Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Great BritainHealth Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.EnglandHealth Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Partnership Practice: A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.United StatesPatient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.LondonGeneral Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)EuropeMedically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Deutschman, Clifford S.; Neligan, Patrick J. (2010). Evidence-based Practice of Critical Care. Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN ... Inspection typically reveals evidence of bleeding (petechiae or ecchymoses), along with slow, continuous bleeding from any ... Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN 9780323292696. Retrieved 2015-04-30. Gresele, Paolo; Fuster, Valentin; Lopez, Jose A.; Page, ... Thrombocytopenia affects a few percent of newborns, and its prevalence in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) is high. ...
Provide accurate, competent, and evidence-based care. Practice preventative health care. Focus on relationship-centered care ... Health education is also a tool used by managed care plans, and may include both general preventive education or health ... Group effort is equally important: each member of the patient's health care team needs to be involved. The value of patient ... Incorporate the multiple determinants of health when providing care. Be culturally sensitive and be open to a diverse society. ...
In Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice. Spector, N. Evidence-Based Health Care in Nursing Reguation. www.ncsbn.org. ... Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice. The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. www.acestar.uthscsa.edu ... Kathleen Stevens at the Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice located at the University of Texas Health Science Center at ... Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice Coordinates: 29°30′22″N 98°34′34″W / 29.506°N 98.576°W / 29.506; -98.576. ...
... is our practice evidence based?". Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 25 (1): 41-52. doi:10.1108/09526861211192395. PMID 22455007. ... what is the evidence?". Crit Care. 9 (5): 431-440. doi:10.1186/cc3742. PMC 1297603 . PMID 16277730. Mock CM, Schwetschenau KH ( ... The conjugate base is valproate. The sodium salt of the acid is sodium valproate and a coordination complex of the two is known ... There is evidence that shows valproic acid may increase the chance of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy ...
Nursing portal AHRQ Health Care Innovations Exchange Evidence-based medicine Nursing Nursing journal Nursing theory Ireland, ... Nursing research is research that provides evidence used to support nursing practices. Nursing, as an evidence-based area of ... for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ created the AHRQ Health Care Innovations Exchange to document and share health care ... Hamer S. & Collinson G. (1999). Achieving Evidence-Based Practice. Ballière Tindall. ISBN 0-7020-2349-3. Parahoo K. (1997). ...
Improving Health (PDF). pp. 4-5. ISBN 1-57285-042-6. O'Donohue, W; K.E. Ferguson (2006). "Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology ... Psychiatric and mental health nursing: the craft and caring. London: Arnold. pp297 Effective Child Therapy: Substance Abuse and ... Lingford-Hughes A. R.; Welch S.; Peters L.; Nutt D. J. (2012). "BAP updated guidelines: evidence-based guidelines for the ... Substance abuse at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Adverse Childhood Experiences: Risk Factors for Substance Misuse and Mental Health Dr ...
Together with Porter O'Grady she has co-authored six books on healthcare leadership, innovation, and evidence-based practice. ... Porter-O'Grady, T. & Malloch, K. (2007). (2nd Ed.). Quantum Leadership: A resource for health care innovation. Sudbury, MA; ... 2006). An Introduction to Evidence Based Practice for nursing and Healthcare. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. Malloch, K. & ... Health Care Financial Management for Nurse Managers: Merging the heart with the dollar. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. ...
University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center. Publication Number 11-E006. Rockville, MD. Agency for Healthcare ... and there is evidence that some interventions to improve health literacy have produced successful results in the primary care ... In the US, Registered dietitian nutritionists (RDs or RDNs) are health professionals qualified to provide safe, evidence-based ... American College Health Association (2007). "American College Health Association National College Health Assessment Spring 2006 ...
"Grady Highlights Importance of Evidence-Based Practice". ""Bringing Science to Life" the NINR History Book, p. 125" (PDF). ... and Columbia University School of Nursing honored her with its prestigious Second Century Award for Excellence in Health Care. ... She excelled in science and was interested in health and decided on a career in nursing "because it gave you flexibility and ... "Georgetown Healthcare Horizons: ALUMNI PROFILE: PATRICIA GRADY (NHS'67)" (PDF). "Grady Presents Keynote at U-Md. Celebration ...
Foundations of Evidence-based Practice. Oxford University Press US. Holloway, I. (2005) Qualitative Research in Healthcare. ... Pope, C., & Mays, N. (2006). Qualitative Research in Health Care. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Key,James Research Design in ... LoBiondo-Wood, G., & Haber, J. (2006). Nursing Research: Methods and Critical Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice. St. Louis ... www.thefreedictionary.com/phenomenologists Evidence-Based Nursing#Methodology Holloway, I. "Qualitative Research in Healthcare ...
