Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.United StatesSequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Helping Behavior: Behaviors associated with the giving of assistance or aid to individuals.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mice, Inbred C57BLCattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Great BritainDNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Mice, Inbred BALB CHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.IndiaBlotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lymphocyte Cooperation: T-cell enhancement of the B-cell response to thymic-dependent antigens.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Chemistry: A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer: Subpopulation of CD4+ lymphocytes that cooperate with other lymphocytes (either T or B) to initiate a variety of immune functions. For example, helper-inducer T-cells cooperate with B-cells to produce antibodies to thymus-dependent antigens and with other subpopulations of T-cells to initiate a variety of cell-mediated immune functions.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.EnglandLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
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The primary aims of the project are (i) to transform the dialogue between scientific and religious concepts of human nature by ... We expect this project to inspire much further research and, in the longer term, to dominate thinking about human nature in ... This project will tackle one of the most important big questions about human nature: how to reconcile contemporary scientific ... This will be the first systematic attempt to explore embodied cognition approaches to human nature in dialogue with Judeo- ...
Nature vs. Altruism Tuesday, July 17, 2012. #fullpost{display:inline;}. In a posting at Why Evolution Is True, Jerry Coyne ... And, indeed, we dont see such altruism in nature. There are reports that vampire bats regurgitate blood to other individuals ... interesting in light of a notion I have seen bandied about to the effect that altruism exists in nature or has somehow been ...
What can I embed to be this in the view absorption human nature and? If you accept on a prime view absorption human nature and ... view absorption human nature and to pull 3 where this phone sounds infected. view absorption human nature and thought in ... view absorption human nature and buddhist out the cab symposium in the Chrome Store. The much siap device that is actually ... view absorption human nature and buddhist provides much written on network book and challenge address but also is Online other ...
... and we suggest that it is society which shapes human nature and character. There is no fixed or inherited human nature. An ... Abstract. We will approach in this article the question of human nature in economics. The traditional homo oeconomicus, as ... Human nature in the economic behavior based on the neoclassical economic model. Ada MARINESCU. School of Advanced Studies of ... capture the essence of human beings and if there is an universal human nature. We propose a more flexible portrait of the ...
Even so, some say that the insects that have been given names are only a small fraction of the insects in nature. Many are yet ... Such insects are important in nature to help keep pest populations (insects or weeds) at a tolerable level. We call this the ... balance of nature. Predatory and parasitic insects are very valuable when they attack other animals or plants that we consider ...
... is the worlds leading multidisciplinary science journal. Nature publishes the finest peer-reviewed research that drives ... Nature Briefing , 17 December 2018. Daily briefing: Whats the heaviest natural element on Earth? We only know for sure that it ... Nature Outlook. 13 December 2018. Gene therapy After a roller-coaster ride of hype and disappointment, the decades-long effort ... Nature events Directory * International Conference on Applied Mathematics and Communication Technology 2019 01 October 2019. - ...
... Outlook. 08 March 2018. The future of medicine. Modern medicine is affording people longer and healthier lives. But ... Nature events Directory * International Conference on Discrete Mathematics and Computer Mathematics (DMCM 2018) 15 September ... Nature authors say a reproducibility checklist is a step in the right direction, but more needs to be done. ... Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience ...
"Nature" can refer to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. The study of nature is a large, if not ... Art of the Nature Timelines on Wikipedia. *Nature, BBC Radio 4 discussion with Jonathan Bate, Roger Scruton & Karen Edwards (In ... Within the various uses of the word today, "nature" often refers to geology and wildlife. Nature can refer to the general realm ... Some fields of science see nature as matter in motion, obeying certain laws of nature which science seeks to understand. For ...
Nature Communications 7 Rights & permissionsfor article Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression ... Nature 519 , 57-62 Rights & permissionsfor article A gp130-Src-YAP module links inflammation to epithelial regeneration . Opens ... Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 10 , 697-698 Rights & permissionsfor article Transplantation: 3D printing of the ... Nature Communications 3 , 1072 Rights & permissionsfor article Enhanced HSP70 lysine methylation promotes proliferation of ...
Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience ...
Nature Communications 2 , 1-11 Rights & permissionsfor article BRCA1 is an essential regulator of heart function and survival ... Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience ...
Nature 383 , 547-550 Rights & permissionsfor article A role for Pyk2 and Src in linking G-protein-coupled receptors with MAP ... Nature Immunology 1 , 31-36 Rights & permissionsfor article Absence of marginal zone B cells in Pyk-2-deficient mice defines ... Nature 575 , 294-295 Rights & permissionsfor article Small molecule combats cancer-causing KRAS protein at last . Opens in a ... Nature 264 , 550-552 Rights & permissionsfor article Lateral motion and valence of Fc receptors on rat peritoneal mast cells . ...
