Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Direct Service Costs: Costs which are directly identifiable with a particular service.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Great BritainPublic Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.EnglandDental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Occupational Health Nursing: The practice of nursing in the work environment.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Social Determinants of Health: The circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics (http://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/).Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.BrazilSocial Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.IndiaEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.National Health Insurance, United States

Development of the physical therapy outpatient satisfaction survey (PTOPS). (1/4244)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purposes of this 3-phase study were (1) to identify the underlying components of outpatient satisfaction in physical therapy and (2) to develop a test that would yield reliable and valid measurements of these components. SUBJECTS: Three samples, consisting of 177, 257, and 173 outpatients from 21 facilities, were used in phases 1, 2, and 3, respectively. METHODS AND RESULTS: In phase 1, principal component analyses (PCAs), reliability checks, and correlations with social desirability scales were used to reduce a pool of 98 items to 32 items. These analyses identified a 5-component model of outpatient satisfaction in physical therapy. The phase 2 PCA, with a revised pool of 48 items, indicated that 4 components rather than 5 components represented the best model and resulted in the 34-item Physical Therapy Outpatient Satisfaction Survey (PTOPS). Factor analyses conducted with phase 2 and phase 3 data supported this conclusion and provided evidence for the internal validity of the PTOPS scores. The 4-component scales were labeled "Enhancers," "Detractors," "Location," and "Cost." Responses from subsamples of phase 3 subjects provided evidence for validity of scores in that the PTOPS components of "Enhancers," "Detractors," and "Cost" appeared to differentiate overtly satisfied patients from overtly dissatisfied patients. "Location" and "Enhancer" scores discriminated subjects with excellent attendance at scheduled physical therapy sessions from those with poor attendance. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: In this study, we identified components of outpatient satisfaction in physical therapy and used them to develop a test that would yield valid and reliable measurements of these components.  (+info)

Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia: pattern of use and health care system costs. (2/4244)

BACKGROUND: The use of mammography for screening asymptomatic women has increased dramatically in the past decade. This report describes the changes that have occurred in the use of bilateral mammography in British Columbia since the provincial breast cancer screening program began in 1988. METHODS: Using province-wide databases from both the breast cancer screening program and the provincial health insurance plan in BC, the authors determined the number and costs of bilateral mammography services for women aged 40 years or older between Apr. 1, 1986, and Mar. 31, 1997. Unilateral mammography was excluded because it is used for investigating symptomatic disease and screening abnormalities, and for follow-up of women who have undergone mastectomy for cancer. RESULTS: As the provincial breast cancer screening program expanded from 1 site in 1988 to 23 in 1997, it provided an increasing proportion of the bilateral mammographic examinations carried out each year in BC. In fiscal year 1996/97, 65% of bilateral mammographic examinations were performed through the screening program. The cost per examination within the screening program dropped as volume increased. Thirty percent more bilateral mammography examinations were done in 1996/97 than in 1991/92, but health care system expenditures for these services increased by only 4% during the same period. In calendar year 1996, 21% of new breast cancers were diagnosed as a result of a screening program visit. INTERPRETATION: Substantial increases in health care expenditures have been avoided by shifting bilateral mammography services to the provincial screening program, which has a lower cost per screening visit.  (+info)

The economic burden of asthma: direct and indirect costs in Switzerland. (3/4244)

Asthma mortality increased in Switzerland between 1980 and 1994. This study aimed to assess the economic burden of asthma in this country. Chart reviews were conducted for the last five patients seen for asthma in physician practices in 1996 and 1997. Direct expenditures and indirect costs for asthma-related morbidity were determined. A total of 589 patient charts were completely analysed, including 117 children's charts, obtained from 120 office-based physicians. The annual direct medical costs were CHF 1,778 and the mean annual indirect costs were CHF 1,019 per patient for all patients. The total estimated cost of asthma in Switzerland in 1997 was nearly CHF 1,252 million. Direct medical expenditures approached CHF 762 million, or 61% of the total. In 1997, the indirect costs for asthma were estimated to have exceeded CHF 490 million. Of these costs CHF 123 million (25%) was associated with morbidity and nearly CHF 368 million (75%) was associated with looking after asthmatic patients who had to be cared for at home. This study provides evidence that asthma is a major healthcare cost factor in Switzerland, amounting to approximately CHF 1,200 million per year. The data suggest that cost savings can be achieved by improving primary care for asthma in an ambulatory setting.  (+info)

The cost of obesity in Canada. (4/4244)

