Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Esophageal pH Monitoring: Analysis of the HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION in the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS. It is used to record the pattern, frequency, and duration of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1: A subclass of cannabinoid receptor found primarily on central and peripheral NEURONS where it may play a role modulating NEUROTRANSMITTER release.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Esophagitis: INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.BaltimoreUnited StatesHypericum: Genus of perennial plants in the family CLUSIACEAE (sometimes classified as Hypericaceae). Herbal and homeopathic preparations are used for depression, neuralgias, and a variety of other conditions. Hypericum contains flavonoids; GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, TANNINS; volatile oils (OILS, ESSENTIAL), hypericin and hyperforin.MarylandNobel PrizeStomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Antacids: Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Anti-Ulcer Agents: Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Omeprazole: A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.

Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux as a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. (1/213)

BACKGROUND: The causes of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus and gastric cardia are poorly understood. We conducted an epidemiologic investigation of the possible association between gastroesophageal reflux and these tumors. METHODS: We performed a nationwide, population-based, case-control study in Sweden. Case ascertainment was rapid, and all cases were classified uniformly. Information on the subjects' history of gastroesophageal reflux was collected in personal interviews. The odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression, with multivariate adjustment for potentially confounding variables. RESULTS: Of the patients interviewed, the 189 with esophageal adenocarcinoma and the 262 with adenocarcinoma of the cardia constituted 85 percent of the 529 patients in Sweden who were eligible for the study during the period from 1995 through 1997. For comparison, we interviewed 820 control subjects from the general population and 167 patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Among persons with recurrent symptoms of reflux, as compared with persons without such symptoms, the odds ratios were 7.7 (95 percent confidence interval, 5.3 to 11.4) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 2.9) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The more frequent, more severe, and longer-lasting the symptoms of reflux, the greater the risk. Among persons with long-standing and severe symptoms of reflux, the odds ratios were 43.5 (95 percent confidence interval, 18.3 to 103.5) for esophageal adenocarcinoma and 4.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.7 to 11.0) for adenocarcinoma of the cardia. The risk of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was not associated with reflux (odds ratio, 1.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.7 to 1.9). CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong and probably causal relation between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The relation between reflux and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia is relatively weak.  (+info)

Low-dose lansoprazole provides greater relief of heartburn and epigastric pain than low-dose omeprazole in patients with acid-related dyspepsia. (2/213)

AIM: To compare the relative efficacies of lansoprazole 15 mg o.m. and omeprazole 10 mg o.m. in relieving heartburn and epigastric pain in patients with acid-related dyspepsia. In addition, the study compared the safety profiles of the two treatments. METHODS: This double-blind, parallel group, randomised, multicentre study was conducted in 52 general practices in the UK. A total of 609 patients was recruited, 562 of whom were eligible for inclusion in the intention-to-treat analysis. All of the patients had experienced at least mild heartburn or mild epigastric pain persistently on at least 4 of the previous 7 days; patients with severe symptoms were excluded. 283 patients received lansoprazole 15 mg and 279 received omeprazole 10 mg, both for 4 weeks. The main efficacy measure was relief of symptoms, based on physician assessments. RESULTS: In the intention-to-treat population, a complete relief of overall primary symptoms of dyspepsia was achieved after 2 weeks in 53% of patients receiving lansoprazole and in 41% of patients receiving omeprazole (P = 0.007). After 4 weeks, 59% of the lansoprazole group and 51% of the omeprazole group had achieved complete symptom relief (P = 0. 078). Antacids were taken for additional relief of symptoms in fewer patients given lansoprazole compared to the omeprazole group in the third and fourth weeks (P = 0.035) and also significantly fewer antacids were taken by patients in the lansoprazole group compared with patients in the omeprazole group (P = 0.033). The proportion of patients reporting adverse events was similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose lansoprazole is more effective than low-dose omeprazole in the treatment of patients with mild heartburn or epigastric pain in general practice.  (+info)

Low-dose ranitidine for the relief of heartburn. (3/213)

