly described aims and objectives, and have a high likelihood that the trial findings will lead to more definitive, hypothesis-driven trialsto improve understanding, diagnosis, prevention or treatment of the diseases studied and have the potential to impact clinical practice and/or public health. (nih.gov)
  • The most common associated diagnosis in children is sickle cell disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • There are numerous benign and malignant hematologic conditions for which a patient could receive a diagnosis. (wakemed.org)
  • Stage, percentage of basophils at diagnosis, hematologic response within six months, cytogenetic response in the first year: the main prognostic variables affecting outcome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase treated with interferon-alpha. (haematologica.org)
  • Although priapism is an uncommon condition overall, it occurs commonly in certain groups, such as people who have sickle cell disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Priapism most commonly affects males in their 30s and older, but can begin in childhood for males with sickle cell disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • It occurs more often in males who have an inherited disorder characterized by abnormally shaped red blood cells (sickle cell disease). (mayoclinic.org)
  • WATERTOWN, Mass.--( BUSINESS WIRE )-- Forma Therapeutics Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq: FMTX), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on sickle cell disease (SCD), prostate cancer and other rare hematologic diseases and cancers, will hold a virtual R&D Day today to provide a comprehensive update on its pipeline and strategic vision. (businesswire.com)
  • We are pleased to share insights into Forma's unique commitment to patients and expansion of etavopivat development into transfusion-dependent populations that have tremendous unmet need across sickle cell disease, thalassemia and MDS," said Frank Lee, president and chief executive officer of Forma. (businesswire.com)
  • Filamentous Basidiomycetes molds are ubiquitous and able to colonize in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Intraoral involvement in Crohn disease occurs in 8-29% of patients and may precede intestinal involvement. (medscape.com)
  • Whether patients with orofacial granulomatoses will subsequently develop intestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is uncertain, but histologic similarities between the oral lesions and the intestinal lesions are obvious. (medscape.com)
  • The health-care facility environment is rarely implicated in disease transmission, except among patients who are immunocompromised. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome who meet the following diagnostic criteria and whose disease is ACTIVE but STABLE, or NON-ACTIVE/QUIESCENT as defined in Appendix V of the study protocol. (knowcancer.com)
  • Disease status must be ACTIVE but STABLE, or NON-ACTIVE/QUIESCENT as defined in Appendix V. It is cautioned that many patients with HLH or familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) will have a viral infection at time of initial presentation and may therefore be misdiagnosed as having VAHS. (knowcancer.com)
  • Patients who have undergone previous stem cell transplant (SCT) and failed engraftment or who had relapse of their disease are considered eligible if they meet other eligibility criteria and if the second SCT would occur 6 months or more after the first. (knowcancer.com)
  • Patients who are moribund or whose life expectancy is severely limited by disease other than their underlying disorder. (knowcancer.com)
  • Forma Therapeutics is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the research, development and commercialization of novel therapeutics to transform the lives of patients with rare hematologic diseases and cancers. (businesswire.com)
  • We offer both testing and imaging to discern the hematologic conditions affecting our patients. (wakemed.org)
  • HSCT) has significantly modified the prognosis of when the pathological process involves BM or when patients with hereditary or acquired hematological, hematopoietic toxicity is the limiting factor in the oncological and immunological diseases and it is the aggressive treatment of the disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • The goal of this study is to determine the levels of blood sugar during pregnancy that are linked to increased body fat in the child, and to a mother's chances of developing diabetes 8 to12 years after her pregnancy," said Mary Horlick, M.D., project scientist and director of the Pediatric Clinical Obesity Program at the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). (nih.gov)
  • Led by researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the study compared the effects of the two diets on calorie intake, hormone levels, body weight, and more. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chronic kidney diseases in agricultur al communities: report from a workshop. (cdc.gov)
  • In June 2018, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences sponsored a workshop to identify research gaps in an increasingly common form of chronic kidney disease in agricultur al communities, often termed "CKDu. (cdc.gov)
  • Specifically, we will use proteomic analysis, flow cytometry and genomic sequencing to detect early signs of myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in these cases, to enable potentially disease altering therapeutic interventions for these cancers. (cdc.gov)
  • Notre etude avait pour objectif de faire le bilan de la prise en charge des cancers hematologiques dans les services d'hematologie oncologie medicale et de medecine interne de l'hopital du Point G de 1996 a 2003. (bvsalud.org)
  • Advances clinical studies and epidemiologic research on renal disease. (nih.gov)
