Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Methylococcus capsulatus: A species of METHYLOCOCCUS which forms capsules and is capable of autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Balneology: Therapy by various hot or warm baths in natural mineral waters, spas, or "cures". It includes not only bathing in, but also drinking the waters, but it does not include whirlpool baths (HYDROTHERAPY).Methylococcaceae: A family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria utilizing only one-carbon organic compounds and isolated from in soil and water.Steam Bath: Therapy of sitting in a hot steamy room followed by a cool bath or shower.Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Oxygenases: Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Electric Conductivity: The ability of a substrate to allow the passage of ELECTRONS.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Potassium Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that are selectively permeable to potassium ions. At least eight major groups of K channels exist and they are made up of dozens of different subunits.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Kidney Tubules, Collecting: Straight tubes commencing in the radiate part of the kidney cortex where they receive the curved ends of the distal convoluted tubules. In the medulla the collecting tubules of each pyramid converge to join a central tube (duct of Bellini) which opens on the summit of the papilla.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Benzodioxoles: Compounds based on benzene fused to oxole. They can be formed from methylated CATECHOLS such as EUGENOL.Loop of Henle: The U-shaped portion of the renal tubule in the KIDNEY MEDULLA, consisting of a descending limb and an ascending limb. It is situated between the PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE and the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE.Barium: An element of the alkaline earth group of metals. It has an atomic symbol Ba, atomic number 56, and atomic weight 138. All of its acid-soluble salts are poisonous.Potassium Chloride: A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Amiloride: A pyrazine compound inhibiting SODIUM reabsorption through SODIUM CHANNELS in renal EPITHELIAL CELLS. This inhibition creates a negative potential in the luminal membranes of principal cells, located in the distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Negative potential reduces secretion of potassium and hydrogen ions. Amiloride is used in conjunction with DIURETICS to spare POTASSIUM loss. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p705)Kidney Tubules, Proximal: The renal tubule portion that extends from the BOWMAN CAPSULE in the KIDNEY CORTEX into the KIDNEY MEDULLA. The proximal tubule consists of a convoluted proximal segment in the cortex, and a distal straight segment descending into the medulla where it forms the U-shaped LOOP OF HENLE.4,4'-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-Disulfonic Acid: An inhibitor of anion conductance including band 3-mediated anion transport.Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials: Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Chloride Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that form channels to selectively pass chloride ions. Nonselective blockers include FENAMATES; ETHACRYNIC ACID; and TAMOXIFEN.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Calcium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Hydrotherapy: External application of water for therapeutic purposes.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.GABA Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and GABA RECEPTOR AGONISTS.PropiophenonesEnzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Microwaves: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from the UHF (ultrahigh frequency) radio waves and extending into the INFRARED RAYS frequencies.gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Electroplating: Coating with a metal or alloy by electrolysis.Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.4-Acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic Acid: A non-penetrating amino reagent (commonly called SITS) which acts as an inhibitor of anion transport in erythrocytes and other cells.Potassium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by inhibition of potassium efflux through cell membranes. Blockade of potassium channels prolongs the duration of ACTION POTENTIALS. They are used as ANTI-ARRHYTHMIA AGENTS and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Carbachol: A slowly hydrolyzed CHOLINERGIC AGONIST that acts at both MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS and NICOTINIC RECEPTORS.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Swimming PoolsMicroelectrodes: Electrodes with an extremely small tip, used in a voltage clamp or other apparatus to stimulate or record bioelectric potentials of single cells intracellularly or extracellularly. (Dorland, 28th ed)Kidney Medulla: The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Bicuculline: An isoquinoline alkaloid obtained from Dicentra cucullaria and other plants. It is a competitive antagonist for GABA-A receptors.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Tetraethylammonium: A potassium-selective ion channel blocker. (From J Gen Phys 1994;104(1):173-90)Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Organ Culture Techniques: A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)Ion Transport: The movement of ions across energy-transducing cell membranes. Transport can be active, passive or facilitated. Ions may travel by themselves (uniport), or as a group of two or more ions in the same (symport) or opposite (antiport) directions.Helping Behavior: Behaviors associated with the giving of assistance or aid to individuals.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Ouabain: A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Alkaloids: Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Ion Channel Gating: The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Barium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain barium as an integral part of the molecule.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate excitatory amino acid receptors.