BACKGROUND: Almost one-third of adult Canadians are at increased risk of disability, disease and premature death because of being obese. In order to allocate limited health care resources rationally, it is necessary to elucidate the economic burden of obesity. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the direct costs related to the treatment of and research into obesity in Canada in 1997. METHODS: The prevalence of obesity (body mass index of 27 or greater) in Canada was determined using data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994-1995. Ten comorbidities of obesity were identified from the medical literature. A population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated for each comorbidity with data from large cohort studies to determine the extent to which each comorbidity and its management costs were attributable to obesity. The direct cost of each comorbidity was determined using data from the Canadian Institute of Health Information (for direct expenditure categories) and from Health Canada (for the proportion of expenditure category attributable to the comorbidity). This prevalence-based approach identified the direct costs of hospital care, physician services, services of other health professionals, drugs, other health care and health research. For each comorbidity, the cost attributable to obesity was determined by multiplying the PAF by the total direct cost of the comorbidity. The overall impact of obesity was estimated as the sum of the PAF-weighted costs of treating the comorbidities. A sensitivity analysis was completed on both the estimated costs and the PAFs. RESULTS: The total direct cost of obesity in Canada in 1997 was estimated to be over $1.8 billion. This corresponded to 2.4% of the total health care expenditures for all diseases in Canada in 1997. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the total cost could be as high as $3.5 billion or as low as $829.4 million; this corresponded to 4.6% and 1.1% respectively of the total health care expenditures in 1997. When the contributions of the comorbidities to the total cost were considered, the 3 largest contributors were hypertension ($656.6 million), type 2 diabetes mellitus ($423.2 million) and coronary artery disease ($346.0 million). INTERPRETATION: A considerable proportion of health care dollars is devoted to the treatment and management of obesity-related comorbidities in Canada. Further research into the therapeutic benefits and cost-effectiveness of management strategies for obesity is required. It is anticipated that the prevention and treatment of obesity will have major positive effects on the overall cost of health care.  (+info)

The economic impact of Staphylococcus aureus infection in New York City hospitals. (5/4244)

We modeled estimates of the incidence, deaths, and direct medical costs of Staphylococcus aureus infections in hospitalized patients in the New York City metropolitan area in 1995 by using hospital discharge data collected by the New York State Department of Health and standard sources for the costs of health care. We also examined the relative impact of methicillin-resistant versus -sensitive strains of S. aureus and of community-acquired versus nosocomial infections. S. aureus-associated hospitalizations resulted in approximately twice the length of stay, deaths, and medical costs of typical hospitalizations; methicillin-resistant and -sensitive infections had similar direct medical costs, but resistant infections caused more deaths (21% versus 8%). Community-acquired and nosocomial infections had similar death rates, but community-acquired infections appeared to have increased direct medical costs per patient ($35,300 versus $28,800). The results of our study indicate that reducing the incidence of methicillin-resistant and -sensitive nosocomial infections would reduce the societal costs of S. aureus infection.  (+info)

Mixed signals: public policy and the future of health care R&D. (6/4244)

The incentives facing health care research and development (R&D) are influenced by the ambiguous signals sent by private and public insurance decisions affecting the use of, and payments for, existing technologies. Increasingly, that uncertainty is exacerbated by confusion over technologies' impact on health care costs, how costs are to be measured, and the social difficulty of determining medical "need" for purposes of insurance coverage. R&D executives appear to believe that "major" advances are more likely to win such coverage and thus to be profitable. The products that result, therefore, may make the current policy dilemma of cost containment versus service restriction more acute rather than less so. If the aim of policy is to cut costs, innovative remedies are necessary.  (+info)

Use of resources and costs of palliative care with parenteral fluids and analgesics in the home setting for patients with end-stage cancer. (7/4244)

BACKGROUND: In 1992 a home care technology project was started in which infusion therapy in the home setting was made available for patients with end-stage cancer. Beside aspects of feasibility and quality of life the resource utilization and costs of this transition was studied. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a cost evaluation study, to determine the actual cost of managing patients with endstage cancer who require parenteral administration of fluid or analgesics in the home setting. A total of 128 patients were prospectively followed, with a detailed analysis of some aspects in a sample of 24 patients. RESULTS: The cost for each patient was found to be between $250.00 and $300.00 per day, half of which are for hospital charges, even with this active home care technology program. One-third of the costs can be attributed to primary health care activities, in particular those of the district nurses. A hypothetical control group (n = 25) was constructed based on current practice and chart review. Patients in this group would have cost around $750.00 per day. With a median treatment period of 16 days this means a saving of $8000.00 per patient. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that significant savings can be obtained by implementing programs transferring palliative care technology to the home setting.  (+info)

