Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Religion and Psychology: The interrelationship of psychology and religion.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Religion and SexReligion and ScienceSpirituality: Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Clergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.Buddhism: The teaching ascribed to Gautama Buddha (ca. 483 B.C.) holding that suffering is inherent in life and that one can escape it into nirvana by mental and moral self-purification. (Webster, 3d ed)Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Hinduism: A complex body of social, cultural, and religious beliefs and practices evolved in and largely confined to the Indian subcontinent and marked by a caste system, an outlook tending to view all forms and theories as aspects of one eternal being and truth, and the practice of the way of works, the way of knowledge, or the way of devotion as a means of release from the round of rebirths. (From Webster, 3d ed)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Spiritualism: Religious philosophy expressing the fundamental belief that departed spirits may be contacted by the living through a medium.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Protestantism: The name given to all Christian denominations, sects, or groups rising out of the Reformation. Protestant churches generally agree that the principle of authority should be the Scriptures rather than the institutional church or the pope. (from W.L. Reese, Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion, 1999)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Bible: The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.IndiaRegional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Thanatology: The study of the theory, philosophy, and doctrine of death.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Posthumous Conception: Conception after the death of the male or female biological parent through techniques such as the use of gametes that have been stored during his or her lifetime or that were collected immediately after his or her death.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Great BritainHealth Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Pastoral Care: Counseling or comfort given by ministers, priests, rabbis, etc., to those in need of help with emotional problems or stressful situations.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.BrazilMen's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.LebanonUrban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.SyriaAdolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Superstitions: A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.
... daily health, wellbeing and life coaching tips; weather updates; religion; and financial services. Waseelah is an Islamic ... The 57357 Children Cancer Hospital and the Magdi Yacoub Heart Foundation, which offer free health care in their respective ...
Physical and psychological health; Religion; Intelligence (Raven's Test); Computer and Internet; Demographics. Socio-Economic ...
Historic functions included: domestic; commerce/trade; government; religion; recreation and culture; industry/processing/ ... extraction; health care Historic subfunction: single dwelling; business; city hall; religious structure; theater; ...
"Religion". bestplaces.net. 2011-02-09. Dickinson, Joy Wallace. "'Winn-Dixie' author returns to Florida roots in new tale". ... ISBN 978 1 56164 084 3. "Algae a threat to health of Clermont lakes". "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived ... In 2017, 89.6% of the population identified with a religion. 27.7% were Baptist, 3.1% were Catholic, Methodist 3.6%, ...
Articles were analyzed in 11 thematic categories: arts and culture; history and biographies; medicine and health; technology ... and applied science; geography; religion; science; mathematics and logic; philosophy; sport and society; and social sciences. ...
As the largest branch of the Candomblé religion, Ketu origins have a major influence on the religion as a whole. Although there ... Kerilyn Daniel, "Understanding Mental Health from a Candomble Perspective", 2007. Retrieved on 2016-02-22. Dom Phillips, "Afro- ... The religion grew popular among slaves because it was a way for Yoruba slaves to maintain their culture and express ... "Lucumí Religion". New Orleans Mistic. Archived from the original on May 28, 2008. Retrieved January 4, 2009. Lois Ritter, Nancy ...
Some religions claim that praying for somebody who is sick can have positive effects on the health of the person being prayed ... 11 903-910 [3] Powell LH, Shahabi L, Thoresen CE (January 2003). "Religion and spirituality. Linkages to physical health". The ... Health Int. 5 (3): 182-185. doi:10.1002/shi.282. Jobst, Kim A. (2004). "Science and Healing: From Bioelectromagnetics to the ... Richard P. Sloan, 2006, Blind Faith: The Unholy Alliance of Religion and Medicine, St. Martin's Press, p. 172. O'Laoire S ( ...
Candomblé Queto Ifá Cuba portal Religion portal "Santería". Religions of the World. Retrieved January 4, 2009. "Lucumí Religion ... Inle is ranked as one of the orichás that is approached for very specific health issues. Thus, Inle is also known as the ... Their religion, based on the worship of nature, was renamed and documented by their slave owners. Santería, a pejorative term ... A similar religion of Yoruba origin called Candomblé Queto is practiced in Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay. This is referred to ...