Nature Genetics 47 , 834-838 Rights & permissionsfor article Variation in ,i,NRT1.1B,/i, contributes to nitrate-use divergence ... Nature Reviews Neuroscience 20 , 5-18 Rights & permissionsfor article Non-nociceptive roles of opioids in the CNS: opioids ... Nature Communications 8 , 1-14 Rights & permissionsfor article BMP restricts stemness of intestinal Lgr5,sup,+,/sup, stem cells ... Nature Immunology 18 , 519-529 Rights & permissionsfor article The metabolic ER stress sensor IRE1α suppresses alternative ...
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 4 , 35-44 Rights & permissionsfor article ,i,In vivo,/i, drug discovery in the zebrafish . Opens ... Nature Chemical Biology 5 , 74-75 Rights & permissionsfor article Novel Wnt antagonists target porcupine and Axin . Opens in a ... Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 14 , 721-731 Rights & permissionsfor article Zebrafish as tools for drug discovery . Opens in a ... Nature Chemical Biology 12 , 552-558 Rights & permissionsfor article σ,sub,1,/sub, receptor ligands control a switch between ...
Origins harnesses the power of nature to provide high-performance skincare, leaving you with flawless-looking skin even before ...
A nature reserve (also known as natural reserve, bioreserve, natural/nature preserve, or natural/nature conserve) is a ... Main article: Nature reserves of Israel. Israels National Parks and Nature Reserves Act of 1963 defines a nature reserve as " ... 10 nature conservation areas and 516 prefectural nature conservation areas.[17] Jordan[edit]. Main article: Nature reserves in ... See also: Nature reserve (Australia). In Australia, a nature reserve is the title of a type of protected area used in the ...
Nature Genetics is a scientific journal founded as part of the Nature family of journals in 1992. It publishes high quality ... Its sister journal is Nature Reviews Genetics. Impact factor - Nature Publishing Group "Journals Ranked by Impact: Genetics". ...
In 1961, La Nature changed its name to La Nature Science Progrès (loosely Nature Magazine: Advances in Science) then in 1963 to ... La Nature (English: Nature) was a French language magazine aimed at the popularization of science established in 1873 by French ... Thesis, University of Vienna 2005 (in French) Summaries and history of La Nature (in French) La Nature, complete year runs 1873 ... Starting in 1915, La Natures publishing year was brought in sync with the calendar year. A weekly magazine until the 1920s, it ...
... you can explore nature with these 11 challenges. See just how good your observation skills are by comparing butterflies, leaves ... With these activities young children can explore the wonders of nature with the help of an adult. The challenge here is to ... No matter what the weather or season, you can explore nature with these 11 challenges. See just how good your observation ... compare examples within categories of field evidence, and then to observe nature with printable field journal pages. ...
ILLINOIS ~ Hiking Trails & Nature & HISTORIC SITES Nature Walks! Scenic & Health Walks ∞ St. Louis Region ~ ST LOUIS CITY* ... nature walks *Nature Walks *City Park Walks *Garden Walks *Scenic Walks southeast * "River Trails" *st. francois *st. gen * ... Nearby nature walks are Turkey Bluffs~State Fish & Wildlife,Fults Hill Prarie and Kidd Lake Natural Area. Piney Creek Nature ... Missouri Nature Walks Discover & Explore Hiking in Missouri ... Nature Walks Home , Scenic Drive Trails , National Parks , ...
Flickr is almost certainly the best online photo management and sharing application in the world. Show off your favorite photos and videos to the world, securely and privately show content to your friends and family, or blog the photos and videos you take with a cameraphone.
... nature, air pollutants, global warming, the greenhouse effect, animals, plants, endangered species, conservation, nature, and ... Nature discusses the Earths wide variety of animals and plants and its endangered species. ...
Visit The Power of Poison exhibition for more about poison in nature. ...
The next time you go for a nature walk, try this fun activity (perfect for kids and adults) to discover what hitchhiking plants ... While hiking through woods and wetlands, some nature-lovers are compromising the "unspoiled" places they enjoy most. They dont ...
Learn how The Nature Conservancy in Missouri is using nature itself to as a strategy for challenges such as climate change, ... Connect With Nature. Work alongside TNC staff, partners and other volunteers to care for nature, and discover unique events, ... Across The Nature Conservancy and here in Missouri, we are focused on incorporating nature-based solutions to adapt to a ... Nature-based solutions refer to the sustainable management and use of nature for tackling challenges such as climate change, ...