Breast cancer screening by mammography in Norway. Is it cost-effective? (8/4244)

BACKGROUND: Mammography screening is a promising method for improving prognosis in breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this economic analysis, data from the Norwegian Mammography Project (NMP), the National Health Administration (NMA) and the Norwegian Medical Association (NMA) were employed in a model for cost-effectiveness analysis. According to the annual report of the NMP for 1996, 60,147 women aged 50-69 years had been invited to a two-yearly mammographic screening programme 46,329 (77%) had been screened and 337 (0.7%) breast cancers had been revealed. The use of breast conserving surgery (BCS) was in this study estimated raised by 17% due to screening, the breast cancer mortality decreased by 30% and the number of life years saved per prevented breast cancer death was calculated 15 years. RESULTS: The cost per woman screened was calculated 75.4 Pounds, the cost per cancer detected 10.365 Pounds and the cost per life year (LY) saved 8.561 Pounds. A raised frequency of BCS, diagnosis and adjuvant chemotherapy brought two years forward, follow-up costs and costs/savings due to prevented breast cancer deaths were all included in the analysis. A sensitivity analysis documented mammography screening cost-effective in Norway when four to nine years are gained per prevented breast cancer death. CONCLUSION: Mammography screening in Norway looks cost-effective. Time has come to encourage national screening programmes.  (+info)

