Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Group Purchasing: A shared service which combines the purchasing power of individual organizations or facilities in order to obtain lower prices for equipment and supplies. (From Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.United StatesOccupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Labor Unions: Organizations comprising wage and salary workers in health-related fields for the purpose of improving their status and conditions. The concept includes labor union activities toward providing health services to members.Medical Savings Accounts: Tax-exempt trusts or custodial accounts established by individuals with financial institutions for saving money for future medical expenses.Deductibles and Coinsurance: Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Income Tax: Tax on the net income of an individual, organization, or business.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Absenteeism: Chronic absence from work or other duty.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Job Application: Process of applying for employment. It includes written application for employment or personal appearance.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Small Business: For-profit enterprise with relatively few to moderate number of employees and low to moderate volume of sales.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Preferred Provider Organizations: Arrangements negotiated between a third-party payer (often a self-insured company or union trust fund) and a group of health-care providers (hospitals and physicians) who furnish services at lower than usual fees, and, in return, receive prompt payment and an expectation of an increased volume of patients.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)National Health Insurance, United StatesInsurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Rehabilitation, Vocational: Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Oocyte Donation: Transfer of preovulatory oocytes from donor to a suitable host. Oocytes are collected, fertilized in vitro, and transferred to a host that can be human or animal.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Employee Grievances: Formal procedures whereby the employee expresses any dissatisfaction or feeling of injustice regarding the work situation.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.MassachusettsAttitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Occupational Health Physicians: Physicians employed in a company or corporate setting that is generally not in the health care industry.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Genetic Counseling: An educational process that provides information and advice to individuals or families about a genetic condition that may affect them. The purpose is to help individuals make informed decisions about marriage, reproduction, and other health management issues based on information about the genetic disease, the available diagnostic tests, and management programs. Psychosocial support is usually offered.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.CaliforniaFocus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Forgiveness: Excusing or pardoning for an offense or release of anger or resentment.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Competitive Medical Plans: Alternative health care delivery mechanisms, such as PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS or other health insurance services or prepaid plans (other than HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS), that meet Medicare qualifications for a risk-sharing contract. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Home Health Aides: Persons who assist ill, elderly, or disabled persons in the home, carrying out personal care and housekeeping tasks. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms. 2d ed, p202)Great BritainHealth Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Premarital Examinations: Medical tests taken by couples planning to be married in order to determine presence of genetic and contagious diseases.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.AIDS Serodiagnosis: Immunologic tests for identification of HIV (HTLV-III/LAV) antibodies. They include assays for HIV SEROPOSITIVITY and HIV SERONEGATIVITY that have been developed for screening persons carrying the viral antibody from patients with overt symptoms of AIDS or AIDS-RELATED COMPLEX.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Employee Performance Appraisal: The assessment of the functioning of an employee in relation to work.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Occupational Health Nursing: The practice of nursing in the work environment.Homosexuality, Female: Sexual attraction or relationship between females.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Off-Label Use: The practice of prescribing or using a drug outside the scope of the drug's official approved label as designated by a regulatory agency concerning the treatment of a particular disease or condition.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.WashingtonPatient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Information Centers: Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Controlled Substances: Drugs or chemical agents whose manufacture, possession, or use are regulated by government. This may include narcotics and prescription medications.
