Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.Night Terrors: A disorder characterized by incomplete arousals from sleep associated with behavior suggesting extreme fright. This condition primarily affects children and young adults and the individual generally has no recall of the event. Episodes tend to occur during stage III or IV. SOMNAMBULISM is frequently associated with this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p391)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Consumer Organizations: Organized groups of users of goods and services.National Health Insurance, United StatesRestaurantsFast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Collective Bargaining: The process of negotiation between representatives of an employee organization, association or union, and representatives of the employer.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Comparative Effectiveness Research: Conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. (hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cer/draftdefinition.html accessed 6/12/2009)Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Patient Outcome AssessmentCost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Hematinics: Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.ArizonaSocialism: A system of government in which means of production and distribution of goods are controlled by the state.Trustees: Board members of an institution or organization who are entrusted with the administering of funds and the directing of policy.Germany, EastFederal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.National Socialism: The doctrines and policies of the Nazis or the National Social German Workers party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933-1945. These doctrines and policies included racist nationalism, expansionism, and state control of the economy. (from Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. and American Heritage College Dictionary, 3d ed.)MichiganMedically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Vivisection: The cutting of or surgical operation on a living animal, usually for physiological or pathological investigation. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dict, 10th ed)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Vanilla: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that is the source of the familiar flavoring used in foods and medicines (FLAVORING AGENTS).Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Paeonia: A plant genus of the family Paeoniaceae, order Dilleniales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. These perennial herbs are up to 2 m (6') tall. Leaves are alternate and are divided into three lobes, each lobe being further divided into three smaller lobes. The large flowers are symmetrical, bisexual, have 5 sepals, 5 petals (sometimes 10), and many stamens.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Adosterol: A sterol usually substituted with radioactive iodine. It is an adrenal cortex scanning agent with demonstrated high adrenal concentration and superior adrenal imaging.

The cost of obesity in Canada. (1/684)

BACKGROUND: Almost one-third of adult Canadians are at increased risk of disability, disease and premature death because of being obese. In order to allocate limited health care resources rationally, it is necessary to elucidate the economic burden of obesity. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the direct costs related to the treatment of and research into obesity in Canada in 1997. METHODS: The prevalence of obesity (body mass index of 27 or greater) in Canada was determined using data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994-1995. Ten comorbidities of obesity were identified from the medical literature. A population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated for each comorbidity with data from large cohort studies to determine the extent to which each comorbidity and its management costs were attributable to obesity. The direct cost of each comorbidity was determined using data from the Canadian Institute of Health Information (for direct expenditure categories) and from Health Canada (for the proportion of expenditure category attributable to the comorbidity). This prevalence-based approach identified the direct costs of hospital care, physician services, services of other health professionals, drugs, other health care and health research. For each comorbidity, the cost attributable to obesity was determined by multiplying the PAF by the total direct cost of the comorbidity. The overall impact of obesity was estimated as the sum of the PAF-weighted costs of treating the comorbidities. A sensitivity analysis was completed on both the estimated costs and the PAFs. RESULTS: The total direct cost of obesity in Canada in 1997 was estimated to be over $1.8 billion. This corresponded to 2.4% of the total health care expenditures for all diseases in Canada in 1997. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the total cost could be as high as $3.5 billion or as low as $829.4 million; this corresponded to 4.6% and 1.1% respectively of the total health care expenditures in 1997. When the contributions of the comorbidities to the total cost were considered, the 3 largest contributors were hypertension ($656.6 million), type 2 diabetes mellitus ($423.2 million) and coronary artery disease ($346.0 million). INTERPRETATION: A considerable proportion of health care dollars is devoted to the treatment and management of obesity-related comorbidities in Canada. Further research into the therapeutic benefits and cost-effectiveness of management strategies for obesity is required. It is anticipated that the prevention and treatment of obesity will have major positive effects on the overall cost of health care.  (+info)

Selection for oesophagectomy and postoperative outcome in a defined population. (2/684)

OBJECTIVE: To measure the extent of use of, and perioperative mortality from, oesophagectomy for carcinoma of the oesophagus, and to examine the association between oesophagectomy and long term survival. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of cases of oesophageal carcinoma notified to the Thames Cancer Registry. SETTING: South East Thames and South West Thames health regions. PATIENTS: 3273 patients first registered with carcinoma of the oesophagus during 1985-9, 789 of whom were excluded because of incomplete data, leaving 2484 (75.9%) for further analysis. MAIN MEASURES: Treatment of oesophagectomy, mortality within 30 days of oesophagectomy, and duration of survival from date of diagnosis to death, according to patient and tumour characteristics. RESULTS: Oesophagectomy was performed in 571(23.0%) patients. Its use decreased with increasing age (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.935(0.925 to 0.944) per year) and was less common for tumours of the middle or upper third of the oesophagus than the lower third (0.56(0.42 to 0.75)). The proportion of patients undergoing oesophagectomy varied threefold among the 28 districts of residence. The perioperative mortality rate was 15.1(86/571) (12% to 18%); it increased with age (odds ratio 1.05(1.02 to 1.08) per year) and for tumours of the middle or upper third of the oesophagus compared with the lower third (2.52(1.31 to 4.84)). Long term survival was slightly higher for patients undergoing oesophagectomy (0.5% v 0.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high perioperative mortality rate patients selected for oesophagectomy showed better long term survival than those who were not, suggesting that clinical judgements used in selection were independent markers of a better prognosis. The nature of this selection needs to be more completely characterised to permit a valid evaluation of outcome of oesophagectomy.  (+info)