  • To outline some of the potential model results, two scenarios have been simulated to compare both methods of care regarding overall costs. (springeropen.com)
  • It is clear that new strategies for patient management or new methods of medical care such as the possibility of telemedical treatment can be essential for the reduction of the future financial burden. (springeropen.com)
  • Aims To describe weight-change pathways in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and associated healthcare costs using repeated BMI measurements and healthcare utilization data. (lu.se)
  • Conclusion In patients with newly-diagnosed T2D, weight stability was the most common BMI change pattern over 3 years and associated with lowest healthcare costs. (lu.se)
  • The future expenditure for care of chronically ill patients is an ever-present challenge for the health care system. (springeropen.com)
  • It enables the treatment of patients by a physician, a specialist or a clinical ambulance for the simulation of the outpatient care. (springeropen.com)
  • The developed model represents a comprehensive tool, which opens a wide field of possible simulation scenarios for the treatment of heart failure patients with special focus on overall cost estimations and reimbursement strategies. (springeropen.com)
  • The advantage of telemedical treatment of heart failure patients lies within the earlier detection of symptoms and abnormal vital parameters compared to standard care solutions. (springeropen.com)
  • Mean annual and three-year cumulative healthcare costs were estimated for each pathway by combining Swedish unit costs with resource use from primary care and national patient registers. (lu.se)
  • Due to the sudden economic impact resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic after five years of depressed oil prices, energy employers had to find ways to reduce operating costs," the report notes. (coastreporter.net)
  • A survey by energy labour market organization PetroLMI shows that more than two-thirds of the employers in Canada's oil and gas sector imposed labour cost reduction measures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, including 37 per cent who enacted permanent layoffs. (coastreporter.net)
  • CALGARY - A survey by energy labour market organization PetroLMI shows that more than two-thirds of the employers in Canada's oil and gas sector imposed labour cost reduction measures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, including 37 per cent who enacted permanent layoffs. (coastreporter.net)
  • A growing number of large companies are turning to telemedicine services, opening workplace health centers and exploring other nontraditional ways to deliver and pay for health care. (aarp.org)
  • Plus, some insurers boost the coinsurance rate for non-emergency visits to the ER and waive the consumer's coinsurance payment entirely for convenience-care centers. (kiplinger.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that gun violence deaths cost the U.S. economy $37 billion and gun injuries $3.7 billion in 2005 , the last year the public health agency conducted an analysis. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Such arrangements will come in many forms, from payer-designated centers of excellence for specialty care to narrow networks for all of a company's covered employees, to directing services for an entire population to the leading area networks. (hhnmag.com)
  • The institute is the home of internationally recognized centers of excellence in medical and public health informatics, aging, and health services and health systems research. (eurekalert.org)
  • New Jersey medical centers are rewarding doctors who can save money without jeopardizing patient care. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • To jump start their programs, those eight states will be able to apply for $48,000 each in federal seed money from the U.S. Administration on Aging, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (pewtrusts.org)
  • For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently says that 75,000 patients die annually, in hospitals alone, from infections alone - just one cause of harm in just one kind of care setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • To improve patient outcomes, winning health care payers are forging partnerships with providers to reduce practice variation, using big data to help standardize practices and procurement across their networks, and engaging in shared decision-making with patients. (bcg.com)
  • The mandate for payers and providers alike is clear: secure better outcomes at lower cost. (bcg.com)
  • However, one of the most researched and emerging solutions to reducing healthcare costs is to address social determinants of health (SDOH), which, according to the CDC , include "conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play that affect a wide range of health and quality-of life-risks and outcomes. (forbes.com)
  • Though this is not an easily resolved issue, one thing is for certain- without sustainable and effective solutions, healthcare prices will only continue to rise, inevitably making it more difficult for communities and individuals to achieve long-term success in healthcare outcomes. (forbes.com)
  • My scholarship is focused on how systemic changes to healthcare affect the realities of actual patient care and societal health outcomes. (forbes.com)
  • To accelerate progress, we will use mapping technology to find 'hot spots' of poor outcomes and high cost, allowing for targeting of outreach efforts and coordination with public health coalitions. (baltimoresun.com)
  • To support better outcomes at lower costs, specialists should wherever possible be paid for a package of services (such as all care related to a knee replacement) and not individual services (such as each office visit, surgery, and re-operation on the path to a knee replacement). (baltimoresun.com)
  • RWJF is engaging health care providers, policymakers, and consumer groups in efforts to provide the right health care at the right price, stem rising health care costs, and improve overall health outcomes for individuals, families and communities. (rwjf.org)
  • If private health insurance really improved health-care outcomes in ways that public systems did not, then the introduction of single-payer would indeed be a bad idea. (nymag.com)
  • High national expenditures obviously don't promise good health outcomes for residents. (nymag.com)