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Tetraethylammonium CompoundsMotor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.4-Aminopyridine: One of the POTASSIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS, with secondary effect on calcium currents, which is used mainly as a research tool and to characterize channel subtypes.Mud Therapy: The therapeutic use of mud in packs or baths taking advantage of the absorptive qualities of the mud. It has been used for rheumatism and skin problems.Pyramidal Cells: Projection neurons in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and the HIPPOCAMPUS. Pyramidal cells have a pyramid-shaped soma with the apex and an apical dendrite pointed toward the pial surface and other dendrites and an axon emerging from the base. The axons may have local collaterals but also project outside their cortical region.Flavobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Bumetanide: A sulfamyl diuretic.6-Cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione: A potent excitatory amino acid antagonist with a preference for non-NMDA iontropic receptors. It is used primarily as a research tool.Interneurons: Most generally any NEURONS which are not motor or sensory. Interneurons may also refer to neurons whose AXONS remain within a particular brain region in contrast to projection neurons, which have axons projecting to other brain regions.Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of the joints of the SPINE, the intervertebral articulations.Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.QuinoxalinesPeriodicity: The tendency of a phenomenon to recur at regular intervals; in biological systems, the recurrence of certain activities (including hormonal, cellular, neural) may be annual, seasonal, monthly, daily, or more frequently (ultradian).Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Glyburide: An antidiabetic sulfonylurea derivative with actions similar to those of chlorpropamide.2-Amino-5-phosphonovalerate: The D-enantiomer is a potent and specific antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). The L form is inactive at NMDA receptors but may affect the AP4 (2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate; APB) excitatory amino acid receptors.United StatesIleum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Nifedipine: A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure.Cesium: A member of the alkali metals. It has an atomic symbol Cs, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 132.91. Cesium has many industrial applications, including the construction of atomic clocks based on its atomic vibrational frequency.N-Methylaspartate: An amino acid that, as the D-isomer, is the defining agonist for the NMDA receptor subtype of glutamate receptors (RECEPTORS, NMDA).Neurotransmitter Agents: Substances used for their pharmacological actions on any aspect of neurotransmitter systems. Neurotransmitter agents include agonists, antagonists, degradation inhibitors, uptake inhibitors, depleters, precursors, and modulators of receptor function.Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
Turkish bath. Notes[edit]. *^ In very isolated onsen, where there is no possibility to use soap before entering in the bath, ... Onsens come in many types and shapes, including outdoor (露天風呂 or 野天風呂, roten-buro or noten-buro) and indoor baths. Baths may be ... Nowadays, as most households have their own bath, the number of traditional public baths has decreased[2], but the number of ... Onsens are different from sentō, indoor public bath houses where the baths are filled with heated tap water. ...
The baths[edit]. In 1517, a Dr. Enzianer, who was Rector of the University of Vienna and court physician, established a bathing ... The baths continued until 1786, when they were closed by a decree of Emperor Joseph II.[2] The baths were reopened only much ...
Watts baths[edit]. Watts nickel plating baths can deposit both bright and semi-bright nickel. Bright nickel is typically used ... A Sulfate-Chloride bath operates at lower voltages than a Watts bath and provide a higher rate of deposition. Although internal ... stresses are higher than the Watts bath, they are lower than that of an all-chloride bath.[3] ...
BATH vowel[edit]. See also: Phonological history of English short A § Trap-bath split in Received Pronunciation ... The pronunciations with /ɑː/ are invariably accepted as RP.[70] The English Pronouncing Dictionary does not admit /æ/ in BATH ... Some research has concluded that many people in the North of England have a dislike of the /ɑː/ vowel in BATH words. A. F. ... Gupta, Anthea Fraser (2005), "Baths and becks", English Today, 21 (1): 21-27, doi:10.1017/S0266078405001069, ISSN 0266-0784. ...
Baths[edit]. Shortly after the opening of the Svartsengi power plant in 1976, the runoff water had made pools. In 1981, a ... The water temperature in the bathing and swimming area of the lagoon averages 37-39 °C (99-102 °F). Guests are required to ... Bathing facilities opened in 1987 and in 1992 the Blue Lagoon company was established.[6] ... psoriasis patient bathed in the water and noted that the water alleviated his symptoms[5] and the lagoon subsequently became ...
Roman Baths[edit]. The Roman Baths of Ankara have all the typical features of a classical Roman bath complex: a frigidarium ( ... hot bath), the tepidarium (warm bath) and the frigidarium (cold bath) in a typically laid-out 80-by-120-metre (260-by-390-foot ... The Roman Baths of Ankara were constructed by the Roman emperor Caracalla (212-217) in honor of Asclepios, the God of Medicine ... cold room), a tepidarium (warm room) and a caldarium (hot room). The baths were built during the reign of the Roman emperor ...
Other sweat bathing facilities[edit]. Many cultures have sweat baths, though some have more spiritual uses while others are ... Steam baths, such as the Turkish bath, where the humidity approaches 100%, will be set to a much lower temperature of around 40 ... In Norway and Sweden saunas are found in many places, and are known as 'badstu' or 'bastu' (from 'badstuga' "bath cabin, bath ... Sauna bathing and heavy drinking of alcoholic beverages, and also sauna bathing during alcohol withdrawal phase can undoubtedly ...
The next rooms are the Baths of the Sultan and the Queen Mother (Hünkâr ve Vâlide Hamamları). This double bath dates from the ... The golden lattice work was to protect the bathing sultan or his mother from murder attempts. The sultan's bath was decorated ... Both baths present the same design, consisting of a caldarium, a tepidarium and a frigidarium.[77] Each room either has a dome ... This area also has a small 18th-century mosque and the bath of Beşir Ağa (Beşir Ağa Camii ve Hamamı), who was the chief black ...
