Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Rubella Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of duck embryo or human diploid cell tissue culture origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of nonpregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age who are unimmunized and do not have serum antibodies to rubella. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hepatitis B Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated hepatitis B or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent hepatitis B. Some vaccines may be recombinantly produced.Measles Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Diphtheria Toxoid: The formaldehyde-inactivated toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. It is generally used in mixtures with TETANUS TOXOID and PERTUSSIS VACCINE; (DTP); or with tetanus toxoid alone (DT for pediatric use and Td, which contains 5- to 10-fold less diphtheria toxoid, for other use). Diphtheria toxoid is used for the prevention of diphtheria; DIPHTHERIA ANTITOXIN is for treatment.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Mass Vaccination: Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.Rubella: An acute infectious disease caused by the RUBELLA VIRUS. The virus enters the respiratory tract via airborne droplet and spreads to the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Tetanus: A disease caused by tetanospasmin, a powerful protein toxin produced by CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI. Tetanus usually occurs after an acute injury, such as a puncture wound or laceration. Generalized tetanus, the most common form, is characterized by tetanic muscular contractions and hyperreflexia. Localized tetanus presents itself as a mild condition with manifestations restricted to muscles near the wound. It may progress to the generalized form.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Diphtheria: A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine: A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Immunization, Secondary: Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Tetanus ToxoidHealth Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Haemophilus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing antigenic polysaccharides from Haemophilus influenzae and designed to prevent infection. The vaccine can contain the polysaccharides alone or more frequently polysaccharides conjugated to carrier molecules. It is also seen as a combined vaccine with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Vaccines, Conjugate: Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.Mumps: An acute infectious disease caused by RUBULAVIRUS, spread by direct contact, airborne droplet nuclei, fomites contaminated by infectious saliva, and perhaps urine, and usually seen in children under the age of 15, although adults may also be affected. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Injections, Jet: The injection of solutions into the skin by compressed air devices so that only the solution pierces the skin.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Commonwealth of Independent StatesQuality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Haemophilus influenzae type b: A type of H. influenzae isolated most frequently from biotype I. Prior to vaccine availability, it was a leading cause of childhood meningitis.Poliovirus Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS. They include inactivated (POLIOVIRUS VACCINE, INACTIVATED) and oral vaccines (POLIOVIRUS VACCINE, ORAL).United StatesPoliovirus Vaccine, Oral: A live vaccine containing attenuated poliovirus, types I, II, and III, grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture, used for routine immunization of children against polio. This vaccine induces long-lasting intestinal and humoral immunity. Killed vaccine induces only humoral immunity. Oral poliovirus vaccine should not be administered to immunocompromised individuals or their household contacts. (Dorland, 28th ed)IndiaDrug Storage: The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Hepatitis B: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS genus, HEPATITIS B VIRUS. It is primarily transmitted by parenteral exposure, such as transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products, but can also be transmitted via sexual or intimate personal contact.Pertussis Vaccine: A suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis organisms, used for immunization against pertussis (WHOOPING COUGH). It is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP). There is an acellular pertussis vaccine prepared from the purified antigenic components of Bordetella pertussis, which causes fewer adverse reactions than whole-cell vaccine and, like the whole-cell vaccine, is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Viral Hepatitis Vaccines: Any vaccine raised against any virus or viral derivative that causes hepatitis.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Whooping Cough: A respiratory infection caused by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS and characterized by paroxysmal coughing ending in a prolonged crowing intake of breath.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE).Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Syringes: Instruments used for injecting or withdrawing fluids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Diphtheria-Tetanus Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent infection with diphtheria and tetanus toxoid. This is used in place of DTP vaccine (DIPHTHERIA-TETANUS-PERTUSSIS VACCINE) when PERTUSSIS VACCINE is contraindicated.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.Mongolia: The country is bordered by RUSSIA on the north and CHINA on the west, south, and east. The capita is Ulaanbaatar.Haemophilus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Encephalitis, Japanese: A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated: A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Government Programs: Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.BrazilRural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Hepatitis B Surface Antigens: Those hepatitis B antigens found on the surface of the Dane particle and on the 20 nm spherical and tubular particles. Several subspecificities of the surface antigen are known. These were formerly called the Australia antigen.Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Mice, Inbred BALB CRotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Meningococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.EnglandAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Rubella Syndrome, Congenital: Transplacental infection of the fetus with rubella usually in the first trimester of pregnancy, as a consequence of maternal infection, resulting in various developmental abnormalities in the newborn infant. They include cardiac and ocular lesions, deafness, microcephaly, mental retardation, and generalized growth retardation. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Great BritainCommunity Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Vaccines, DNA: Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Administration, Intranasal: Delivery of medications through the nasal mucosa.Papillomavirus Infections: Neoplasms of the skin and mucous membranes caused by papillomaviruses. They are usually benign but some have a high risk for malignant progression.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.SingaporeAdjuvants, Immunologic: Substances that augment, stimulate, activate, potentiate, or modulate the immune response at either the cellular or humoral level. The classical agents (Freund's adjuvant, BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, et al.) contain bacterial antigens. Some are endogenous (e.g., histamine, interferon, transfer factor, tuftsin, interleukin-1). Their mode of action is either non-specific, resulting in increased immune responsiveness to a wide variety of antigens, or antigen-specific, i.e., affecting a restricted type of immune response to a narrow group of antigens. The therapeutic efficacy of many biological response modifiers is related to their antigen-specific immunoadjuvanticity.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Hepatitis B Antibodies: Antibodies to the HEPATITIS B ANTIGENS, including antibodies to the surface (Australia) and core of the Dane particle and those to the "e" antigens.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.EuropeRegional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Meningitis, Meningococcal: A fulminant infection of the meninges and subarachnoid fluid by the bacterium NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS, producing diffuse inflammation and peri-meningeal venous thromboses. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, nuchal rigidity, SEIZURES, severe HEADACHE, petechial rash, stupor, focal neurologic deficits, HYDROCEPHALUS, and COMA. The organism is usually transmitted via nasopharyngeal secretions and is a leading cause of meningitis in children and young adults. Organisms from Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W-135 have been reported to cause meningitis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp689-701; Curr Opin Pediatr 1998 Feb;10(1):13-8)Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.BCG Vaccine: An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.Schools: Educational institutions.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Bacterial Capsules: An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Carrier State: The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.Immunity, Mucosal: Nonsusceptibility to the pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or antigenic substances as a result of antibody secretions of the mucous membranes. Mucosal epithelia in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts produce a form of IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) that serves to protect these ports of entry into the body.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
  • St. Elizabeth Business Health offers complete business or leisure travel immunization consultations with a licensed physician utilizing the current information available on diseases and illnesses affecting travelers. (stelizabeth.com)
  • epidemiology, prevention, and health care issues for chronic infectious diseases. (albany.edu)
  • Immunizations protect children from many serious childhood diseases. (nj.us)
  • 1 Health departments are still dependent on archaic methods of tracking diseases, including phone,fax and paper. (aacc.org)
  • AHPPC is also tasked with the role of mitigating emerging health threats related to infectious diseases, the environment as well as natural and human made disasters. (health.gov.au)
  • However, without active monitoring and established protocols, immunization rates can fall, leaving children at risk for serious infectious diseases. (aafp.org)
  • The AAFP Foundation applauds this year's program winners for their dedication to protecting children from infectious diseases and to raising awareness of the importance of immunizations to a community's health and well-being," said Craig M. Doane, executive director of the AAFP Foundation. (aafp.org)
  • Infectious diseases: when can my child go back to school or child care? (mydr.com.au)
  • Children who have caught certain infectious diseases need to stay away from school or child care until they have completely recovered. (mydr.com.au)
  • Because infectious diseases are spread by contact with others, there are regulations about when children can go back to school or child care after contracting these diseases. (mydr.com.au)
  • It protects people from a range of diseases that they may not see, but that remain a risk to public health," said Nina Arron, Director of the Public Health Policy and Programs Branch, Public Health Division, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. (gov.on.ca)
  • HFM Work Health Options offers advanced coaching by a nurse practitioner or physician assistant for employees with chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, metabolic syndrome and obesity. (hfmhealth.org)
