Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.
Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.
Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.
Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.
A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.
INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.
Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
The S-isomer of omeprazole.
Analysis of the HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION in the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS. It is used to record the pattern, frequency, and duration of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.
Compounds that contain benzimidazole joined to a 2-methylpyridine via a sulfoxide linkage. Several of the compounds in this class are ANTI-ULCER AGENTS that act by inhibiting the POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE found in the PROTON PUMP of GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.
A histamine H2 receptor antagonist with low toxicity that inhibits gastric acid secretion. The drug is used for the treatment of duodenal ulcers.
The R-isomer of lansoprazole.
Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.
STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.
A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.
A substituted benzamide used for its prokinetic properties. It is used in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, and other disorders associated with impaired gastrointestinal motility. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)
A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.
Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridinyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the digestive system or its organs or demonstration of their physiological processes.
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.
Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
A compound with many biomedical applications: as a gastric antacid, an antiperspirant, in dentifrices, as an emulsifier, as an adjuvant in bacterins and vaccines, in water purification, etc.
Impaired digestion, especially after eating.
Symptoms of NAUSEA and VOMITING in pregnant women that usually occur in the morning during the first 2 to 3 months of PREGNANCY. Severe persistent vomiting during pregnancy is called HYPEREMESIS GRAVIDARUM.
An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral brucite. It acts as an antacid with cathartic effects.
A 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxypyridyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS. Lansoprazole is a racemic mixture of (R)- and (S)-isomers.
A motility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS in which the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (near the CARDIA) fails to relax resulting in functional obstruction of the esophagus, and DYSPHAGIA. Achalasia is characterized by a grossly contorted and dilated esophagus (megaesophagus).
Inflammation of the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA, including the VOCAL CORDS. Laryngitis is characterized by irritation, edema, and reduced pliability of the mucosa leading to VOICE DISORDERS such as APHONIA and HOARSENESS.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.
Delivery of a drug or other substance into the body through the epithelium lining of MUCOUS MEMBRANE involved with absorption and secretion.
Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.
A condition with damage to the lining of the lower ESOPHAGUS resulting from chronic acid reflux (ESOPHAGITIS, REFLUX). Through the process of metaplasia, the squamous cells are replaced by a columnar epithelium with cells resembling those of the INTESTINE or the salmon-pink mucosa of the STOMACH. Barrett's columnar epithelium is a marker for severe reflux and precursor to ADENOCARCINOMA of the esophagus.
The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.
Organic compounds that have the general formula R-SO-R. They are obtained by oxidation of mercaptans (analogous to the ketones). (From Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 4th ed)
Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.
A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.
Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.
A movement, caused by sequential muscle contraction, that pushes the contents of the intestines or other tubular organs in one direction.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Disorders affecting the motor function of the UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; the ESOPHAGUS body, or a combination of these parts. The failure of the sphincters to maintain a tonic pressure may result in gastric reflux of food and acid into the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX). Other disorders include hypermotility (spastic disorders) and markedly increased amplitude in contraction (nutcracker esophagus).
The physiologic or functional barrier to GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX at the esophagogastric junction. Sphincteric muscles remain tonically contracted during the resting state and form the high-pressure zone separating the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS from that of the STOMACH. (Haubrich et al, Bockus Gastroenterology, 5th ed., pp399, 415)
The ejection of gas or air through the mouth from the stomach.

Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux as a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. (1/213)

BACKGROUND: The causes of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and gastric cardia are poorly understood. We conducted an epidemiologic investigation of the possible association between gastroesophageal reflux and these tumors. METHODS: We performed a nationwide, population-based, case-control study in Sweden. Case ascertainment was rapid, and all cases were classified uniformly. Information on the subjects' history of gastroesophageal reflux was collected in personal interviews. The odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression, with multivariate adjustment for potentially confounding variables. RESULTS: Of the patients interviewed, the 189 with esophageal adenocarcinoma and the 262 with adenocarcinoma of the cardia constituted 85 percent of the 529 patients in Sweden who were eligible for the study during the period from 1995 through 1997. For comparison, we interviewed 820 control subjects from the general population and 167 patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Among persons with recurrent symptoms of reflux, as compared with persons without such symptoms, the odds ratios were 7.7 (95 percent confidence interval, 5.3 to 11.4) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 2.9) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The more frequent, more severe, and longer-lasting the symptoms of reflux, the greater the risk. Among persons with long-standing and severe symptoms of reflux, the odds ratios were 43.5 (95 percent confidence interval, 18.3 to 103.5) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 4.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.7 to 11.0) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The risk of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was not associated with reflux (odds ratio, 1.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.7 to 1.9). CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong and probably causal relation between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The relation between reflux and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia is relatively weak.  (+info)

Low-dose lansoprazole provides greater relief of heartburn and epigastric pain than low-dose omeprazole in patients with acid-related dyspepsia. (2/213)

AIM: To compare the relative efficacies of lansoprazole 15 mg o.m. and omeprazole 10 mg o.m. in relieving heartburn and epigastric pain in patients with acid-related dyspepsia. In addition, the study compared the safety profiles of the two treatments. METHODS: This double-blind, parallel group, randomised, multicentre study was conducted in 52 general practices in the UK. A total of 609 patients was recruited, 562 of whom were eligible for inclusion in the intention-to-treat analysis. All of the patients had experienced at least mild heartburn or mild epigastric pain persistently on at least 4 of the previous 7 days; patients with severe symptoms were excluded. 283 patients received lansoprazole 15 mg and 279 received omeprazole 10 mg, both for 4 weeks. The main efficacy measure was relief of symptoms, based on physician assessments. RESULTS: In the intention-to-treat population, a complete relief of overall primary symptoms of dyspepsia was achieved after 2 weeks in 53% of patients receiving lansoprazole and in 41% of patients receiving omeprazole (P = 0.007). After 4 weeks, 59% of the lansoprazole group and 51% of the omeprazole group had achieved complete symptom relief (P = 0. 078). Antacids were taken for additional relief of symptoms in fewer patients given lansoprazole compared to the omeprazole group in the third and fourth weeks (P = 0.035) and also significantly fewer antacids were taken by patients in the lansoprazole group compared with patients in the omeprazole group (P = 0.033). The proportion of patients reporting adverse events was similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose lansoprazole is more effective than low-dose omeprazole in the treatment of patients with mild heartburn or epigastric pain in general practice.  (+info)

Low-dose ranitidine for the relief of heartburn. (3/213)

BACKGROUND: Approximately 30% of adults in the USA suffer from heartburn or related symptoms monthly; more than 20% of these sufferers experience heartburn at least once per day. Although many rely on self-medication with antacids for the relief of their symptoms, treatments that decrease gastric volume as well as increase the pH of refluxed material should be more effective in relieving heartburn. AIM: To compare the safety and efficacy of low-dose regimens of ranitidine for the relief of heartburn. METHODS: Adults with at least a 3-month history of heartburn were eligible for this randomized, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre dose-ranging study. Following a 1-week open-label run-in phase to document baseline heartburn frequency, subjects were randomized to receive treatment with one tablet of either ranitidine 75 mg (n = 491), ranitidine 25 mg (n = 504), or placebo (n = 494), to be taken as needed up to four times daily for 2 weeks for the relief of heartburn. RESULTS: The ranitidine 75 mg regimen was clinically (> 10 percentage points) and statistically (P < 0.05) significantly more effective than placebo for all measured efficacy end-points in relieving heartburn and reducing antacid consumption. In addition, the ranitidine 75 mg regimen was superior to placebo in providing heartburn relief within 30 min of dosing that lasted for up to 12 h. Ranitidine 25 mg was observed to be statistically superior (P < 0.05) but not clinically different from placebo, as defined a priori, in providing heartburn relief. All treatments were well tolerated and adverse events occurred no more frequently with the ranitidine regimens than with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Ranitidine 75 mg provides prompt relief of heartburn that lasts for up to 12 h and has a safety profile comparable to that of placebo.  (+info)

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of non-prescription ranitidine 75 mg in the prevention of meal-induced heartburn. (4/213)

BACKGROUND: Ranitidine 75 mg (Zantac 75) has been shown to be effective for the treatment of pre-existing heartburn symptoms. AIM: To compare the efficacy of dosing ranitidine 75 mg or placebo 30 min prior to a proven heartburn-provoking meal in completely preventing or reducing subsequent heartburn symptoms. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, parallel methodology was used at nine investigative centres. Following a screening visit, patients ate a standard test meal consisting of chili, chips and a soft drink on two occasions. On the first occasion, patients received single-blind placebo 30 min before the meal. This meal was used to qualify patients and to ensure the onset of a minimum level of heartburn. Patients who qualified were randomized (n = 284) to receive double-blind ranitidine 75 mg or placebo 30 min before a second test meal administered 4-14 days later at the treatment visit. Patients recorded whether heartburn was present and rated heartburn severity by completing visual analogue scales at 15-min intervals over the 4. 5 h meal evaluation periods. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences favouring ranitidine 75 mg were determined for complete prevention of heartburn (P < 0.006), heartburn severity area under the curve (P < 0.001), a clinical success end-point (P < 0.001), and all other end-points (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These data clearly demonstrate that ranitidine 75 mg is effective in completely preventing or decreasing heartburn when administered 30 min prior to a provocative meal.  (+info)

An evaluation of increasing doses of ranitidine for treatment of heartburn. (5/213)

BACKGROUND: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, parallel group, dose-ranging trial of ranitidine tablets for relief of episodic heartburn. Adult out-patients who reported heartburn relieved by antacids at least seven times per week were eligible. METHODS: Patients who successfully completed a 1-week single-blind placebo run-in phase and who did not achieve adequate relief in more than 50% of heartburn episodes were randomized to a 1-week, double-blind treatment phase during which they received ranitidine doses of 25, 75 or 125 mg, or placebo. RESULTS: Of 577 patients randomized, 566 had at least one evaluable heartburn episode and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. All three ranitidine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo in providing overall episodic heartburn relief for the first episode (P < 0.002), last episode (P+info)

Cisapride 20 mg b.d. for preventing symptoms of GERD induced by a provocative meal. The CIS-USA-89 Study Group. (6/213)