Many of these spas offered individual tub baths, vapor baths, douche sprays, needle showers, and pool bathing to their guests. ... the old Roman ideas of medicinal bathing were revived at towns like Bath (not the source of the word bath), and in 1596 William ... Patients periodically bathed in warm water for up to 10 or 11 hours while drinking glasses of mineral water. The first bath ... Bathing, however, was still not a universal custom. Only one year later - in 1843 - bathing between 1 November and 15 March was ...
The Man • EOTO • Miami Horror • Eskmo • Baths • Afro Man • Brother Ali • Jesse Woods • Emory Quinn • Michal Menert • Sugarpill ...
The baths included a wedge shaped pool and bathing boxes, and was designed using ideas gleaned from Coutie's examination of ... "Baths". Architecture in Australia: 813-818. October 1969. "History of Harold Holt Swim Centre". Harold Holt Swim Centre. City ... Originally built as a municipal swimming baths, in 1927, the facilities were renovated in 1967 by Borland and Jackson to ... Built at a cost of £10,476, the Malvern Baths was designed by the City Engineer, Barton Coutie. ...
These public baths were not only used as a place for bathing, but also as a location for social gatherings. The baths contained ... Bunson, Matthew (1994). "Baths". Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire. New York: Facts on File. . "Notes On Supplementary Plates CV ... It was the site of many extravagant buildings as well as baths and gardens. The Campus Esquilinus was also the site of ... Because of the popularity of the Esquiline Hill, the Flavians decided to construct the Baths of Titus right by the Domus Aurea ...
Baths. The public Roman baths were built of rubble and revetted with ashlar and brick. These "thermae" may date as early as the ... These baths were included within the Byzantine fortress, no doubt built on an earlier enclosure and defended by 13 towers. It ... The only other important monument discovered are the public baths. The theatre was built in the first or second year of the 3rd ...
Seafield Baths opened in 1813 as Leith's first indoor bathing facility. Portobello Pier opened in 1871. It was designed by ... p. 6. "Trinity Baths and Chain Pier". Edinburgh Evening Courant. 4 August 1869. p. 2. "Eligible bathing quarters". Edinburgh ... there were regular omnibuses from the Mound to the Chain Pier and also to the Trinity Baths, a nearby sea bath which had opened ... and the focus of bathing moved to indoor pools. Sea bathing continued at Portobello beach, 3.4 miles (5.5 km) east of the city ...
In 1933 a second building, the Blue Baths, opened under much controversy, as mixed bathing was accommodated. The Blue Baths ... The former bath house, now Rotorua Museum, and the Blue Baths have Category I registrations. Four structures have Category II ... The original Bath House, which opened in 1908, closed in 1966 for bathing. The building was extensively renovated in 1995 and ... "Blue Baths". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 10 July 2016. "The Bath House (Former)". Register of ...
Roman baths. Roman theatre. Palazzo Comunale (Town Hall) of the 14th century. The cathedral of Fiesole (Il Duomo), containing ...
Ocean baths. Dictionary of Sydney, 2011 New South Wales Ocean Baths Flickr New South Wales Ocean Baths. ... "Ocean baths". Visit Newcastle. Missing or empty ,url= (help); ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) "The Entrance Ocean Baths - ... Wylie's Baths established in 1907 at Coogee, New South Wales, by Henry Alexander Wylie, the father of Mina Wylie, was one of ... Coogee's McIver's Baths constructed in the 1860s seems to now be the only seawater pool in Australia still reserved solely for ...
A medicated fish bath (using methylene blue or potassium permanganate and salt), is generally a first step, as well lowering ... "Fish Baths". "Columnaris in Fish". Columnaris Disease, expert reviewed and published by Wikivet at http://en.wikivet.net/ ...
The baths were used for dances during its early years, when the pool was covered with a large dance floor. The baths are the ... Bramley Baths are an example of Edwardian swimming baths. Built in 1904, and restored, it has a 25-metre pool, a gymnasium and ... "Bramley Baths". Historic England. Retrieved 12 April 2017. Bramley local area. Useful local organisations Newlay and Whitecote ... only remaining example of an Edwardian era bath-house in Leeds today and are a Grade II listed structure. Bramley Shopping ...
"Obsidian - Baths". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 12, 2015. Cohen, Ian (May 28, 2013). "Baths: Obsidian". ... "Baths - Chart history - Top Dance/Electronic Albums". Billboard. Retrieved December 16, 2016. "Baths - Chart history - ... Pollard, Vincent (2013-05-24). "Baths - Obsidian". Exclaim.ca. Retrieved 2013-06-03. Liedel, Kevin (2013-05-27). "Baths: ... "Baths: Obsidian". Pitchfork.com. Retrieved 2013-06-03. Minsker, Evan (March 6, 2013). "Baths Announces New Album Obsidian, ...