"Evidence based practice in postgraduate healthcare education: A systematic review". BMC Health Serv Res. 7: 119. doi:10.1186/ ... See: As medical professional stakeholders in the field of health care (i.e. entities integrally involved in the health care ... Steinberg, Michael L. "Introduction: Health Policy and Health Care Economics Observed". Seminars in Radiation Oncology. 18 (3 ... Williams, Tim R. "A Cultural and Global Perspective of United States Health Care Economics". Seminars in Radiation Oncology. 18 ...
2013). Essentials of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing: Concepts of Care in Evidence-Based Practice. F. A. Davis Company. p. ... Their results based on literally millions of tests, have made it abundantly clear that there exists no such phenomenon as ... G. A. Smith and myself have been accepted and cited as the basic evidence of the truth of thought transference... ...the whole ... He found that Fogel's mind reading acts were all based on trickery, he relied on information about members of his audience ...
Bach PB, Mirkin JN, Luke JJ (2011). "Episode-based payment for cancer care: A proposed pilot for Medicare". Health Affairs. ... ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd edition)". Chest. 132 (3 Suppl): 69S-77S. doi:10.1378/chest.07-1349. PMID ... accessed 11/9/2012) Geographic Variation in Health Care Spending and Promotion of High-Value Care Institute of Medicine updated ... His research focuses on healthcare policy, particularly as it relates to Medicare, racial disparities in cancer care quality, ...
Evidence-based Practice Center)" (PDF). AHRQ Publication No. 11-EHC056-EF. Rockville, Maryland: Agency for Healthcare Research ... Clinical practice guideline. No. 5. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, 1999. Sutherland JE, Sutherland ... Shared care, when primary and specialty physicians have joint management of an individual's health care, has been shown to ... A more widely practiced technique, called psychodynamic psychotherapy, is loosely based on psychoanalysis and has an additional ...
Montgomery, R., Rowe, J., & Kosloski, K. (2007). Handbook of gerontology: Evidence-based approaches to theory, practice, and ... Family Caregiver Alliance Committee on the Future Health Care Workforce for Older Americans, Board on Health Care Services, ... It varies in forms, but the basic principle of respite care is to provide temporary care for a care recipient when their ... and technological and health care improvements allowing more nursing or medical care to be provided at home. This trend has ...
... an evidence-based guide to planning care. Maryland Heights, Mo: Mosby. ISBN 9780323071505. Amico, Donita (2016). Health & ... Schreiber, Mary L. Evidence-Based Practice. Neurovascular Assessment: An Essential Nursing Focus. MEDSURG Nursing (MEDSURG NURS ... "Pediatric Pain Assessment In the Emergency Department: A Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Protocol." Pediatric Nursing 41, no. 4 ... Who in the family takes responsibility for health concerns? Describe any special health beliefs and practices: From whom does ...
Tort law in many countries and jurisdictions not only discourages but actively penalizes physicians who practice evidence-based ... Defensive decision making do not only occur in health care but also in business and politics. For instance, managers of large ... but with custom-based liability, they actually impede the translation of evidence into practice, harming patients and ... A prerequisite for evidence-based medicine". Psychological Science in the Public Interest. 8: i-ii. doi:10.1111/j.1539- ...
Allen, D. (2000b). Training carers in physical interventions: Research towards evidence based practice. Kidderminster: British ... "Mental health units are meant to be caring, therapeutic environments, for people feeling at their most vulnerable, not places ... The charities sent an open letter to health secretary, Jeremy Hunt showing evidence from 'Agenda, the alliance for women and ... www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/05/09/national/science-health/tying-mental-health-patients-soaring/#.WkGKhMgjFPY 長谷川利夫. (2016). ...
A commitment to evidence based practice. Inclusiveness and collaborative relationships within and outside the chiropractic ... The significance and value of chiropractic in health care in Australia. The highest standards of ethics and professionalism in ... competent and effective health care. To engage with stakeholders including governments, academic institutions, media and the ... Practising the highest standards of representative engagement. The principle of unity with diversity within the profession. CAA ...
Medical librarians use web based resources to conduct research and help generate evidence based approaches to healthcare. ... A 2013 survey of health care providers in the United States concluded from its data that professionals in the health care ... The focus of the medical librarian is to emphasize the use of evidence based research and practice. This can be for both ... and information specialists in finding health and scientific information to improve, update, assess, or evaluate health care. ...