  • A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association looks across the health care systems of the 10 highest-income countries around the globe to examine what makes our system uniquely inefficient -- spending almost twice as much per person, with worse population health outcomes on measures like life expectancy. (triplepundit.com)
  • These databases enable research on a broad range of health research and policy issues at the national, state, and local market levels, including cost and quality of health services, medical practice patterns, access to health care, and outcomes of treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • It's been aggressive in managing health care costs in recent years, through retooling supplier agreements, reducing the number of plans offered and eliminating administrative redundancies. (hhnmag.com)
  • The South Whitley, Indiana, company also helps cover about half the cost of that deductible with contributions to an employee health reimbursement arrangement account, Controller Eric Trump said. (cnbc.com)
  • The system has provided ample reimbursement for high-tech care for complicated illness while underpaying for the primary and preventive care needed to support people in health and wellness. (baltimoresun.com)
  • In recent years, primary care has been weakened by reimbursement systems that pay only for brief clinical office visits. (baltimoresun.com)
  • But "what they all have in common is that they're moving away from the fee-for-service model and encounter-based reimbursement to more comprehensive population health management, where they do whatever it takes to keep people healthy," says Marcotte. (cfo.com)
  • HealthMine says its findings are relevant to the increased use of account-based health plans, which include health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reimbursement accounts (HRAs), and increase plan participant responsibility for cost management. (plansponsor.com)
  • Where agency took corrective action following several supplemental protests, request that Government Accountability Office recommend reimbursement of costs is denied where the initial protest grounds were not clearly meritorious, and corrective action was not unduly delayed in response to supplemental issues raised by the protester after receipt of the agency report. (gao.gov)
  • However, our Regulations do not contemplate a recommendation for the reimbursement of protest costs in every case where an agency takes corrective action, but rather only where an agency unduly delays taking corrective action in the face of a clearly meritorious protest. (gao.gov)
  • Thus, as a prerequisite to our recommending the reimbursement of costs where a protest has been resolved by corrective action, not only must the protest have been meritorious, but it also must have been clearly meritorious. (gao.gov)
  • After Yale New Haven Health System absorbed St. Raphael in 2012, it gained a 76 percent share of metro New Haven inpatient business. (courant.com)
  • The unit costs of inpatient admission were estimated by using the proportions of admissions for each type of DRG and the public hospital cost-weights for DRGs, to create a weighted average cost per admission with HIV. (health.gov.au)
  • Topping the list of health care cost initiatives planned for 2020 is implementing more virtual care solutions, which 51% of the 147 survey respondents said they will be doing. (cfo.com)
  • Almost half (49%) of survey respondents said they plan to pursue an advanced primary care strategy in 2020, and an additional 26% expect to consider doing so by 2022. (cfo.com)
  • The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has released a new MEPS data file (August 2020, data in .zip or self decompressing [.exe] ASCII text and SAS Transport format, with documentation in HTML and .pdf format, and Stats, SAS and SPSS programming statements in ASCII format). (wisc.edu)
  • Health Care Spending and the Medicare Program: A Data Book ," (July 2020, .pdf format, 200p. (wisc.edu)
  • A. " Older People are Less Pessimistic about the Health Risks of Covid-19 ," by Pedro Bordalo, Katherine B. Coffman, Nicola Gennaioli, and Andrei Shleifer (w27494, July 2020, .pdf format, 29p. (wisc.edu)
  • B. " Variation in Health Care Prices Across Public and Private Payers ," by Toren L. Fronsdal, Jay Bhattacharya, and Suzanne Tamang (w27490, July 2020, .pdf format, 58p. (wisc.edu)
  • B. " Medicare Beneficiaries' Out-of-Pocket Spending for Health Care ," by Claire Noel-Miller (June 2020, .pdf format, 8p. (wisc.edu)
  • Although veterans from recent conflicts will represent a fast-growing share of enrollments in VA health care over the next decade, the share of VA's resources devoted to the care of those veterans is projected to remain small through 2020, in part because they are younger and healthier than other veterans served by VA. (cbo.gov)
  • FILE PHOTO: Nurse Leah Silver cares for a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient in the COVID ICU at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake during the COVID-19 outbreak in Seattle, Washington, U.S. April 24, 2020. (reuters.com)
  • UnitedHealth Group Inc, the largest U.S. health insurer, last week posted first-quarter earnings above Wall Street expectations and kept its profit forecast in place for 2020, despite an economy battered by massive layoffs and business shutdowns to slow the spread of the virus. (reuters.com)
  • Paying people to use lower-price medical providers can help reduce health care spending. (rand.org)
  • Together these provisions will dramatically reduce financial burdens for many people with lower income or significant health care needs. (kff.org)
  • 3. Find lower-cost after-hours care. (kiplinger.com)
  • Many are turning to workplace health programs to help employees adopt healthier lifestyles and lower their risk of developing costly chronic diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • In 35 other countries, people enjoy better health care at a much lower cost. (sfbayview.com)
  • We currently pay twice as much per person and get lower quality healthcare than the average of 35 other countries. (sfbayview.com)
  • Also ask about lower-cost facilities and medicines. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If all smokers quit, health care costs would be lower at first, but after 15 years they would become higher than at present. (nih.gov)