  • The most recent updates by the Society of Actuaries (SOA) to standard annuitant tables have already been reflected in plan and employer financial statements, and now, as explained in our October 10, 2017 For Your Information, the Treasury has mandated their use in determining ERISA minimum funding requirements and PBGC premiums beginning with 2018 or 2019 valuations (depending on use of a transition option). (buck.com)
  • While the District does not yet have this consumer protection, Councilmembers Mary Cheh, David Grosso, and Anita Bonds recently introduced the Consumer Disclosure Act of 2017 which is currently pending before the Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety . (nclnet.org)
  • The Consumer Disclosure Act of 2017 would not only protect consumers from unscrupulous business practices, but it would also help the District's businesses and employers. (nclnet.org)
  • As we enter into the new year, we take a look at the top cases to watch so far for 2017, and what they might mean for employers. (croner.co.uk)
  • Ask all health plan related vendors - e.g., your administrator, insurance company, health management company, network, pharmacy benefit manager - for compensation disclosures. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Then communicate them to vendors so they understand what you expect and are motivated to find solutions that will help achieve them. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • You also need to do this because as stated, there are many sources for such background information: if you fixed the problem with one such report vendor or supplier, that would not help the fact that the other vendors would still be supplying inaccurate information. (freeadvice.com)
  • After disclosures are received from the plan service providers, employers will have enhanced responsibility to ensure that the fees and compensation paid is reasonable based on the services provided. (sentinelgroup.com)
  • Within ten days of being notified of your injury or illness, your employer must then complete and submit an Employer's First Report of Injury form with the Colorado Division of Workers' Compensation. (freeadvice.com)
  • You must also make sure to file your claim for workers' compensation benefits in Colorado within two years of the date of your injury or the first signs of your occupational illness. (freeadvice.com)
  • In Colorado, workers' compensation attorneys can at a minimum be of great assistance and, in cases of particularly difficult workers' compensation claims, may be absolutely essential to getting you the workers' compensation benefits you need to help see you through the difficult and stressful recovery process from your injury or illness. (freeadvice.com)
  • An experienced Colorado workers' compensation lawyer can also help you develop a strategy for your case, file a claim, and explain the possible benefits for which you may be eligible. (freeadvice.com)
  • Additionally, if your employer does not have the state-mandated workers' compensation insurance, does not have enough insurance, or is uncooperative, your case can become more complicated, and it may be useful to have a workers' compensation lawyer at your side to help you understand what your next steps should be and to recommend the best course of action for your case. (freeadvice.com)
  • If there is a third party partially responsible for your injury (such as a manufacturer whose faulty piece of equipment caused your work-related injury), the assistance of a Colorado workers' compensation lawyer is also crucial to ensuring that you understand your options for recovering from both your employer and the manufacturer, and the procedures that must be followed to successfully do so. (freeadvice.com)
  • 30 days employer had no problem even called my parole officer saying I was hired giving work hours work days and starting pay. (freeadvice.com)
  • For one thing, I'm not really sure what they can do to adjust things work-wise to help at the moment. (nshn.co.uk)
  • On the other hand, I am really struggling at time right now and I'm not going to get any help with this work-wise unless I actually raise the issue. (nshn.co.uk)
  • As far as I know, your employer can't really make there be consequences to where or how you work due to a disclosure like that, unless you both think it would help you to not be at home alone so much. (nshn.co.uk)
  • Work to focus on the progress you are making with each application - honing your search tactics, getting efficient with your application process and understanding what keywords to use are all important tools to use as you go through your search. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • With some exceptions, an employer may be required to return the service member to work for up to five years from the time service commenced. (bricker.com)
  • Over time, though, as I've come to know Lynn better, I've found he has a profoundly practical view of the world, supported by a belief that careful management makes it possible for health care to work far better than it usually does.Here is his advice to employers on managing employer-sponsored health plans. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Some employers don't believe that they can control costs, and have simply lost faith in their power to impact how the care delivery and administrative processes work. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • However, the NDA does not address who owns the inventions, artwork, or other work products created after signing the NDA. (scu.edu)