CAMLS integrates simulation technology, aviation science, team training, and evidence-based best practice into innovative ... 105 million to develop a health care system using state of the art technology to improve health care management. The latest ... The Advanced Healthcare at USF Health is also making an effort towards Holistic Health. The educational focus of the two ... The Carol and Frank Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care is located at the corner of Holly Avenue and Magnolia Avenue in ...
Firm conclusions on the effects of meditation practices in healthcare cannot be drawn based on the available evidence. Future ... December 2008). "Clinical trials of meditation practices in health care: characteristics and quality". J Altern Complement Med ... mental or physical health conditions should speak with their health care providers prior to starting a meditative practice and ... "Meditation practices for health: state of the research" (PDF). Evidence Report/technology Assessment (155): 1-263. PMC 4780968 ...
"Towards evidence-based clinical practice: an international survey of 18 clinical guideline programs". Int J Qual Health Care. ... A public resource for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. NGC is an initiative of the Agency for Healthcare Research ... modern medical guidelines are based on an examination of current evidence within the paradigm of evidence-based medicine. They ... In the United Kingdom, clinical practice guidelines are published primarily by the National Institute for Health and Care ...
The PICO process is a technique used in evidence based practice to frame and answer a clinical or health care related question ...
... evidence-based) practices into health practices, systems and policies. To date, this effort resulted in development of a ... Dolor, R.J., Smith, P.C., Neale, A.V. & Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Practice-Based Research Network (2008). ... An Evidence-Based Research Collaborative Guide. San Antonio, TX: Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, University of ... The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Stevens, K. R. (2013). The impact of evidence-based practice in ...
Public health nursing: practicing population-based care (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. p. 317. ISBN 978- ... "In Feinglos MN, Bethel MA (eds.). Type 2 diabetes mellitus: an evidence-based approach to practical management. Contemporary ... "Standards of medical care in diabetes--2015: summary of revisions". Diabetes Care. 38 Suppl (38): S4. January 2015. doi:10.2337 ... critical review and evidence base". Nutrition. 31 (1): 1-13. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2014.06.011. PMID 25287761.. ...
Get the facts about Victor Valley College health fair. Qualifications for nursing programs vary widely. Learn about the various ... provides and evaluates professional nursing care based on evidenced base practice or research... 5 hours ago ... Read your health plans summary of benefits to learn what is covered and what is excluded. Health insurance only pays for care ... Care practices make up 30% of all NCLEX questions, covering safety concerns and patient care, particularly in the ...
... social care, research and evidence-based practice), research management, private and NHS healthcare (community and acute ... Tag: evidence based practice. Posted on 24th April 2018. 19th April 2018. ... Before embarking in his PhD Paul spent a period of 18 years in practice UK and international social work practice where the ... online social networks and social media in healthcare and healthcare education. Gemmas ongoing research involves raising ...
Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Practice Database. The Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Practice Database offers ... systematic reviews, practice recommendations, and consumer information designed to support evidence-based practice. This recent ... Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence-Based Practice Database. *Safety in Home Care - QJBC Review Published ...
About the Population Health Research Institute Institute Director Professor Peter WhincupTel: 020 8725 5577 Email: [email protected] ... ENRICH Project: Enhanced discharge from inpatient to community based mental health care. National Institute for Health Research ... National Institute for Health Research. Dr Chris Cates. Evidence to guide care in adults and children with asthma. National ... SW London Academic Health & Social Care System. Dr Jared Smith. Screening for chlamydia related bacteria to prevent miscarriage ...
... clinical practice guidelines, and research agendas. The EPCs also conduct research on methodology of evidence synthesis. ... relevant scientific literature on a wide spectrum of clinical and health services topics to produce various types of evidence ... Program of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5-year contracts are awarded to institutions in the United States ... its initiative to promote evidence-based practice in everyday care through establishment of the Evidence-based Practice Center ...
Better practices in collaborative mental health care: an analysis of the evidence base.. Craven MA1, Bland R. ... Service restructuring designed to support changes in practice patterns of primary health care providers is also required. ... of the experimental literature in order to identify better practices in collaborative mental health care in the primary care ... Collaborative practice is likely to be most developed when clinicians are colocated and most effective when the location is ...
... provides commentary on interdisciplinary research and the role nurses play in improving care quality. This commentary ... Promoting Rigorous Interdisciplinary Research and Building an Evidence Base to Inform Health Care Learning, Practice, and ... Promoting rigorous interdisciplinary research and building an evidence base to inform health care learning, practice, and ... relationships between the level of professional nursing practice, adoption of evidence-based care strategies, and the number ...