  • The authors find that obesity raises medical costs by $430.33, and that a 10 percent reduction in the BMI of each obese person would only lower costs by $45.28. (nber.org)
  • Primary care practices that are medical homes can share in the savings when their patients are healthier at lower cost, with the remaining savings passed to Maryland families, businesses and taxpayers. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The people who succeed in the future will be those who excel at delivering a better-quality outcome for a lower cost. (hhnmag.com)
  • By negotiating lower-cost contracts with these provider networks, they can pass on cost savings to you. (doctoroz.com)
  • This article will teach you how to cut your prescription costs, negotiate with your provider for lower health care costs, and save money in a health care fund. (brighthub.com)
  • Again, the international comparison should put this to rest, as in all those other countries, with much lower health spending, everyone is fully covered. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Shifting health care costs to employees can lower employee job satisfaction and pose a barrier for attracting new talent. (shrm.org)
  • About one-half of respondents said they utilized health and wellness educational initiatives (56 percent) and lower-cost generic prescription drugs (48 percent) to control costs. (shrm.org)
  • Health care costs dropped by $341 annually per person for SBI patients taking oral diabetes drugs and by $241 for SBI patients taking statins to lower cholesterol. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Cost savings induced by the ACA are particularly beneficial because they could increase quality while they lower spending. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The reduction in technology development means lower costs but also fewer ways to treat sick people. (washingtonpost.com)
  • While UCLA Health System has long prided itself on being at the forefront of treating patients like Giselle, it is now trying to lower sharply the cost of providing that care. (nytimes.com)
  • The drive to lower costs is resulting in numerous efforts. (nytimes.com)
  • The Cleveland Clinic, another medical powerhouse that has little difficulty attracting patients and demanding high prices, is trying group visits for diabetic patients so more people can be seen at a lower cost. (nytimes.com)
  • The Regenstrief Institute's clinician-researchers work to improve care and lower health costs. (eurekalert.org)
  • I don't know if it's something we need around the whole state if it doesn't lower costs. (denverpost.com)
  • Requiring facilities to post their prices allows consumers to find lower-cost sites of care. (tennessean.com)
  • The hospital with the least expensive patients was Howard University Hospital, also a teaching hospital, albeit one across town that generally serves lower-income residents, where patients cost Medicare $16,369, or 9 percent below the median. (kentucky.com)
  • Some researchers have suggested that perhaps lower U.S. social spending led to worse population health. (triplepundit.com)
  • Last year also showed a smaller regional increase in medical and prescription drug costs of 7.4 percent, which was 1.5 percentage points lower than last year's increase of 8.9 percent and one-half percentage point lower than the national average increase of 7.9 percent. (bizjournals.com)
  • Primary care is often acknowledged as the foundation of any high-performing health care delivery system. (rand.org)
  • Despite the many cost-reducing provisions in the ACA, system-wide health care costs are still projected to rise faster than national income for the foreseeable future, and this cost growth has important implications for government and family budgets. (kff.org)
  • Create an "alliance of stakeholders" to improve the quality and cost efficiency of the health care system. (rwjf.org)
  • Collect data on cost, quality, delivery-system infrastructure, and population health to create a profile of the state's health care industry. (rwjf.org)
  • and profound changes in how people use and regard the health-care system. (csmonitor.com)
  • A comprehensive picture of costs in Japan's effective and efficient health care system. (umich.edu)
  • The Japanese health care system provides universal coverage to a healthy but aging population. (umich.edu)
  • This system has resulted in the provision of quality health care to the entire population at roughly half the cost of American health care. (umich.edu)
  • Editor's Note: For Campaign 2012 , Alice Rivlin wrote a policy brief proposing ideas for the next president on America's health care system. (brookings.edu)
  • Even if the epidemic does not worsen, these costs are likely to prove an unsustainable burden on the health system given the long-term growth of the federal debt. (brookings.edu)
  • Keeping the costs of obesity from overwhelming the health care system will require a renewed focus by the next president on obesity prevention . (brookings.edu)
  • The American healthcare system is complex, and has many key stakeholders, each with their own opinion on how to fix healthcare spending. (forbes.com)
  • Numerous studies continue to find that resolving problems centered around SDOH often mitigates downstream health problems, leading to an overall cost-savings for the patient, healthcare system, and community. (forbes.com)
  • A key root cause of high health care spending in Maryland - and across the country - is a lack of balance in our health care system. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Maryland's health care system has become known for providing high-quality care - but very often for conditions that could have been prevented in the first place. (baltimoresun.com)
  • A more effective and efficient health care system starts with primary care. (baltimoresun.com)
  • These are just a few of the health-care innovations that South African medical researchers and companies have up their sleeves, and are planning to introduce to the health-care system in their bid to drive down costs. (iol.co.za)
  • Which is very important and then you're also looking at cost in some cases you get the best doctor for the lowest book system. (go.com)