Resource allocation for public hospitals in Andhra Pradesh, India. (3/684)

The composition of the hospital sector has important implications for cost effectiveness accessibility and coverage. The classification of acute general hospitals is reviewed here with particular reference to India and Andhra Pradesh. Approaches to arrive at a norm for allocation of hospital expenditure among secondary and tertiary hospitals are discussed. The actual allocation of public sector hospital expenditures is analyzed with data from Andhra Pradesh. The shift in allocative emphasis away from hospitals and in favour of primary health care during the 1980s was found to have been equally shared by secondary and tertiary hospitals. The shares of recurrent (non-plan) expenditure to secondary and tertiary hospitals were 51% and 49% respectively. This can be compared to a derived norm of 66% and 33%. The opportunity that new investment funds (plan schemes) could have provided to rectify the expenditure bias against secondary level hospitals was missed as two-thirds of plan expenditure were also spent on tertiary level hospitals. The share of secondary hospital bed capacity was 45.5% against India's Planning Commission norm of 70%. Public spending strategies should explicitly consider what mix of hospital services is being financed as well as the balance between hospital and primary health care expenditures.  (+info)

Ability to pay for health care: concepts and evidence. (4/684)

In many developing countries people are expected to contribute to the cost of health care from their own pockets. As a result, people's ability to pay (ATP) for health care, or the affordability of health care, has become a critical policy issue in developing countries, and a particularly urgent issue where households face combined user fee burdens from various essential service sectors such as health, education and water. Research and policy debates have focused on willingness to pay (WTP) for essential services, and have tended to assume that WTP is synonymous with ATP. This paper questions this assumption, and suggests that WTP may not reflect ATP. Households may persist in paying for care, but to mobilize resources they may sacrifice other basic needs such as food and education, with serious consequences for the household or individuals within it. The opportunity costs of payment make the payment 'unaffordable' because other basic needs are sacrificed. An approach to ATP founded on basic needs and the opportunity costs of payment strategies (including non-utilization) is therefore proposed. From the few studies available, common household responses to payment difficulties are identified, ranging from borrowing to more serious 'distress sales' of productive assets (e.g. land), delays to treatment and, ultimately, abandonment of treatment. Although these strategies may have a devastating impact on livelihoods and health, few studies have investigated them in any detail. In-depth longitudinal household studies are proposed to develop understanding of ATP and to inform policy initiative which might contribute to more affordable health care.  (+info)

Choice and accountability in health promotion: the role of health economics. (5/684)

Choices need to be made between competing uses of health care resources. There is debate about how these choices should be made, who should make them and the criteria upon which they should be made. Evaluation of health care is an important part of this debate. It has been suggested that the contribution of health economics to the evaluation of health promotion is limited, both because the methods and principles underlying economic evaluation are unsuited to health promotion, and because the political and cultural processes governing the health care system are more appropriate mechanisms for allocating health care resources than systematic economic analysis of the costs and benefits of different health care choices. This view misrepresents and misunderstands the contribution of health economics to the evaluation of health promotion. It overstates the undoubted methodological difficulties of evaluating health promotion. It also argues, mistakenly, that economists see economic evaluation as a substitute for the political and cultural processes governing health care, rather than an input to them. This paper argues for an economics input on grounds of efficiency, accountability and ethics, and challenges the critics of the economic approach to judge alternative mechanisms for allocating resources by the same criteria.  (+info)

Audit in the therapy professions: some constraints on progress. (6/684)

AIMS: To ascertain views about constraints on the progress of audit experienced by members of four of the therapy professions: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, and clinical psychology. METHODS: Interviews in six health service sites with a history of audit in these professions. 62 interviews were held with members of the four professions and 60 with other personnel with relevant involvement. Five main themes emerged as the constraints on progress: resources; expertise; relations between groups; organisational structures; and overall planning of audit activities. RESULTS: Concerns about resources focused on lack of time, insufficient finance, and lack of access to appropriate systems of information technology. Insufficient expertise was identified as a major constraint on progress. Guidance on designing instruments for collection of data was the main concern, but help with writing proposals, specifying and keeping to objectives, analysing data, and writing reports was also required. Although sources of guidance were sometimes available, more commonly this was not the case. Several aspects of relations between groups were reported as constraining the progress of audit. These included support and commitment, choice of audit topics, conflicts between staff, willingness to participate and change practice, and concerns about confidentiality. Organisational structures which constrained audit included weak links between heads of professional services and managers of provider units, the inhibiting effect of change, the weakening of professional coherence when therapists were split across directorates, and the ethos of regarding audit findings as business secrets. Lack of an overall plan for audit meant that while some resources were available, others equally necessary for successful completion of projects were not. CONCLUSION: Members of four of the therapy professions identified a wide range of constraints on the progress of audit. If their commitment to audit is to be maintained these constraints require resolution. It is suggested that such expert advice, but also that these are directed towards the particular needs of the four professions. Moreover, a forum is required within which all those with a stake in therapy audit can acknowledge and resolve the different agendas which they may have in the enterprise.  (+info)

Aid instruments and health systems development: an analysis of current practice. (7/684)