  • People who get ahead at work tend to follow through on their commitments, help other people reach their goals, and do more than what is merely expected. (wisebread.com)
  • This may also be explained in separate privacy notices made available when your personal information are first collected by that Aon entity, for example where you or the business you work for engages us to provide a service. (aon.com)
  • Estimated Schedule and First Work Schedule On or before your first day of work, your employer must give you: Written schedules for first 2 weeks of workwith hours, dates, start and end times, and locations of shifts. (hardcontrol.com)
  • Under the Fair Workweek Law, retail employers in NYC must give workers predictable work schedules. (hardcontrol.com)
  • Under the Fair Workweek Law, fast food employers in NYC must give workers good faith estimates of when and how much they will work, predictable work schedules and the opportunity to work newly available shifts before hiring new workers. (hardcontrol.com)
  • Since most people get their insurance through work-based plans subsidized by their employers, these marketplaces likely won't interest them. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • The employer should adjust work processes to ensure that workers can be a safe distance from each other. (ueunion.org)
  • Investing the maximum annual investment -- $3,450 for individual coverage and $6,900 for family coverage with an additional $1,000 contribution for those 55 or older in 2018 -- could allow you to meet minimum balance requirements more quickly so you can begin making the money work for you. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Building your net worth takes significant work. (gsnmagazine.com)
  • Inform your employer that you have been injured at work or are showing symptoms of an occupational illness. (freeadvice.com)
  • You should also immediately seek medical help after you have been injured on the job or have developed symptoms of a work-related disease. (freeadvice.com)
  • We work in ways that honors involvement, respect, collaboration and connection-where the richness of ideas, backgrounds, and perspectives are cultivated to create business impact. (paypal.com)
  • What happens if you have been dismissed from work or made redundant, or you had to leave. (advicenow.org.uk)
  • Also explains where to get free, confidential legal advice to help you decide whether and if so how to raise a concern about a danger or illegality that you have witnessed at work. (advicenow.org.uk)
  • You may ask them if they perhaps can help you with the deductible since you were doing a work related duty. (freeadvice.com)
  • It means understanding how an entire company and its industry work so you can help that company to be profitable and competitive. (investopedia.com)
  • Do you want to work in a role making a difference to the lives of children and young people with autism? (localgov.co.uk)
  • A comprehensive service to keep journalists informed about the work of NHS Employers. (nhsemployers.org)
  • Rather, these guidelines serve as both guardrails and wings - to help you stay in bounds, while learning how to take staff's personal brand and the company they work for to the next level through social media. (is4profit.com)
  • Employers need to think about how support can be maintained as we all work in different ways. (cipd.asia)
  • An empathetic, non-judgmental approach and flexibility (for example in working hours or concerning work tasks) are two key areas employers should focus on. (cipd.asia)
  • Create open work cultures that help to break the silence around this important issue and ensure people know that the organisation will support people experiencing domestic abuse to seek help. (cipd.asia)
  • That doesn't mean you shouldn't work to make the most of it, though, and that work doesn't stop when you make your monthly contribution. (nerdwallet.com)
  • You still need to do the work to make sure you're on track to save enough. (nerdwallet.com)
  • Under equal opportunity and anti-discrimination laws, employers are required to create a workplace free from discrimination and harassment. (qld.gov.au)
  • People-First - Transform the workplace into a force that helps people grow. (garysguide.com)
  • Organizations are continually evolving to build a strong, talented team that will propel their businesses forward while creating a desirable workplace that fosters creativity and innovation. (nyas.org)
  • The broader intent of the ADA in organizational settings is to create inclusive environments that welcome equal opportunities for people with disabilities in the workplace. (adata.org)
  • Employers should implement engineering controls to reduce exposure to hazards, including installing physical barriers (such as clear plastic sneeze guards) and improving workplace ventilation (such as installing high-efficiency air filters or increasing ventilation rates). (ueunion.org)
  • Employers have a duty of care for the health, safety and wellbeing of their staff and are in a strong position to create a safe and supportive workplace environment. (cipd.asia)
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements rule, which would propose the collection of additional data to help employers and workers track injuries at individual workplaces, improve the Nation's occupational injury and illness information data, and assist the agency in its enforcement of the safety and health workplace requirements. (wyattfirm.com)