  • This project will tackle one of the most important big questions about human nature: how to reconcile contemporary scientific assumptions about the physical nature of human beings with traditional religious assumptions about the importance of mind, soul and inner life. (templeton.org)
  • Stand up for our natural world with The Nature Conservancy. (nature.org)
  • Across The Nature Conservancy and here in Missouri, we are focused on incorporating nature-based solutions to adapt to a changing world for the benefit of nature and people. (nature.org)
  • Through a collaborative partnership, The Nature Conservancy helped establish Naturally Resilient Communities , which includes over 50 solutions and case studies that can help communities become more resilient to flooding and erosion. (nature.org)
  • Naturally Resilient Communities is a partnership of the American Planning Association, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Association of State Floodplain Managers, the National Association of Counties and The Nature Conservancy and made possible with support from the Kresge Foundation. (nature.org)
  • The Nature Conservancy is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charitable organization (tax identification number 53-0242652) under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. (nature.org)
  • Global sites represent either regional branches of The Nature Conservancy or local affiliates of The Nature Conservancy that are separate entities. (nature.org)
  • The 73 acres of Blowing Rocks Preserve, a Nature Conservancy preserve, contains several different habitats, including beach dune, coastal strand, mangrove wetlands, tropical hammock and oak hammock. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • A nature reserve (also known as natural reserve , bioreserve , natural/nature preserve , or natural/nature conserve ) is a protected area of importance for wildlife , flora , fauna or features of geological or other special interest, which is reserved and managed for conservation and to provide special opportunities for study or research . (wikipedia.org)
  • My wife and I hope that someday our girls will look back on their experiences we had in the woods and at Thanksgiving with love, hope and a desire to conserve natures great gifts. (nature.org)
  • Our mission is to protect and conserve nature in Canada by engaging Canadians and by advocating on behalf of nature. (e-activist.com)
  • In Class 2 , students use the online exhibition, Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature and learn about several science topics that served as a backdrop to the novel and the film. (nih.gov)
  • The online exhibition, Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature looks at the world from which Mary Shelley came, at how popular culture has embraced the Frankenstein story, and at how Shelley's creation continues to illuminate the blurred, uncertain boundaries of what we consider "acceptable" science. (nih.gov)
  • Nature-based solutions refer to the sustainable management and use of nature for tackling challenges such as climate change, water and food security, biodiversity protection, human health, and disaster risk management. (nature.org)
  • Nature-based solutions are actions to protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural and modified ecosystems that address societal challenges effectively and adaptively, simultaneously providing human well-being and biodiversity benefits. (iucn.org)
  • By devoting 20% of its territory to nature, the European Union wishes to put a stop to the erosion of its biodiversity. (europa.eu)
  • NatureHood in the Schoolyard seeks to engage children in hands-on learning about local biodiversity by inspiring in them an interest in nature. (e-activist.com)
  • Nature reserves fall into different IUCN categories depending on the level of protection afforded by local laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gland, Switzerland - The first-ever Global Standard for Nature-based Solutions has been developed by IUCN. (iucn.org)
  • Within the various uses of the word today, "nature" often refers to geology and wildlife . (wikipedia.org)
  • From building a bug hotel in your garden to reducing your carbon footprint around the home, we're inviting you to make simple promises to help nature and wildlife thrive. (nationaltrust.org.uk)
  • In this episode of the PBS series, travel to Cuba, as Nature cameras explore the rarely seen wildlife that inhabits the Caribbean island country thanks to a special agreement with the government which allowed filmmakers unprecedented access to the remarkable natural landscapes and exotic creatures. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • Finally, in 1972, La Nature merged with the scientific magazine La Recherche, which is still in print today. (wikipedia.org)
  • The world's first modern nature reserve was established in 1821 by the naturalist and explorer Charles Waterton around his estate in Walton Hall, West Yorkshire . (wikipedia.org)
  • As you stand alongside geologists and marvel at waves that rise above 70 feet tall on Maui's North Shore, you'll see just how the turbulent forces of Mother Nature combine to create one of the world's most beloved paradises. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • Guided nature walks, bird hikes, mini-canoeing trips for ages 6 and up, and other programs for adults and children are offered seasonally. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • While hiking through woods and wetlands, some nature-lovers are compromising the "unspoiled" places they enjoy most. (pbs.org)
  • I've just come from the twitter and facebook feeds and seen more than enough of the usual unhelpful polarisation of cat haters wanting to get their shotguns out and cat lovers saying it's just nature or cats do no harm. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Frolicsome, bewhiskered and great natural aquatic performers, sea otters have charmed an untold number of nature lovers who have observed them at play in the kelp beds off California's central coast. (nytimes.com)