There has been a clear shift in the policy of many donors in the health sector-away from discrete project assistance towards more broad-based sectoral support. This paper, based on interviews with officials in a number of bilateral and multilateral agencies, explores whether this shift in policy has been matched by similar changes in the form or range of aid instruments. The paper develops a framework for examining current practice in relation to the different objectives that donors seek to promote through technical and financial assistance. In particular, it looks in some detail at the advantages and disadvantages of budgetary support compared to more traditional forms of project assistance. It concludes that the debate should not be about whether one form of aid is better than another. Ideally, they should be complementary and the forms, channels and systems used for managing aid need to be assessed in relation to how they help to achieve the mix of development objectives that are most appropriate to the country concerned. The review demonstrates that this is a complex task and that to achieve an effective balance is not easy. The final section summarizes the main themes emerging from the discussion and suggests some preliminary conclusions and proposals for future action.  (+info)

Costs and financing of improvements in the quality of maternal health services through the Bamako Initiative in Nigeria. (8/684)

This paper reports on a study to assess the quality of maternal health care in public health facilities in Nigeria and to identify the resource implications of making the necessary quality improvements. Drawing upon unifying themes from quality assurance, basic microeconomics and the Bamako Initiative, locally defined norms were used to estimate resource requirements for improving the quality of maternal health care. Wide gaps existed between what is required (the norm) and what was available in terms of fixed and variable resources required for the delivery of maternal health services in public facilities implementing the Bamako Initiative in the Local Government Areas studied. Given such constraints, it was highly unlikely that technically acceptable standards of care could be met without additional resource inputs to meet the norm. This is part of the cost of doing business and merits serious policy dialogue. Revenue generation from health services was poor and appeared to be more related to inadequate supply of essential drugs and consumables than to the use of uneconomic fee scales. It is likely that user fees will be necessary to supplement scarce government budgets, especially to fund the most critical variable inputs associated with quality improvements. However, any user fee system, especially one that raises fees to patients, will have to be accompanied by immediate and visible quality improvements. Without such quality improvements, cost recovery will result in even lower utilization and attempts to generate new revenues are unlikely to succeed.  (+info)