Robert Bennet, The last of the Georgian architects of Bath: the life and times of John Pinch, Bath History IX (2002) 87-103 H.M ... Norfolk Crescent in Bath was started around 1793 by John Palmer and continued about 1820 by John Pinch. A similar completion of ... A few years later he completed Northampton Street in Bath which had been started by Thomas Baldwin, and was completed by George ... John Pinch the elder (1769 - 1827) was an architect working mainly in the city of Bath, England. He was surveyor to the ...
"Public Baths". Retrieved 24 February 2013. "AFTER 25 YEARS, CONSTRUCTION RESUMES AT CHELSEA RECREATION CENTER". The Daily Plant ...
Lameroo Baths were the second ocean baths built in Darwin. The first, built near Fort Hill in 1880, were damaged in a cyclone. ... p. 1. "DARWIN BATHS". Daily Mail (6253). Brisbane. 15 May 1922. p. 4. Retrieved 19 October 2016 - via National Library of ... "LAMEROO BEACH BATHS". The Brisbane Courier (20,066). 15 May 1922. p. 4. Retrieved 19 October 2016 - via National Library of ... A long-time Darwin resident recalled that the Lameroo Baths were surrounded by "a cement wall, topped by palings and with the ...
London: Country Life, 1908). "Bath Abbey Heritage Vaults". Bath UK. Retrieved 7 October 2017. "Vaults Museum". Bath Abbey. ... "Museum of Bath at Work". Museum of Bath at Work. Archived from the original on 12 June 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2010. "Free ... "Roman Baths". Bath and North East Somerset Council. Archived from the original on 15 August 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2010. "Sally ... "About us". Bath Postal Museum. Archived from the original on 30 January 2008. Retrieved 27 October 2007. "Bath Postal Museum". ...
After a 10-second exposure, the paper was directed to developing and fixing baths, then either air- or machine-dried. The ... These included the "manifold writer," developed from Christoph Scheiner's pantograph and used by Mark Twain; copying baths; ...
There are now many dozens of methods of applying hydrotherapy, including baths, saunas, douches, wraps, and packs. ... Hydrothermal therapy additionally uses its temperature effects, as in hot baths, saunas, wraps, etc. Hydro- and hydrothermal ... These include: baths and showers, neutral baths, sitz baths, contrast sitz baths, foot baths, cold mitten friction rub, steam ... Sitz bath. This is generally taken in a hip bath as a cold, rising temperature, or warm sitz bath. Prior to a sitz bath, warm ...
Here we present a genome-scale metabolic model for Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), a well-studied obligate methanotroph, which ... A Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Suggests Reduced Efficiency Electron Transfer to the ... A Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Suggests Reduced Efficiency Electron Transfer to the ... A Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Suggests Reduced Efficiency Electron Transfer to the ...
Buy Nyassa Dead Sea Bath Salt online from Ayurvedabay.com. Shop for Nyassa products, ayurvedic products, organic herbs & ... Youre reviewing: Nyassa Dead Sea Bath Salt. How do you rate this product? *. 1 star. 2 stars. 3 stars. 4 stars. 5 stars. ... Nyassa Dead Sea Bath Salt. The Dead Sea salts are popular all over the world for its reputed therapeutic effects. The water of ... Directions for Use: Toss a few scoops into the bath or bucket and soak your hands and feet. Enjoy the heavenly aroma. For all ...
Peat Bath. Finally, the high quality of hydrotherapy care here at NUHS is the direct result of the skill and knowledge shared ...
Hydrotherapy use decreased after the fall of the Roman Empire and the use of public baths was banned. It was then. re- ... Around 500BC, its use was further progressed when the Greeks and Romans used baths for health, hygiene and recreational ...
Most Finns take a sauna bath weekly and grew up hearing the adage: "If the sauna, schnapps, and birch tar dont help, then ... death is near." (1) There are several distinct types of saunas: Finnish steam sauna (Finnish steam bath), dry-heat sauna, ...
Dollan Aqua Centre (previously known as Dollan Baths) is a 20th-century category A listed building in East Kilbride, Scotland. ... In 1993, the international conservation organisation DOCOMOMO listed Dollan Baths as one of sixty key monuments in Scottish ... The Dollan Baths, Twentieth Century Society Dollan Aqua Centre, South Lanarkshire Leisure and Culture Dollan Aqua Centre, East ...
... uszoda Lukács Thermal Bath Bath Units of Lukács Thermal Bath Archived 2012-07-23 at Archive.is Lukács Thermal Bath Coordinates ... Lukács has four thermal baths, ranging in temperatures from the 26 °C (79 °F) cooling bath to the 40 °C (104 °F) hot bath. The ... The Császár Thermal Bath and Swimming Pool next door to Lukács, is the oldest continually operating thermal bath in Budapest, ... The Lukács Thermal Bath (Hungarian: Szt. Lukács gyógyfürdő) is a historic indoor/outdoor thermal bath spa in Budapest, Hungary ...
Ritual bathing is traceable to ancient Egypt, to prehistoric cities of the Indus River valley, and to the early Aegean ... Remains of bathing apartments dating from the Minoan period exist in the palaces at Knossos and Tiryns. ... in a bath: they bathed the baby. ∎ [tr.] (usu. be bathed) fig. suffuse or envelop in something: the park lay bathed in sunshine ... Baths Encyclopedia of Religion COPYRIGHT 2005 Thomson Gale. BATHS. BATHS in a religious context are sacred places where people ...