  • Thus, how prostate cancer cells evolve over time and throughout disease history remains unclear. (pcf.org)
  • Blood-related diseases might contribute to priapism - usually ischemic priapism, when blood isn't able to flow out of the penis. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We are also capitalizing on our knowledge of the emerging science of red blood cell health by exploring areas beyond hematologic disease. (businesswire.com)
  • Hematologic conditions are benign and malignant disease systems within the blood. (wakemed.org)
  • Skin lesion at biopsy site 4 weeks after the biopsy in patient with invasive fungal disease caused by Inonotus spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Oral findings as described above warrant a full systemic evaluation for intestinal Crohn disease, including referral for colonoscopy and biopsy with histopathologic correlation. (medscape.com)
  • Symptoms of Crohn disease include intermittent attacks of diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and fever. (medscape.com)
  • Some may have no symptoms, mild symptoms or severe disease. (who.int)
  • People with mild symptoms of both diseases can usually be treated safely at home. (who.int)
  • o Signs or symptoms consistent with active TB disease. (cdc.gov)
  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement encourages the submission of pilot and feasibility clinical trials conducted in humans that will lay the foundation for larger clinical trials related to the prevention and/or treatment of diseases and conditions within the mission of NIDDK. (nih.gov)
  • Fissures or fistulas may occur in persons with chronic disease. (medscape.com)
  • We report a lung-invasive fungal disease with possible cutaneous needle tract seeding in a patient with a febrile neutropenia caused by the Basidiomycetes mold Inonotus spp. (cdc.gov)
  • The cutaneous porphyrias are dermatologic diseases that may or may not involve the liver and nervous system. (medscape.com)
  • The mouth is frequently involved in conditions that affect the skin or other multiorgan diseases. (medscape.com)
  • Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe, and disabling conditions affecting Americans. (nih.gov)
  • I am Commander Ibad Kahn and I'm representing Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) with the Emergency Risk Communication Branch at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • We are pleased to have Dr. David Shay, who is a medical officer in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Both regimens are given every 28 d, along with infectious disease (ID) prophylaxis. (medscape.com)
  • Flor Munoz disclose she receives a royalty for offering the Seasonal Influenza in Children chapter in UpToDate and is a member of the Data Safety Monitoring Board Pfizer, Moderna, and is a member of American pediatrics committee on infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Who is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases, and Molecular Virology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • 5 to 3, when the delta variant up to 5 and further context provided that most infectious typical viral disease of childhood is Measles which has an R naught of 12 to 18. (cdc.gov)
  • Computed tomography of the lungs in patient with invasive fungal disease caused by Inonotus spp. (cdc.gov)
  • I also serve as the KUH liaison for the Loan Repayment Program and oversee a portfolio that includes Career Development Awards (K23s) to support the career and training of clinical investigators conducting patient-oriented research related to kidney disease. (nih.gov)
  • The mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying kidney disease and its progression. (nih.gov)
  • The mechanisms and pathophysiology of kidney failure and the progression of chronic kidney disease to kidney failure. (nih.gov)
  • PFS is defined as the time from the date of randomization to the date of disease progression (as assessed by IMWG criteria) or death due to any cause, whichever occurs first. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Antiplatelet agents decrease the overall risk of cardiovascular disease from myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. (medscape.com)
  • Note: The number of publications displayed in this table will differ from the number displayed in the HuGE Literature Finder as the number in Genopedia reflects only the indexed disease term without children terms, but the number in the HuGE Literature Finder reflects all text searches of the disease term including the indexed term and corresponding children terms. (cdc.gov)
  • A new TB classification (Class B: Latent TB Infection Needing Evaluation for Treatment) should be used for all applicants who are recent arrivals to the United States (less than 5 years) from countries with a high TB prevalence, with a Mantoux TST reaction of 10 mm or greater of induration, and no evidence of TB disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Crohn disease is an idiopathic disorder that can involve the entire GI tract with transmural inflammation, noncaseating granulomas, and fissures. (medscape.com)
  • My responsibilities also involve the scientific and programmatic management of studies of chronic kidney disease, including clinical, behavioral, health services, and dissemination and implementation research. (nih.gov)
  • Dr. Koleilat is a driven scientist and laboratorian committed to research and contributing to the scientific community, dedicated to educating the next generation of leaders in science and medicine, and passionate about answering the complex diagnostic questions regarding the influence of genetics in human disease. (ohsu.edu)
  • Vaccination is an important part of preventing severe disease and death for both COVID-19 and influenza. (who.int)
  • COVID-19 vaccines have been proven to protect against severe illness and death caused by COVID-19 disease. (who.int)