  • In the latter decades of the twentieth century, health economists calculated the economic impact of many common diseases. (acoem.org)
  • Special attention is also given to, communicable diseases, and the health needs of special needs students are monitored. (psdschools.org)
  • A report in Managed Healthcare Executive said, "High drug prices will continue to be the biggest pharmacy challenge for payers in 2017, sparked by the entry of many new specialty drugs on the market for some common chronic diseases. (mckesson.com)
  • The monograph, with funding from sanofi pasteur, will be produced in partnership with leaders in the fields of infection prevention and infectious disease from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID). (emaxhealth.com)
  • The Ministry of Health sponsors regular vaccination campaigns against TB and other diseases such as hepatitis B. Bahrain is currently suffering from an obesity epidemic as 28.9% of all males and 38.2% of all females are classified as obese. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 , 2 HPV is a sexually acquired virus, and mathematical modelling and economic analyses have demonstrated that the vaccine's maximum benefit in terms of preventing cervical cancer is achieved when vaccination programs target female and possibly male adolescents before their sexual debut, likely before the age of 12 years. (cmaj.ca)
  • Within the Division of General Pediatrics our experienced and knowledgeable specialists provide a variety of services for infants, children, and adolescents to care for your child's general pediatric needs. (utah.edu)
  • Infected adults and adolescents can pass on the disease to infants who have not yet completed their immunization series against pertussis. (gov.on.ca)
  • The mission of today's Harriet Lane Clinic is to improve the health and quality of life of children and adolescents within their families and communities and to educate trainees in this model of care. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The Defense Health Agency Immunization Healthcare Division (DHA-IHD) supports Department of Defense (DoD) immunization programs and provides clinical consultative services, educational support, and training resources for the entire DoD family. (health.mil)
  • Support Force Health Protection and Readiness, and the Military Health System (MHS) by developing and promoting programs and services that enhance immunization effectiveness, safety, and acceptability. (health.mil)
  • Provide evidence based solutions that improve immunization health care through policy implementation guidance, strategic communication, education, training, and clinical services worldwide. (health.mil)
  • Through trained healthcare professionals, Interim HealthCare of Delaware provides a broad array of home care services to meet the needs of each person who wants to remain in the comfort of his or her home. (interimhealthcare.com)
  • Public Health services are provided at Public Health Centers located in Seattle and King County. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Not all services are offered at every Public Health Center. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Special Interests: Local public health services. (albany.edu)
  • Report on protections against health care providers seeking direct reimbursement from members of the uniformed services. (wikisource.org)
  • VA-DOD sharing agreements for health services. (wikisource.org)
  • Receive health services such as Hepatitis C testing, immunizations, information, and referrals to other community agencies, including drug treatment. (wa.gov)
  • VBID provisions are a potential tool to use in offsetting financial barriers from deductibles and can help maintain low-cost access to high-value health care services and treatments," the researchers said. (mckesson.com)
  • The U.S. has followed a pattern of underfunding of vital public health services, followed by a crisis, a quick infusion of cash, and then dwindling investments over time. (aacc.org)
  • De som k pt den h r boken har ofta ocks k pt Priority Areas for National Action av Committee On Identifying Priority Areas For Quality Improvement, Board On Health Care Services, Institute Of Medicine, National Academy Of Sciences, Karen Adams (h ftad). (bokus.com)
  • Greenwood Urgent Care has on-site lab and X-ray services to help diagnose your condition quickly and accurately. (iuhealth.org)
  • Disasters put special strains on the provision of health services as demands increase and resources to meet these needs diminish. (coursera.org)
  • The six major components of health services may be each damaged in different ways, and all can require urgent attention. (coursera.org)
  • Welcome everyone, to this discussion of providing health services in disasters. (coursera.org)
  • services and the need for health services which a population has. (coursera.org)
  • also the capacity of health services to respond to the disaster or emergency. (coursera.org)
  • We'd want to know something about the health facilities and services. (coursera.org)
  • Healthy people require less health care services. (gov.on.ca)
  • For more information about coronavirus, go to our coronavirus page , the CDC site , or the WI Dept. of Health Services site . (hfmhealth.org)
  • As unemployment rates soar, unemployed workers and their families turn to state and local health departments and community-based organizations for basic health services, like immunizations and preventive services that are provided free of charge to those who cannot afford them. (healthyamericans.org)
  • PSD health services are provided according to Colorado Department of Education guidelines and as directed by the PSD Board of Education. (psdschools.org)
  • Gaps in insurance also can have negative effects on individuals' health, including increased use of expensive hospital services . (nashp.org)
  • Offers counselling and immunization services for people planning on travelling outside of Canada. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • During the course of this pandemic, we're talking to Californians about access to health care services, and to physicians and nurses about their experiences. (californiahealthline.org)