  • AGFA HealthCare Corporation of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, requests that our Office recommend that it be reimbursed the costs of filing and pursuing its protest against the award of a contract to Philips Healthcare of Andover, Massachusetts, under request for proposals (RFP) No. VA-260-08-RP-0167, issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs for an enterprise-wide Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS). (gao.gov)
  • The president, who has emphasized his desire to build an 'ownership society,' sketched a vision for the nation's health system radically different from today's employer-based, government-supported system. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Many of the president's critics, including most Democrats, argue that Bush's health care plan amounts to shifting the burdens of an out-of-control health care system onto individuals who cannot afford them, leaving the poorest and sickest patients without care. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects that the future costs for VA to treat enrolled veterans will be substantially higher (in inflation-adjusted dollars) than recent appropriations for that purpose, partly because more veterans are likely to seek care in the VA system but mostly because health care costs per enrolled veteran are projected to increase faster than the overall price level. (cbo.gov)
  • VA's enrollment system includes eight categories that determine veterans' eligibility and priority for access to health care. (cbo.gov)
  • Could lean processes transform the U.S. health care system, with its spiraling costs and inconsistent quality? (upenn.edu)
  • So how can a health care system run with this? (upenn.edu)
  • With help from BCG, the University of North Carolina Health Care System (UNC Health Care) launched a lean pilot program that is increasing efficiency and enabling the hospital to serve more patients. (upenn.edu)
  • Giselle sees specialists in a program coordinated by UCLA Health System. (nytimes.com)
  • She regularly sees a host of pediatric specialists, including an ophthalmologist, an endocrinologist and a neurologist at UCLA Health System. (nytimes.com)
  • By enrolling young patients with complex and expensive diseases in a program called a medical home, the system tries to ensure that doctors spend more time with patients and work more closely with parents to coordinate care. (nytimes.com)
  • The effort is part of a much broader ambition by UCLA Health System to reduce its costs by 30 percent, or hundreds of millions of dollars, over the next five years, according to Dr. David T. Feinberg, the system's president. (nytimes.com)
  • Regardless of what happens to the law, the market will force the system to become more efficient," said Paul H. Keckley, the executive director of the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, a research arm of the consultant Deloitte. (nytimes.com)
  • UCLA Health System is scrutinizing its use of imaging procedures on patients in the cardiothoracic intensive care unit. (nytimes.com)
  • But they can help us deal with larger health system and cultural issues. (eurekalert.org)
  • I wouldn't take any of these cost measures to the bank," said Dr. Tom Rosenthal, the chief medical officer of the UCLA Health System. (kentucky.com)
  • These test runs come as millions of new patients will gain eligibility for health insurance under the federal law, putting additional pressure on the system. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • We also have a larger population of uninsured along with the highest amount if dissatisfaction with the health care system in general. (triplepundit.com)
  • The hospital opened in 2000, the same year that the World Health Organization announced that France had the best health system in the world. (bmj.com)
  • An evaluation of Duke University's Live for Life Health Promotion Program and its impact on employee health. (cdc.gov)
  • Negotiations have barely begun, but Colorado's insurance commissioner, Michael Conway, is excited about the strategy and is already planning to try it elsewhere, perhaps by nudging the state employee health plan to join a statewide alliance that would bargain with health care providers. (denverpost.com)
  • U.S. Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Oregon) adds, "Today's small businesses often face the harsh choice between ending employee health coverage or facing bankruptcy. (msbusiness.com)
  • Most companies now offer health coverage that requires employees to pay an annual deductible before insurance kicks in, and the size of that deductible has soared in the past decade, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research & Educational Trust. (cnbc.com)
  • Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California. (kff.org)
  • According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, health spending in 1999 averaged $3,993 per person in Maryland, about the national average. (baltimoresun.com)
  • It's a $2.6 trillion problem, according to 2010 data from The Kaiser Family Foundation - a health expenditure increase ten-times the $256 billion spent in 1980. (businessinsider.com)
  • This fact sheet on health care costs presents key statistics about the growth, level and impact of rising U.S. health care costs. (kff.org)
  • When asked which current issues could hinder their growth in 2016, an unstable global economy topped the list at 29 percent, followed by quality of partnerships and vendors (25 percent), healthcare costs (22 percent), presidential election results (12 percent), and rising minimum wage (11 percent). (eweek.com)
  • The most widely used measure of employer health care costs, the health insurance component of the Employment Cost Index, indicates that cost growth has decelerated since 1989. (nber.org)
  • Does the Growth in Cost Per Case Really Explain More of Spending Growth than Treated Prevalence? (nber.org)
  • For our progress to be sustainable, however, the growth in health care spending must be slowed and brought into balance. (baltimoresun.com)
  • While growth in health costs stays flat, companies are employing more virtual care, innovating primary care, and seeking solutions to specialty drug costs. (cfo.com)
  • Historically - throughout the 2000s, for example - trends in health care costs were volatile, with the growth rate spiking for two or three years and then receding, Marcotte says. (cfo.com)
  • But at least the rate of growth in health care costs is more predictable now. (cfo.com)
  • Virtual care for musculoskeletal health, the category of physical conditions that has the greatest impact on health care cost, shows the greatest potential for growth, according to the NBGH. (cfo.com)