  • As you make your plans, we have a number of key issues for you to consider (along with the calendar deadlines) as we head into 2018. (buck.com)
  • The NRA super PAC's failure to disclose occupation and employer information for 95% of its individual donors suggests a systematic effort to evade federal disclosure requirements by not collecting the required information, or by not reporting it, or both. (commondreams.org)
  • This publication provides an overview of federal disclosure laws affecting private-sector, employer sponsored group health plans and health insurers. (samhsa.gov)
  • People told us that they had a say in their support and were able to make choices and decisions whilst living at the service. (cqc.org.uk)
  • It also requires that reasonable efforts, such as training or retraining, be made to enable returning service members to refresh or upgrade their skills to help them qualify for reemployment. (bricker.com)
  • The National Relay Service allows people who are deaf, hard of hearing and/or have a speech impairment to make and receive phone calls. (qld.gov.au)
  • We may collect and process personal data about you because you give it to us, because other people give that data to us (for example, third party service providers that we use to help operate our business) or because it is publicly available. (immiwork.com)
  • For example, if you ask us to obtain insurance quotes on your behalf, or if you contact us as a representative of your employer to enquire about a professional service you would like us to offer to your company. (aon.com)
  • By clicking 'Create alert' you agree to the Terms and Conditions applicable to our service and acknowledge that your personal data will be used in accordance with our Privacy and Cookie Policy and you will receive emails and communications about jobs and career related topics. (charityjob.co.uk)
  • The 18 December appeal, which is backed by both the BBC and the journalists' union NUJ, details 'serious and credible death threats' made to BBC Persian Service journalists in recent months, and further harassment of both BBC Persian Service staff and their families, including freezing of journalists' assets and online attacks. (hazards.org)
  • You could drive for a ridesharing service, help neighbors with household repairs, or sell handmade items online. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Our goal is to help you make smarter financial decisions by providing you with interactive tools and financial calculators, publishing original and objective content, by enabling you to conduct research and compare information for free - so that you can make financial decisions with confidence. (bankrate.com)
  • At Bankrate we strive to help you make smarter financial decisions. (bankrate.com)
  • Data aggregation helps employers, insurers, and lenders make smarter decisions faster. (cato.org)
  • Essex County Council has published the Smarter working in Essex - A guide for businesses to help businesses cope with changes in working practices, new thinking about workspaces and creative uses of new technologies. (essex.gov.uk)
  • Like a lot of people, my employer still has me working from home full-time - there are only a few people going into the office a couple of days a week. (nshn.co.uk)
  • It is highly unlikely that 95% of the NRA Victory Fund contributors ignored the committee's request for occupation and employer information at the time they made their donation and additionally ignored the super PAC's follow-up requests. (commondreams.org)
  • Allow yourself a day or a few days off and spend that time doing something that energizes you and makes you happy, and reflect on what's going well in your search. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • Take the time to clean out your profiles , or create some new ones that show you in a more professional light, and keep them current so potential bosses can see that you're active on social media for all the right reasons. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • Over time I've been struck that most interests in the health care equation want care to cost more, not less, and that it is difficult for the responsible employer to navigate through this system. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • At this time, you may not be able to log in, register for an event, or make a donation via the website. (nyas.org)
  • Those 65-and-over can also make withdrawals for any purpose without penalty, but the income will be taxable at that time. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Consider such investments like the guaranteed investment contracts or the index funds to help you increase your income with time. (gsnmagazine.com)
  • Under California law, it is also true that there is no right to paid vacation time, but if an employer establishes a policy or practice of providing paid vacation, am employer does not have carte blance to limit how much vacation time is accrued. (freeadvice.com)
  • However, it is legal for an employer to allow vacation time to accrue to a reasonable cap after which no more vacation time accrues. (freeadvice.com)
  • GetAHEAD works to upskill students and graduates with disabilities in making the transition from third-level education to full-time employment. (ahead.ie)
  • For the first deduction an employer makes for support payment, they may charge a one-time fee of up to $25 for administrative reimbursement. (freeadvice.com)