Health and Social Care Studies (Sexual Health). BMedSci (Hons) Health and Social Care Studies (Primary Care and Public Health) ... Promoting Evidence Based Practice (SNM2127/SNM3182). Who is it for?. The unit is suitable for all health care professionals ... BMedSci (Hons) Health and Social Care Studies (Neonatal Intensive Care). BMedSci (Hons) Health and Social Care Studies (Acute, ... The unit is designed to introduce healthcare professionals to the concept of evidence-based practice, within the context of ...
Based on a collaborative project we present examples of existing systems and tools for EBCP and a framework for implementation ... The Hospital Trust Project: Towards evidence-based practice in specialist health care Based on a collaborative project between ... Frontpage Publications 2011 The Hospital Trust Project: Towards evidence-based practice in specialist health care ... Evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) combines application of current best research evidence with clinical expertise and ...
Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice Pocket Guide: Pediatric Designed for quick, easy point-of-care reference, this ... Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing & Healthcare: A Guide to Best Practice 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews. ... Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice Pocket Guide: Pediatric Designed for quick, easy point-of-care reference, this ... Essentials of Nursing Research: Appraising Evidence for Nursing Publishers Note: Products purchased from 3rd Party sellers are ...
The Evidence-based Practice Center Experience ,21 June 2005 Better Information for Better Health Care: The Evidence-based ... Better Information for Better Health Care: The Evidence-based Practice Center Program and the Agency for Healthcare Research ... Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 49 (Prepared by Oregon Health & Science University Evidence-based Practice Center ... Prepared by Duke University Evidence-based Practice Center under contract 290-97-0014). Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care ...
Education and management resources for nursing professionals to effectively train and lead staff members and employ evidence- ... based best practices. Covering challenges including nursing accreditation, developing management skills, building critical ... and raise the level of patient care. ... Evidence-Based Practice. *HCPros Resources for the ANCC Magnet ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging healthcare organizations to improve their use of antibiotic ...
Education and management resources for nursing professionals to effectively train and lead staff members and employ evidence- ... based best practices. Covering challenges including nursing accreditation, developing management skills, building critical ... Study finds healthcare workers often provide care while ill. Many healthcare workers may be putting patients at risk by ... Six ways to critique evidence-based practice articles. Starting a journal club that involves a group of nurses is a great way ...
What are the effects of teaching evidence-based health care (EBHC)? Overview of systematic reviews. PLoS One 2014;9:86706: ... Instructional practices for evidence-based practice with pre-registration allied health students: a review of recent research ... Evidence-based practice (EBP) is established as a fundamental element and key indicator of high-quality patient care. ... Its not just saying I want to do some evidence-based practice…its ultimately about…improving healthcare. (CH) ...
How to s a buy a beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care of any role, at any country and within a ... fix you be the l. for? 11 in buy a beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care the installation was. ... Her features use sued the buy a beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care that her flow bond; is yet ... Howard Davies, a little BoE s buy a beginners guide to evidence based practice in health and social care, ruled a design sleeve ...
... was demonstrated for a novel instrument to identify barriers and facilitators for Evidence Based Practice in health care. J ... Evidence based practice in postgraduate healthcare education: a systematic review. BMC Health Serv Res 2007;7:119.doi:10.1186/ ... Healthcare professionals behavior, skills, knowledge and attitudes on evidence-based health practice: a protocol of cross- ... Healthcare professionals behavior, skills, knowledge and attitudes on evidence-based health practice: a protocol of cross- ...
Behavior changes should be aimed at abandoning outdated practices and adopting and maintaining evidence-based practices. ... transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers may be prevented through adoption of evidence-based practices and ... However, little information is available regarding the frequency with which hospitals have adopted evidence-based practices for ... the attitudes and the frequencies of evidence-based practices that prevent hospital transmission of HCV. All 37 hemodialysis ...
2010 Practice Guidelines - The WSAVA Hills Excellence in Veterinary Healthcare Award ... Clinicians are reminded that you are ultimately responsible for the care of your patients. Any content that concerns treatment ... There is strong evidence of the efficacy of oral glucocorticoids and ciclosporin for treatment of AD in dogs. Such oral ... There is evidence that the atopic status predisposes dogs to develop hypersensitivity to flea saliva if exposed repeatedly to ...
Evidence based practice is crucial to be reviewed to deliver high-quality care to every health care practise. EBP is practise ... An appraisal of a piece of research-based evidence relevant to healthcare practice - handwashing and nurses study.. ... An appraisal of a piece of research-based evidence relevant to healthcare practice. ... Related University Degree Healthcare essays. * Unit 10 care practice and provision 3 star(s) ...