Bath, New York, a town *Bath (village), New York, village within the town of Bath ... Bath may refer to: *Bathing, immersion in a fluid *Bathtub, a large open container for water, in which a person may wash their ... Bath Rugby, a professional rugby union club in the English city. *Bath City F.C., a semi-professional football club based in ... Bath, Somerset, a city and World Heritage Site in the south-west of England, UK *Bath (UK Parliament constituency) ...
Cleopatras Bath Milk : -. ** Cleopatras Bath Milk ** Bath Milk to Nourish your Body. How is it Made?. How can I buy it?. ... Try some today and tell your MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT what you think of Cleopatras Bath Milk. Also, suggest he or she might like ... NEWS FLASH! We now have a great new product Cleopatras Bath Cream! Try some today. Remember Cream is Butterfat - saturated ... UNPROCESSED JERSEY COWS MILK as a BATH MILK for you to bathe in as was the regular practise of Cleopatra who it was said had ...
Thats why MAAX Bath worked with MagicLamp to transform order capture and management using IBM Enterprise Content Management ... About MAAX Bath MAAX Bath is a leading manufacturer of bathroom products for the residential housing market in Canada and the ... MAAX Bath. Getting the right products out to customers on time with automated order processing. No one likes waiting around for ... MAAX Bath takes advantage of ERP Data Gateway from MagicLamp to provide seamless integration between its Datacap and SAP ...
Fizzing bath products came into use as effervescent bath salts early in the 20th century; the bath bomb became a popular form ... Surfactant preparations for this purpose are themselves called "bath foam", "foaming bath", or "bubble bath", and frequently ... aerated or carbonated baths are called bubble baths. Bubbles on top of the water, less ambiguously known as a foam bath (see ... Foam baths became more popular with later surfactants; an early publicized use of an alkyl sulfate surfactant as bath foam was ...
Telegraph Travels best hotels, tours and holidays in Bath, tried, tested and recommended by our Bath experts ... The loveliest street in Bath, running between Pulteney Bridge and the Holburne Museum, is home to... Read expert review ... Read all of our latest articles on Bath, including guides to the main attractions, the citys best museums and galleries, ... This luxury hotel encompasses two townhouses in Baths showpiece Georgian crescent, plus a large ... Read expert review ...
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Category: Music News, tour dates Tags: Eaters, Hari Kanri, Liturgy, pgymy shrews, Queening, Ritual Humor, Russian Baths, Shop ... Category: Music News, Whats Going on Tonight in NYC Tags: Moaning, No Swoon, Quietus, Richard Papiercuts, Russian Baths ... Category: Music News Tags: Algiers, Bambara, Cold Beat, IDLES, Monograms, Northside Festival, Remote/Control, Russian Baths ... Category: Music News, tour dates Tags: Ben Greenberg, Birds, Creepoid, Iyez, Russian Baths ...
Media in category "Baths in Italy". The following 6 files are in this category, out of 6 total. ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Baths_in_Italy&oldid=55947307" ...
Upptäck de romerska baden som ligger mitt i hjärtat av Bath. Du kan känna värmen från termalbaden, se Sacred Spring (den heliga ... Image ©Bath Tourism Plus / Colin Hawkins Roman Baths (Bath). Upptäck de romerska baden som ligger mitt i hjärtat av Bath. Du ...
Email: [email protected]bath.ac.uk. Current Research. My research investigates the processes involved in diseases caused by ...
... bath safety, after-bath care and helping the person feel in control. ... Bathing for people with Alzheimers or other dementias - get tips on preparation, ... Simplify the bathing process. Try different approaches to make bathing easier. For example, sew pockets into washcloths to help ... Behaviors during bathing. People with dementia may become resistant to bathing. Such behavior often occurs because the person ...
Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=bath_tub&oldid=54955147" ...
Since leaving Bath Technical College in 1985 where he studied technical illustration and fine art, his reputation as a very ... of the City of Bath, at the Guildhall in Bath) 25 Artists Signed Proofs All Sold. 250 Signed, Limited Edition Prints Some ... Bath Abbey An original watercolour by Matthew Grayson of. The South West prospect of Bath Abbey (2003). Medium : Watercolour, ... In 1244 Bath and Wells share cathedral status and Roger of Salisbury becomes the joint Bishop of Bath and Wells.. In 1499 the ...
Ian Cohen catches up with the mastermind behind electronic act Baths, Will Wiesenfeld, to talk about the producer/songwriters ... Baths. The mastermind behind L.A. electronic act Baths talks about his forthcoming follow-up to 2010s Cerulean: Its like my ... Baths: Exit the Mine Pitchfork: Weve seen a lot of people that have come up in the past couple of years as bedroom acts who ... Another change: Though Baths has been entirely made up of Wiesenfeld in the studio and on stage thus far, most of the new ...
told me that once into a cycle that I should stay away from baths all together to be on the safe side. I also LOVE baths and ... We have a claw foot tub and I love baths and usually never shower. Im wondering if I could slip one bath in before the ... you OB tells you go home take a nice hot bath and even a couple glasses of wine in the bath - HOW freakin GOOD will that feel! ... No bath, hot tubs, saunas, heating pads/blankets, nothing that raises the body temp in that area. Kinda stinks, but think of ...