  • What the scaremongers don't like to talk about is how much our private insurers ration now -- mostly for the sake of their own profits. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Even with the ACA, insurers have many ways to limit choice and access to care, including high-deductible plans (annual deductibles of5,000 for an individual and10,000 for families are part of bronze policies), narrow networks without coverage of out-of-network costs, high co-insurance for specialty drugs, restrictive definitions of medical necessity, and denial of services. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • page needed] The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed in March 2010 will prohibit insurers from limiting coverage to people with preexisting conditions beginning in 2014, which will alleviate this type of rationing. (wikipedia.org)
  • We resist rationing because someone else (insurers, the government) usually pays for it, and we want everything to be available for ourselves and our families. (chron.com)
  • While billions are poured into the search for a magic pill, health insurers and local groups like the YMCA are looking for more pragmatic, low-tech solutions like the one recommended by USPSTF. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • The USPSTF gave the counseling approach to controlling obesity a 'B' rating, which means under the Affordable Care Act that insurers will have to cover its cost with no co-pays to the insured. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • In seeking the status quo, do these pols really imagine that health care isn't now rationed by private insurers? (motherjones.com)
  • Both insurers have since modified their coverage policies for direct-acting antiviral medications used to clear the hepatitis C virus with Regence essentially adopting the standard of care . (bna.com)
  • This is also the case under the federal health care overhaul legislation signed by the president, insurers say. (reason.com)
  • Among those who have argued in favor of health care rationing are moral philosopher Peter Singer and Oregon governor John Kitzhaber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Emanuel - an oncologist who studies end-of-life issues - told The Washington Times Thursday that he used to favor health care rationing, but no longer does. (cnn.com)
  • Lastly it will kill old people or those who some federal human bean counter says have been assessed to be somehow less deserving of the rationed resource in favor of some other more "important or deserving" group. (freerepublic.com)
  • In other words - the type of medical care rationing that many conservatives seem to favor, that allow rich people to bid medical care away from the poor by bidding the price above what the poor are capable of paying, would still exist. (blogspot.com)
  • The federal bureaucrats would, in effect, reduce the payment to providers, forcing them to reduce the care," Kyl warned. (juneauempire.com)
  • a semi-secret tax so the feds have cash to pay bureaucrats to examine everyone's health records and, in turn, the government can save money by cutting back on care. (judicialwatch.org)
  • This is especially true on the right, as illustrated by former vice president candidate Sarah Palin's warning during the 2009 debate that the ACA that would bring on rationing and "empower unelected bureaucrats to make decisions affecting life or death health care matters," referring to Medicare's funding of end-of-life counseling sessions as "death panels. (huffpost.com)
  • It takes the telltale fingerprints from the government: instead of bureaucrats directly specifying the treatment denials that will mean death and poorer health for older people, it compels individual doctors to do the dirty work. (blogspot.com)
  • On the basis of an innovative qualitative data analysis, which translates what people say into ethical principles identified in the theoretical literature, the public appear to support three main rationing principles: (1) a broad 'rule of rescue' that gives priority to those in immediate need, (2) health maximisation and (3) equalisation of lifetime health. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Many of the initial attempts are ultimately abandoned and may, in retrospect, seem pathetically simplistic, but terms such as rationing, efficiency, cost-benefit analysis, priority-setting, QUALYs (Quality Adjusted Life Years), DALYs (Disability Adjusted Life Years), and evidence-based medicine have become integral parts of the vocab- ulary of almost everyone involved in healthcare. (medethics.org.il)
  • For a variety of reasons, rationing and priority setting were not discussed very much when I was a medical student in the early 1950s. (medethics.org.il)
  • In 1984, Victor Fuchs, a leading health economist, described a statement that the United States will soon have to begin rationing as sheer nonsense because, he pointed out, rationing and priority-setting, both on micro and macro levels, have been with us since the dawn of time. (medethics.org.il)
  • The SOFA score is added to the mortality score-ranging from 1 to 8-after which a triage color grouping is assigned-Red for those expected to survive, while Yellow then Blue are afforded the lowest priority for critical care resources. (wsws.org)
  • Efficiency and priority setting : some problems in cost-effectiveness analysis of health care / Erik Nord. (who.int)
  • Managing scarcity : priority setting and rationing in the National Health Service / Rudolf Klein, Patricia Day, and Sharon Redmayne. (who.int)
  • Priority setting : the health care debate / edited by Joanna Coast, Jenny Donovan and Stephen Frankel. (who.int)
  • Resource scarcity and priority setting: from management to leadership in the rationing of health care? (edu.au)
  • Determining how health care resources should be allocated--often termed rationing or priority setting--has traditionally been carried out by health care personnel, usually doctors but increasingly managers. (bmj.com)
  • Because priority setting entails assigning value to different outcomes, however, the consumers of health care have a legitimate claim to be involved in the process of allocating resources. (bmj.com)
  • Dialysis machines for patients in kidney failure were rationed between 1962 and 1967. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in what I believe to be a first in the nation (for now) approach, they directed the state Health Care Authority to find $72 million in savings specifically from emergency department (ED) utilization, and more specifically from those patients who over-utilize the ED for non-emergent medical care. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The idea, should this go into effect as planned, was that patients would redirect their care back to clinics and primary care providers. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Simply put if you add 50 million more patients on the same number of doctors that we currently have it is NOT possible to avoid longer waits and some form of rationing. (cnn.com)
  • Early drafts of the legislation did include a section that paid physicians for providing voluntary counseling to Medicare patients about advance directives and end-of-life care options, but the language never made it into the final legislation. (chron.com)
  • In fact, studies show that patients want 40 percent less care than is sometimes recommended by a physician. (chron.com)
  • It is time to begin open discussions about how to deal with expensive, minimally effective, medical care with patients, families, professionals and ethicists and not the medical industrialists who gain from prolonging life at every expense. (chron.com)
  • These things aren't "rationing" in the old-fashioned sense, but as far as patients are concerned (to quote Kyl), "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • It's not exactly rationing - but as far as patients are concerned, "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • He found that uninsured patients stayed in hospitals for less time, received 20 percent less care and died at a rate 37 percent higher than the insured. (juneauempire.com)