BACKGROUND: Cisapride is a substituted piperidinyl benzamide indicated for the symptomatic treatment of patients with nocturnal heartburn due to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The currently recommended dosing regimen for cisapride is 10 mg q.d.s., but the elimination half-life of 8-10 h supports b.d. dosing with 20 mg. METHODS: This multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken to determine the efficacy and safety of cisapride 20 mg b.d. dosing in reducing or preventing heartburn and other meal-related symptoms after challenge with a provocative fatty meal. In phase 1 of the study, 137 patients with at least a 3-month history of symptoms suggestive of GERD and at least five episodes of GERD on 7-day diary were eligible to receive single-blind treatment with placebo for 7 (range +/- 3) days and then ingested a provocative meal. One hundred and twenty-two patients (45 men and 77 women, 22-65 years of age) who experienced heartburn during the 3 h after ingestion of the meal qualified for the double-blind phase of the study and were randomly assigned to either cisapride 20 mg or matching placebo b.d. for 7 (+/-3) days. At the end of this period, 118 patients again ate a fatty meal and were assessed for symptoms of GERD. RESULTS: Heartburn was prevented in a significantly higher percentage of cisapride-treated patients (40%; 24 out of 60) than placebo-treated patients (21%; 12 out of 58) after the repeat provocative meal at the end of the double-blind phase (P = 0.017). Cisapride was also significantly more effective in reducing the severity of postprandial heartburn, belching, and regurgitation (P < 0.05). Twice-daily dosing with cisapride 20 mg was well tolerated; the number of cisapride- and placebo-treated patients who experienced at least one adverse event was similar (31% and 22%, respectively). The most common adverse events were diarrhoea (cisapride, 18%; placebo, 0%) and rhinitis (cisapride, 2%; placebo, 5%). CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that cisapride 20 mg b.d. is effective in preventing or reducing symptoms of heartburn in patients who developed heartburn after ingesting a provocative fatty meal. Cisapride was also effective in reducing the severity of heartburn-related symptoms such as belching and regurgitation.  (+info)

Lansoprazole in the treatment of heartburn in patients without erosive oesophagitis. (7/213)

BACKGROUND: This randomized, double-blind, multicentre study compared lansoprazole with placebo for symptomatic relief of patients with non-erosive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: 214 patients with symptomatic, non-erosive GERD (moderate to severe daytime and/or night-time heartburn greater than half the days over the past 6 months and during the 7- to 10-day pre-treatment period) were randomized to either lansoprazole 15 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg, or placebo o.d. for 8 weeks. RESULTS: Daily diary data indicated that on the first treatment day a statistically significantly smaller percentage of lansoprazole patients reported daytime and night-time heartburn and antacid usage, compared with placebo patients. Lansoprazole patients also reported statistically significant less severe daytime and night-time heartburn on the first treatment day. During 0-4, 4-8, and 0-8 weeks of therapy, a statistically significant smaller percentage of days and nights with heartburn, less severe daytime and night-time heartburn, and less antacid usage were observed in the lansoprazole group compared to the placebo group. The percentages of patients with adverse reactions were similar in the lansoprazole and placebo groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrate that lansoprazole is an appropriate therapy for patients with symptomatic non-erosive GERD.  (+info)

Heartburn treatment in primary care: randomised, double blind study for 8 weeks. (8/213)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects and tolerability of omeprazole and cisapride with that of placebo for control of heartburn in primary care patients. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study. SETTING: 65 primary care practices in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 483 untreated patients with complaints of heartburn >/=3 days a week, with at most grade 1 reflux oesophagitis. INTERVENTIONS: Omeprazole 20 mg once daily, cisapride 20 mg twice daily, or placebo for 8 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adequate control of heartburn, defined as +info)

Heartburn is not a cardiac condition, but rather a digestive disorder. The medical term for heartburn is "pyrosis." It is characterized by a burning sensation in the chest or throat, caused by the reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus. This backflow of acid can irritate the lining of the esophagus, leading to discomfort and pain. Heartburn often occurs after eating, when lying down, or during bending over, and it can be worsened by certain foods, drinks, or medications. Chronic or severe heartburn may indicate a more serious condition, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the retrograde movement of stomach contents into the esophagus, which can cause discomfort and symptoms. It occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach) relaxes inappropriately, allowing the acidic or non-acidic gastric contents to flow back into the esophagus.

Gastroesophageal reflux becomes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when it is more severe, persistent, and/or results in complications such as esophagitis, strictures, or Barrett's esophagus. Common symptoms of GERD include heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, difficulty swallowing, and chronic cough or hoarseness.

Antacids are a type of medication that is used to neutralize stomach acid and provide rapid relief from symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach discomfort. They work by chemically reacting with the stomach acid to reduce its acidity. Antacids may contain one or more active ingredients, including aluminum hydroxide, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and sodium bicarbonate.

Antacids are available over-the-counter in various forms, such as tablets, chewable tablets, liquids, and powders. They can provide quick relief from acid reflux and related symptoms; however, they may not be effective for treating the underlying cause of these symptoms. Therefore, if you experience frequent or severe symptoms, it is recommended to consult a healthcare professional for further evaluation and treatment.

Esophagitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and irritation of the esophageal lining, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This inflammation can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chest pain, heartburn, and acid reflux.

Esophagitis can be caused by various factors, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), infection, allergies, medications, and chronic vomiting. Prolonged exposure to stomach acid can also cause esophagitis, leading to a condition called reflux esophagitis.

If left untreated, esophagitis can lead to complications such as strictures, ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus, which is a precancerous condition that increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Treatment for esophagitis typically involves addressing the underlying cause, managing symptoms, and protecting the esophageal lining to promote healing.

Anti-ulcer agents are a class of medications that are used to treat and prevent ulcers in the gastrointestinal tract. These medications work by reducing the production of stomach acid, neutralizing stomach acid, or protecting the lining of the stomach and duodenum from damage caused by stomach acid.

There are several types of anti-ulcer agents, including:

1. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): These medications block the action of proton pumps in the stomach, which are responsible for producing stomach acid. PPIs include drugs such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole.
2. H-2 receptor antagonists: These medications block the action of histamine on the H-2 receptors in the stomach, reducing the production of stomach acid. Examples include ranitidine, famotidine, and cimetidine.
3. Antacids: These medications neutralize stomach acid and provide quick relief from symptoms such as heartburn and indigestion. Common antacids include calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and aluminum hydroxide.
4. Protective agents: These medications form a barrier between the stomach lining and stomach acid, protecting the lining from damage. Examples include sucralfate and misoprostol.

Anti-ulcer agents are used to treat conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is important to take these medications as directed by a healthcare provider, as they can have side effects and interactions with other medications.

Ranitidine is a histamine-2 (H2) blocker medication that works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces. It is commonly used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines, and to manage conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Ranitidine is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn. Additionally, ranitidine can be used to prevent and treat upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by stress or injury in critically ill patients.

The medication is available in both prescription and over-the-counter forms, and it comes in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. As with any medication, ranitidine should be taken as directed by a healthcare professional, and its potential side effects and interactions with other medications should be carefully monitored.

Peptic esophagitis is a medical condition that refers to inflammation and damage of the lining of the esophagus caused by stomach acid backing up into the esophagus. This is also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The term "peptic" indicates that digestive enzymes or stomach acids are involved in the cause of the condition.

Peptic esophagitis can cause symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, difficulty swallowing, and painful swallowing. If left untreated, it can lead to complications like strictures, ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus, which is a precancerous condition. Treatment typically involves lifestyle changes, medications to reduce acid production, and sometimes surgery.

Histamine H2 antagonists, also known as H2 blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine on the H2 receptors in the stomach. Histamine is a chemical that is released by the body during an allergic reaction and can also be released by certain cells in the stomach in response to food or other stimuli. When histamine binds to the H2 receptors in the stomach, it triggers the release of acid. By blocking the action of histamine on these receptors, H2 antagonists reduce the amount of acid produced by the stomach, which can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach ulcers. Examples of H2 antagonists include ranitidine (Zantac), famotidine (Pepcid), and cimetidine (Tagamet).

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of medications that work to reduce gastric acid production by blocking the action of proton pumps in the parietal cells of the stomach. These drugs are commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and other conditions where excessive stomach acid is a problem.

PPIs include several different medications such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, pantoprazole, and esomeprazole. They are usually taken orally, but some PPIs are also available in intravenous (IV) form for hospital use.

By inhibiting the action of proton pumps, PPIs reduce the amount of acid produced in the stomach, which can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing. They are generally considered safe and effective when used as directed, but long-term use may increase the risk of certain side effects, including bone fractures, vitamin B12 deficiency, and Clostridium difficile infection.

Esomeprazole is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). It works by reducing the amount of acid produced in the stomach. Esomeprazole is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid. It is also used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis, a condition in which the esophagus becomes damaged by stomach acid.

Esomeprazole is available in delayed-release capsule and suspension forms, and it is typically taken once a day. It may be prescribed or taken over-the-counter. Common side effects of esomeprazole include headache, diarrhea, nausea, and stomach pain.

It's important to note that long-term use of PPIs like esomeprazole has been associated with an increased risk of certain health problems, such as bone fractures, vitamin B12 deficiency, and Clostridium difficile infection. As with any medication, it is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking esomeprazole.

Esophageal pH monitoring is a medical test used to measure the acidity (pH level) inside the esophagus. The test involves inserting a thin, flexible tube through the nose and down into the esophagus. The tube contains a sensor that detects changes in pH levels and transmits this information to a recording device worn by the patient.

The test typically lasts for 24 hours, during which time the patient keeps a diary of their activities and symptoms. This information is used to correlate any symptoms with changes in pH levels. The test can help diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and assess the effectiveness of treatment.

It's important to note that there are some precautions to be taken before and after the test, such as avoiding certain medications that may affect the pH levels or interfere with the test results. Patients should follow their healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure accurate results.

Omeprazole is defined as a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric ulcers, and other conditions where reducing stomach acid is desired. It works by blocking the action of the proton pumps in the stomach, which are responsible for producing stomach acid. By inhibiting these pumps, omeprazole reduces the amount of acid produced in the stomach, providing relief from symptoms such as heartburn and pain caused by excess stomach acid.

It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and oral suspension, and is typically taken once or twice a day, depending on the condition being treated. As with any medication, omeprazole should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and its potential side effects and interactions with other medications should be carefully considered before use.

The esophagus is the muscular tube that connects the throat (pharynx) to the stomach. It is located in the midline of the neck and chest, passing through the diaphragm to enter the abdomen and join the stomach. The main function of the esophagus is to transport food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion.

The esophagus has a few distinct parts: the upper esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the throat), the middle esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (another ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach). The lower esophageal sphincter relaxes to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach and then contracts to prevent stomach contents from flowing back into the esophagus.

The walls of the esophagus are made up of several layers, including mucosa (a moist tissue that lines the inside of the tube), submucosa (a layer of connective tissue), muscle (both voluntary and involuntary types), and adventitia (an outer layer of connective tissue).

Common conditions affecting the esophagus include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, esophageal strictures, and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a condition in which the stomach contents, particularly acid, flow backward from the stomach into the larynx (voice box) and pharynx (throat). This is also known as extraesophageal reflux disease (EERD) or supraesophageal reflux disease (SERD). Unlike gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), where acid reflux causes symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation, LPR may not cause classic reflux symptoms, but rather symptoms related to the upper aerodigestive tract. These can include hoarseness, throat clearing, cough, difficulty swallowing, and a sensation of a lump in the throat.

Esophagoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the visual examination of the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This procedure is typically carried out using an esophagogastroduodenoscope (EGD), a flexible tube with a camera and light on the end.