  • This process -- called talent analytics -- can help recruiters save time, money, and effort, all while attracting the best hires. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Under the current law, if your employer misses an SG payment or doesn't pay on time, it is required to lodge an SG charge statement and pay a late fee. (actionartistry.com)
  • We will help you make the right super contributions at the right time. (actionartistry.com)
  • If you miss a payment, because you didn't pay an employee's super on time or to the right fund, you must: If you make a late payment you can either: Find out how to lodge and pay your SGC when an SGC statement is required. (actionartistry.com)
  • While the ADA requires employers to make 'reasonable accommodations' to qualified persons with disabilities, USERRA goes further by requiring employers to affirmatively make reasonable efforts to assist a veteran returning to employment. (bricker.com)
  • This includes not only making efforts to return the veteran to his or her position (or the position in which he or she would have been employed but for the leave), but also making reasonable efforts to help qualify the veteran for a job of equivalent seniority, status and pay, through training or retraining for the position, at no cost for the veteran. (bricker.com)
  • In the case of an employer with a vacation allotment of 10 days, a reasonable accrual cap might be two times the annual vacation allotment, or 20 days, after which no more vacation accrues until some is used. (freeadvice.com)
  • The Defend Trade Secrets Act, for example, defines a trade secret as information that "derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable through proper means by, another person who can obtain economic value from the disclosure or use of the information"-but only if its owner has "taken reasonable measures to keep such information secret. (tradesecretslaw.com)
  • The employer may be held liable for the payments owed, plus costs, interest, and reasonable attorneys' fees. (freeadvice.com)
  • A reasonable accommodation is an accommodation which doesn't pose what is called an "undue hardship" on the employer. (freeadvice.com)
  • Help improve management of spending, reduce back-office expenses, mitigate risk and boost bottom-line results. (pnc.com)
  • A Chief Financial Officer's (CFO) daily responsibilities include such as building financial models, analyzing and preparing financial statements, and reconciling income and expenses. (investopedia.com)
  • If you're among this group, you should know there are steps you can take to be more prepared for your future expenses, and this could help reduce your financial stress. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Whether or not your plan sponsor is willing to make a change to improve your plan's expenses, it's important to take some ownership by checking in with your investment options regularly, Mitchell says. (nerdwallet.com)
  • The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport has accredited the course, which helps give our graduates additional credibility and employability. (northumbria.ac.uk)
  • Employers should keep in mind that the ultimate cost of a plan is the amount paid out in benefits, and reduced funding today will translate to higher funding requirements tomorrow. (buck.com)
  • Attractive health and retirement benefits are designed to make a job more attractive than competing offers for new prospects. (wisebread.com)
  • It is understood that human milk provides benefits to babies as they develop, particularly in its ability to help protect babies from a variety of infections. (nyas.org)
  • Employer and occupation information was disclosed for just two out of the 42 contributors, and several months after first filing incomplete reports with the FEC, the super political action committee (PAC) has yet to amend any FEC reports to disclose any donor's occupation or employer. (commondreams.org)
  • Political committees, regardless of their mission, must identify all individuals who contribute over $200 in a calendar year and that must disclose their donors' occupations and employers. (commondreams.org)
  • Namely, employers must disclose to applicants in writing that they may obtain the applicant's consumer credit report, and they must get each applicant's written authorization before doing so. (foley.com)
  • It provides details on who has been offered employer-sponsored healthcare coverage, whether workers have chosen to take advantage of that coverage, and if so, what months you were or weren't covered by the employer plan. (creditkarma.com)
  • As long as you make withdrawals specifically for healthcare expenditures, the withdrawals are not taxable. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Sixty percent of physician-director relationships identified via the SEC database were healthcare companies not listed in Open Payments (i.e., companies that are exempt due to their products being in development or clinical trials, companies that manufacture only non-prescription drugs, healthcare services, health insurance, and medical equipment companies). (medpagetoday.com)
  • But if you think that you can slip past a potential employer - or the applicant tracking system , which is designed to weed out unqualified candidates - think again. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • The disclosure and authorization must be contained in a "stand-alone" document, free of any extra language that might confuse or distract the applicant from reading and understanding the disclosure. (foley.com)