  • A new quasi-governmental agency ( Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute or PCORI) created by Obamacare to provide information about the "best available evidence to help patients and their health care providers make more informed decisions. (judicialwatch.org)
  • PCORI claims its research is intended to give patients a better understanding of the prevention, treatment and care options available. (judicialwatch.org)
  • By changing that, we'll save billions of dollars while improving the quality of care for patients. (freerepublic.com)
  • In ten groups of about six people, members of the public are asked to discuss a hypothetical rationing choice, concerning four identified patients who are described in general terms but without detailed information. (lse.ac.uk)
  • When a hospital phy- sician-in-training goes home leaving more work behind from which patients might benefit, she is rationing her time. (medethics.org.il)
  • Last Friday, Arizona hospitals asked their state's health department to formally activate the "Crisis Standards of Care" guidelines that would provide hospitals the legal right to determine who and how patients should be treated for the coronavirus. (wsws.org)
  • Based on estimates provided by various health officials, concerns were raised that there would be insufficient capacity to ventilate patients. (wsws.org)
  • Infected patients who have arrived for life-saving treatments and critical care at the hospital will have to first undergo an assessment on "the best available relevant and objective medical evidence. (wsws.org)
  • When Globerman surveyed people at the forum--about 85 attended including hospital reps, health care professionals, elderly people, and family members of elderly patients--100 percent responded affirmatively to the question: "Do you believe that some health care providers would have treated you (or a senior you know) better if you or they had been younger? (blindcanadians.ca)
  • In intensive care, disputes sometimes arise when patients or surrogates strongly desire treatment, yet health professionals regard it as potentially inappropriate. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • He knew that failing to take the medication could cause graft rejection, so he made an appointment with Dr. Roberts, a nephrologist at a local academic center who specialized in care of renal transplant patients. (uw.edu)
  • Further, Dr. Roberts was wary because purchasing organs was illegal in the U.S. Having worked in the transplant field for several decades and witnessed numerous changes in the regulations about and care of transplant patients, Dr. Roberts understood how difficult it was to secure an organ, but didn't want to be perceived as condoning Mr. Lawrence's actions. (uw.edu)
  • Rationing healthcare is a difficult task, which includes preventing patients from accessing potentially beneficial treatments. (georgetown.edu)
  • As the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak begins to crest over the nation during April and early May, it will send patients in respiratory distress to hospitals en masse, where many of them may die for lack of treatment. (newsweek.com)
  • As intensive care wards fill up with patients needing ventilators, hospitals expect to see a shortfall. (newsweek.com)
  • 23 Only certain refugees, including young or malnourished children, pregnant and lactating women, and infectious tuberculosis patients, receive additional rations and multivitamin supplements. (cdc.gov)
  • WMUK, a member of the Specialised Healthcare Alliance, has signed a letter to Theresa May calling for fair treatment for patients with rare and complex conditions. (wmuk.org.uk)
  • We urge you to ensure that this year's budget provides the NHS with the funding it needs to deliver the standards of care patients expect. (wmuk.org.uk)
  • NHS England is now choosing to restrict and ration treatments that patients with rare and complex conditions need - often without proper consultation with patients. (wmuk.org.uk)
  • Although their goal is to '…lead to the best clinical outcome for the treatment or prevention of infection while producing the fewest possible side effects and the lowest risk for subsequent resistance', 5 clinicians often have concerns that ASPs ration care, putting their patients at risk of worsening infection due to hasty discontinuation or narrowing of antibiotics. (bmj.com)
  • National Right to Life Executive Director, David N. O'Steen, Ph.D, says, "This is the cruelest and most effective way to ensure that doctors are forced to ration care for their senior citizen patients. (blogspot.com)
  • Police are considering whether to launch a criminal investigation after regulators the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found evidence that staff were put under pressure to falsify data, leaving some patients waiting up to four months for urgent treatment. (freerepublic.com)
  • What makes it worse in the case of ICU, is that it directly impacts upon serious elective surgery, such as cancer, and also hinders Doctors from escalating a really medically sick patients care, for example a patient with pneumonia. (keithswanick.com)
  • A sample of 20 patients were invited to take part in a semistructured interview about their views on how health services should be determined. (bmj.com)
  • Doctors and patients make health care decisions, says Dr. Bruce Silva of the Sierra Vista Regional Health Center, "but then it has to be okay'd by someone else who puts their belief systems and their ethics on me and on my patients. (pbs.org)
  • It is ethically controversial whether medical doctors are morally permitted to ration the care of their patients at the bedside. (beds.ac.uk)
  • A form of rationing as the NHS has not the resources to deal with all patients and all illnesses seems to be the only logical answer. (carersuk.org)
  • At two of its Valley hospitals, Chandler Regional Center and Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, doctors are changing the way they take care of patients in order to save protective equipment, according to Dignity Health. (phoenixnewtimes.com)
  • They are now potentially limiting contact with patients suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19 to hospital intensivists - physicians who generally treat only patients in intensive care. (phoenixnewtimes.com)
  • Non-ICU doctors are having "pre-discussions" with the unit's intensivist to decide whether non-ICU doctors should see patients in the ICU who have or might have COVID-19, a spokesperson for Dignity Health told New Times via email. (phoenixnewtimes.com)
  • Containing the most important and classic articles surrounding the theoretical and practical issues related to rationing and how to allocate scare medical resources, this collection aims to assist and inform those who wish to be a part of bioethics' 21st century shift including practitioners and policy-makers, and students and scholars in the health sciences, philosophy, law, and medical ethics. (oup.com)
  • Justice in healthcare is a substantial part of ethics in medicine, here we will cover some of the distinctive aspects of justice-based concerns and some basic ethics language to help wade through these interesting ethical issues. (uw.edu)
  • Arthur L. Caplan is Director of the Division of Medical Ethics in the Department of Population Health at New York University's Langone Medical Center. (mit.edu)
  • This is, Emanuel noted, a form of de facto rationing that stems from legislated attempts to constrain market forces that might otherwise have worked to make generic drugs more profitable. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • CHICAGO - Having practiced medicine at a large, inner-city public hospital for the past 20 years, I can readily attest to the long-term existence of de facto rationing of health care in this country. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Individuals who are able to do so may also pay for private treatments beyond what the NHS offers, but low-income people largely have equal access to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless, a paucity of effective interventions and universal pressure on health-care budgets means that access to obesity treatments is often limited. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • WASHINGTON - The health care bill proposed by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus on September 16 contains a dangerous provision that creates a financial incentive for Medicare doctors to deny treatments to seniors. (blogspot.com)