... religion policy; space policy; and science and technology policy. The Science and Technology Policy Program aims to develop an ... health policy; tax and expenditure policy; Latin America, Mexico, Middle East, and China studies; drug policy; international ...
"Religion, 2001; Area: Longsight (Ward)". Neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk. 2004-11-18. Retrieved 2013-03-13. "Manchester Health ... Only 7.0% of the population declined to state a religion, with 12.7% stating no religion. The census tended to underestimate ... He was later partially responsible for the 1848 Public Health Act and then the succeeding 1875 Public Health Act. The ... "Religion, 2011; Area: Longsight (Ward)". Neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk. 2013-01-30. Retrieved 2013-03-13. " ...
In a 1993 study, members of two mainline Protestant religions had a 20% chance of being divorced in 5 years; a Catholic and an ... "Vital and Health Statistics; Series 23, No. 22 (July 2002)" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-06-11. Riley, Naomi Schaefer (6 June 2010). " ... Except religion". The Washington Post. Washington, DC. pp. B1. "New Statistics on Church Attendance and Avoidance". Barna Group ... The National Center for Health Statistics reports that from 1975 to 1988 in the U.S., in families with children present, wives ...
... religion, 1.5; and health, 1.5. Electives change annually and may be reviewed in Blair's course catalog. A full complement of ...
Dept of Public Health (1912). First Annual Report: Massachusetts, Department of Public Health. Retrieved 2008-10-27. "Merrimack ... "Teaching the Eco-Justice Ethic: The Parable of the Billerica Dam". religion-online.org. Retrieved 2008-10-27. "River Herring: ...
The Asian Journal of Health is an international peer-reviewed journal that aims to publish new discoveries from the ... philosophy and religion; science and mathematics; and, engineering, ICT and technology. It is published annually every December ... The UERMMMC Journal of Health Sciences is an official publication of University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical ... The contents are multidisciplinary: health, behavioral and social science; business, law and public policy; education, culture ...
"Roberts, Ruth Logan". Religion and Community. Facts On File, 1997. African-American History Online. Retrieved 6 February 2016. ... Concerned about the educator's health, Rosenwald encouraged him to slow his pace. In 1915, Washington died at the age of 59, as ... This experiment was conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in collaboration with the Tuskegee Institute. In 1941, in an ... Third Floor exhibition contains "The United States Public Health Service Untreated Syphilis Study in the Negro Male, Macon ...
"Guidelines for health Care Providers Interacting with Patients of the Sikh Religion and their Families" (PDF). Metropolitan ... It is only postponed or abrogated in the case of threat to the life or health of the child. It is usually performed by a mohel ... The functional integrity of the person may be sacrificed to maintain the health or life of the person when no other morally ... "Question #7073: The health and religious benefits of circumcision". Islam Q&A. Retrieved 2006-07-01. "Circumcision of boys". ...
Art of Living; Travel, Health,etc. Wisdom; Wisdom in living,etc. How to live;Lies, etc. Progress of People; Money and Fortune; ... Parents and Children, Siblings, Couples; Life; Heart and Religion; Others; 木村山治郎 『道歌教訓和歌辞典』 (1998) 東京堂出版 東京 ISBN 4-490-10490
His father, Luigi Mennini, who died in 1997, was managing director of the Holy See's Institute for Works of Religion (the ... "Nuncio to Great Britain to retire due to ill health". CatholicHerald.co.uk. 2010-11-12. "New Apostolic Nuncio presented to HM ... "Former Vatican Ambassador to Russia is decorated with Order of Friendship". interfax-religion.com. 2011-02-18. "Great Britain ...
Realized religion: research on the relationship between religion and health Theodore J. Chamberlain, Christopher Alan Hall 2007 ... 11 903-910 [1] Powell LH, Shahabi L, Thoresen CE (January 2003). "Religion and spirituality. Linkages to physical health". The ... Mental Health, Religion & Culture. 11 (1): 85-92. doi:10.1080/13674670701709055. Mind and Spirit Archived 2009-02-01 at the ... "National Trends in Prayer Use as a Coping Mechanism for Health Concerns: Changes from 2002 to 2007". Psychology of Religion and ...