  • Adhering to a "listen-?rst" mantra will help you gain valuable insights that inform how - or even if - you want to engage. (is4profit.com)
  • If your company isn't keeping track of data like this, it may be missing out on other crucial insights that can help guide the hiring process. (foxbusiness.com)
  • A debt management plan is an informal proposal your credit counsellor makes to your creditors on your behalf. (canada.ca)
  • Make sure your statutory rights are protected. (legaltechnology.com)
  • The letter asks the government to treat the issue with the seriousness it deserves and to improve protection for staff by creating a new statutory offence of assaulting, threatening, or abusing a retail worker. (hazards.org)
  • The taxation of residents and non-residents in the UK is very different but there is a Statutory 'Residence' Test to help you determine whether you are resident or not. (taxback.com)
  • When you receive the forms, you really only need to worry about them if you claimed advanced premium tax credits to help you afford insurance or if you could be eligible for these credits. (creditkarma.com)
  • Use the current market value for your vehicles, … The $50,000 that you made five years ago cannot afford you the same lifestyle today it would have then. (gsnmagazine.com)
  • You can use new-house calculators to estimate how much house you can afford and retirement calculators to help estimate the overall cost of your retirement . (foxbusiness.com)
  • It adds brains to the economy, helping designers, makers, marketers, and sellers of goods and services do a better job for consumers. (cato.org)
  • Marketers use our software & services to create & optimize valuable content so that it gets found, answers questions, & solves problems for real people. (garysguide.com)
  • We believe we're making the world a better place by empowering marketers to really help their customers rather than just sell stuff. (builtinnyc.com)
  • You'll build on your all-round knowledge of business, adding a strong emphasis on logistics and supply chain management (LSCM). (northumbria.ac.uk)
  • Use their Accesshub for information about the range of accessible services and communication options to help customers contact your business. (qld.gov.au)
  • For example, when in the early stages and losing money, an S-corporation might make more sense because founders may be able to write off business losses on their taxes. (scu.edu)
  • This helps our business grow by assembling useful information from our end-user. (immiwork.com)
  • Small business owners are made in a variety of ways. (hrblock.com)
  • For years, class counsel enjoyed a lucrative business arising from employers' procedural mistakes, whether or not they resulted in any concrete harm to the class members. (foley.com)
  • GOV.UK's get help and support for your business page offers advice on business planning, exporting and financial help from government-backed schemes. (essex.gov.uk)
  • He helps both emerging and mature companies manage issues such as ensuring sufficient cash flow to sustain growth, enhancing working capital , freeing up money tied up in inventory, determining where to concentrate sales efforts, deciding whether to sell the business and more. (investopedia.com)
  • Do a bit of research on which industries and type of jobs are hiring for remote workers to help speed along your search," suggests Frana. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • The whole idea behind the GFE aka the Loan Estimate … Download Important Information for Fast Food Employers/Workers: NYC… A GFE helps borrowers … Flood Certification: If required, you'd have this charge for running a check to verify that the property is not in a flood zone. (hardcontrol.com)
  • The union GMB has welcomed a UK government report accepting the need for employers to do more to support workers that have survived domestic abuse. (hazards.org)
  • Shortly after beginning to experience symptoms, Ms. Core requested that her employer ask her co-workers to refrain from wearing the perfume, but no action was taken, and Ms. Core's symptoms continued and grew worse. (freeadvice.com)
  • Here's what's keeping 44 percent of American workers awake at night - and why employers are growing concerned. (moneytalksnews.com)
  • Find a failure that you see frequently and fix the root of it, fix it in such a way that it knocks out the biggest portion of mistakes you make. (christopherspenn.com)
  • As we were walking into the restaurant, he turned to me and said, 'In reinsurance you make a very sizable bet and find out three years later how things turned out. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • But since we generally make money when you find an offer you like and get, we try to show you offers we think are a good match for you. (creditkarma.com)
  • Read on to find out how these forms could be used to help you complete your tax returns. (creditkarma.com)
  • Find out how our Members across sectors have built innovative cross-disciplinary teams. (nyas.org)
  • In this context, the district court disagreed and did not find a per se concrete harm in Home Depot's alleged failure to maintain its FCRA disclosures as stand-alone documents. (foley.com)
  • Stewards can find other ideas for demands to make on employers at www.ueunion.org/covid19/employers . (ueunion.org)
  • Whether you're making dinner or buying cookies, do what you can to find out what the person you're thanking likes. (wisebread.com)