The majority of research done has found no evidence to suggest that ice baths are anything but a placebo. An alarming amount of ... There is zero science behind ice baths. None. They suck because theyre cold, it feels wonderful because you got out. ... studies have found that ice baths actually cause more soreness and pain. Yet fitness blogs everywhere keep the practice alive. ...
  • During the Renaissance, bath houses were once again used for health treatments, and in 1697, Sir John Floyer, English physician and author, introduced the word "hydrotherapy" in scientific literature, describing the positive and negative effects of hot and cold water. (aleh.org)
  • Here we present a genome-scale metabolic model for Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), a well-studied obligate methanotroph, which has been used as a production strain of single cell protein (SCP). (dtu.dk)
  • That sophisticated spa town tradition continues at Thermae Bath Spa, a luxurious new/old building combo that offers views of the cityscape from its alfresco roof-top pool. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Over recent years, hot baths, saunas, and other so-called passive heating therapies have received growing attention from scientists. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Literally meaning "heated bath room" (not "heated bathroom" mind you), jjim-jil-bang are relaxation emporiums with a heavy lean towards hot tubs and saunas that are affordable, open 24/7 and a staple of Korean culture. (gadling.com)
  • I've visited wonderful Korean bath saunas in many cities, and many offer hot rooms and pools of different temperatures, to intensify the ritual of cleansing. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Check your local city guide for information, or, you can visit my website for a list of reputable, classical Korean bath saunas across the country that I personally have experienced and highly recommend. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • But you are right, I should amend my comment: A person who wants a wooden tub is a person who has never taken a splinter-free, hygienic, leak-free bath in smooth comfort. (metafilter.com)
  • The stability requirement currently under development takes into account the types of bath tubs in which these products are used, as well as surface conditions in bath tubs. (cpsc.gov)
  • If two tubs are not handy, the patient may sit in a hot bath (up to the navel). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Also, to avoid all temptations to a reversion to the rigors of old, as with Cheltenham, there are no bath tubs, just showers. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Such behavior often occurs because the person doesn't remember what bathing is for or doesn't have the patience to endure lack of modesty, being cold or other discomforts. (alz.org)
  • Still, a really phenomenal amount of health benefit gets lost in the migration from bath to shower, and from the spirit of cleansing to the behavior of clean. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Owing to to the extraordinary health of benefits of RAW COWS MILK to your SKIN and BODY , we have decided to supply our organic, RAW, UNPROCESSED JERSEY COW'S MILK as a BATH MILK for you to bathe in as was the regular practise of Cleopatra who it was said had beautiful skin and countenance . (angelfire.com)
  • Monday, Jan. 21, 2019, Cleveland: While it has been standard practice for decades to whisk newborns off to a bath within the first few hours of their birth, a new Cleveland Clinic study found that waiting to bathe a healthy newborn 12 or more hours after birth increased the rate of breastfeeding exclusivity during the newborn hospital stay. (eurekalert.org)
  • Ritual bathing is traceable to ancient Egypt, to prehistoric cities of the Indus River valley, and to the early Aegean civilizations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Washing away misfortune and purifying his aura seems the best way to success and each of his helpers will suggest one after another a bath ritual. (gumroad.com)
  • A sitz bath (also called a hip bath) is a type of bath in which only the hips and buttocks are soaked in water or saline solution. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A sitz bath is used for patients who have had surgery in the area of the rectum, or to ease the pain of hemorrhoids, uterine cramps, prostate infections, painful ovaries, and/or testicles. (encyclopedia.com)
  • it is best to have someone else present when doing a contrast sitz bath. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The sitz bath is a European tradition in which only the pelvis and abdominal area are placed in water, with the upper body, arms, legs, and feet out of the water. (encyclopedia.com)
  • To ease discomfort from a vaginal yeast infection, women should take a warm saline sitz bath. (encyclopedia.com)
  • That way, you won't wash it off in your bath. (webmd.com)
  • Be sure to thoroughly wash yourself beforehand just outside the baths. (gadling.com)
  • Instead, we lather up with bath foams, shower gels, facial washes and scrubs, all of which rely on complex detergents - often the same ones used in heavy industry - to wash away simple dirt. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • The norm today, or at least the standard, in many Western countries, is to wash our bodies a lot -- and not in the bath at all, but in the shower. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Popular products that contained both contaminants include: Johnson's Baby Shampoo, Sesame Street Bubble Bath, Grins & Giggles Milk & Honey Baby Wash and Huggies Naturally Refreshing Cucumber & Green Tea Baby Wash. (ewg.org)
  • Wall sconces, bath light bars and ceiling fixtures aren't necessarily going away, but people are beginning to consider how impractical overhead, too-high-up or too-far-on-the-sides light placement is for grooming purposes (due to shadows cast on the face). (constantcontact.com)