During the procedure, the EGD is inserted through the mouth and down the throat into the esophagus, allowing the medical professional to examine its lining for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. The procedure may also involve taking tissue samples (biopsies) for further examination and testing.

Esophagoscopy is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, and other disorders affecting the esophagus. It may also be used to treat certain conditions, such as removing polyps or foreign objects from the esophagus.

2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles is a class of chemical compounds that have both a pyridinylmethylsulfinyl group and a benzimidazole ring in their structure. Pyridinylmethylsulfinyl refers to a functional group consisting of a sulfinyl group (-S(=O)-) attached to a methyl group (-CH2-) that is, in turn, attached to a pyridine ring. Benzimidazoles are heterocyclic compounds containing a fused benzene and imidazole ring.

These types of compounds have been studied for their potential biological activity, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antitumor properties. However, it's important to note that medical definitions typically refer to specific substances or classes of substances that have established clinical use or are under investigation for therapeutic purposes. As such, 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles do not have a recognized medical definition in this sense.

Manometry is a medical test that measures pressure inside various parts of the gastrointestinal tract. It is often used to help diagnose digestive disorders such as achalasia, gastroparesis, and irritable bowel syndrome. During the test, a thin, flexible tube called a manometer is inserted through the mouth or rectum and into the area being tested. The tube is connected to a machine that measures and records pressure readings. These readings can help doctors identify any abnormalities in muscle function or nerve reflexes within the digestive tract.

Nizatidine is a histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonist, which is a type of medication that works by reducing the amount of acid produced by the stomach. It is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines, and to manage conditions where the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Nizatidine is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

The medical definition of Nizatidine is: "A synthetic histamine H2-receptor antagonist that is used in the treatment of gastric ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is also used to manage Zollinger-Ellison syndrome."

Dexlansoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication that is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach ulcers, and other conditions caused by excessive stomach acid production. It works by blocking the action of the proton pumps in the stomach, which are responsible for producing stomach acid.

Dexlansoprazole is a single enantiomer of lansoprazole, which means that it contains only one of the two mirror-image forms of the drug. This can result in fewer side effects and improved efficacy compared to the racemic mixture (a 50/50 mix of both enantiomers) found in some other PPIs.

Dexlansoprazole is available in delayed-release capsule form, and it is typically taken once daily for the treatment of GERD or twice daily for the treatment of stomach ulcers. As with all medications, it should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who can determine the appropriate dosage and monitor for any potential side effects.

Gastric acidity determination is a medical test used to measure the amount of acid in the stomach. This test is often performed to diagnose or monitor conditions such as gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. The test involves measuring the pH level of the stomach contents using a thin, flexible tube called a catheter that is passed through the nose and down into the stomach. In some cases, a small sample of stomach fluid may also be collected for further testing.

The normal range for gastric acidity is typically considered to be a pH level below 4. A higher pH level may indicate that the stomach is producing too little acid, while a lower pH level may suggest that it is producing too much. Based on the results of the test, healthcare providers can develop an appropriate treatment plan for the underlying condition causing abnormal gastric acidity.

A hiatal hernia is a type of hernia that occurs when a part of the stomach protrudes or squeezes through an opening (hiatus) in the diaphragm, the muscular partition between the chest and abdominal cavities. Normally, the esophagus passes through this opening to connect to the stomach, but in a hiatal hernia, a portion of the stomach also moves up into the chest cavity through the hiatus.

There are two main types of hiatal hernias: sliding and paraesophageal. In a sliding hiatal hernia, the junction between the esophagus and stomach (gastroesophageal junction) slides upward into the chest cavity, which is the most common type. Paraesophageal hiatal hernias are less common but can be more severe, as they involve the stomach herniating alongside the esophagus, potentially leading to complications like obstruction or strangulation of the blood supply to the stomach.

Many people with hiatal hernias do not experience symptoms, but some may have heartburn, acid reflux, regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, chest pain, or shortness of breath. Treatment depends on the severity and associated symptoms, ranging from lifestyle modifications and medications to surgical repair in severe cases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Silicic Acid" is not a recognized medical term. Silicic acid, also known as orthosilicic acid, is a compound that contains silicon and oxygen in a ratio of 1:2 (Si(OH)4). It's commonly found in water, soil, and various plants.

In the context of health and medicine, silica or silicic acid supplements are sometimes used for their potential benefits to bone health, collagen production, and hair and nail growth. However, more research is needed to fully understand these effects and their optimal usage.

If you have any questions related to a specific medical condition or treatment, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional.

Cisapride is a medication that was used to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders, such as gastroparesis and constipation. It belongs to a class of drugs called "prokinetic agents" which work by increasing the contractions or movements of the muscles in the digestive tract, thereby helping to move food and waste through the system more efficiently.

Cisapride was first approved for use in the United States in 1993, but its use was later restricted due to concerns about serious side effects, including cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats) and interactions with other medications. In 2000, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requested that cisapride be withdrawn from the market due to these safety concerns.

While cisapride is no longer available for use in many countries, it may still be used in some cases under strict guidelines and monitoring conditions. It is important to note that the use of cisapride should only be initiated and monitored by a healthcare professional, and patients should inform their doctor about all other medications they are taking to avoid potential interactions.

Hydrochloric acid, also known as muriatic acid, is not a substance that is typically found within the human body. It is a strong mineral acid with the chemical formula HCl. In a medical context, it might be mentioned in relation to gastric acid, which helps digest food in the stomach. Gastric acid is composed of hydrochloric acid, potassium chloride and sodium chloride dissolved in water. The pH of hydrochloric acid is very low (1-2) due to its high concentration of H+ ions, making it a strong acid. However, it's important to note that the term 'hydrochloric acid' does not directly refer to a component of human bodily fluids or tissues.

Fundoplication is a surgical procedure in which the upper part of the stomach (the fundus) is wrapped around the lower esophagus and then stitched into place. This procedure strengthens the lower esophageal sphincter, which helps prevent acid reflux from the stomach into the esophagus. It is commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and paraesophageal hernias.

Rabeprazole is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The medical definition of Rabeprazole is:

A substituted benzimidazole that acts as a prodrug, being selectively converted to the active form in the acidic environment of gastric parietal cells. It suppresses gastric acid secretion by inhibiting the H+/K+ ATPase enzyme system at the secretory surface of the gastric parietal cell. Rabeprazole is used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It is available by prescription in various forms, including tablets and sodium salt for oral administration.

In simpler terms, Rabeprazole works by reducing the amount of acid produced in the stomach, which helps to prevent and heal damage to the esophagus and stomach caused by excessive acid production.

Diagnostic techniques for the digestive system are medical tests and procedures used to diagnose and evaluate various conditions and diseases related to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and associated organs. These techniques can be categorized into invasive and non-invasive methods.

Non-invasive diagnostic techniques:

1. Imaging tests: These include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) scans, and ultrasounds. They help visualize the structure and function of the digestive organs without requiring any invasive procedures.
2. Laboratory tests: Blood, stool, and urine samples can be analyzed to detect signs of infection, inflammation, or other abnormalities related to digestive system disorders. Examples include complete blood count (CBC), liver function tests (LFTs), coagulation studies, and fecal occult blood test (FOBT).
3. Breath tests: These are used to diagnose conditions like lactose intolerance, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), or helicobacter pylori infection by analyzing the patient's exhaled air after consuming a specific substance.

Invasive diagnostic techniques:

1. Endoscopy: A thin, flexible tube with a light and camera attached to its end is inserted through the mouth or rectum to directly visualize the GI tract's inner lining. There are different types of endoscopies, such as gastroscopy (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum), colonoscopy (colon and rectum), sigmoidoscopy (lower part of the colon), and enteroscopy (small intestine).
2. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS): This combines endoscopy with ultrasound technology to provide detailed images of the digestive organs' structure and surrounding tissues, allowing for accurate diagnosis and staging of conditions like cancer.
3. Biopsy: During an endoscopy or surgery, a small tissue sample can be taken from the affected area for further examination under a microscope to confirm a diagnosis or assess the severity of a condition.
4. Capsule endoscopy: A patient swallows a tiny camera-equipped capsule that transmits images as it passes through the GI tract, allowing doctors to diagnose conditions in the small intestine that may be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.
5. Imaging studies: Procedures like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or positron emission tomography (PET) scans can provide detailed images of the digestive organs and help diagnose conditions like tumors, inflammation, or obstructions.

These diagnostic techniques help healthcare providers identify and manage various gastrointestinal conditions, ensuring appropriate treatment and improved patient outcomes.

Gastric acid, also known as stomach acid, is a digestive fluid produced in the stomach. It's primarily composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium chloride (NaCl). The pH of gastric acid is typically between 1.5 and 3.5, making it a strong acid that helps to break down food by denaturing proteins and activating digestive enzymes.

The production of gastric acid is regulated by the enteric nervous system and several hormones. The primary function of gastric acid is to initiate protein digestion, activate pepsinogen into the active enzyme pepsin, and kill most ingested microorganisms. However, an excess or deficiency in gastric acid secretion can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders such as gastritis, ulcers, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Deglutition disorders, also known as swallowing disorders, are conditions that affect the ability to move food or liquids from the mouth to the stomach safely and efficiently. These disorders can occur at any stage of the swallowing process, which includes oral preparation (chewing and manipulating food in the mouth), pharyngeal phase (activating muscles and structures in the throat to move food toward the esophagus), and esophageal phase (relaxing and contracting the esophagus to propel food into the stomach).

Symptoms of deglutition disorders may include coughing or choking during or after eating, difficulty initiating a swallow, food sticking in the throat or chest, regurgitation, unexplained weight loss, and aspiration (inhaling food or liquids into the lungs), which can lead to pneumonia.

Deglutition disorders can be caused by various factors, such as neurological conditions (e.g., stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis), structural abnormalities (e.g., narrowing or blockage of the esophagus), muscle weakness or dysfunction, and cognitive or behavioral issues. Treatment for deglutition disorders may involve dietary modifications, swallowing exercises, medications, or surgical interventions, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

Aluminum hydroxide is a medication that contains the active ingredient aluminum hydroxide, which is an inorganic compound. It is commonly used as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn. Aluminum hydroxide works by reacting with the acid in the stomach to form a physical barrier that prevents the acid from backing up into the esophagus.

In addition to its use as an antacid, aluminum hydroxide is also used as a phosphate binder in patients with kidney disease. It works by binding to phosphate in the gut and preventing it from being absorbed into the bloodstream, which can help to control high phosphate levels in the body.

Aluminum hydroxide is available over-the-counter and by prescription in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid suspensions. It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully and to talk to a healthcare provider if symptoms persist or worsen.