  • CARROLLTON, Ga.--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Greenway Medical Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: GWAY) today announced that Walgreens (NYSE: WAG) (NASDAQ: WAG) is deploying its electronic health record (EHR) solution to more closely integrate the healthcare services Walgreens offers in its stores. (businesswire.com)
  • Providing valuable and far-reaching healthcare services emphasizing preventive medicine is paramount as patients increasingly become consumers of accessible and affordable care. (businesswire.com)
  • The WellHealth EHR scalable functionality supports additional pharmacy, health and wellness services in the future, including integration with electronic prescribing and data exchange that tracks patients throughout the care continuum. (businesswire.com)
  • The deployment of EHR technology advances our pharmacy staff's ability to provide integrated and comprehensive healthcare services in the communities where people live and work. (businesswire.com)
  • Each day, Walgreens provides nearly 6 million customers the most convenient, multichannel access to consumer goods and services and trusted, cost-effective pharmacy, health and wellness services and advice in communities across America. (businesswire.com)
  • These services improve health outcomes and lower costs for payers including employers, managed care organizations, health systems, pharmacy benefit managers and the public sector. (businesswire.com)
  • 1) the economic characteristics of health insurance, (2) the benefits that are or are not covered, and (3) actual access to health services and resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • The economic definition of underinsurance is a person's actual ability to pay for their recommended health care and services. (wikipedia.org)
  • This definition is also used when a person chooses to delay, or not receive necessary health care services solely because of the out-of-pocket costs associated with the services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structural definitions of insurance, generally consider both the type of benefits that are offered by the healthcare insurance program, as well as the number and range of providers whose services are covered under the identified plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • CSHCN have been routinely been defined as those who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hopkins Children's Center has provided primary health care services to the community in East Baltimore for almost a century, first as the Harriet Lane Home and currently as the Harriet Lane Clinic located within the David M. Rubenstein Child Health Building . (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • With about 18,000 visits each year, the clinic serves as a training site for medical students, pediatric residents and fellows, who provide comprehensive health care services for approximately 8,500 children and youth up to 21 years of age. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Project HEAL (health, education, advocacy and law) provides the legal advocacy education and services of a full-time lawyer to help families with legal needs. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • On her list were the expansion and diversification of clinical services and programs offered to patients. (mckesson.com)
  • Those services and programs may include medication synchronization, immunization programs and medication therapy management. (mckesson.com)
  • The forum brought together established and emerging leaders in the field of quality improvement (QI) for inspiring keynotes, engaging workshops, lively discussions, and exchange of innovative ideas on improving the quality of health services across Africa. (jsi.com)
  • The technical aspects of QI focus on the theory and tools used to systematically and measurably improve the quality of health services and patient outcomes. (jsi.com)
  • This is the only way change can happen-testing, learning, and adapting to improve the way we plan, manage, and deliver health services within a complex system. (jsi.com)
  • For the second consecutive year, Head Start children will be provided preventative healthcare services at the Head Start Children's Health Day Tuesday, August 31st from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm at the Mohawk Valley Community Action Head Start at 9882 River Road in Marcy, Oneida County Executive Anthony Picente, Jr. announced today. (ocgov.net)
  • and while this program provides direct healthcare and lead poisoning prevention services to Head Start children and their families so that they may enroll in Head Start this year, it also assists them to obtain health insurance and a primary care provider so that they will have adequate care in the future," Picente said. (ocgov.net)
  • Picente added, "This partnership between the Oneida County Health Department through its Lead Primary Prevention Program, fulfills our mission of insuring that children in all cities, townships and municipalities have access to quality health care services. (ocgov.net)
  • Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP), implemented during the onset of crisis to prevent and manage the consequences of sexual violence, prevent excess maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality, reduce HIV transmission, and plan for comprehensive Reproductive Health services beginning in the early days and weeks of an emergency. (internationalmedicalcorps.org)
  • Integrating immunization-related capabilities within EHRs and other clinical software is expected to improve clinical and patient decision-making by providing more timely access to immunization histories and forecasts and supporting information sharing between EHRs and immunization registries, according to HIMSS officials. (healthcare-informatics.com)
  • Sign up for Insight Alerts highlighting editor-chosen studies with the greatest impact on clinical care. (aappublications.org)
  • Better pharmacy clinical performance manifests itself as better pharmacy financial performance, creating more value for the entire health care system. (mckesson.com)