... attitudes and practices of primary health care physicians towards evidence-based medicine in Doha, Qatar ... Knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary health care physicians towards evidence-based medicine in Doha, Qatar ... The place of evidence based medicine among primary health care physicians in Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia. Family Practice, 2002 ... attitudes and practices of primary health care physicians towards evidence-based medicine in Doha, Qatar ...
2010 Practice Guidelines - The WSAVA Hills Excellence in Veterinary Healthcare Award ... Improvement of Skin and Coat Hygiene and Care. Bathing with a Non-irritating Shampoo ... There is strong evidence of the efficacy of oral glucocorticoids and ciclosporin for treatment of AD in dogs. Such oral ... There is evidence that the atopic status predisposes dogs to develop hypersensitivity to flea saliva if exposed repeatedly to ...
Practice nurses have developed an extended role in diabetes and asthma care. They may still have a promising future in the ... The conclusion from this study is that there is still no evidence to support the setting up of clinics in which practice nurses ... Assessment and follow up of depressed patients by practice nurses was similar to care by GPs ... Assessment and follow up of depressed patients by practice nurses was similar to care by GPs ...
Evidence-Based Practice. Recent literature on adoption of evidence-based practice [3] suggests that traditional health care ... evidence-based practice, knowledge management, and work in health care practice and social media. ... Health care professionals beliefs about using wiki-based reminders to promote best practices in trauma care. J Med Internet ... Changing clinical practice to become more evidence based. Health Care Manage Rev 2002;27(3):35-47. [Medline] ...
Read chapter 3 Narrowing the Research-Practice Divide-Systems Considerations: As our nation enters a new era of medical science ... Using Routine Care Delivery to Generate Reliable Clinical Knowledge. Evidence-based best practice faces a massive evidence gap ... The Learning Healthcare System considers how health care is structured to develop and to apply evidence--from health profession ... Bridges between health care research evidence and clinical practice. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 2( ...
Principles and Practice of Evidence Based Health Care. Study Options. *Short Course (for credit) / Full-time / 12 Weeks ... module offers students the opportunity to examine recent literature and to consider its contribution to evidence-based practice ... Students will explore the types of information that are collected about health and will critically evaluate research material ...
  • This vision for improving health and health care is shared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which funds an innovative and unique initiative to improve patient care by examining the role nurses play in improving care quality: the Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI). (rwjf.org)
  • More than 3.1 million strong, nurses represent the largest segment of the health care professional workforce in the United States and are the professionals who provide the most direct patient care. (rwjf.org)
  • To that end, INQRI attempts to understand the nurses' role in delivering high-quality care across a variety of patient populations and settings. (rwjf.org)
  • As orthopaedic specialty units are being combined with other nursing units or integrated into medical-surgical units, more nurses are frequently unprepared to care for these patients with orthopaedic problems. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • This useful resource for practicing nurses and nursing students provides a highly visual approach to mastering important clinical concepts and techniques. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • A cross-sectional survey has been conducted among nurses in Calabria region (Italy) in order to acquire information about the level of knowledge, the attitudes and the frequencies of evidence-based practices that prevent hospital transmission of HCV. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Correct answers about HCV pattern of transmission ranged from 73.7% to 99.3% and were significantly higher in respondents who knew that isolation of HCV-infected patients is not recommended and among those who knew that previous bloodstream infections should be included in medical record and among nurses with fewer years of practice. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Self-reporting of appropriate handwashing procedures were significantly more likely in nurses who were aware that transmission of bloodborne pathogens among healthcare workers may be prevented through adoption of evidence-based practices and with a correct knowledge about HCV transmission patterns. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to effective prevention practices among nurses in HDU are strongly needed. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therefore, a cross-sectional survey has been conducted among nurses who are in practice in chronic HDU in Calabria region (Italy) in order to acquire and make available information about the level of knowledge, the attitudes and the frequencies of evidence-based practices and those determinants that may help expand understanding on how to motivate HCWs to adopt precautions to prevent HDU transmission of HCV. (biomedcentral.com)
  • An appraisal of a piece of research-based evidence relevant to healthcare practice - handwashing and nurses study. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • An evaluation of practice nurses working with general practitioners to treat people with depression. (bmj.com)
  • Question What extended role can practice nurses have in the assessment and follow up of depressed patients who are seen by general practitioners (GPs)? (bmj.com)
  • Patients were allocated to receive follow up from nurses which comprised a recommended 8 hours of contact for each patient (n=271) or standard care from a GP (n=148). (bmj.com)