Dyspepsia is a medical term that refers to discomfort or pain in the upper abdomen, often accompanied by symptoms such as bloating, nausea, belching, and early satiety (feeling full quickly after starting to eat). It is also commonly known as indigestion. Dyspepsia can have many possible causes, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, gastritis, and functional dyspepsia (a condition in which there is no obvious structural or biochemical explanation for the symptoms). Treatment for dyspepsia depends on the underlying cause.

Morning sickness is a common condition during pregnancy, typically characterized by nausea and vomiting. It usually occurs in the morning, although it can happen at any time of the day. The exact cause is not known, but it's thought to be due to the hormonal changes that occur during early pregnancy. For most women, morning sickness improves or goes away after the first trimester. However, for some, it may last longer. While it can be unpleasant and uncomfortable, morning sickness is generally not harmful to the mother or baby, unless it's severe and leads to dehydration or weight loss. In such cases, medical attention is required.

Magnesium hydroxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Mg(OH)2. It is a white solid that is amphoteric, meaning it can react as both an acid and a base. Magnesium hydroxide is commonly used as an over-the-counter antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. It works by increasing the pH of the stomach, which can help to reduce the production of stomach acid.

Magnesium hydroxide is also used as a laxative to relieve constipation, as it has a softening effect on stools and stimulates bowel movements. In addition, magnesium hydroxide is sometimes used in medical procedures to neutralize or wash away stomach acid, for example during endoscopies or the treatment of poisoning.

It's important to note that while magnesium hydroxide is generally considered safe when used as directed, it can cause side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal cramps. In addition, people with kidney disease or severe heart or lung conditions should use magnesium hydroxide with caution, as it can worsen these conditions in some cases.

Lansoprazole is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). It works by reducing the amount of acid produced in the stomach. The medical definition of Lansoprazole is:

A substituted benzimidazole that is a selective gastric proton pump inhibitor, which suppresses gastric acid secretion by specific inhibition of the H+/K+ ATPase enzyme system at the secretory surface of the gastric parietal cell. It is used as an effective therapy for various gastrointestinal disorders, including gastric and duodenal ulcers, erosive esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Lansoprazole is available in the form of capsules or oral granules for delayed-release oral administration.

Here's a brief overview of its mechanism of action:

* Lansoprazole is absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the parietal cells in the stomach, where it is converted into its active form.
* The active form of lansoprazole binds to and inhibits the H+/K+ ATPase enzyme system, which is responsible for pumping hydrogen ions (protons) from the cytoplasm of the parietal cell into the lumen of the stomach, where they combine with chloride ions to form hydrochloric acid.
* By inhibiting this proton pump, lansoprazole reduces the amount of acid produced in the stomach, which helps to relieve symptoms and promote healing of gastrointestinal disorders.

Esophageal achalasia is a rare disorder of the esophagus, the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. In this condition, the muscles at the lower end of the esophagus fail to relax properly during swallowing, making it difficult for food and liquids to pass into the stomach. This results in symptoms such as difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), regurgitation of food, chest pain, and weight loss. The cause of esophageal achalasia is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to damage to the nerves that control the muscles of the esophagus. Treatment options include medications to relax the lower esophageal sphincter, botulinum toxin injections, and surgical procedures such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

Laryngitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the larynx, or voice box. This inflammation can lead to hoarseness, throat pain, and difficulty speaking or swallowing. Laryngitis can be caused by viral infections, bacterial infections, vocal strain, or other factors such as exposure to irritants like smoke or chemicals. In some cases, laryngitis may be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition, so it is important to seek medical attention if symptoms persist for more than a few days or are accompanied by other concerning symptoms.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a medical procedure that allows direct visualization of the inner lining of the digestive tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and sometimes the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum). This procedure is performed using an endoscope, a long, thin, flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth for upper endoscopy or through the rectum for lower endoscopy (colonoscopy), and the images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor for the physician to view.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy can help diagnose various conditions, such as inflammation, ulcers, tumors, polyps, or bleeding in the digestive tract. It can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps, taking tissue samples (biopsies), treating bleeding, and performing other interventions to manage certain digestive diseases.

There are different types of gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures, including:

1. Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure examines the colon and rectum.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: A limited examination of the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) using a shorter endoscope.
4. Enteroscopy: An examination of the small intestine, which can be performed using various techniques, such as push enteroscopy, single-balloon enteroscopy, or double-balloon enteroscopy.
5. Capsule Endoscopy: A procedure that involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera, which captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is generally considered safe when performed by experienced medical professionals. However, like any medical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, such as bleeding, infection, perforation, or adverse reactions to sedatives used during the procedure. Patients should discuss these risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy.

Mucosal administration refers to the delivery of a medication or vaccine via the mucous membranes, which line various body cavities such as the nose, mouth, lungs, and genitals. This route of administration can be beneficial because the mucosa contain immune cells that can help stimulate an immune response, making it useful for vaccines. Additionally, some medications may be absorbed more quickly or effectively through the mucous membranes compared to other routes of administration. However, the duration of action and effectiveness of mucosal administration can vary depending on the specific medication and site of administration.

Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3. It is a common substance found in rocks and in the shells of many marine animals. As a mineral, it is known as calcite or aragonite.

In the medical field, calcium carbonate is often used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency. It is also commonly used as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, acid reflux, and indigestion.

Calcium carbonate works by reacting with hydrochloric acid in the stomach to form water, carbon dioxide, and calcium chloride. This reaction helps to raise the pH level in the stomach and neutralize excess acid.

It is important to note that excessive use of calcium carbonate can lead to hypercalcemia, a condition characterized by high levels of calcium in the blood, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, confusion, and muscle weakness. Therefore, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Barrett esophagus is a condition in which the tissue lining of the lower esophagus changes, becoming more like the tissue that lines the intestines (intestinal metaplasia). This change can increase the risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma, a type of cancer. The exact cause of Barrett esophagus is not known, but it is often associated with long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as chronic acid reflux.

In Barrett esophagus, the normal squamous cells that line the lower esophagus are replaced by columnar epithelial cells. This change is usually detected during an upper endoscopy and biopsy. The diagnosis of Barrett esophagus is confirmed when the biopsy shows intestinal metaplasia in the lower esophagus.

It's important to note that not everyone with GERD will develop Barrett esophagus, and not everyone with Barrett esophagus will develop esophageal cancer. However, if you have been diagnosed with Barrett esophagus, your healthcare provider may recommend regular endoscopies and biopsies to monitor the condition and reduce the risk of cancer. Treatment options for Barrett esophagus include medications to control acid reflux, lifestyle changes, and in some cases, surgery.

The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is the region of the gastrointestinal tract where the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach) meets the stomach. It serves as a physiological sphincter, which helps control the direction of flow and prevent reflux of gastric contents back into the esophagus. The EGJ is also known as the gastroesophageal junction or cardia.

Sulfoxides are organic compounds characterized by the functional group consisting of a sulfur atom bonded to two oxygen atoms and a carbon atom. The general structure is R-S(=O)O-R', where R and R' represent alkyl or aryl groups. They are often formed by the oxidation of sulfides, which contain a sulfur atom bonded to two carbon atoms. Sulfoxides have a trigonal pyramidal geometry at the sulfur atom due to the presence of two electron-withdrawing oxygen atoms. They exhibit properties of both polar and nonpolar compounds, making them useful as solvents and intermediates in organic synthesis.

Esophageal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. Here are some common esophageal diseases with their brief definitions:

1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A chronic condition in which stomach acid or bile flows back into the esophagus, causing symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing.
2. Esophagitis: Inflammation of the esophageal lining, often caused by GERD, infection, or medication.
3. Esophageal stricture: Narrowing of the esophagus due to scarring or inflammation, which can make swallowing difficult.
4. Esophageal cancer: Cancer that forms in the tissues of the esophagus, often as a result of long-term GERD or smoking.
5. Esophageal motility disorders: Disorders that affect the normal movement and function of the esophagus, such as achalasia, diffuse spasm, and nutcracker esophagus.
6. Barrett's esophagus: A condition in which the lining of the lower esophagus changes, increasing the risk of esophageal cancer.
7. Esophageal diverticula: Small pouches that form in the esophageal wall, often causing difficulty swallowing or regurgitation.
8. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE): A chronic immune-mediated disorder characterized by inflammation of the esophagus due to an allergic reaction.

These are some of the common esophageal diseases, and their diagnosis and treatment may vary depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition.

Sodium bicarbonate, also known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. It is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste and is commonly used in cooking as a leavening agent.

In a medical context, sodium bicarbonate is used as a medication to treat conditions caused by high levels of acid in the body, such as metabolic acidosis. It works by neutralizing the acid and turning it into a harmless salt and water. Sodium bicarbonate can be given intravenously or orally, depending on the severity of the condition being treated.

It is important to note that sodium bicarbonate should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can have serious side effects if not used properly. These may include fluid buildup in the body, electrolyte imbalances, and an increased risk of infection.

Nontherapeutic human experimentation refers to medical research studies in which the primary goal is not to directly benefit the participants, but rather to advance scientific knowledge or develop new medical technologies. These studies often involve some level of risk or discomfort for the participants, and may include the administration of experimental treatments, procedures, or interventions.

Nontherapeutic human experimentation can take many forms, including clinical trials, observational studies, and other types of research involving human subjects. In these studies, researchers must carefully weigh the potential benefits of the research against the risks to the participants, and ensure that all participants are fully informed of the nature of the study, its purposes, and any potential risks or benefits before providing their consent to participate.

It's important to note that nontherapeutic human experimentation is subject to strict ethical guidelines and regulations, designed to protect the rights and welfare of research participants. These guidelines and regulations are intended to ensure that all research involving human subjects is conducted in a responsible and ethical manner, with the goal of advancing scientific knowledge while minimizing harm to participants.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Nonprescription drugs, also known as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, are medications that can be legally purchased without a prescription from a healthcare professional. They are considered safe and effective for treating minor illnesses or symptoms when used according to the directions on the label. Examples include pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen, antihistamines for allergies, and topical treatments for skin conditions. It is still important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if there are any concerns or questions about using nonprescription drugs.

Endoscopy of the digestive system, also known as gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, is a medical procedure that allows healthcare professionals to visually examine the inside lining of the digestive tract using a flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it, called an endoscope. This procedure can help diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the digestive system, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cancer.

There are several types of endoscopy procedures that focus on different parts of the digestive tract:

1. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). It is often used to investigate symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, abdominal pain, or bleeding in the upper GI tract.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure explores the large intestine (colon) and rectum. It is commonly performed to screen for colon cancer, as well as to diagnose and treat conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulosis, or polyps.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: Similar to a colonoscopy, this procedure examines the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) and rectum. It is often used as a screening tool for colon cancer and to investigate symptoms like rectal bleeding or changes in bowel habits.
4. Upper GI endoscopy: This procedure focuses on the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, using a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it. It is used to diagnose and treat conditions such as GERD, ulcers, and difficulty swallowing.
5. Capsule endoscopy: This procedure involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera that captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through. It can help diagnose conditions in the small intestine that may be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.