"Religion and Ethics". "Philosophy and Medicine". Springer Publishing. "ALbert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics:Staff ... "Beyond Health Care Accountability: The Gift of Medicine". Oxford Journals. "Health care ethics updates". Vanderbilt University ... The director of the Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, he is most widely recognized and cited for work in medical ... Bishop is a member of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and the American Academy of Religion. He is also an ...
"Facing the Abusing God: A Theology of Protest (Westminster/John Knox, 1993)". Religion.emory.edu. p. 223. Archived from the ... Mental Health, Psychotherapy and Judaism Mondial. 2011.. ...
Religion Today (ed). Chennai: Sri Ramakrishna Math, 1992. Monasticism: Ideals and Traditions (ed). Chennai: Sri Ramakrishna ... Healthy Mind, Healthy Body: New Thoughts on Health (ed). Chennai: Sri Ramakrishna Math, 1997. Values: The Key to a Meaningful ... Sharma, Arvind (Spring 2004). "Hindus and Scholars". Religion in the News. trincoll.edu. 7 (1). Retrieved 2008-07-17. ...
One person is of a Jewish religion while 79 people within the parish have non-or not stated their religion. The healthcare in ... "Neighbourhood Statistics Health". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. 2001. Retrieved 18 April 2016. ... "Religion: Neighbourhood Statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. 2001. Retrieved 18 April 2016. " ... of the population having bad to very bad health. The church of St Mary is a fine example of East Anglian late Medieval work. ...
Kalb, Claudia (2004-11-10). "Can religion improve health? While the debate rages in journals and med schools, more Americans ... Village, Andrew (2005). "Dimensions of belief about miraculous healing". Mental Health, Religion & Culture. 8 (2): 97-107. doi: ... of Health and Human Services. April 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-10-11. Retrieved 2009-02-27. CHILD ABUSE in ... the end of the 20th century has given rise to a parallel interest among sociologists in the relationship of religion to health ...
Religion •Victor Martinez, Features, health and recreation •Dave Acosta, arts/entertainment •Felix Chavez, high school sports • ... Living: local and national feature stories including rotating sections covering seniors, religion, pop culture, the arts, books ... health, home decor, entertainment news, local music and fashion. Tiempo: weekly entertainment guide published on Fridays. It ...
... "no religion and no church" children were being subjected to "an inculcation of socialistic views at an age particularly ... was a Christian socialist and campaigned for better education and health for poor children. A few years later the Springburn ...
... Angus Deaton. Chapter in NBER book Explorations in the Economics of Aging (2011), David A. Wise, ... This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w15271, Aging, religion, and health, Angus S. Deaton Commentary on this ... Bulletin on Health including Archive of Lists of Affiliates Work in Medical and Other Journals with Pre-Publication ... Archives of Bulletin on Aging and Health. Digest - Non-technical summaries of 4-8 working papers per month. Reporter - News ...
... James P. Smith. Chapter in NBER book Explorations in the Economics of Aging (2011), ... Aging, Religion, and Health. Chandra and Williams. Comment on "Is Decentralized Iron Fortification a Feasible Option to Fight ... This chapter is a comment on Aging, Religion, and Health, Angus Deaton. Users who downloaded this chapter also downloaded* ... Bulletin on Health including Archive of Lists of Affiliates Work in Medical and Other Journals with Pre-Publication ...
But Biola University religion and ethics professor Scott Rae believes Obamacare takes too much authority out of the hands of ... Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ... be thinking about how we can more vigorously and effectively help the people of West Africa and how we can protect health care ...
... spirituality and health - its a topic that has begun to receive more attention after years of neglect. Dr. Kenneth Pargament, ... Religion, spirituality and health Bowling Green State University / News / 2014 / January / Religion, spirituality and health ... Religion, spirituality and health - its a topic that has begun to receive more attention after years of neglect. Dr. Kenneth ... "We are now moving beyond the basic question of whether religion and spirituality are tied to health to the more critical and ...