  • If people are going to be denied medical tests or treatments that might preserve their life or maintain their health, we ought to ensure that all members of society have a voice in the decision making process. (ssrn.com)
  • This genome-based care focuses on genetic markers to target diseases and care methods, such as susceptibility to certain drug treatments. (normanmakous.com)
  • The World Bank, long regarded by many as a bastion of incorrigible conservatism and lacking adequate social conscious- ness, broke precedent by devoting its entire 1993 World Develop- ment Report to health. (medethics.org.il)
  • Even the occasional drama has featured key bioethical dilemmas such as euthanasia ( Million Dollar Baby ) and just access to healthcare services ( John Q ) to the recent film depiction of savior siblings ( My Sister's Keeper ). (cbhd.org)
  • Proponents argue that because all plans are required to provide access to the same basic comprehensive services, these plans will provide more amenities, not more services, i.e., better carpet on the floor, quicker service (206) However, proponents fail to realize that these 'amenities' can make a difference in quality of care. (udayton.edu)
  • People make different choices about how to live their life and these choices have a significant effect on their health, the risks they face and their need for treatment in the future. (nih.gov)
  • With drugs, when people stop, they gain the weight back," said David Grossman, a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute in Seattle and chairman of the 16-member panel that issued the updated guidelines on obesity prevention on Tuesday. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • This use of the term 'ration' allows Feldstein to effectively mislead people by use of the fallacy of equivocation. (blogspot.com)
  • In some, if not many cases, the care and treatment of elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes "is not meeting acceptable standards," he says. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • If it were a child receiving the same care, there's no way that people would accept it. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • Globerman's goal for Running To Daylight is not only to continue questioning standards for the care and treatment of elderly people, but also to provide independent patient advocates for them. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • Oftentimes health bloggers rage about the 'fruitless end-of-life' attempts where people in terminal disease or the extreme elderly have full code status. (blogspot.com)
  • Some people like to think of health care and education of basic human rights. (blogspot.com)
  • The result: more than 8,300 people - a record number - are on waiting lists in 13 states to get antiretrovirals and other drugs used to treat HIV and AIDS or the side effects, mental health conditions or opportunistic infections. (medicynic.com)
  • When healthcare costs are rising exponentially, one tool that people are tempted to use is price controls, and Medicare is certainly an instrument of cost containment policy. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • As a result, old people are being asked if we would be willing to give up some expensive, life-sustaining treatment so that our grandchildren can have health care. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • In a country that already spends more than 16 percent of each GDP dollar on health care ( PDF ), it's easy to see why so many people believe there's simply not enough of it to go around. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • At the end of the day, there is a growing recognition that we need people to take better care of themselves. (cfah.org)
  • This country does need health care and I am sure the people who hate change will find out what a good thing they opposed. (cnn.com)
  • Depriving people of healthcare when most needed is a crime against humanity. (globalresearch.ca)
  • Mental health law, at its heart, involves the forcible confinement and medication of some of society's most vulnerable people, and the authors look closely at the legal and social issues raised by this, and the human rights of those who suffer from mental illness. (oup.com)
  • Amazingly enough, there are actually many Christians who have ignorantly chosen to side with left-wing ideology, believing that somehow it's the government's job to take care of people, run entitlement programs and fix every problem in society. (conservativetruth.org)
  • If it is a requirement of social justice, we should be clear about what kinds of care we owe people and how we determine what care is owed if we cannot possibly meet every health need, as arguably no society can. (stanford.edu)
  • If, however, there is widespread belief that people owe each other access to certain kinds of care, and this belief is embodied in institutions that attempt to do that, it may give us some evidence about what people think they owe each other. (stanford.edu)
  • Should We Ration Health Care for Older People? (sagepub.com)
  • Savings have resulted mainly from reducing the number of inappropriate or harmful interventions, managing care of people with chronic disease more effectively, and implementing health information technology. (cdc.gov)
  • Its messaging underscores the severity of shortages of gear that is critical to protecting people who take care of the community's sickest, even at some of the nation's largest hospital chains. (phoenixnewtimes.com)
  • It is useful and necessary to "ration" services that are not efficacious or cost effective based on scientific evidence, as is done successfully by such countries as the United Kingdom, with their National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Economically defined, healthcare rationing is simply limiting health care goods and services to only those who can afford to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Defined by regulatory means, healthcare rationing involves restricting health care goods and services from even those who can afford to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some fear that this initiative will lead to rationing certain medical services. (chron.com)
  • The past decade has seen the virtual collapse of the Soviet-style socialist economies, with serious disruption of their poor but at least superficially relatively egalitarian health services. (medethics.org.il)
  • There is a common misconception that rationing of healthcare services is the result of the economic and societal changes that are sweeping many countries and that it is a uniquely modern phenom- enon. (medethics.org.il)
  • Social Policy and the Rationing of Medical Services. (annals.org)
  • Part B Medicare, on the other hand, provides standard medical care, including outpatient surgery, medical equipment and other primary care services. (cityprofile.com)
  • Services include pediatrics and integrated management of childhood illness, reproductive health, psychiatric consultation, emergency medical services and referrals, basic laboratory services, tuberculosis (TB) management (Directly Observed Therapy with first-line agents), voluntary testing and counseling for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) with referral services for antiretroviral treatment, and nutrition promotion. (cdc.gov)
  • His many awards have included the Association ofUniversity Programs in Health Administration'sJohn D. Thompson Prize in Health Services Research andnumerous "research article of the year" prizes. (ebooks.com)
  • Nearly half a million UNISON members work in health care in the NHS and for organisations providing NHS services in all four countries of the UK. (unison.org.uk)
  • AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 3 -- The Texas Democratic Party issued the following news release: According to data released by the Health and Human Services Department in October, retired teachers and retired state employees in Texas have been among the biggest beneficiaries of the early retirement provision of the health care law. (freerepublic.com)
  • This series publishes recent economic research and its applications to public policy problems of health and health services. (springer.com)
  • The interviews focused on the source and content of the information that helps shape the thoughts, beliefs and values that in their turn help to determine individuals' opinions about the priorities within health services. (bmj.com)
  • The prevention, treatment, and management of illness and the preservation of mental and physical well-being through the services offered by the medical and allied health professions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • CAPP CARE Managed Care Networks offer access to some of the highest quality, most cost-effective health care providers and facilities in the nation, and its synergistic combination of health care management services are designed to effectively coordinate medical services and benefits throughout the entire treatment process. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Many societies, and nearly all wealthy, developed countries, provide universal access to a broad range of public health and personal medical services. (stanford.edu)
  • International efforts to increase the quality and efficiency of health care services may be creating financial savings that can be used to improve population health. (cdc.gov)
  • The rapid growth of an international movement to improve the quality (including the safety) and efficiency of health care services has led to speculation about whether any resulting savings can be used to improve population health. (cdc.gov)
  • This article explores the limited evidence about whether improvements in the quality and efficiency of health care services yield net savings (ie, a quality/efficiency or value dividend) and scantier evidence about how savings to date have been allocated. (cdc.gov)
  • A select committee of the British Parliament recommended in 2007 that the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) offer more guidance about what health services to "disinvest" from and how to reinvest the savings in clinical and community health interventions. (cdc.gov)
  • The search for a dividend as a result of improving the quality (including safety) and efficiency of health care services in the United States began in the 1980s. (cdc.gov)
  • Business leaders applied these techniques to all aspects of their business, including spending for health services. (cdc.gov)
  • The chronic conditions associated with lifelong obesity - heart disease, diabetes, increased rates of cancer - are one of the major reasons why health care costs are rising as fast as they are. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • As health care costs exponentially rise - 5.2 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product was spent on health care in 1960, compared with 16.5 percent presently - Fleck adds this is an issue that needs immediate attention. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Following up on my last two blog posts, dealing with the greed of the pharmaceutical industry (2) and the soaring costs and prices of health care despite all efforts toward cost containment (3), we now need to consider where we stand on rationing itself. (huffpost.com)
  • The reaction so far in both the private and public sectors is to continue business as usual without recognizing trade-offs that would be necessary to avoid another huge escalation of health care costs. (huffpost.com)
  • indirect costs were estimated using an approach developed by the World Health Organization Commission on Macroeconomics and Health and factoring in 2015 values for gross domestic product and disability-adjusted life years from the Global Burden of Disease Study. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Using a case-based exercise, readers are asked to weigh the potential costs and benefits of six health and social programs. (georgetown.edu)
  • The rationing of health care is the only way to significantly reduce health-care costs in the United States. (csmonitor.com)
  • The best way to cause a dramatic reduction in costs through covert rationing is simply to put the health providers on lower salaries. (csmonitor.com)
  • At the same time, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with the development of antibiotic-resistant organisms (AROs), which due to their resistance properties are associated with higher healthcare costs as well as increased morbidity and mortality compared with non-AROs. (bmj.com)
  • The idea of rationing really strikes at the core of all that we are talking about with regard to health care - this idea of lowering costs, trying to increase access. (cnn.com)
  • Now the president says they'll add prevention programs and wellness programs, creating a healthier population and that will be a cheaper population with regard to health care costs. (cnn.com)
  • Here's what I mean: Nearly every other industrialized country recognizes health care as a human right, whose costs and benefits are shared among all citizens. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • One of the most serious effects of occupational stress is mental illness - a prominent health issue in terms of both financial and human costs. (msfhr.org)
  • Donald Berwick, an American who is an international leader in quality improvement, argues on the basis of international experience that it is feasible to achieve the "triple aim" of "improving the experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing per capita costs of health care" (2). (cdc.gov)
  • During the 1940s, a limited supply of iron lungs for polio victims forced physicians to ration these machines. (wikipedia.org)
  • I'd quite like to see those folks re-routed to clinics or primary care physicians. (medpagetoday.com)
  • His physicians advise him that he could be on the list for up to 3 years and that his health during that time would not be jeopardized, aside from the risks and inconveniences associated with long-term dialysis. (uw.edu)
  • Individuals with significant health problems are likely both to want comprehensive benefits and to stay with their current physicians. (udayton.edu)
  • This award supports the creation of a team focused on working with practicing neuroscientists, physicians and clinical researchers, ethicists, and health policy-makers in BC to ensure that advances in neuroscience are aligned with societal and individual human values. (msfhr.org)
  • Primary care physicians are the ones who traditionally focus on personal care. (normanmakous.com)
  • Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. (acpinternist.org)
  • Shortages of donated organs for transplantation has resulted in the rationing of hearts, livers, lungs and kidneys in the United States, mediated by the United Network for Organ Sharing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health systems throughout the country were facing severe shortages of PPEs and testing capacity. (wsws.org)
  • Two of Arizona's largest hospital systems, Banner Health and Dignity Health, are rationing masks for doctors, nurses, and other health care workers as they face shortages of critical protective gear during an unprecedented pandemic of the new coronavirus. (phoenixnewtimes.com)
  • The Institute of Medicine has proposed that the amount of disease-specific research funding provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) be systematically and consistently compared with the burden of disease for society. (nih.gov)
  • Given that the United States devotes far more of its economy to health care than other rich countries, and gets worse results by many measures, it's hard to argue that we are now rationing very rationally. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the country's leading health care program, Medicare offers qualified residents an affordable solution for their medical needs. (cityprofile.com)