  • The purpose of this Rapid Response is to identify the clinical effectiveness of seasonal influenza immunization in health care workers to prevent the spread of influenza to patients. (worldcat.org)
  • 1 Discipline of Public Health, School of Population Health and Clinical Practice, Mail Drop 207, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005, Australia. (nih.gov)
  • These celebrated family medicine residency programs have achieved excellence in clinical practice by developing creative solutions that result in increased immunization rates in their communities. (aafp.org)
  • 1-3 Multiple clinical guidelines and health-related organizations recommend exclusive breastfeeding up to (or around) 6 months, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 5 the World Health Organization, 6,7 and others. (ahrq.gov)
  • the highest participation rates were found in non-clinical and non-general practice health care settings. (thebody.com)
  • The program runs during the fall semester of each year for 16 weeks beginning in August and ending in December and prepares students with didactic courses and hospital-based clinical experiences. (etsu.edu)
  • The program runs during the spring and summer semesters of each year for 26 weeks beginning in January and ending in July and prepares students with didactic courses and hospital-based clinical experiences. (etsu.edu)
  • Opportunities still exist for health system pharmacy leaders who understand and can demonstrate the unique clinical and operational competencies and expertise required to build, buy or partner with specialty pharmacies," the team said. (mckesson.com)
  • Medical Assistants perform administrative and clinical tasks to keep the offices of physicians, chiropractors and other health professionals running smoothly. (coloradomtn.edu)
  • Any medical facility or health department that provides direct patient care is encouraged to formulate a comprehensive immunization policy for all HCWs. (cdc.gov)
  • WIC is a supplemental food program for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, infants and children. (kingcounty.gov)
  • The intervention improved immunization rates, the percentage of parents intending to vaccinate their infants and knowledge scores. (biomedcentral.com)
  • evidence supports the association between breastfeeding and better health outcomes for both infants and mothers. (ahrq.gov)
  • Despite evidence supporting the association between breastfeeding and better health outcomes (for infants and mothers), 45 percent of U.S. women who initiate breastfeeding report early, undesired weaning. (ahrq.gov)
  • Al Jalila Children's Specialty Hospital, the only pediatric hospital in the United Arab Emirates, has entered into an agreement with Washington, D.C.-based Children's National Health System to form a health IT strategic partnership. (healthcare-informatics.com)
  • Some public health units (PHUs) vaccinate children in schools. (ices.on.ca)
  • The Immunization Unit is committed to providing resources, information, and tools needed to ensure children are immunized appropriately. (wyo.gov)
  • It can relieve stress, restore energy, and promote the necessary balance in life for those caring for their elderly loved ones, children, or anyone in need of support and supervision. (interimhealthcare.com)
  • By simply tracking children's immunizations and calling on those families whose children fall behind on their shots, doctors can dramatically increase the number of children who are vaccinated as well as increase the likelihood of those children returning for regular, preventative checkups, according to a University of Rochester study being published today in the January issue of Pediatrics . (rochester.edu)
  • It was so successful that the county of Monroe, New York, where the study originated, adopted and expanded the program in an effort to fully immunize 90 percent of its community's children by 2000. (rochester.edu)
  • American health care leaders were left bewildered as to how the greatest health care system in the world could lose children to such a preventable disease. (rochester.edu)
  • New Jersey requires immunizations for children entering school and day care programs. (nj.us)
  • Children must have periodic medical examinations to receive immunizations according to established national guidelines. (nj.us)
  • It is preferable for children to have an identified physician who is familiar with their health history and coordinates all of their health care and immunizations. (nj.us)
  • These children may need different or additional immunizations while other children may not be able to receive some of the recommended immunizations. (nj.us)
  • Find State Summary Reports by school buildings or preschool/childcare sites that measure compliance with immunization requirements among children enrolled in seventh grade, kindergarten, preschool, childcare and new entrants to the school district. (miottawa.org)
  • Brady said the goal for children is still to provide immunizations along with comprehensive well child growth and development care at a primary medical home, but making immunizations more convenient can help ensure children aren't slipping through the cracks. (cardinalhealth.com)
  • Dr. B.A. Jinadu, the department's director, said, "About 9,500 Kern County children already are in the program, which works mainly by following youngsters from birth through the immunization process. (californiahealthline.org)
  • notes that the "total population of children in Kern County hasn't been determined," which makes it impossible to tell what percentage of children are receiving immunizations, according to health department officials. (californiahealthline.org)
  • Children with Special Healthcare Needs (CSHCN) have been the most highly research population that experiences the effects of underinsurance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parents adopting traumatized children from foster care or from other settings have unique needs for post adoption support. (ed.gov)
  • Children in child welfare protective custody (e.g., foster care) are known to have increased health concerns compared to children not in protective custody. (ed.gov)