In most countries, religious people report better health; they say they have more energy, that their health is better, and that ... as well as the effects of religiosity on a range of health measures and health-related behaviors. The main contribution of the ... The topic is particularly germane for the health of women and of the elderly, who are much more likely to be religious. In this ... which allow me to use nationally representative samples to study the correlates of religion within and between more than 140 ...
Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ... senior national correspondent for Religion News Service. "Brittany Maynard moved from California to Oregon, where its legal ... be thinking about how we can more vigorously and effectively help the people of West Africa and how we can protect health care ...
Get updates from Public Religion delivered straight to your inbox. Also, send me the Public Square Newsletter and special ...
The Journal of Religion and Health is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed academic journal published by Springer Science+ ... It publishes original articles that deal with mental and physical health in relation to religion and spirituality of all kinds ... Irmak, M. Kemal (2012). "Schizophrenia or Possession?". Journal of Religion and Health. 53 (3): 773-7. doi:10.1007/s10943-012- ... The journal is abstracted and indexed by Academic OneFile, Arts & Humanities Citation Index, ATLA Religion Database, Current ...
Mental Health, Religion and Culture are very controversial when brought together. In some rural parts of the world, where some ... Mental Health, Religion and Culture is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed academic journal published by Routledge. It publishes ... we see that they think mental health issues are linked to religion. People from places such the Borana semi-nomadic population ... original articles that deal with mental health in relation to religion and spirituality of all kinds. The journal was ...
Religion Dispatches. Religion Dispatches is your independent, non-profit, award-winning source for the best writing on critical ... A Devils Dozen of the Best New Religion Journalism Books of the Decade ... Who says an interview with a scholar on a religion, politics, and media crit needs to be dry? https://t.co/2BK3LQxQew ... and timely issues at the intersection of religion, politics, and culture. ...
Las Vegas community information including Health, Fashion, Home and Garden, Recreation, Religion, Travel, Comics, Games, ... Data reported Friday by the state Department of Health and Human Services ended a two-day streak of below-average increases in ... Figures posted by the Department of Health and Human Service Thursday showed 729 new cases of COVID-19 were reported over the ... Sisters Caroline and Lauren Edgeworth work to raise awareness about mental health and teen suicide through Hope Means Nevada ...
... religion should not be a hurdle in health and medication. ... Health and medication should not be linked to religion," said ... Health, medication should not be linked to religion: Amitabh Bachchan. Amitabh Bachchan said that though India is a country ... religion should not be a hurdle in health and medication.. ... Health, medication should not be linked to religion: Amitabh ... religion should not be a hurdle in health and medication. ... "The huge problem which we face during health campaigns is, how ...
The program in the Department of Comparative Religion is based upon a cultural understanding of the body, illness and health, ... If you are interested in combining an online graduate certificate in spirituality, culture and health with the online Master of ... Health and human services professionals throughout the United States will benefit from Western Michigan Universitys unique ... Department of Comparative Religion. Western Michigan University. Kalamazoo MI 49008-5320 USA. (269) 387-4393 ...
To test a model of the religion-health connection to determine whether religious coping plays a mediating role in health ... and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, ... The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in ... Affiliations: 1: University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral and Community Health, College Park, ...
The bulk of the book is devoted to detailed examinations of each religious tradition, presented in an easy-to-use format. Sections provide basic information on the history of the faith and core tenets, and outline beliefs associated with key areas related to care, including attitudes toward illness; gender and privacy; naming, diet, and hygiene; birth, dying, and death; contraception and assisted reproductive technologies; and organ/tissue donation. The author is careful to note the diversity of beliefs within faiths where relevant (for instance, within Islam, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism there are debates over the permissibility of organ donation).. ...
Religion has often been seen by mental health professionals in Western societies as irrational, outdated, and dependency ... This created a divide between religion and mental health care, which has continued until recently. Psychiatry has a long ... A major change occurred when Charcot1 and his pupil Freud2 associated religion with hysteria and neurosis. ... psychiatry and religion were closely connected. Religious institutions were responsible for the care of the mentally ill. ...