  • A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). (jmir.org)
  • The two nurses have collaborated to develop this workshop to provide parents, students, and teachers with information about the importance of health promotion. (theacademicessays.com)
  • The University at Albany School of Public Health is an Approved Provider of continuing nurse education by the Northeast Multi-State Division, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. (albany.edu)
  • In support of improving patient care, NetCE is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team. (netce.com)
  • With access to primary care providers increasing and a shortage of child psychiatric providers, collaboration between psychiatric, pediatric and family advanced practice nurses is essential to improving care for this vulnerable population. (wiley.com)
  • Dr. Yearwood is ANCC certified as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Child/Adolescent Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing and is a member of the International Society of Psychiatric Nurses. (wiley.com)
  • Geraldine S. Pearson , PhD, PMHCNS, BC, FAAN is Past President of the International Society of Psychiatric Nurses and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Perspectives in Psychiatric Care . (wiley.com)
  • Nursing Philosophy is an international peer reviewed Journal for nurses and healthcare professionals seeking to articulate a more theoretical basis for their practice.Established in response to the emergence of a substantial research interest in philosophy as applied to nursing and health care, the Journal provides a unique forum for discussion of issues at the very foundations of nursing theory and practice. (libguides.com)
  • Masters in Nursing programs are advanced post graduate courses of study that could lead to a Masters Degree in Nursing (MSN, also known as Master of Science in Nursing), and is the best educational core to prepare students to become advanced practice nurses. (gradschools.com)
  • For instance, nurses who work towards their MSN in Gerontology could learn about acute care. (gradschools.com)
  • Online nursing degrees are ideal for nurses who are already practicing and want to continue with their education. (excite.com)
  • In recent years, EBP has been stressed by professional organizations such as the American Psychological Association, the American Occupational Therapy Association, the American Nurses Association, and the American Physical Therapy Association, which have also strongly recommended their members to carry out investigations to provide evidence supporting or rejecting the use of specific interventions. (wikipedia.org)
  • This online course is ideal for nurses everywhere who want to develop their professional practice and move on in their careers. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • It generally aims to help nurses address a practice issue that affects groups of patients, health care organizations, or health care systems. (gradschools.com)
  • We are proud to say that here at St. Elizabeth Healthcare our ICU's are staffed with Registered Nurses. (stelizabeth.com)
  • They are here to assist you and the nurses in providing the best care possible. (stelizabeth.com)
  • The goal of this interprofessional course is to provide students with a broad overview of the principles and tools of quality improvement and patient safety in healthcare as well address the knowledge, skills and attitudes as defined by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) guidelines. (upenn.edu)
  • Core competencies for all healthcare professionals are emphasized, content is applicable for all healthcare providers including, but not limited to, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, social workers and healthcare administrators, and may be taken as an elective by non-majors. (upenn.edu)
  • Based on a collaborative project between the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services and Innlandet Hospital Trust we present examples of existing systems and tools for EBCP and a framework for implementation of EBCP in Norwegian hospitals. (fhi.no)
  • In 2005 the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services received a request from the largest regional hospital trust in Norway to support the uptake of EBCP in their hospitals. (fhi.no)
  • The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services developed the Hospital Trust project in collaboration with Sykehuset Innlandet, a local hospital trust with 9 non-academic hospitals and 41 units serving 400 000 inhabitants living in 2 rural counties in a region the size of Denmark. (fhi.no)
  • 2 Initiatives such as the European Union Evidence-Based Medicine project 4 and EBP teaching programmes for educators facilitated by Oxford (Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine) and McMaster Universities provide support in advancing the EBP agenda within healthcare education. (bmj.com)
  • Stepped care for CFS, consisting of a minimal intervention followed by face-to-face CBT, was found efficacious when tested in a CFS specialist centre. (cambridge.org)
  • Stepped care implemented in a community-based mental health centre (MHC) has not yet been evaluated. (cambridge.org)
  • The National Health Service Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) 2 in Oxford, UK, has been the second group to apply this concept. (elsevier.es)
  • The programme is delivered through the Department for Continuing Education, with the expertise in curriculum design and teaching drawn from the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine and the Clinical Academic Graduate School. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) is one of six centres funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada. (cwhn.ca)
  • Dental hygienists are at the threshold of expanded responsibilities for assessing and caring for their patient's oral and overall health, creating this "moment of opportunity. (elsevier.com)
  • Evidence-based radiology is defined as the decision that results from integrating clinical information to select the most appropriate imaging test on the basis of the best available evidence, the physician's experience, and the patient's expectations. (elsevier.es)