BACKGROUND: Approximately 30% of adults in the USA suffer from heartburn or related symptoms monthly; more than 20% of these sufferers experience heartburn at least once per day. Although many rely on self-medication with antacids for the relief of their symptoms, treatments that decrease gastric volume as well as increase the pH of refluxed material should be more effective in relieving heartburn. AIM: To compare the safety and efficacy of low-dose regimens of ranitidine for the relief of heartburn. METHODS: Adults with at least a 3-month history of heartburn were eligible for this randomized, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre dose-ranging study. Following a 1-week open-label run-in phase to document baseline heartburn frequency, subjects were randomized to receive treatment with one tablet of either ranitidine 75 mg (n = 491), ranitidine 25 mg (n = 504), or placebo (n = 494), to be taken as needed up to four times daily for 2 weeks for the relief of heartburn. RESULTS: The ranitidine 75 mg regimen was clinically (> 10 percentage points) and statistically (P < 0.05) significantly more effective than placebo for all measured efficacy end-points in relieving heartburn and reducing antacid consumption. In addition, the ranitidine 75 mg regimen was superior to placebo in providing heartburn relief within 30 min of dosing that lasted for up to 12 h. Ranitidine 25 mg was observed to be statistically superior (P < 0.05) but not clinically different from placebo, as defined a priori, in providing heartburn relief. All treatments were well tolerated and adverse events occurred no more frequently with the ranitidine regimens than with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Ranitidine 75 mg provides prompt relief of heartburn that lasts for up to 12 h and has a safety profile comparable to that of placebo.  (+info)

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of non-prescription ranitidine 75 mg in the prevention of meal-induced heartburn. (4/213)

BACKGROUND: Ranitidine 75 mg (Zantac 75) has been shown to be effective for the treatment of pre-existing heartburn symptoms. AIM: To compare the efficacy of dosing ranitidine 75 mg or placebo 30 min prior to a proven heartburn-provoking meal in completely preventing or reducing subsequent heartburn symptoms. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, parallel methodology was used at nine investigative centres. Following a screening visit, patients ate a standard test meal consisting of chili, chips and a soft drink on two occasions. On the first occasion, patients received single-blind placebo 30 min before the meal. This meal was used to qualify patients and to ensure the onset of a minimum level of heartburn. Patients who qualified were randomized (n = 284) to receive double-blind ranitidine 75 mg or placebo 30 min before a second test meal administered 4-14 days later at the treatment visit. Patients recorded whether heartburn was present and rated heartburn severity by completing visual analogue scales at 15-min intervals over the 4. 5 h meal evaluation periods. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences favouring ranitidine 75 mg were determined for complete prevention of heartburn (P < 0.006), heartburn severity area under the curve (P < 0.001), a clinical success end-point (P < 0.001), and all other end-points (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These data clearly demonstrate that ranitidine 75 mg is effective in completely preventing or decreasing heartburn when administered 30 min prior to a provocative meal.  (+info)

An evaluation of increasing doses of ranitidine for treatment of heartburn. (5/213)

BACKGROUND: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, parallel group, dose-ranging trial of ranitidine tablets for relief of episodic heartburn. Adult out-patients who reported heartburn relieved by antacids at least seven times per week were eligible. METHODS: Patients who successfully completed a 1-week single-blind placebo run-in phase and who did not achieve adequate relief in more than 50% of heartburn episodes were randomized to a 1-week, double-blind treatment phase during which they received ranitidine doses of 25, 75 or 125 mg, or placebo. RESULTS: Of 577 patients randomized, 566 had at least one evaluable heartburn episode and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. All three ranitidine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo in providing overall episodic heartburn relief for the first episode (P < 0.002), last episode (P+info)

Cisapride 20 mg b.d. for preventing symptoms of GERD induced by a provocative meal. The CIS-USA-89 Study Group. (6/213)