Among the issues explored are how mental states in general and belief states in particular affect physical health. The book ... positively affect a wide variety of health outcomes such as susceptibility to cancer and recovery following surgery. ... This book presents new medical research establishing a connection between religion and health and examines the implications for ... The Link Between Religion and Health: Psychoneuroimmunology and the Faith Factor. Harold G. Koenig and Harvey J. Cohen. ...
... depending upon the mental health and methodology of the representatives of religion. (The Role of Religion in the Psychoses, ... 4. A layman can implement his mental health ministry by accepting leadership in community mental health projects. A churchman ... As Wayne Oates puts the matter: Religion may either facilitate mental health or breed and maintain mental pathology, ... Chapter 12: Minister and Laymen Work Together for Mental Health. The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church. by Howard J. ...
"The religion of health." Vatican officials criticize the rich countries of the world for luxuriating in excessive health care. ... Is health becoming a religion? Some people make it the central value around which they order their lives. Health is worshipped ... Yes, this religion of health has sinners, doesnt it?. ANOTHER UPDATE: A reader, Reginald White, writes (and I use his name ... Is health] becoming our religion? Maybe. If my life is representative there is sin -- eating junk food and carousing -- and ...
The Freedom From Religion Foundation is pushing the Vermont Statehouse to pass a pending reproductive health care bill. FFRF Co ... The Freedom From Religion Foundation is pushing the Vermont Statehouse to pass a pending reproductive health care bill. ... Religiously affiliated health care institutions have a record of hostility toward providing comprehensive reproductive health ... As a secular nation, our laws governing health care, including reproductive health care, must reflect science and reason, ...
Christian Witness and Ministry in a COVID-Shaped World: Religion, Behavior, and Public Health. ... Christian Witness and Ministry in a COVID-Shaped World: Religion, Behavior, and Public Health ... If youre a religious leader, health care provider, social worker, or counseling professional, youll find plenty of ideas to ... Faith, human behavior, and public health-whats the connection? Discover how Christians and churches can positively promote ...
Religion and mental health: what should psychiatrists do? Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from BJPsych ... KOENIG, H. G., MCCULLOUGH, M. E. & LARSON, D. B. (2001) Handbook of Religion and Health, pp. 514-554, Oxford University Press. ... KOENIG, H. G. (2008) Research on religion, spirituality and mental health: a review. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, in press. ... a review of literature on religion/spirituality and mental health prior to 2000 identified 724 quantitative studies (Koenig et ...
... is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and ... Prevention (CDC), and is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian, noninstitutionalized, household ... "The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health ... Religion Family Trees. Family trees diagram the rich history of major world religions and American denominations. View More... ...
The May 2010 survey focuses on personal health, health insurance, and health-related services provided by the congregations. ... Religion Family Trees. Family trees diagram the rich history of major world religions and American denominations. View More... ... Social Movements & Religion. Interactively explore the role of religion within various social movements in the United States ... Religion Family Trees. Group Profiles. Compare Members. Data Sources. Search Religious Groups. Site Tutorials. ...
Chapter 3:. Rapid Social Change, the Churches, and Mental Health by Bertram S. Brown. The basic question is this: Can religion ... Chapter 3:. Rapid Social Change, the Churches, and Mental Health by Bertram S. Brown. Community Mental Health: The Role of ... concerns itself as deeply with the matter of values as does religion. Religion is based on the respect and dignity of the ... Next PostNext Chapter 21: The Community Pastor and the Comprehensive Mental Health Center by Frank S. Moyer. ...