  • However, we also need to eliminate the egregious supply-side excess that has dominated this country's health care for the past three or more decades by imposing global budgets on hospitals and other health care providers and by constraining the never-ending expansion and diffusion of beds and technology. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Written by two of the country's leading specialists in mental health law, this book provides a detailed overview of the law and the socio-legal, historical, sociological, and cultural issues that surround it. (oup.com)
  • In the United States, most health care is privately financed, and so most rationing is by price: you get what you, or your employer, can afford to insure you for. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States this type of rationing affects about 15% of the population, who are either too poor to afford care or unwilling to buy care or simply uninsured. (wikipedia.org)
  • Otherwise, the gap between those who can and can't afford care will grow. (medicalxpress.com)
  • With our aversion to paying taxes to cover health care (also wars, roads, social security, etc) we're now to the point where those who cannot afford it, don't get it. (medicynic.com)
  • But in the United States, the leaders of both political parties along with most of the "experts" persist in treating health care as a commodity that is purchased, in one way or another, by those who can afford it. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • Expenditures for health care had been increasing for several decades at a rate higher than general inflation. (cdc.gov)
  • And, although Sarah's insurer may deny it, we also ration it to those who are lucky enough to have access to the big soapbox that she happens to have. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Their bills set up a council on "comparative effectiveness research" to study which forms of care are cost-effective and which are wasteful, but they insist the board won't have power to deny payment for inefficient practices - at least, not now. (juneauempire.com)
  • Instead of continuing to deny that we have had and still have rationing, and that it must continue, the necessity for rationing should be admitted. (normanmakous.com)
  • While politicians of all stripes shun the idea of health care rationing as the political third rail that it is, most of them accept a premise that leads, one way or another, to that end. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act of 1986 requires any properly equipped hospital receiving Medicare funds (nearly all private hospitals) to provide emergency healthcare regardless of citizenship, immigration status, or ability to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Savings to date have accrued to the revenues of public and private collective purchasers of care and large provider organizations, but none seem to have been reallocated to address other determinants of health. (cdc.gov)
  • Managers of hospitals and health systems had begun in the 1970s to identify with private sector executives rather than with their predecessors, for whom careers in health care were extensions of philanthropic service or public administration. (cdc.gov)
  • Databases searched included Medline, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PsycINFO. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • However, by the 1930s, the term socialized medicine was routinely used negatively by conservative opponents of publicly funded health care who wished to imply it represented socialism, and by extension, communism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Health Care Authority (HCA) had been set a hard target of cost savings -- $72 million -- that they were mandated to achieve. (medpagetoday.com)
  • She is saying that the cost of her children care and needs are supposed to be laid upon others. (cnn.com)
  • Shouldn't we foster the same kind of comparisons in health care as we do for a brand of shirt in order to know which is the best in terms of cost and quality? (chron.com)
  • Currently, the cost of health care is too high, leading to more uninsured, global noncompetitiveness and budget deficits. (chron.com)
  • In other words, there is nothing in the bill that outlaws price rationing, where those with an interest in these high-cost, low-benefit procedures can pay for them out of their own pocket, provided they have deep enough pockets. (blogspot.com)
  • This waste raises the cost of care for all of us. (udayton.edu)
  • If yearly pap smears diagnose cervical cancer earlier than the basic health care benefits, then women in the higher cost-sharing and combination plans (primarily upper middle- income and European American women) will have better health care than women in the lower cost-sharing plan (largely ethnic American and poor). (udayton.edu)
  • The option of kicking the cost problem down the road cannot continue indefinitely, and policy experts have given much thought to options for containing health care spending. (ssrn.com)
  • Health systems that incorporate the primary care physician as a central part of treatment have better outcomes at lower cost than those systems without them. (normanmakous.com)
  • Center for Medicine in the Public Interest is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization promoting innovative solutions that advance medical progress, reduce health disparities, extend life and make health care more affordable, preventive and patient-centered. (drugwonks.com)
  • So we continue on our merry way without dealing with the problem, without admitting that we ration care or looking at the trade-offs we need to make. (huffpost.com)
  • Quicker service can make a difference in health status, if quicker service means that a person can see the provider within a day or two and the alternative is a two-week wait for an appointment. (udayton.edu)
  • Quicker service can make a difference in health care seeking behavior if a person has to wait in a waiting room for 2-3 hours to obtain service rather than 15-20 minutes. (udayton.edu)
  • That gives the president an opportunity - and seven months - to make the affirmative case for the health care bill. (cnn.com)
  • Engelhard is director of the Health Policy Program, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia. (chron.com)
  • The public, health professionals, and political leaders are united in the belief that a serious problem exists in providing comprehensive healthcare to the entire population at an affordable and politically acceptable price. (medethics.org.il)
  • Vaccination has long been a familiar, highly effective form of medicine and a triumph of public health. (mit.edu)
  • The CNN poll also suggests that public opposition to health care will not necessarily be a boon to Republicans in the 2010 midterm elections in Congress. (cnn.com)
  • An audio interview with Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding, the Director of the Department of Public Health for Los Angeles County. (pbs.org)
  • It was founded by a pioneering eye surgeon who was a disciple of the spiritual teacher Sri Aurobindo, and its business success and social mission have long made it a model in public health textbooks. (pbs.org)
  • The impact of this report on the public debate and on the allocation of healthcare remains to be seen. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Public values must control our methods of rationing. (normanmakous.com)
  • Nearly all developed countries provide all their residents with access to a broad set of public health and individual medical interventions. (stanford.edu)
  • Consider preventive care. (iwf.org)
  • But preventive care is not free, and will thus become a target for budget cutters. (iwf.org)
  • Men also are threatened by the attack on preventive care. (iwf.org)
  • This book discusses some of the most critical ethical issues in mental health care today, including the moral dimensions of addiction, patient autonomy and compulsory treatment, privacy and confidentiality, and the definition of mental illness itself. (mit.edu)