Endoscopy is typically performed under sedation or anesthesia to ensure patient comfort during the procedure. The images captured by the endoscope are displayed on a monitor, allowing the healthcare provider to assess the condition of the digestive tract and make informed treatment decisions.

Peristalsis is an involuntary muscular movement that occurs in the digestive tract, including the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. It is characterized by alternate contraction and relaxation of the smooth muscles in the walls of these organs, which creates a wave-like motion that helps propel food, fluids, and waste through the digestive system.

The process of peristalsis begins with a narrowing or constriction of the muscle in one area of the digestive tract, followed by a relaxation of the muscle in the adjacent area. This creates a localized contraction that moves along the length of the organ, pushing its contents forward. The wave of contractions continues to move along the digestive tract until it reaches the anus, where waste is eliminated from the body.

Peristalsis plays a crucial role in maintaining proper digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as in the elimination of waste products from the body. Disorders that affect peristalsis, such as gastrointestinal motility disorders, can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Esophageal motility disorders are a group of conditions that affect the normal movement (motility) of the muscles in the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. The esophageal muscles normally contract and relax in a coordinated manner to help move food from the mouth to the stomach.

In esophageal motility disorders, this muscle movement is impaired, leading to difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), chest pain, heartburn, or regurgitation of food. Some common examples of esophageal motility disorders include:

1. Achalasia: a condition in which the lower esophageal sphincter muscle fails to relax properly, preventing food from passing into the stomach.
2. Diffuse esophageal spasm: a disorder characterized by uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal muscles, leading to difficulty swallowing and chest pain.
3. Nutcracker esophagus: a condition in which the esophageal muscles contract too forcefully, causing pain and difficulty swallowing.
4. Hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter: a disorder in which the lower esophageal sphincter muscle is too tight, making it difficult to swallow and leading to symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation.
5. Ineffective esophageal motility: a condition in which the esophageal muscles have weak or disorganized contractions, leading to difficulty swallowing and other symptoms.

Esophageal motility disorders can be diagnosed through tests such as manometry, which measures the pressure and coordination of esophageal muscle contractions, or barium swallow studies, which use X-rays to visualize the movement of food through the esophagus. Treatment may include medications, lifestyle changes, or surgery, depending on the specific disorder and its severity.

The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized ring of muscle located at the junction of the esophagus and stomach. It functions as a physiological valve that regulates the direction of content flow between the esophagus and the stomach. Normally, the LES remains contracted to prevent the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus, and it relaxes during swallowing to allow food to enter the stomach.

A dysfunctional lower esophageal sphincter may lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), where stomach acid frequently backs up into the esophagus, causing symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing.

Eructation is the medical term for belching or burping. It refers to the act of expelling gas from the upper digestive tract (esophagus and stomach) through the mouth. This voluntary or involuntary action helps to relieve symptoms of bloating, discomfort, or pain caused by excessive gas build-up in the stomach. Eructation often occurs after swallowing air while eating or drinking quickly, consuming carbonated beverages, or experiencing anxiety or stress. In some cases, frequent eructations may indicate an underlying digestive disorder such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastritis.