  • The effect of education on religion: Evidence from compulsory schooling laws ," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization , Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 52-63. (repec.org)
  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Faith, human behavior, and public health-what's the connection? (calvin.edu)
  • In this class, you'll be inspired to change your own behavior and discover how your individual actions can promote public health-not only mental or spiritual health, but physical health. (calvin.edu)
  • Mental disorders are health conditions that are characterized by alterations in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination thereof) associated with distress and/or impaired functioning. (cbhd.org)
  • The health behavior sleep hours had the strongest association with SRH (β total = 0.178) followed by fruit/vegetable consumption (β total = 0.144), physical activity (β total = 0.135) and a vegetarian diet (β total = 0.103). (springer.com)
  • Substantial work has been done in the areas of sexual health and responsible sexual behavior, through public-private partnerships at the national as well as community level, by many researchers and organizations throughout the country. (thebody.com)
  • Youth development programs, although they typically do not specifically address sexuality, have been shown to have a significant impact on sexual health and behavior. (thebody.com)
  • The rule of thumb is that there are three general types of medication: 1) Medicine which is critical to one's health, and missing the daily dosage can. (askmoses.com)
  • Alternately, if being in a particular social position or group has an effect on one's health, researchers say that something about the social environment associated with that position or group has an effect on health, and they then must investigate further to determine the underlying factors. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Information collected at one point in time, however, does not untangle whether one's current social position or one's health status came first. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Active participation in 'good' religion can enhance good living and, therefore, impact positively on one's health. (ourhealthforum.net)
  • The purpose of this study was to explore the determinants of self-rated health (SRH) of adolescents attending a faith-based school system in Australia. (springer.com)
  • The Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health longitudinal study draws on life-course models to understand ethnic differences in health. (springer.com)
  • In this paper, I use data from the Gallup World Poll to study the within and between country relationships between religiosity, age, and gender, as well as the effects of religiosity on a range of health measures and health-related behaviors. (repec.org)
  • There were ethnic differences in religiosity with less-acculturated Hispanic women reporting higher importance of religion in their lives than more-acculturated Hispanics and Whites, but not Blacks. (utexas.edu)
  • Cross-National Correlations of Quantifiable Societal Health with Popular Religiosity and Secularism in the Prosperous Democracies Journal of Religion and Society http://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/2005/2005-11.html [Creighton is a Roman Catholic Jesuit university, founded in Omaha in 1878. (extropy.org)
  • http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1798944,00.html ------------------- ISSN: 1522-5658 Cross-National Correlations of Quantifiable Societal Health with Popular Religiosity and Secularism in the Prosperous Democracies A First Look Gregory S. Paul Baltimore, Maryland Introduction Two centuries ago there was relatively little dispute over the existence of God, or the societally beneficial effect of popular belief in a creator. (extropy.org)
  • To understand the connection between social factors and health, it is necessary to examine the average level of health of aging people in one social group and then compare this to the average level of health of those in another social group. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Duke University Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health is based in the Center for Aging at Duke and gives opportunities for scholarly trans-disciplinary conversation and the development of collaborative research projects. (conservapedia.com)
  • The initiative, undertaken by Medanta - The Medicity hospital, has been launched in collaboration with the government of Haryana, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and the Central TB Division of the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare. (indianexpress.com)
  • One social force or institution influences another, and it is this interaction that is important in any discussion of community mental health, air pollution, education, welfare, or religion. (religion-online.org)
  • Because religious fundamentalism is intertwined with other political trends, the publication defines terms such as nationalism, ethnicity and religion, which is important in understanding the phenomena and why it is an uphill battle for human rights defenders. (sxpolitics.org)
  • How Does Personal Well-being Vary by Sex, Disability, Ethnicity and Religion? (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • We have explored this dataset to find out how personal well-being ratings compare for different equality groups: sex, disability, ethnicity and religion. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • It is a task for all of us as human beings, a task for which religion as an institution and clergy as professionals are uniquely equipped in theory if not in practice. (religion-online.org)
  • However, pediatric practice may need to recognize that religion and spirituality are not confined to issues pertaining to death, but rather may play an important role in determining the way(s) families live, and therefore, have a broader impact on child health. (aappublications.org)