  • The practice of evidence-based radiology consists of five steps: formulating the question, performing an efficient search of the literature, critically evaluating the literature, applying the results of the search and evaluation while taking into account our experience and the patient's values, and evaluating the results obtained within our own practice. (elsevier.es)
  • Although some of these factors cannot be modified (e.g. patient's age), others can be controlled or eliminated through an excellent care process focused on prevention (e.g. skin antisepsis, antibiotic prophylaxis, etc. (scielo.br)
  • A patient's husband talks about the kind, attentive, top-notch care his wife received at Sutter Lakeside. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Based on an initial qualitative study of hospital employees, we developed projects and initiatives together with health personnel and leaders in the local hospital trust. (fhi.no)
  • Nursing Science Quarterly (NSQ) is a peer-reviewed quarterly journal publishing original manuscripts focusing on nursing theory development, nursing theory-based practice and quantitative and qualitative research related to existing nursing frameworks, contributed by the leading theorists, researchers and nurse executives. (libguides.com)
  • 3. Is there an up-to-date summary of the recommended databases in addition to Medline which one would need to search in order to capture all or most qualitative health and health services research on a particular topic? (jiscmail.ac.uk)
  • The principal aim of Health Systems is to bring together critical disciplines that have proved themselves already in health, and to leverage these contributions by providing a forum that brings together diverse viewpoints and research approaches (qualitative, quantitative, and conceptual). (palgrave.com)
  • Collaborative practice is likely to be most developed when clinicians are colocated and most effective when the location is familiar and nonstigmatizing for patients. (nih.gov)
  • Their text has provided a blueprint for the future of nursing practice and a rigorously substantiated and clearly described means for clinicians, educators, and administrators to participate in improving quality of care. (eglenin.net)
  • Knowing that the best way to learn statistical concepts is to use them, the authors employ real examples and articles from health science literature, complete with the complexities that real life presents, in an approach that will help bring researchers and clinicians one step closer towards being statistical savvy and better able to critically read research literature and interpret the results. (wiley.com)
  • This group was proposing to carry out a clinical practice based on the best results of an investigation and to train clinicians the skills to perform an efficient search and a critical appraisal of articles in order to make their research tasks easier. (elsevier.es)
  • It will provide a foundation for students or practicing clinicians who are interested in quality improvement and patient safety research, administration, or clinical applications.Content will address the history of the quality improvement process in healthcare, quality databases and improvement process tools and programs. (upenn.edu)
  • Don't miss the chance to improve nurse satisfaction, increase your nursing staff's commitment to the organization, and raise the level of patient care. (hcpro.com)
  • Chapter 4, Health Education and Health Promotion he community health nurse is planning a health promotion workshop for a high school PTSO (Parent-Teacher-Student Organization). (theacademicessays.com)
  • ASTHO is the national nonprofit organization representing public health agencies in the United state, the U.S. Territories, and the District of Columbia, and over 100,000 public health professionals these agencies employ. (cdc.gov)
  • It's an organization that provides women's health care to those who might otherwise not have access. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Jane: I work in a community based substance abuse prevention organization and we have partnered with a local elementary school to provide life skills training/development of social/emotional skills in two classrooms with developmentally disabled students. (naric.com)
  • Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health provides a practical reference to aid in this endeavour. (wiley.com)
  • This month we are providing information on an exciting new project underway at TJC to develop a certification for Behavioral Health Homes. (constantcontact.com)
  • This new certification option will be available beginning January 1, 2014 to organizations accredited under the Behavioral Health standards. (constantcontact.com)
  • A major impetus for the development of Behavioral Health Homes is the Affordable Care Act which has enabled many states to develop such homes. (constantcontact.com)
  • TJC has developed proposed standards for the Behavioral Health Home certification and plans to make the pre-publication standards available this summer. (constantcontact.com)
  • TJC is working closely with state authorities to acquire recognition for the new Behavioral Health Home certification. (constantcontact.com)
  • In particular, environmental suicide risks are frequently cited in surveys of psychiatric hospitals, psychiatric units of acute care hospitals, residential behavioral health programs and sometimes even in outpatient behavioral health settings. (constantcontact.com)
  • This interactive public workshop will focus on the development and training of an integrated health care workforce that promotes family-focused behavioral health and well-being of children, youth, and families. (nap.edu)
  • Current training protocols, programs, and core competencies will be examined in an effort to address the promotion of children's behavioral health in an interdisciplinary, integrated, and multigenerational manner. (nap.edu)
  • Kempsville Center for Behavioral Health, founded in 1986, is an 82 bed facility within the city of Norfolk , Virginia. (indeed.com)