Indigestion is sometimes defined as a combination of epigastric pain and heartburn. Heartburn is commonly used interchangeably ... as with other instances of heartburn, behavioral modifications can exacerbate or alleviate symptoms Functional heartburn is ... Heartburn is common during pregnancy having been reported in as high as 80% of pregnancies. It is most often due to GERD and ... Heartburn-like symptoms and/or lower chest or upper abdomen may be indicative of much more sinister and/or deadly disease. Of ...
Heartburn is a burning sensation in the chest. Heartburn may also refer to: Heartburn (novel), a 1983 novel by Nora Ephron ... "Heartburn", a song from Alicia Keys' 2003 album The Diary of Alicia Keys "Heart Burn", an episode from season 18 of Family Guy ... a 1986 Mike Nichols comedy-drama film based on the novel Heartburn (album), a 1976 album by Kevin Coyne "Heartburn", a song ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Heartburn. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ...
Heartburn at IMDb Heartburn at the TCM Movie Database Heartburn at Box Office Mojo Heartburn at Rotten Tomatoes (Rotten ... 118-. ISBN 978-0-7864-2017-9. Heartburn (1986) at Rotten Tomatoes "Heartburn reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved January 24, 2018 ... Heartburn is a 1986 American comedy-drama film directed and produced by Mike Nichols, starring Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson ... "HEARTBURN (15)". British Board of Film Classification. July 1, 1986. Retrieved August 4, 2015. "The Unstoppables". Spy: 94. ...
"Kevin Coyne - Heartburn Album Reviews, Songs & More , AllMusic" - via www.allmusic.com. "WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN - Record ... "Kevin Coyne: Heartburn. By John Tobler : Articles, reviews and interviews from Rock's Backpages". www.rocksbackpages.com. " ... Stafford, James (21 January 2020). "Hipgnosis Cover of the Week: Kevin Coyne, 'Heartburn'". "Poster for the Kevin Coyne album ' ... Heartburn' released by Virgin..." Getty Images. "Don't Make Waves". 45cat.com. Retrieved 25 June 2022. "Walk On By". 45cat.com ...
... at BBC Online Heartburn Hotel at British Comedy Guide Heartburn Hotel at IMDb Heartburn Hotel at epguides.com ( ... Heartburn Hotel is a British sitcom that ran for two series on BBC One from 1998 to 2000. The programme concerns the owner- ... Heartburn Hotel was written by John Sullivan and Steve Glover; it starred Tim Healy as the hotel's proprietor. The first series ... Other characters include Baker (Kim Wall), Morgan (Ifan Huw Daffyd) and Scouse (Stephen Aintree). "Heartburn Hotel cast and ...
Heartburn is an autobiographical novel based on Nora Ephron's marriage to and divorce from Carl Bernstein, her second husband. ... In a New Yorker piece on novels that include recipes, Adam Gopnik writes, "in Heartburn, the recipes serve both as a joke about ...
... is the debut solo extended play by American singer-songwriter Laura Jane Grace, released under her birth name. It ... " "Tom Gabel Heart Burns , Exclaim!". "Against Me! interview at Virgin Festival". YouTube. Retrieved 2012-02-20. "Laura Jane ...
... (German: Wenn das Herz in Haß erglüht) is a 1917 German silent romantic drama film directed by ... When the Heart Burns with Hate at IMDb v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ...
Heartburn.] Praha: Aurora, 1998. Fast, Howard: Tony a zázračná dvířka. [Tony and the Wonderful Door.] Praha: Mladá fronta, 1957 ...
Ephron, Nora (1983). Heartburn. William Heinemann. p. 178. ISBN 978-1-84408-517-0. Viktor Vaughn - Raedawn, retrieved 2021-01- ... In her semi-autobiographical 1983 novel Heartburn, Nora Ephron's protagonist describes the recipe for an ideal vinaigrette as " ...
Heartburn, IMDB. Retrieved 12 March 2013. Awakenings, IMDB. Retrieved 12 March 2013. Stephen Holden, "Music Noted in Brief", ... As an actor, Titus had small parts in Mike Nichols's Heartburn (1986) and Penny Marshall's Awakenings (1990), in which she ...
Heartburn (1986); The Witches of Eastwick (1987); Broadcast News (1987); and Ironweed (1987). Three Oscar nominations also ... Heartburn (1986), Broadcast News (1987), Batman (1989), Hoffa (1992), Mars Attacks! (1996), Something's Gotta Give (2003), The ...
Wong, Cathy (September 15, 2012). "Heartburn Remedies". About.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved ...
Covrett, Donna (2009). "Heart burn". Cincinnati Magazine. Cincinnati, Ohio: Emmis Communications. pp. 44-45.. Vasil Stefanov, ... Covrett, Donna (2009). "Heart burn". Cincinnati Magazine. Cincinnati, Ohio: Emmis Communications. pp. 64-66.. Veterans History ...
"Heartburn - Overview". Allmusic. Retrieved March 20, 2011. "Step Inside My Deathray - Overview". Allmusic. Retrieved March 20, ...
"Heart Burn". July 23, 2022. "Lights Out". March 25, 2023. "Sunmi Chart History: Billboard K-pop Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved ... "Heart Burn". Billboard. August 6, 2022. RIAS Weekly Chart: "Siren" (PDF). September 20, 2018. Archived from the original (PDF) ... On June 8, 2022, Sunmi's agency announced that she was preparing for a comeback with a single titled "Heart Burn" on June 29. ...
"Heartburn" 06. "Good Woman Down" 04. "Lou's Tavern" 06. "Nice" 09. "Fast Girls" 10. "Cold As A Butcher" 11. "Insomnia" 12. " ...
... his heartburn ... the pain in his legs ... to make him [expletive] ... to make him sleep." He turns the name of the place into ...
heartburn center. neuro-interventional radiology program. Overlook has a clinical affiliation with the Sidney Kimmel Medical ...
Heartburn Chat; Killer Whales (October 22, 1985) Space Shuttle; Rube Goldberg; Crazy Inventions (October 29, 1985) Chimp ...
"Heartburn (Soundtrack)". Carlysimon.com. Archived from the original on July 6, 2014. Retrieved April 23, 2022. "Working Girl ( ... Simon began recording more songs for films in the 1980s, including "Coming Around Again" for the film Heartburn (1986). The ... which was written for and featured in the 1986 Mike Nichols film Heartburn), returning her to the top 20 on the Billboard Hot ... who asked Simon to score their upcoming film Heartburn. In 1986, Simon signed with Arista Records and soon rebounded from her ...
Maaloxan for heartburn; Colagogum, a stomach and intestine medication; Lipostabil, a lipid-lowering drug. In 1950, the company ...
Watson S (11 November 2022). Felson S (ed.). "Laryngospasm". Heartburn/GERD Guide. WebMD. Retrieved 8 February 2017. Gdynia HJ ...
Nohara, Yoshiaki (July 29, 2007). "Monroe eat Sultan? Idea causes heartburn". The Everett Herald. Retrieved March 2, 2019. ...
"Gastroparesis - Your Guide to Gastroparesis - Causes of Gastroparesis". Heartburn.about.com. Retrieved 2012-02-10. " ... and heartburn. The most common known mechanism is autonomic neuropathy of the nerve which innervates the stomach: the vagus ... Heartburn Lack of appetite Morning nausea Muscle weakness Night sweats Palpitations Spasms of the stomach wall Constipation or ...
Reade, Eric (1979). History and Heartburn; The Saga of Australian Film 1896-1978. Sydney: Harper & Row. ISBN 0-06-312033-X. ...
Functional heartburn A3. Reflux hypersensitivity A4. Globus A5. Functional dysphagia B. Gastroduodenal Disorders B1. Functional ...
Functional heartburn A3. Reflux hypersensitivity A4. Globus A5. Functional dysphagia B. Gastroduodenal disorders B1. Functional ...
... "heartburn"; or (C) is unaffected (only Mechanoid, Photobot, Fanbot, and Electrobot are immune to the Laser Lance impalement and ...
Perreault, John (26 September 1974). "Acute linoleum heartburn". The Village Voice: 40. Perreault, John (1 May 1975). " ...
Indigestion is sometimes defined as a combination of epigastric pain and heartburn. Heartburn is commonly used interchangeably ... as with other instances of heartburn, behavioral modifications can exacerbate or alleviate symptoms Functional heartburn is ... Heartburn is common during pregnancy having been reported in as high as 80% of pregnancies. It is most often due to GERD and ... Heartburn-like symptoms and/or lower chest or upper abdomen may be indicative of much more sinister and/or deadly disease. Of ...
Find out more about heartburn (pyrosis) and how to relieve this type of indigestion. ... Heartburn (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish * Heartburn (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ... If you have heartburn more than twice a week, you may have GERD. But you can have GERD without having heartburn. ... Pregnancy, certain foods, alcohol, and some medications can bring on heartburn. Treating heartburn is important because over ...
Posts about Heartburn written by Teeccino Caffe, What Doctors Dont Tell You, Dana Ullman MPH, Sally LaMont ND, Michael Traub ... Heartburn ;Heartburn has nothing to do with the heart. Rather, it i ... When heartburn hits, how do you spell relief? If youre like millions of Americans, youve been conditioned by advertizing to ... Frequent reflux, heartburn and indigestion could be signs of a more serious, underlying problem such as leaky gut, parasites or ...
Heartburn. From Conservapedia. This is the current revision of Heartburn as edited by JacobB (Talk , contribs) at 00:18, ... Heartburn (acid reflux) is a medical condition caused by the backward flow of gastric acid from the stomach (which is lined ... Chronic heartburn can be treated with lifestyle changes, antacids, H2-receptor blockers or proton-pump inhibitors; however, ... to consult a physician for proper diagnosis as sometimes the symptoms of angina or heart attack can mimic those of heartburn. ...
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) - used widely to reduce stomach acid and treat heartburn - have been linked to an increased risk ... Cite this: Popular Heartburn Medication Linked to Increased Stroke - Medscape - Nov 29, 2016. ...
Had heartburn for a while? You doctor may recommend the esophageal pH test to measure the amount of acid that flows into the ... Heartburn, primarily in patients who have had a normal endoscopy and who have failed medical treatment or may be considered as ... Esophageal pH Test for Heartburn and Acid Reflux. Medically Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD. on April 22, 2022 ... The test may also be performed to evaluate the effectiveness of current treatments for heartburn or reflux. This test is often ...
When it comes to treating heartburn, the first treatment option your doctor will most likely discuss with you is a ... If youre taking antacids for longer than two weeks, then the heartburn may be caused by a more serious medical problem. It is ... Reduce your stress and intake of acid foods and increase the consumption of alkaline foods to avoid acid re-flux and heart burn ... Other people have opted for home remedies to treat their heartburn.. If these methods either dont work or arent effective ...
Occasional heartburn is a common, manageable condition - but when is it a problem? ... Occasional heartburn is common and no cause for alarm. Most people can manage the discomfort of heartburn on their own with ... How heartburn and GERD occur. Acid reflux occurs when the sphincter muscle at the lower end of your esophagus relaxes at the ... Heartburn is a burning pain in your chest, just behind your breastbone. The pain is often worse after eating, in the evening, ...
There are some things you can do to prevent acute heartburn, and some lifestyle changes you can make which may help to keep it ... Everybody gets some form of heartburn from time to time, but as we age, the bouts may seem more frequent and severe. Reflux ... If you have developed chronic heartburn that occurs when you are in bed, try elevating the head of your bed by about 6-10 ... If you are troubled with heartburn, try over-the-counter antacids or some of the newer acid blockers. Do not take these drugs ...
FTSE 100 rival GSK has also faced legal woes over its discontinued heartburn drug Zantac, which was alleged to be linked to ... Drugs giant AstraZeneca has agreed to settle a raft of legal claims over its heartburn treatments for 425 million US dollars (£ ...
Learn ways to prevent and relieve heartburn, like home remedies, medications, and changing your diet. ... Heartburn is a burning feeling in your chest and throat. ... OTC heartburn medications. Plenty of OTC heartburn medications ... Frequent Heartburn? Here Are Some Possible Causes. Heartburn is common, but when you have it all the time or after every meal, ... Heartburn can be either an uncomfortable experience or the first sign of a more serious problem. Learn how to ease heartburn ...
If you are one of the 15 million people that the American Gastrointestinal Society estimate experience heartburn, or if youre ... and gastro-esophageal acid reflux where gastric contents backflow into the esophagus which leads to tissue damage or heartburn ... prone to "holiday heartburn", here are some things to keep in mind: *Keep meals small - dont try to finish leftovers, put them ...
The FDA announced that certain ranitidine heartburn medications, including Zantac, may contain traces of a cancer-causing ... The heartburn and ulcer medication Zantac has been taken off store shelves as concerns increase over cancer-causing ingredients ... The chain continues to sell other over-the-counter (OTC) heartburn medications such as Pepcid and Tagamet that dont contain ... In September, the FDA reported that small amounts of NDMA were detected in several brand-name and generic heartburn medications ...
Briefly discusses possible causes of heartburn and the severity of symptoms. Offers interactive tool to help decide when to ... Severity of heartburn. Mild heartburn occurs about once a month. Moderate heartburn occurs about once a week. ... Causes of heartburn. Heartburn occurs when food and stomach juices back up (reflux) into the esophagus. This is the tube that ... Symptoms of heartburn and symptoms of a heart attack may feel the same. Sometimes your heartburn symptoms may mean a more ...
... machine can relieve not only sleep apnea but the heartburn and chronic cough that often accompanies it, a new study finds. ... A continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine can relieve not only sleep apnea but the heartburn and chronic cough that ... The researchers found that those who used CPAP regularly were about 42% less likely to suffer nighttime heartburn, compared ... or heartburn or persistent cough, CPAP may help control that along with controlling the other sleep apnea-related problems, he ...
Treatment: Here are a few simple things you can do to get rid of a dry mouth as well as heartburn-related dry mouth. ... having a glass after you finish your meal also helps reduce the risk of heartburn dry mouth. ...
These good eats get the thumbs-up for heartburn sufferers. ... copd , heartburn/gerd , anxiety , skin cancer , eating and ... Chinese restaurants. Do not gorge on a plate of heartburn-inducing General Tsos Chicken: you will get heartburn. Instead try ... Heartburn Medications and Dementia Risk Drink Up: Your Guide to Tea 4th of July Foods: What to Eat, and What to Avoid 11 ... Breaded and fried means more fat, which means more heartburn. * Cheese. Feta cheese, which is a great addition to salads, is ...
... or... Unsteady Times at the Stagger Inn ... she is saved by the timely arrival of Harry Heartburn, unemployed deputy, itinerant chef and all-around hero! ...
Cabbage and potato is very suitable for people with problems of heartburn, digestive ulcers and constipation because cabbage is ... A GOOD RECIPE FOR PEOPLE WITH HEARTBURN. Properties of this recipe. Boiled cabbage with potatoes is a very healthy dish for all ... Why cooked cabbage with potatoes is good for heartburn?. Cabbage and potato is very suitable for people with problems of ... heartburn, digestive ulcers and constipation because cabbage is a natural antacid on account of of its glutamine content. ...