  • Meditation on the breath is found in the spiritual practices of many religions (see The Breath of Life: The Practice of Breath Meditation According to Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, Jewish and Christian Traditions at OCOY.org), and particularly in Buddhism, where it is known as Anapanasati, awareness of the inhaling and exhaling breaths, and is the meditation technique practiced and taught by the Buddha. (hubpages.com)
  • ASECSA was founded in 1978 by a small group of international health professionals with ties to programs started by Catholic and Protestant clergy and laity in Guatemala's western highlands in the 1960s. (oxfordre.com)
  • Religion is an important psychological and social factor that may serve either as a powerful resource for healing or be intricately intertwined with psychopathology. (rcpsych.org)
  • Interactively explore the role of religion within various social movements in the United States history. (thearda.com)
  • For questions about health services, your entitlements, or how to access HSE health or social services in your area? (hse.ie)
  • If people with certain health problems are not able to attain or remain in a certain social position, researchers say that the underlying mechanism was selection into the social status. (encyclopedia.com)
  • To address this problem, some researchers design studies that follow the same individuals over time, noting the changes in health status and social position over the course of their lives. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This suggests that it is not only the presence of a social tie, but also the quality of the relationship that affects mental health. (encyclopedia.com)
  • What are the health benefits of being social? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Interns receiving academic credit in religion often work with non-profit, social service agencies and organizations associated with particular religious traditions. (lakeforest.edu)
  • Templeton awarded $8 million to Pargament in collaboration with Dr. Neal Krause, principal investigator at the University of Michigan, and other researchers at the University of California-Davis, Biola University and the University of Miami, to delve deeper into the topic and help provide some solid explanations for why religion has both positive and negative effects on human health. (bgsu.edu)
  • The researchers will follow people over time and gather data on various health issues - blood pressure, height, weight, waist circumference, immune function, glucose levels, inflammation associated with heart disease - and measure them against a full complement of religion measures. (bgsu.edu)
  • Browse 114 concepts used in the study of religion, review how survey researchers measured them in the past, and quickly compare the results of more than 7,600 survey questions. (thearda.com)
  • Researchers led by Laura Wallace, a doctoral researcher in psychology at the Ohio State University in Columbus, have conducted two studies whose results show that religion could give believers a 4-year longevity boost. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers speculate on potential reasons why religion gives a longevity boost. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Intriguingly, mental health researchers have examined the impact of prayer on the lives of ordinary people, both with and without mental illness. (psychologytoday.com)
  • The team hopes to address major gaps in the current literature on the subject, including expanding the ages, types of religion and practices of those surveyed. (bgsu.edu)
  • The Federal Register release titled Ensuring That Department of Health and Human Services Funds Do Not Support Coercive or Discriminatory Policies or Practices in Violation of Federal Law provides that the new rules take effect January 20, 2009-- just before the change in administrations. (blogspot.com)
  • Both practices can have an incredible impact on mental health. (nami.org)
  • Difference in hypertension awareness by nativity may skew surveillance estimates used to track health disparities by large heterogeneous racial categories. (cdc.gov)
  • The posts on this blog do not necessarily reflect the views of the Maternal Health Task Force. (mhtf.org)
  • Our objective is to provide a platform for our Editorial Committee and other experts to post a myriad of data and evidence, as well as opinions/views that exist in the field which will contribute to expanding the maternal health dialogue. (mhtf.org)
  • Maternal health is the health of women during pregnancy , childbirth , and the postpartum period . (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal health revolves around the health and wellness of women, particularly when they are pregnant, at the time they give birth, and during child-raising. (wikipedia.org)
  • The investment can be achieved in different ways, among the main ones being subsidizing the healthcare cost, education on maternal health, encouraging effective family planning, and ensuring progressive check up on the health of women with children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Education on various issues related to maternal health is essential to control and improve the healthcare of women. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the government manages to reduce unwanted and unplanned pregnancies among these two groups of people, it will become easier to reduce the maternal health issue and the cost associated with it. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the five states where it's legal, physician-assisted dying involves rigorous regulations, including how long a person has lived there, says Cathy Lynn Grossman, senior national correspondent for Religion News Service. (pbs.org)
  • Find health information and advice, local NHS services in England, access to Department of Health reports and policies plus the latest health news. (devonlink.co.uk)
  • This interdisciplinary, cross-cultural study seeks to understand pathways for sustaining positive mental health among caregivers of orphans living in four countries (India, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Cambodia) and of four religious traditions (Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism). (duke.edu)