  • This park offers everything nature lovers could want: Explore pristine beaches. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Nature reserves may be designated by government institutions in some countries, or by private landowners, such as charities and research institutions , regardless of nationality. (wikipedia.org)
  • This sudden (well, this decade anyway) realization of the importance of glial cells prompted piles of research, and this research is being highlighted in the current issue of Nature Neurobiology . (scienceblogs.com)
  • Now the Caltech researchers have engineered new versions of the enzyme, unlocking its ability to drive a completely different and synthetically useful reaction that does not take place in nature. (caltech.edu)
  • Furthermore, tweaking these catalysts to predictably make specific products remains a significant challenge-one the researchers hoped nature could overcome with evolution's help. (caltech.edu)
  • Writing in the journal Nature, the researchers say this does not affect estimates of long-term global warming. (bbc.co.uk)
  • In Australia , a nature reserve is the title of a type of protected area used in the jurisdictions of the Australian Capital Territory , New South Wales , Tasmania and Western Australia . (wikipedia.org)
  • They provide a number of co-benefits for people and nature - notably, capturing and storing CO2 emissions and reducing the impacts of climate change (including droughts, floods, fires, and land erosion). (nature.org)
  • Cyclopropanes are a necessary part of many natural-product intermediates and pharmaceuticals, but nature forms them through a complicated series of steps that no chemist would want to replicate. (caltech.edu)
  • Nature can refer to the general realm of living plants and animals, and in some cases to the processes associated with inanimate objects-the way that particular types of things exist and change of their own accord, such as the weather and geology of the Earth . (wikipedia.org)
  • Nature reserve , area set aside for the purpose of preserving certain animals, plants, or both. (britannica.com)
  • The origin of modern nature reserves lies in medieval times, when landowners established game preserves for the protection of animals that they hunted. (britannica.com)
  • The Emmy award-winning PBS series Nature takes a look at animals at their wildest in this release, which also explores the battle for space between humans and animals. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • Inspired by a real-life pandemic of mass frog deformities discovered in Minnesota, the plot of Strange Nature follows a former pop star and her young son moving to rural Minnesota to reconnect with her estranged father, only to find themselves in danger when the mutations begin infecting animals and humans. (yahoo.com)
  • Strange nature is all these components added together in an odd yet fun mix bowl of mutated animals, humans, weird behaviors and creature feature horror. (yahoo.com)
  • The abandoned power plant was reclaimed by nature, covered in overgrowth and home to feral animals. (dictionary.com)
  • Listening to birdsongs and observing animals in nature have shown to promote wellbeing, reduce stress, improve mood, and reduce attention fatigue. (nps.gov)
  • Environmental Determinism The popular assumption today is that before the general acceptance of the concept of culture in the mid-twentieth century, white people conceived of human nature as determined by biology. (jhu.edu)
  • The idea that biology (human nature) and customs and traditions (culture) are distinct realms whose precise relationship is a problem stemmed from the breakdown of. (jhu.edu)
  • Judy Lehmberg is a former college biology teacher who now shoots nature videos. (cbsnews.com)
  • Walking through nature also improves cognitive function and memory. (nps.gov)
  • Walking in nature reduces inflammation and boosts your immune system, which decreases the risk of certain diseases and cancers. (nps.gov)
  • 5 minutes walking in nature improves mood, self-esteem, and relaxation. (nps.gov)
  • The mental and attention restoration achieved from walking in nature can improve performance on tasks in school and at work.Exercising in nature leads to greater health benefits than performing the same activity indoors. (nps.gov)
  • Thesis, University of Vienna 2005 (in French) Summaries and history of La Nature (in French) La Nature, complete year runs 1873-1905, digitized by Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Paris This article incorporates text from the French language Wikipedia article La Nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • This installment of PBS's multi-award winning Nature series delves into the life and history of the highly endangered giant panda. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • Your purchases and support enable us to continue to care for the nature, beauty and history we all miss. (nationaltrust.org.uk)
  • Inspired by this prototype, Yan and colleagues looked to Mother Nature to solve their nano-sized problem. (nsf.gov)
  • Those nature reserves were built according to the laws no. 102/1983 and 4/1994 for protection of the Egyptian nature reserve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Work alongside TNC staff, partners and other volunteers to care for nature, and discover unique events, tours and activities across the country. (nature.org)
  • Views of nature in work or school increase direct attention, well being and life satisfaction. (nps.gov)
  • We work closely with local, nature groups that organize events to help get kids outside, active, and into nature right where they live. (e-activist.com)