  • However, little information is available regarding the frequency with which hospitals have adopted evidence-based practices for preventing HCV infection among hemodialysis patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Guest Author - Jason G. Newland, MD MEd FPIDS Medical Director of Patient Safety and Systems Reliability Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri Antibiotic resistance is one of the nation's most pressing public health threats. (cdc.gov)
  • Many patients do not receive the same quality of care at different hospitals across the same health care system. (academyhealth.org)
  • As this complete process includes several coordinated activities, its standardization through the design or planning of the care process and the institutional implementation of standards and protocols can be a key structural factor to encourage professionals' adherence to these practices and consequently, to improve safety in hospitals (13) . (scielo.br)
  • Thus, one of the patient safety indicators our group constructed and validated in 2007, through an agreement with the Spanish Ministry of Health and Consumption, establishes that hospitals should have implemented standards and protocols for the pre-surgical preparation of skin and mucosa (14) . (scielo.br)
  • Reducing Healthcare Associated Infections in Hospitals in England. (city.ac.uk)
  • The journal sees the systems approach to be widely applicable to all areas of health and healthcare delivery, including public health, hospitals, primary care, telemedicine, disparities, and community health. (palgrave.com)
  • You learn how to successfully implement small-scale, locally-based service improvement initiatives that help engage with the continuous quality improvement agenda. (tees.ac.uk)
  • Learn how community developers are impacting the health of residents in a low-income housing complex in St. Paul and a senior center in Minneapolis, through two Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)-supported projects. (cdc.gov)
  • Analysis of key contemporary issues in health and social policy that will provide students with a deeper understanding of the design and structure of the U.S. health care system, the policy initiatives that have shaped it, and the roles of the government, the private sector, and consumers and advocacy groups in setting the policy agenda. (upenn.edu)
  • Steven Pearson's paper outlines how the current process of assessing bodies of evidence to inform the coverage decision process might not be able to meet future needs, and the potential utility of a means to consider factors such as clinical circumstance in the process. (nap.edu)
  • The emphasis is on the integration of theory and practice within a multi-professional working and learning environment and intends to develop a lifelong ability to understand how evidence is generated, retrieved, critically appraised and employed in practice. (tees.ac.uk)
  • Public health refers to 'the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations , public and private, communities and individuals. (omicsonline.org)
  • A Decade of Advocacy presents a case study of the Strategic Alliance, a network of 15 California-based organizations that came together to promote healthy food and activity environments. (cdc.gov)
  • Launched in June 2007, the Health Equity Initiative is a county-wide effort focused on health inequities that also collaborates with local organizations to support policy change and monitor results. (cdc.gov)
  • The reports and assessments provide organizations with comprehensive, science-based information on common, costly medical conditions and new health care technologies and strategies. (ahrq.gov)
  • The impact of eRI extends from product development to critical research and beyond, enabling academia and member organizations to collaborate, innovate and advance critical care together. (philips.com)
  • Thus, problems in healthcare need to be viewed holistically as an integrated system of multiple components (people, organizations, technology and resources) and perspectives. (palgrave.com)
  • Network development among the NCCs and other existing networks and organizations to support the use of evidence in decision -making and the various governance structures for public health. (cwhn.ca)
  • Service restructuring designed to support changes in practice patterns of primary health care providers is also required. (nih.gov)
  • Cuba prioritizes primary care and prevention and addresses social determinants of health. (rand.org)
  • The primary aim is to promote a high standard of clinically related scholarship which supports the practice and discipline of nursing. (libguides.com)
  • the allocation of graduate supervision for this course is the responsibility of Department for Continuing Education and/or the Nuffield Department of Primary Health Care Sciences and it is not always possible to accommodate the preferences of incoming graduate students to work with a particular member of staff. (ox.ac.uk)
  • under exceptional circumstances a supervisor may be found outside the Department for Continuing Education and/or the Nuffield Department of Primary Health Care Sciences. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The contribution of dietitians to the primary health care workforce. (dietitians.ca)
  • 2009 Moving Forward Role of the Registered Dietitian in Primary Health Care: A National Perspective. (dietitians.ca)
  • Several jurisdictions attempting to reform primary care have focused on changes in physician remuneration. (cmaj.ca)
  • Primary care providers are increasingly interested in ensuring that preventive health care be part of their work routines. (cmaj.ca)
  • In Canada, the province of Ontario has four primary care funding models ( Table 1 ). (cmaj.ca)
  • This variety provides a unique opportunity to compare primary care delivery under different funding models in a single jurisdiction. (cmaj.ca)
  • Edilma L. Yearwood , PhD, PMHCNS, BC, FAAN is Associate Professor at the School of Nursing & Health Studies at Georgetown University. (wiley.com)