  • The terms Eastern and Western religions do not really correspond to the Eastern and Western Hemispheres of the earth but rather to the religious traditions born in the Near East, North Africa, and Europe (Western) versus those born in countries of the Far East (Eastern). (oup.com)
  • Students majoring in religion can pursue internship positions in the Chicago area and around the world, as a way to further develop their academic study of diverse religious traditions and communities. (lakeforest.edu)
  • In some rural parts of the world, where some people lack education, we see that they think mental health issues are linked to religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This article is about the demographic features of the population of the Republic of the Congo , including population density , ethnicity , education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Policies that support collaboration between the formal health system and organizations in partner sectors--housing, education, and transportation--are key to achieving a culture of health. (rand.org)
  • held out Pope John Paul II's stoic suffering with Parkinson's disease as an antidote to the mentality that modern medicine must cure all, calling this a "religion of health" that is taking hold in affluent countries. (blogspot.com)
  • But for modern medicine and its expensive treatments (which have stabilized my health by slowing the rate of disease progression), I would be in a wheel chair or worse. (blogspot.com)
  • Recent efforts are underway to arrive at a new synthesis between medicine, religion, and spirituality, extending notions of healing to include concern for the body, mind, and spirit. (aappublications.org)
  • It is hoped that dissemination of this experience outside of the Islamic Republic of Iran will encourage the development of similar dialogue and synergy between religion and health in other countries. (who.int)
  • Look, I don't think contraception/abortion coverage in a health plan makes the owners of the company "responsible" in the eyes of God in any way, shape or form - so they all need to farking take a breath and stop this nonsense. (fark.com)
  • In a move to oppose the federal mandate on contraception coverage in health insurance policies, the Missouri legislature yesterday voted to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of SB 749 . (blogspot.com)
  • The bill permits employers, employees and insurance companies to opt out of providing health insurance coverage for abortion, contraception or sterilization where the procedures are contrary to the person's religious beliefs or moral convictions. (blogspot.com)
  • Durkheim's famous study of suicide is a precursor of a large contemporary literature that investigates the links between religion and health. (repec.org)
  • The main contribution of the current study comes from the coverage and richness of the data, which allow me to use nationally representative samples to study the correlates of religion within and between more than 140 countries using more than 300,000 observations. (repec.org)
  • Published in: Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies , Vol. 8, No. 24 (2009): pp. 257-283. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • vii This study was a secondary data analysis using cycle 6 of the National Survey of Family Growth, a dataset publicly available through the National Center for Health Statistics. (utexas.edu)
  • The study counters the view of believers that religion is necessary to provide the moral and ethical foundations of a healthy society. (extropy.org)
  • The result: The world's longest running study on human health. (npr.org)
  • While these are just hypotheses, one thing that the study did show with a fair degree of certainty was that conformity mediates the relationship between religion and longevity - that is, in cities where conformity was important, believers lived longer than non-believers. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Another study examined the perspectives of over 2,000 adults with mental illness in California, finding that over 80 percent agreed or strongly agreed that spirituality was important to their mental health. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Young people who are active in their religion are more likely to become obese by the time they reach middle age, according to a new study. (treehugger.com)
  • Although it was founded in Guatemala, ASECSA's publications and meetings attracted participation by health professionals and paraprofessionals from Mexico, Central America, and even the Caribbean. (oxfordre.com)
  • Data reported Friday by the state Department of Health and Human Services ended a two-day streak of below-average increases in the metrics. (reviewjournal.com)
  • Health and human services professionals throughout the United States will benefit from Western Michigan University's unique online Master of Arts in spirituality, culture and health created to address the needs of people who serve an increasingly diverse population. (wmich.edu)
  • The program in the Department of Comparative Religion is based upon a cultural understanding of the body, illness and health, and emphasizes practical tools for addressing religious, spiritual and cultural diversity in health and human services settings. (wmich.edu)
  • FFRF Co-President Annie Laurie Gaylor this week submitted written testimony to the Vermont House Committee on Human Services in favor of H. 663 , which would expand access to birth control in health insurance programs and in educational settings. (ffrf.org)
  • H. 663 is a laudable approach to ensuring dissemination of scientifically valid information and adequate reproductive health services. (ffrf.org)
  • This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant T76MC00001 and entitled Training Grant in Maternal and Child Health. (mhtf.org)
  • Support for the health programs and ASECSA came from secular and religious international agencies, including the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), German Misereor, Catholic Relief Services, and the World Council of Churches. (oxfordre.com)