... which can be loosely described as persistent and troublesome heartburn or asymptomatic reflux that causes esophageal injury. Th ... which can be loosely described as persistent and troublesome heartburn or asymptomatic reflux that causes esophageal injury. ...
About a month ago, I finished her semi-autobiographical novel Heartburn. Yes, this was the book that was later made into a ... To order your copy of Heartburn-and believe me, the book is even more stimulating than the recipe!-click here. ...
Tag Archives: heartburn. Coffee and Alcohol May Increase Heartburn. If youve ever experienced heartburn and were left stumped ... 10 Worst Foods for Heartburn. Most people know that citrus, alcohol, caffeine and spicy foods can all trigger heartburn. But ... 4 Ways to Know if its Just Heartburn, or a Heart Attack. Maybe youre not a hypochondriac, but when you get a sudden pain in ... Childhood Heartburn - Another Symptom of Weight Epidemic. Childhood obesity is at epidemic levels. According to the Centers for ...
Learn about the side effects of Alka-Seltzer Heartburn + Gas ReliefChews (calcium carbonate/simethicone), from common to rare, ... Alka-Seltzer Heartburn + Gas ReliefChews Side Effects. Generic name: calcium carbonate / simethicone ... Tums Chewy Bites with Gas Relief (Lemon & Strawberry), Alka-Seltzer Heartburn + Gas, Gas-X with Maalox Extra Strength ... Some dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Alka-Seltzer Heartburn + Gas ReliefChews. ...
What causes heartburn during pregnancy? Those muscle-relaxing pregnancy hormones are to thank. Heres what you can do about it. ... Does heartburn during pregnancy mean my baby will be born with hair?. Suffering from severe heartburn? You may want to stock up ... Can I prevent heartburn during pregnancy?. The chances of having a completely heartburn-free pregnancy are slim to none. The ... However, if your heartburn is persistent, your doctor may suggest that you try an over-the-counter heartburn medicine that ...
If you suffer from heartburn, you know how painful it can be. Heartburn is a burning pain in the chest that usually occurs ... 10 Heartburn Natural Remedies Better Than Medication!. DavidWolfe.com. March 2, 2017. ...
... Some people have basic questions about how pregnancy happens. Some may have questions ... Heartburn symptoms are one of the most commonly reported complaints among pregnant women. Heartburn usually starts during the ... "Heartburn medications to treat acid reflux during pregnancy should be balanced to alleviate the mothers symptoms of heartburn ... Strategies to Ease Heartburn Symptoms during Pregnancy. According to the ACG, pregnant women can treat and relieve their ...
Heartburn av Ephron, Nora: A 40th anniversary reissue of the national bestselling authors hilarious first novel that memorably ...
Re: OT: Heartburn by wombat ..... Iodine Supplementation Support by VWT Team. Date: 1/31/2010 11:31:42 AM ( 13 years ago ago). ...
"Heartburn" is a convenient phrase (as Nora Ephron knew), but of course heartburn has nothing at all to do with your heart. In ... The occasional heartburn that is the target of these marketing campaigns, the heartburn that is caused by eating the colossal ... If ones heartburn is caused by excessive enchilada consumption, then one could, at least theoretically, avoid heartburn by not ... Zero heartburn.". This spot does engender a little bit of dissonance, inasmuch as it advocates not so much the treatment of a ...
  • Heartburn is commonly used interchangeably with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) rather than just to describe a symptom of burning in one's chest. (wikipedia.org)
  • GERD (most common cause of heartburn) occurs when acid refluxes from the stomach and inflames the esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have heartburn more than twice a week, you may have GERD . (medlineplus.gov)
  • But you can have GERD without having heartburn. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Heartburn is a symptom of GERD. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Heartburn that occurs frequently and interferes with your routine is considered gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (mayoclinic.org)
  • Heartburn is a symptom of acid reflux or GERD, which feels like burning in the middle of your chest. (healthline.com)
  • Acid reflux, heartburn, or GERD? (healthline.com)
  • There are two types of reflux, laryngopharyngeal reflux where stomach acid backs up into the back of the throat at the level of the laryngopharynx (aka silent reflux or LPR) and gastro-esophageal acid reflux where gastric contents backflow into the esophagus which leads to tissue damage or heartburn also known as GERD. (dole.com)
  • This affects the many people who regularly use ranitidine medications to prevent and treat heartburn, ulcers, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (healthline.com)
  • In this case, heartburn may be caused by a more serious problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) . (healthwise.net)
  • The American Gastroenterological Association has issued guidelines on the management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), which can be loosely described as persistent and troublesome heartburn or asymptomatic reflux that causes esophageal injury. (communitycatalyst.org)
  • What is heartburn, acid reflux and GERD? (ksnt.com)
  • They prevent the stomach from producing more acid, which creates a less acidic environment for the esophagus and lessens symptoms associated with heartburn, acid reflux and GERD. (ksnt.com)
  • Omeprazole is used to treat conditions where reduction in acid secretion is required for proper healing, including stomach and intestinal ulcers (gastric and duodenal ulcers), the prevention and treatment of ulcers associated with medications known as NSAIDs, reflux esophagitis, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, heartburn, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). (medbroadcast.com)
  • People who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often warned against fatty food, which is thought to exacerbate heartburn symptoms. (lesliebeck.com)
  • GERD is a chronic condition in which acid from the stomach flows back into the esophagus, causing severe heartburn. (lesliebeck.com)
  • Acid reflux, Heartburn, and GERD: What's the difference? (medlineplus.gov)
  • Heartburn is usually due to regurgitation of gastric acid (gastric reflux) into the esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the chest houses other important organs besides the esophagus (including the heart and lungs), not all symptoms related to heartburn are esophageal in nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of greatest concern is to confuse heartburn (generally related to the esophagus) with a heart attack as these organs share a common nerve supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treating heartburn is important because over time reflux can damage the esophagus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Heartburn is a symptom of acid reflux, which is when some of the stomach contents travel back up into the esophagus or food pipe. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A person will feel heartburn when stomach acid flows back up into the esophagus, the pipe that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Heartburn, on the other hand, occurs when stomach acid travels back up the esophagus. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Heartburn occurs when stomach acid backs up into the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach (esophagus). (mayoclinic.org)
  • If the lower esophageal sphincter isn't working as it should, stomach acid can flow back up into the esophagus (acid reflux) and cause heartburn. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Heartburn ( acid reflux ) is a medical condition caused by the backward flow of gastric acid from the stomach (which is lined with protective mucus) into the esophagus (which does not have the same protective lining). (conservapedia.com)
  • But sometimes it can rise up into your esophagus and cause irritation, heartburn, or other symptoms. (healthline.com)
  • Heartburn occurs when food and stomach juices back up (reflux) into the esophagus. (healthwise.net)
  • Heartburn symptoms that won't go away can be a sign of a more serious medical condition, such as severe inflammation of the esophagus or cancer of the stomach or esophagus. (healthwise.net)
  • And when this happens, he says, stomach acid can come back up into the esophagus, which is reflux - which is what causes the burning sensation we experience with heartburn. (dietsinreview.com)
  • Heartburn occurs when the ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach relaxes (like all the muscles in the GI tract), allowing food and harsh digestive juices to back up from the stomach to the esophagus. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Heartburn is a group of symptoms experienced when stomach acid and bile push past the esophageal sphincter and enter the esophagus, a condition known medically as acid reflux. (ksnt.com)
  • Heartburn is caused by stomach acid going back up your esophagus (the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach). (msdmanuals.com)
  • And it is true that when used properly, antacids are useful in relieving occasional heartburn and indigestion. (selfgrowth.com)
  • If you're taking antacids for longer than two weeks, then the heartburn may be caused by a more serious medical problem. (selfgrowth.com)
  • A 2017 study showed that herbal formulas with licorice consistently provided heartburn relief even better than commonly used antacids. (healthline.com)
  • If you are troubled with heartburn, try over-the-counter antacids or some of the newer acid blockers. (ksl.com)
  • You have your antacids, like your Tums and your Milk of Magnesia, which neutralize the gastric acids with alkalinizing agents (and are not too far removed from the heartburn recommendation of Pliny the Elder in the 1st Century AD, coral powder ). (theawl.com)
  • A difference among the treatment options is that antacids and H2 blockers are remedies that you take after you have the heartburn, and that PPIs are more of a long-term treatment (and accordingly, useful for some of the scarier gastric conditions mentioned above). (theawl.com)
  • Antacids are one of the most common over-the-counter medications to treat heartburn. (health.am)
  • 1. Antacids containing aluminum, calcium, or magnesium are considered safe and effective in treating the heartburn of pregnancy. (health.am)
  • In a double-blind, placebo controlled, triple crossover study, ranitidine (Zantac®) taken once or twice daily in pregnant heartburn patients not responding to antacids and lifestyle modification, was found to be more effective than placebo in reducing the symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation. (health.am)
  • Proton pump inhibitors should be reserved for pregnant patients with more severe heartburn symptoms and those not responding to antacids and lifestyle and dietary changes. (health.am)
  • Prilosec OTC's active ingredient, delayed released omeprazole, works to fight heartburn differently from treatments like acid controllers/antacids. (picknsave.com)
  • With one Prilosec OTC pill each morning, block heartburn for 24 hours,* unlike antacids which last only one to three hours. (picknsave.com)
  • Compared to how antacids for heartburn. (picknsave.com)
  • Heartburn, also known as pyrosis, cardialgia or acid indigestion, is a burning sensation in the central chest or upper central abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term indigestion includes heartburn along with a number of other symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indigestion is sometimes defined as a combination of epigastric pain and heartburn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Frequent reflux, heartburn and indigestion could be signs of a more serious, underlying problem such as leaky gut, parasites or fermentation in the gut, perhaps due to an overgrowth of Candida albicans. (healthy.net)
  • Again, if you do take an antacid, it should be used only for occasional relief of mild heartburn or indigestion. (selfgrowth.com)
  • As a result, food sometimes moves more slowly through your system, resulting in indigestion issues of all kinds, from that bloated, gassy feeling to heartburn. (whattoexpect.com)
  • If our gut has difficulty breaking down difficult foods like carbs and fat, it can end up giving us a whole host of uncomfortable symptoms, including heartburn and indigestion. (enzymedica.com)
  • Enzymes are a great natural solution for digesting troublesome foods that cause occasional heartburn and indigestion. (enzymedica.com)
  • The symptoms can often be mistaken for indigestion or heartburn. (who.int)
  • Hormonal - related to the increasing amounts of estrogen and progesterone and their effect on the LES Mechanical - the enlarging uterus increasing intra-abdominal pressure, inducing reflux of gastric acid Behavioral - as with other instances of heartburn, behavioral modifications can exacerbate or alleviate symptoms Functional heartburn is heartburn of unknown cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most frequent symptom of acid reflux or heartburn is a feeling of warmth, heat, or burning in the chest and throat. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The test may also be performed to evaluate the effectiveness of current treatments for heartburn or reflux. (webmd.com)
  • If you're taking drugs to relieve heartburn or acid reflux, chances are you're shortchanging your body of zinc and iron. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Hill added that the ability of CPAP to relieve acid reflux is another reason to be attentive to sleep apnea therapy, 'Particularly if you're having symptoms of reflux, or heartburn or persistent cough, CPAP may help control that along with controlling the other sleep apnea-related problems,' he added. (medicinenet.com)
  • As she spoke, I realized that I suffered from a number of other symptoms related to acid reflux in addition to heartburn: chronic hoarseness and coughing, the feeling of something stuck in my throat, and a voice that was easily fatigued. (dietsinreview.com)
  • Trusted Source National Institutes of Health Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease During Pregnancy See All Sources [1] Here's more about pregnancy heartburn and what you can do about it. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Overfilling the stomach can result in acid reflux and heartburn. (health.am)
  • According to ACG President Amy E. Foxx-Orenstein, DO, FACG, "Heartburn medications to treat acid reflux during pregnancy should be balanced to alleviate the mother's symptoms of heartburn, while protecting the developing fetus. (health.am)
  • Heartburn No More is the natural, holistic solution you've been looking for to treat your acid reflux and heartburn . (santaclaracountylib.org)
  • So, when I stumbled across a natural and holistic solution that can treat acid reflux within two months while also providing relief from heartburn in as little as 48 hours, I was eager to try. (santaclaracountylib.org)
  • He suffered from severe acid reflux and heartburn for more than 10 years before deciding that enough was enough. (santaclaracountylib.org)
  • Looking for reliable heartburn and acid reflux symptom relief? (ralphs.com)
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) - used widely to reduce stomach acid and treat heartburn - have been linked to an increased risk for ischemic stroke in a new study. (medscape.com)