  • and most importantly how we create more equality for those areas which do not have the access to bus services they need to participate in inclusive economic growth. (spt.co.uk)
  • Through Unity, a PayPal affinity group of women and men working together to create more opportunities for women at PayPal, we are focused on gender equality and gender balance. (paypal.com)
  • After identifying whether your co-founder's employer poses a threat to your company, assess relevant state laws. (scu.edu)
  • Building/grounds/transportation security enhancements, such as interior and exterior security doors and mechanisms ( e.g. , panic bars, bulletproof glass, bullet resistant coating materials for existing glass), protective vehicle crash barriers at the front of entrances, modifications of building/facility entrances to restrict access, secured keycard systems, metal detectors (fixed or portable), security cameras and emergency (police dispatch) call poles. (bricker.com)
  • How can employers help to remove these barriers? (news-medical.net)
  • If you don't mind me asking, what is your employer like with regard to your MH? (nshn.co.uk)
  • In this local government case, the GMB union reached a negotiated settlement of their equal pay claims with the employers, but given the process followed and outcome of the deal, the union was found to have indirectly discriminated against female members with regard to their right to receive equal pay. (nhsemployers.org)
  • Employers should consult with their lawyers about claims that may be progressing, in full or in part, and make preparations with regard to disclosure of data as necessary. (nhsemployers.org)
  • Studying for a Master's degree in computer science, you will be taught in Northumbria's brand new, purpose-built computing facility on our Newcastle City Centre campus, with access to industry standard equipment and technology. (northumbria.ac.uk)
  • If you have any questions relating to this Statement, please contact us at the Data Protection Officer, The Aon Centre, The Leadenhall Building, 122 Leadenhall Street, London, EC3V 4AN or [email protected] . (aon.com)
  • It is not intended to be legal advice and does not create or imply an attorney-client relationship. (bricker.com)
  • The company prevailed in having the case dismissed by successfully arguing that the named plaintiff, Katherine Saltzberg, did not allege a "concrete injury" and as a result, lacked legal standing to sue her employer. (foley.com)
  • This inside knowledge helps our legal team to quickly asses your situation and create a legal strategy to reach your goals. (cohanlawgroup.com)
  • The fees have arguably been beneficial for employers, in the sense that their introduction has deterred false or spurious claims from reaching the stages of a tribunal hearing. (croner.co.uk)
  • Cued by the new press attention to data security, senators and representatives have stepped in front of earnestly scribbling reporters announcing their plans to make us safe. (cato.org)
  • New cloud-based solutions make it even easier to gather and classify your IP data. (legaltechnology.com)
  • Future-Proofing your IP by creating a consistent way to file and retrieve data will be invaluable as unexpected changes come your way. (legaltechnology.com)
  • This is not a contractual document, and it does not create any rights or obligations on either party, beyond those which already exist under data protection laws. (aon.com)
  • This Privacy Policy explains our personal data practices and the choices you can make about the way your personal data is used. (shangri-la.com)
  • The employer now changes plans or providers. (freeadvice.com)
  • If they so chose, an employer can commonly change plans. (freeadvice.com)
  • The calendar provided in this FYI In-Depth will help you set up your own schedule of activities to address as the year progresses so that you do not miss important deadlines for your qualified plans. (buck.com)
  • SIIA is the national association of third party administration firms, the organizations that administer health plans for self-funded employer health plans. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • March 23, 2005 (PLANSPONSOR.com) - President Bush's defined benefit reform proposals would hurt employers with significantly underfunded plans, according to a new report. (plansponsor.com)
  • A Standard & Poor's news release said the research report by the company's Rating Services asserted that the reform suggestions (See Chao Releases Administration DB Reform Proposal ) would enhance regulatory disclosure and accountability for plans as well. (plansponsor.com)
  • CareerBuilder, LLC and its subsidiaries and divisions (collectively, "CareerBuilder") provides the Talent Network on behalf of the employer customer whose career and employment opportunities are promoted on this Talent Network. (jobs.net)
  • The Talent Network may obtain information about you that you upload to the site or that may be provided by the employer customer whose career and employment opportunities are promoted on this Talent Network. (jobs.net)
  • At Cohan Law Group , we help people involved in a broad range of employment disputes. (cohanlawgroup.com)
  • We will help you resolve your employment issues quickly and effectively. (cohanlawgroup.com)
  • Employer brand awareness, while one of the more nebulous metrics to track, is absolutely critical for your long-term recruiting strategy. (foxbusiness.com)