  • Nearly 1,000 healthy mother-newborn pairs took part in the study, including 448 babies bathed shortly after birth (January-February 2016) and 548 who delayed the bath (July-August 2016). (eurekalert.org)
  • In addition, the focus group recommended consistency when referring to the occupant of the bath seat, by using the word baby (or babies) rather than child (or children). (cpsc.gov)
  • Babies in the delayed bath group were more likely to have stable/normalized temperatures post first bath. (eurekalert.org)
  • They weren't as cold as the babies who were bathed sooner after birth, so they may not have been as tired trying to nurse" DiCioccio said. (eurekalert.org)
  • Did You Know, that babies HATE baths in the COLD SINK? (screencast.com)
  • You may need to experiment to determine if the individual prefers showers or tub baths. (alz.org)
  • Infant bath seats are used in a sink or tub to provide back and front support to a seated infant while he or she is being bathed. (cpsc.gov)
  • In 1994, ASTM International initiated the development of a voluntary standard for bath seats, ASTM F 1967-99 Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Infant Bath Seats . (cpsc.gov)
  • Such stacks are a good indication that you've stumbled across a sento, or communal bath house. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Growing up in Korea, my first experiences of bathing were of going with my grandmother to the local communal bath house. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Ask: 'Would you like to take a bath or a shower? (alz.org)
  • We have a claw foot tub and I love baths and usually never shower. (dailystrength.org)
  • Bathrooms are decorated with attractive black-and-white or coloured tiling - smaller rooms usually have just a shower, larger ones a shower over a bath. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Whirlpool baths fit into smaller spaces, and tile surrounds can be designed to fit a variety of tub/shower shapes. (baltimoresun.com)
  • JeffB at Lifehack.Community has posted his tips on how to optimize your bathing - you'll be out of the shower faster and likely cleaner . (lifehack.org)
  • When using this preparation in the bath or shower take care to avoid slipping, especially when getting in or out, as this preparation may make the bath or shower more slippery than usual. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • A couple of years ago, some friends turned their attic into a master bedroom and a big bath with a double-size whirlpool tub and a steam shower. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Feeling a trifle self-conscious in what could be mistaken for a male stripper's costume, I proceeded into the main baths, pausing first for the obligatory shower. (gadling.com)
  • These days, most of us don't use soap in the shower or bath. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Foot baths are most effective for treating diseases of the interdigital skin such as interdigital dermatitis and foot rot. (cornell.edu)
  • They are also exploring a range of ways to deliver the killer fungus throughout the hives from bee fungal foot baths to powder sprays. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Foot baths should be 8 to 10 feet long and approximately 3 feet wide with a depth of 6 inches. (cornell.edu)
  • Locate foot baths on a level surface. (cornell.edu)
  • There should be a gap of 6 to 8 feet between the treatment and water (prebath) foot baths. (cornell.edu)
  • Cows tend to defecate when entering foot baths. (cornell.edu)
  • The 6 to 8 foot gap between foot baths allows cows to complete defecation prior to entering the treatment foot bath. (cornell.edu)
  • Alternate times for replenishing foot baths with fresh solution so each group of cows has access to fresh solution. (cornell.edu)
  • It is recommended that foot baths be used at least 3 to 4 days per week. (cornell.edu)
  • therefore, foot baths must be managed properly to achieve maximum effectiveness. (cornell.edu)
  • Bath bombs are the perfect addition to a warm bath, but they're no fun if they fizz or break down before you get a chance to use them. (wikihow.com)
  • Bath bombs react to moisture, so they last longer when they're properly wrapped. (wikihow.com)
  • Start with dry bath bombs. (wikihow.com)
  • Bath bombs are very reactive to moisture and will fizz early or fall apart if they aren't fully dry before you wrap and store them. (wikihow.com)
  • If you bought your bath bombs from a store, then they will already be dry. (wikihow.com)
  • Just pick a size that's big enough for your bath bombs. (wikihow.com)
  • If your bath bombs are small, you might try snack-sized baggies for a tighter fit, which provides more protection. (wikihow.com)
  • You want to keep the bath bombs as dry as possible, so press the baggy down to push the air out. (wikihow.com)
  • Bath bombs require only a few ingredients. (ehow.com)
  • The fizzing action of bath bombs comes from baking soda interacting with citric acid when water dissolves them. (ehow.com)
  • You can add cornstarch to make bath bombs float in the water, but it's not essential. (ehow.com)
  • Tint the bath bombs with paste or liquid food coloring. (ehow.com)
  • All you need to mix your own bath bombs is a bowl, stirring spoon, spray bottle, measuring cups and spoons. (ehow.com)
  • Shape bath bombs into balls by hand or mold them into shapes with items from the kitchen, such as ice cube trays or muffin cups. (ehow.com)
  • You can also use things like plastic Easter eggs, holiday ornaments or baking molds for more elaborate bath bombs. (ehow.com)
  • You can also stir dried flowers or herbs into the dry ingredients instead of using essential oils for fragrance, or you can press the flowers or herbs into the molds to coat your bath bombs. (ehow.com)
  • Remove the bath bombs from the molds once they are dry enough to hold their shape, so they can dry faster. (ehow.com)