  • Picente said the program, which originally only served children residing in the City of Utica, will be opened to serve Head Start families throughout Oneida County this year. (ocgov.net)
  • The Veterans Health Administration decreased the use of antibiotics at its 168 hospitals by 12 percent following the 2010 launch of a system-wide antimicrobial stewardship program, according to a study in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology . (mckesson.com)
  • it is available only through health care providers (i.e. physicians and nurse practitioners) and other settings like long-term care homes and hospitals. (tbdhu.com)
  • List of hospitals in Bahrain "Health Care Financing and Expenditure" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Effective April 1, 2017, the Education Program for Immunization Competencies (EPIC) program is no longer available for purchase. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, Publisher: Ottawa (ON) : Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, June 19, 2017. (worldcat.org)
  • Since 2007, HFM has provided nearly 40,000 HRAs in Manitowoc County alone and has achieved an 8.8% average cost avoidance of total healthcare-related expenses from 2007-2017. (hfmhealth.org)
  • In each of the four posts, health care subject matter experts made their predictions about the major trends that will reshape the health care landscape in 2017. (mckesson.com)
  • In " Top Five Health System Pharmacy Trends to Watch in 2017 ," McKesson's Pharmacy Optimization team ranked the five trends that it anticipated will impact hospital and health system pharmacies this year. (mckesson.com)
  • In " The Outlook for Health Care Business in 2017 ," McKesson's editorial staff curated 13 industry outlooks and predictions from leading industry sources. (mckesson.com)
  • In " Top Five Independent Pharmacy Trends for 2017 ," Crystal Lennartz, chief pharmacist at Health Mart, a McKesson affiliate, identified the five trends that she saw affecting independent pharmacies this year. (mckesson.com)
  • From my point of view, there can be little doubt that we need to review the safety and effectiveness of the current vaccination program in the U.S., and this review needs to include methodologically sound investigative science. (mercola.com)
  • Depending on the tasks he or she performs, any health-care or public safety worker may be at high risk for HBV exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • She also belongs to a WhatsApp counseling group facilitated by a health worker for pregnant women in her community so they can share their experiences and learn from one another. (nap.edu)
  • He noted that health managers or leaders who focus only on the inspection aspects of quality (e.g., ticking a box on what each health worker is supposed to do) can erode trust within a workplace. (jsi.com)
  • It has been established that individuals who are categorized as underinsured, are at high financial risk, and face barriers in the level of access to care. (wikipedia.org)
  • You acknowledge the Concussion Program Materials are not to be used as definitive diagnostic tools with any specific patient and your independent medical judgment will be used to treat any patient. (choa.org)
  • The Concussion Program Materials do not create a patient-physician relationship and should not be used as a substitute for professional advice and treatment from a licensed doctor. (choa.org)
  • A new patient doesn't have immunization records. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Processes for patient safety in mihtary and veterans health care systems. (wikisource.org)
  • Patient care reporting and management system. (wikisource.org)
  • The quality and safety of patient care are inextricably linked with the cost of patient care. (mckesson.com)
  • This research aims to examine the impact of a primarily web-based educational intervention on the diabetes care provided by general practitioners (GPs) in rural areas, and subsequent patient outcomes. (apo.org.au)
  • Rossi Pharmacy, in Brooklyn, New York, started an immunization program at the beginning of 2018 to meet patient expectations and stay competitive with large chains. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Score is an average of all responses to care provider related questions on our nationally-recognized NRC Health Patient Experience Survey. (iuhealth.org)
  • We help minimize OSHA recordables, reduce average cost per case, and reduce lost time, which in turn helps your bottom line without compromising quality patient care. (iuhealth.org)
  • This report highlights our performance on important measures of access, quality, and patient safety across the Military Health System (MHS). (health.mil)
  • Family medicine's cornerstone is an ongoing and personal patient-physician relationship where the family physician serves as the hub of each patient's integrated care team. (aafp.org)
  • The Asheville Project and the 40+ replications nationwide by APhA Foundation are some of the most successful programs paying pharmacists for improving patient outcomes. (associationdatabase.com)
  • The WellHealth EHR will deliver to Walgreens pharmacy staff a single patient view capturing their immunization and health testing history with their prescription profile. (businesswire.com)
  • Once rollout is complete, Walgreens pharmacy staff will have up-to-date patient immunization and health testing information combined with pharmacy information regardless of the Walgreens location where a patient received the service. (businesswire.com)
  • Explore our state-of-the-art patient care facilities in the Sheikh Zayed Tower. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • View our phone directory or find a patient care location . (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • 1) Because of its accessibility and ubiquity, text messaging is a cost-effective option with the abilities to reach a large audience, support provider-patient communication, deliver health information and education, and collect patient data. (ucdenver.edu)