BACKGROUND: Cisapride is a substituted piperidinyl benzamide indicated for the symptomatic treatment of patients with nocturnal heartburn due to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The currently recommended dosing regimen for cisapride is 10 mg q.d.s., but the elimination half-life of 8-10 h supports b.d. dosing with 20 mg. METHODS: This multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken to determine the efficacy and safety of cisapride 20 mg b.d. dosing in reducing or preventing heartburn and other meal-related symptoms after challenge with a provocative fatty meal. In phase 1 of the study, 137 patients with at least a 3-month history of symptoms suggestive of GERD and at least five episodes of GERD on 7-day diary were eligible to receive single-blind treatment with placebo for 7 (range +/- 3) days and then ingested a provocative meal. One hundred and twenty-two patients (45 men and 77 women, 22-65 years of age) who experienced heartburn during the 3 h after ingestion of the meal qualified for the double-blind phase of the study and were randomly assigned to either cisapride 20 mg or matching placebo b.d. for 7 (+/-3) days. At the end of this period, 118 patients again ate a fatty meal and were assessed for symptoms of GERD. RESULTS: Heartburn was prevented in a significantly higher percentage of cisapride-treated patients (40%; 24 out of 60) than placebo-treated patients (21%; 12 out of 58) after the repeat provocative meal at the end of the double-blind phase (P = 0.017). Cisapride was also significantly more effective in reducing the severity of postprandial heartburn, belching, and regurgitation (P < 0.05). Twice-daily dosing with cisapride 20 mg was well tolerated; the number of cisapride- and placebo-treated patients who experienced at least one adverse event was similar (31% and 22%, respectively). The most common adverse events were diarrhoea (cisapride, 18%; placebo, 0%) and rhinitis (cisapride, 2%; placebo, 5%). CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that cisapride 20 mg b.d. is effective in preventing or reducing symptoms of heartburn in patients who developed heartburn after ingesting a provocative fatty meal. Cisapride was also effective in reducing the severity of heartburn-related symptoms such as belching and regurgitation.  (+info)

Lansoprazole in the treatment of heartburn in patients without erosive oesophagitis. (7/213)

BACKGROUND: This randomized, double-blind, multicentre study compared lansoprazole with placebo for symptomatic relief of patients with non-erosive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: 214 patients with symptomatic, non-erosive GERD (moderate to severe daytime and/or night-time heartburn greater than half the days over the past 6 months and during the 7- to 10-day pre-treatment period) were randomized to either lansoprazole 15 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg, or placebo o.d. for 8 weeks. RESULTS: Daily diary data indicated that on the first treatment day a statistically significantly smaller percentage of lansoprazole patients reported daytime and night-time heartburn and antacid usage, compared with placebo patients. Lansoprazole patients also reported statistically significant less severe daytime and night-time heartburn on the first treatment day. During 0-4, 4-8, and 0-8 weeks of therapy, a statistically significant smaller percentage of days and nights with heartburn, less severe daytime and night-time heartburn, and less antacid usage were observed in the lansoprazole group compared to the placebo group. The percentages of patients with adverse reactions were similar in the lansoprazole and placebo groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrate that lansoprazole is an appropriate therapy for patients with symptomatic non-erosive GERD.  (+info)

Heartburn treatment in primary care: randomised, double blind study for 8 weeks. (8/213)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects and tolerability of omeprazole and cisapride with that of placebo for control of heartburn in primary care patients. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study. SETTING: 65 primary care practices in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 483 untreated patients with complaints of heartburn >/=3 days a week, with at most grade 1 reflux oesophagitis. INTERVENTIONS: Omeprazole 20 mg once daily, cisapride 20 mg twice daily, or placebo for 8 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adequate control of heartburn, defined as +info)

  • In a study published in September 2017 in The American Journal of Gastroenterology , researchers looked at a group of adults with heartburn and related symptoms who didn't experience relief from taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug . (everydayhealth.com)
  • Persistent heartburn can also be a sign of other problems, such as peptic ulcer or hiatal hernia. (uspharmacist.com)
  • But you might not know that persistent heartburn. (ammeglobe.com)
  • It can feel like chest pain behind your sternum, heartburn, pain with. (ammeglobe.com)
  • Heartburn usually feels like a burning chest pain beginning behind the breastbone and moving upward to the neck and throat. (heartburndiet.com)
  • Most people describe heartburn as a painful burning sensation in the chest, sometimes along with a sour taste in the mouth and throat. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Heartburn often begins after you've eaten a large meal, but it can also be triggered by certain foods even if you don't eat very much. (everydayhealth.com)
  • There is a wide range of potentially problematic foods and other factors that can contribute to heartburn. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Heartburn can last for several hours and is often worse after eating, or when lying down, or when a person who just ate suddenly bends over. (heartburndiet.com)
  • Occasional heartburn is common, especially after eating a large meal, when bending over, or upon lying down. (uspharmacist.com)