  • Large bath bombs may take several days to dry completely, while small ones may dry overnight. (ehow.com)
  • Of the anionics, soap is not a common deliberate constituent of bath foam preparations because they react rapidly with "hardness" cations in water to produce lime soaps, which are anti-foams. (wikipedia.org)
  • The kind you'd put into a bath, or find in lotion or soap, is called colloidal oatmeal . (webmd.com)
  • The wave-swept remnants of Sutro Baths below San Francisco's Cliff House are among the city's most famous ruins. (kqed.org)
  • There are ruins of public baths in Pompeii, and in Rome there exist extensive remains of the thermae of Titus (AD 80), of Caracalla (AD 212-35), and of Diocletian (AD 302). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Japan's public baths, known as sento, represent an institution with hundreds of years of history. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Public baths are the shortest route there is to moral and spiritual enlightenment. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • An association of operators of Tokyo's sento public baths is now offering etiquette tips in three foreign languages - English, Chinese and Korean - as part of a push to better educate tourists. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Bath , also called Berkeley Springs , town, seat (1820) of Morgan county, in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia , U.S., near the Potomac River . (britannica.com)
  • an early publicized use of an alkyl sulfate surfactant as bath foam was in the original 1936 production of the play The Women, but it is possible that a similar composition was used to produce foams seen in bath photos since the marketing of Dreft in 1933. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tokyo's "sento" public bathhouses are making an effort to become foreigner-friendly by printing multilingual brochures and posters to explain Japan's communal bathing etiquette ahead of the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Talk with your child's health care provider if you have questions about the safety of your bathroom or your child's bathing routine. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Try different approaches to make bathing easier. (alz.org)
  • The Petite Marseille luxury single ended freestanding bath will make a stylish addition to any bathroom. (ebay.co.uk)
  • In 1702, Queen Anne traveled from London to the mineral springs of Bath, launching a fad that was to make the city the most celebrated spa in England. (sacred-destinations.com)
  • Especially if you're putting a bath in a space not originally designed as a living space, you need to make sure the joists are strong enough. (baltimoresun.com)
  • But be careful because bath oils can make your tub slippery. (webmd.com)
  • Here are some great homemade bath teas recipes that you can make in the comfort of your own home, and once you try them you most definitely will want to give them as gifts or even party favors at your next tea! (bellaonline.com)
  • There are several ways that a tea bath bag can be made, one can use an existing large Chamomile bag or one can make your own tea bag. (bellaonline.com)
  • If you would like to make a donation to Samaritans of Bath & District, please follow the link below. (samaritans.org)
  • As befits a city that's long been a leading light in the cultural scene, contemporary arts make a strong showing in Bath. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • You can add custom scents and oils to make a soothing bath even more enjoyable. (ehow.com)
  • Divide the bath bomb mixture to make multiple scents and colors from one batch. (ehow.com)
  • This will vary due to reasons such as cow cleanliness, use of a pre-bath, type and concentration of medication used, and weather conditions. (cornell.edu)
  • That's why MAAX Bath worked with MagicLamp to transform order capture and management using IBM Enterprise Content Management solutions. (ibm.com)
  • Bubbles on top of the water, less ambiguously known as a foam bath (see photo), can be obtained by adding a product containing foaming surfactants to water and temporarily aerating it by agitation (often merely by the fall of water filling the tub). (wikipedia.org)
  • Surfactant preparations for this purpose are themselves called "bath foam", "foaming bath", or "bubble bath", and frequently contain ingredients for additional purposes common to bath enhancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saponins were also used to foam machine-aerated baths. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Preparations to produce a foam bath must be able at high dilution in water of common "hardness" to produce a foam and hold it for a useful duration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bath foam preparations may be in the form of liquid (or gel) with water, or as solids in the form of powders, grains, or tablets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bath foam that triggers headaches. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Bathing is often the most difficult personal care activity that caregivers face. (alz.org)
  • For more ideas, join ALZConnected , our online support community where caregivers like you share tips on bathing a person with dementia. (alz.org)
  • a larger permanent warning label alerting parents and caregivers that bath seats are not safety devices and that infants should never be left unattended in a bath seat. (cpsc.gov)
  • On October 16, 2003, the Commission voted to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (2003 NPR) for baby bath seats. (cpsc.gov)
  • On December 29, 2003, the NPR on Baby Bath Seats and Rings was published in the Federal Register (Volume 68, page 74878). (cpsc.gov)
  • Feature: With 5 big sucker on the bottom of the chair, ensure the safety of the baby in the bath tub and your hands are free to play with your baby. (ebay.com)
  • New Listing Blooming Bath Baby Plush Lotus Flower Yellow Gently Used Free Shipping! (ebay.com)