  • Apple cider vinegar is another home remedy that some people use to treat heartburn. (healthline.com)
  • How do you treat heartburn during pregnancy? (whattoexpect.com)
  • There are several ways to control and treat heartburn during pregnancy. (whattoexpect.com)
  • The American College of Gastroenterology estimate that more than 15 million people in the United States experience heartburn symptoms every day. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If you're one of the lucky few who doesn't experience heartburn after consuming caffeine or alcohol, consider yourself normal. (dietsinreview.com)
  • But nearly one in five people experience heartburn several days or more per week. (ksnt.com)
  • A person may prevent heartburn by avoiding acidic foods and drinks that contain caffeine. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This article covers home remedies, medications, and lifestyle tips to help you get rid of heartburn, plus ways to prevent heartburn before it happens. (healthline.com)
  • Eat a few almonds after each meal, since these tasty nuts neutralize the juices in the stomach, which may relieve or even prevent heartburn. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Can I prevent heartburn during pregnancy? (whattoexpect.com)
  • Tight clothes might look cute on a pregnant belly, but it is better with loose fitting clothes if you want to prevent heartburn ! (wizzley.com)
  • Baking soda can calm some episodes of heartburn by neutralizing your stomach acid. (healthline.com)
  • Since occasional heartburn is about more than just stomach acid, we made a product for all aspects - with herbs to soothe the digestive tract, zinc carnosine to repair the gut lining and enzymes to break down troublesome foods. (enzymedica.com)
  • Prilosec OTC's delayed-release formula helps it pass through the tough stomach acid, preventing excess acid production to block frequent heartburn. (picknsave.com)
  • Severe heartburn occurs every day. (healthwise.net)
  • However, Dr. Metz warns that chronic severe heartburn should never be taken lightly (i.e., see your doctor! (theawl.com)
  • Lyle is plagued with severe heartburn, Lil Bit gets drunk and has a gross bonding experience with Daddy, and Mattie brings home a new guy and delights in making Lyle jealous. (cmt.com)
  • Other common descriptors for heartburn (besides burning) are belching, nausea, squeezing, stabbing, or a sensation of pressure on the chest. (wikipedia.org)
  • This herb can help relieve nausea, so some believe it may be worth trying for heartburn, too. (healthline.com)
  • There are, however, quite a few things you can do to limit the nausea and heartburn, naturally without medications. (wizzley.com)
  • This can also cause heartburn and/or nausea, although not because of hormonal changes. (wizzley.com)
  • Keep in mind that we are here talking about normal feelings of nausea and heartburn. (wizzley.com)
  • These usually trigger nausea and heartburn. (wizzley.com)
  • When heartburn hits, how do you spell relief? (healthy.net)
  • More recent innovations in heartburn relief required no abdominal peephole. (theawl.com)
  • The better digested our foods are, the less likely they are to cause occasional heartburn, making enzymes a great choice for relief. (enzymedica.com)
  • Alka-Seltzer Extra Strength Heartburn ReliefChews has you covered with fast antacid relief of heartburn that you can feel working. (kroger.com)
  • These Extra Strength heartburn chews provide fast, powerful antacid relief of a trio of unpleasant symptoms. (kroger.com)
  • RELIEF ALWAYS WITHIN REACH: Conveniently sized for a backpack, purse, gym bag, and more, these on-the-go antacid chews offer portable, powerful heartburn relief when you need it most-from the dinner party, to the office party, to the party platter. (kroger.com)
  • EASY TO USE: For heartburn relief in non-chalky and non-gritty assorted fruit flavors, adults and children 12+ simply take 2 to 4 chewable antacid tablets as symptoms occur. (kroger.com)
  • If a person experiences heartburn pain alongside shortness of breath or sweating, this could be a heart-related issue. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • However, if your heartburn is persistent, your doctor may suggest that you try an over-the-counter heartburn medicine that controls acid production, like proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2 blockers. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and PPIs are a powerful class of frequent heartburn medicines. (picknsave.com)
  • PPIs block heartburn by preventing excess acid production. (picknsave.com)
  • The procedure simply involves taking 2 or 3 teaspoons (10-15 ml) of apple cider vinegar in an 8 ounce glass of water, before meals or whenever heartburn is experienced. (apple-cider-vinegar-benefits.com)
  • I'm surprised that you did not list Apple Cider Vinegar as a remedy/cure for recurring heartburn. (drbenkim.com)
  • Fresh, dried or freeze-dried papaya helps relieve heartburn for some women and scores vitamins A and C too. (whattoexpect.com)
  • If lifestyle and dietary changes are not enough, you should consult your doctor before taking any medication to relieve heartburn symptoms. (health.am)
  • Heartburn is common during pregnancy having been reported in as high as 80% of pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tons of women feel the burn during pregnancy - heartburn, that is. (whattoexpect.com)
  • What's more, you may well experience pregnancy heartburn discomfort during all three trimesters. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Nearly half of expectant moms have heartburn during pregnancy. (whattoexpect.com)
  • When does heartburn generally start during pregnancy? (whattoexpect.com)
  • For many women, heartburn starts in the first trimester , beginning around month two, and is a pregnancy symptom that lasts throughout the nine months. (whattoexpect.com)
  • What medications can I take for heartburn during pregnancy? (whattoexpect.com)
  • Avoid other heartburn medications during pregnancy unless they're prescribed by your doctor. (whattoexpect.com)
  • The chances of having a completely heartburn-free pregnancy are slim to none. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Studies have shown elevated levels of the hormone progesterone accompanied by increased intra-abdominal pressures from the enlarging uterus, may lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure in pregnant women contributing to heartburn symptoms, according to research highlighted in the newly updated "Pregnancy in Gastrointestinal Disorders" monograph by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). (health.am)
  • Based on a review of published scientific clinical studies (in animals and humans) on the safety of heartburn medications during pregnancy, researchers conclude there are certain drugs that are considered safe for use in pregnancy and those which should be avoided. (health.am)
  • I suffer with heartburn too and did throughout my first pregnancy although I use gaviscon I only really get it when I get hungry which is a lot as I eat little and often so I'm not helping myself, I tend to drink milkshake if its not meal time. (mumsnet.com)
  • Morning sickness and heartburn are probably among the most common inconveniences during pregnancy. (wizzley.com)
  • My sister is 32 weeks & in both of her pregnancies has suffered with heartburn to the point where it'll reduce her too tears, I had some tums left over from when I was pregnant and she took them, she hasn't looked back since! (mumsnet.com)
  • Being overweight or pregnant also can increase your risk of experiencing heartburn. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Treatments for heartburn used to require a prescription, but the Food and Drug Administration has approved many popular brands for over-the-counter availability. (ksnt.com)
  • It is common for people to experience occasional heartburn, and it is rarely a significant cause for concern. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Occasional heartburn is common and no cause for alarm. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The fact that we are looking at heartburn remedies in the sense of the occasional, sporadic, post-Roman Feast sufferer is not intended to be a slight to those with more serious issues. (theawl.com)
  • Don't let occasional heartburn keep you from your favorite foods. (enzymedica.com)
  • While the foods we eat may have a big impact on whether or not we feel the symptoms of occasional heartburn, our digestion plays an equally important role. (enzymedica.com)
  • Heartburn" is a convenient phrase (as Nora Ephron knew), but of course heartburn has nothing at all to do with your heart. (theawl.com)
  • Getting more exercise, reaching or maintaining a moderate weight, eating smaller meals, and sitting upright after eating may also help avert heartburn. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • According to an older study from 2005, chewing sugar-free gum for a 1/2 hour after meals may also help lower heartburn. (healthline.com)
  • If you dislike drinking water while eating your meals, having a glass after you finish your meal also helps reduce the risk of heartburn dry mouth. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • Big meals cause heartburn and discomfort. (who.int)
  • Some symptoms of heartburn and a heart attack could be similar, such as chest pain . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Symptoms of heartburn and symptoms of a heart attack may feel the same. (healthwise.net)
  • Most people can manage the discomfort of heartburn on their own with lifestyle changes and nonprescription medications. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The study also indicates that another class of drugs that is used to suppress the discomfort of heartburn - known as H2 blockers - also poses a similar but smaller risk of paving the way to developing hip fractures. (drbenkim.com)
  • citation needed] Treatment for heartburn may include medications and dietary changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the beginning of the year, I have been undergoing treatment for heartburn. (dietsinreview.com)
  • Heartburn that is more frequent or interferes with your daily routine may be a symptom of a more serious condition that requires medical care. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Everybody gets some form of heartburn from time to time, but as we age, the bouts may seem more frequent and severe. (ksl.com)
  • Prilosec OTC is the top Doctor and Gastroenterologist recommended frequent heartburn medicine for over 15 years. (picknsave.com)
  • Take one pill per day as directed to treat frequent heartburn. (picknsave.com)
  • Using some lifestyle and behavioral tips can help prevent or reduce heartburn. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Alka-Seltzer Heartburn + Gas ReliefChews. (drugs.com)
  • When it comes to treating heartburn, the first treatment option your doctor will most likely discuss with you is a "no medication" approach. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The heartburn and ulcer medication Zantac has been taken off store shelves as concerns increase over cancer-causing ingredients. (healthline.com)
  • 10 Heartburn Natural Remedies Better Than Medication! (davidwolfe.com)
  • If the heartburn continues, you may need prescription medicines or surgery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Heartburn medicines come in three basic forms. (ksnt.com)
  • Spicy foods have also been dubbed as the worst foods for heartburn and many have reported feeling the burn after eating Indian, Mexican and other traditionally spicy cuisine. (panlasangpinoy.com)
  • FTSE 100 rival GSK has also faced legal woes over its discontinued heartburn drug Zantac, which was alleged to be linked to cancer. (yahoo.com)
  • Soothe with a small glass of almond milk after every meal or just when the heartburn hits. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Argentum Nitricum is a homeopathic medicine that relieves apprehension with heartburn. (boironusa.com)
  • Many women have heartburn every day when they're pregnant. (healthwise.net)
  • No one knows heartburn quite like a pregnant woman. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Heartburn symptoms are one of the most commonly reported complaints among pregnant women. (health.am)
  • From the monograph, physician experts from ACG have compiled important health tips on managing heartburn symptoms, and importantly, identifying which heartburn medications are safe for use in pregnant women and those, which should be avoided. (health.am)
  • According to the ACG, pregnant women can treat and relieve their heartburn symptoms through lifestyle and dietary changes. (health.am)
  • Heartburn-like symptoms and/or lower chest or upper abdomen may be indicative of much more sinister and/or deadly disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heartburn is a painful burning feeling in your chest or throat. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Heartburn may feel like a burning pain in the lower chest. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Heartburn is a burning pain in your chest, just behind your breastbone. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Heartburn or chest pain? (mayoclinic.org)
  • I had first been diagnosed with heartburn during college, after experiencing chest pain so severe it woke me up in the middle of the night. (dietsinreview.com)
  • Heartburn is a burning pain in the chest that usually occurs after eating and may occur at night. (davidwolfe.com)
  • Despite what it's called, heartburn-or that burning feeling in your chest-has nothing to do with your heart. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A continuous positive airway pressure ( CPAP ) machine can relieve not only sleep apnea but the heartburn and chronic cough that often accompanies it, a new study finds. (medicinenet.com)
  • All are rich in fiber to help grind the food substances in your stomach and are less likely to trigger heartburn. (panlasangpinoy.com)
  • Pasta can also trigger heartburn, especially if it's eaten with spicy Italian sauces and marinades. (panlasangpinoy.com)
  • Experts from the University of California, Los Angeles, are suggesting that alcohol and caffeinated beverages can have a direct effect on heartburn. (dietsinreview.com)
  • Heartburn may occur with other symptoms, such as hoarseness, a feeling that food is stuck in your throat, tightness in your throat, a hoarse voice , wheezing, asthma, dental problems, or bad breath. (healthwise.net)
  • Omeprazole blocks heartburn for a full 24 hours after taking one pill each morning. (picknsave.com)
  • As a result, some people who are having a heart attack do not take action as they think they have heartburn. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Other people have opted for home remedies to treat their heartburn. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Boiled cabbage with potatoes is a very healthy dish for all ages and in all types of diets but we advise to use it for people with heartburn problems . (botanical-online.com)
  • In fact, many people are convinced they know of the best way to treat my heartburn. (dietsinreview.com)
  • A study published in a recent edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association indicates that taking heartburn drugs like Nexium, Prilosec, or Prevacid for one year or longer can significantly increase the risk of experiencing a hip fracture in people over 50 years of age. (drbenkim.com)