  • But the news that health care cost growth has slowed dramatically over the past several years has been greeted by progressives with a lot of caution and is rarely discussed by Democratic Party elected officials at all. (slate.com)
  • And wonks at the CBO also worry about health care cost growth. (slate.com)
  • So when health care cost growth slows, shouldn't people be happy? (slate.com)
  • Now the fact of the matter is that health care cost growth is slowing. (slate.com)
  • Our nation has struggled with the burden of our health care costs and spending, approximately 18% of our GDP and rising, which has eroded wage growth, diminished our ability to invest in our children's education, and challenged our global competitiveness. (brookings.edu)
  • Health care costs have dramatically escalated over time, though the rate of that growth has slowed in recent years. (brookings.edu)
  • Amidst rapidly escalating prices, the annual rate of cost growth has slowed in recent years. (brookings.edu)
  • The law has two overarching goals: Cover almost everyone, and slow the growth of medical care costs. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Their goal is to slash the rate of growth in the nation's $2.7 trillion health care bill by roughly half to keep it more in line with overall inflation. (nytimes.com)
  • Health insurance has emerged as one of the fastest growing segments in the non-life insurance industry with 30% growth in 2010-11 with annual premium collections being over Rs 6,000 crores. (medindia.net)
  • would be a good thing, we'd still be facing the question of how to slow the rate of cost growth. (typepad.com)
  • Most importantly, policymakers cannot continue to let arguments over the relatively small sliver of insurance spending represented by the ACA distract them from the need to confront the much greater problem of health care cost growth. (triplepundit.com)
  • The relation between economic growth and development and health, education and other basic needs of people is well recognized and studied since the beginning of this century. (un.org)
  • The study published by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1996 stated: 'While the industrialized countries are expected to grow richer still in coming decades, most developing regions are likely to see more modest income growth. (un.org)
  • The law provides new standards for private health insurance, including identifying minimum benefits for health insurance, placing limits on cost sharing for covered benefits, and establishing new rules for private health insurance that assure access to coverage for people with health problems and limit premium and contribution differences based on health-related factors. (kff.org)
  • Although the Urban Institute report suggests that the health-reforms may in fact level the playing field for some small businesses, not all small companies would see such benefits. (entrepreneur.com)
  • Administrative data such as insurance claims offer a potentially powerful data source to examine the relative benefits and costs of competing drug treatments. (nber.org)
  • You can claim travel costs for your children if you're eligible for any of the benefits described under condition 1 and your child has been referred for treatment as outlined in condition 2 and condition 3. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The survey results are available online at www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Pages/2014-SHRM-Strategic-Use-of-Benefits-Health-Care.aspx . (shrm.org)
  • This survey is one of SHRM's six-part Strategic Benefits Survey report series featuring wellness initiatives, flexible work arrangements, health care, leveraging benefits to retain employees, leveraging benefits to recruit employees, and communicating benefits. (shrm.org)
  • Try the tips below to help you get the most from your benefits and save money on your care. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A health advocate can help you get the most of your benefits. (medlineplus.gov)
  • When benefits enrollment season arrives this fall, employees around the country can expect to see the impact of corporate cost-cutting on their finances. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Employees hired after Feb. 1, 2012, who fail to average the magic 30-hours per week requiring a company to provide a healthcare benefit, will lose their healthcare benefits on the following January. (forbes.com)
  • Of course, Walmart carefully controls employee work schedules and will have the opportunity to design worker hours in a manner that will keep employees at a level below the threshold required to accomplish company healthcare benefits pursuant to the law. (forbes.com)
  • In the Portland area, spiking costs have forced Steve Ferree to reduce the benefits he offers his 32 employees at the Mr. Rooter Plumbing franchise he owns. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • Another possibility is a " hybrid long-term care policy, which combines long-term care benefits with those offered by a traditional life insurance policy . (edwardjones.com)
  • Cost benefits studies were developed to evaluate the economic gain related to the expenditure for a specific treatment or health care method. (un.org)
  • Private insurance would kick in to pay for only the most expensive, catastrophic health care costs, after a substantial deductible. (baltimoresun.com)
  • A 2009 study found that childhood obesity alone is responsible for $14.1 billion in direct medical costs annually. (brookings.edu)
  • The way medical costs are paid for removes the price tags when the product is being selected and encourages us to spend someone else's money. (shreveporttimes.com)
  • Therefore, neither health insurance nor BMI can be treated as exogenous in estimating a cost function and a Tobit model must be used to account for corner solutions when the individual does not visit a provider and incurs no medical costs. (nber.org)
  • The recent pattern isn't necessarily a good thing, he adds, since 4% to 5% inflation in medical costs has tended to be about twice the general inflation rate. (cfo.com)
  • They then calculated the financial impact of such health problems for two popular Orange County, Calif., beaches--Newport and Huntington--using average salaries and medical costs for the area. (scientificamerican.com)
  • An Asbury Park Press roundtable meeting brings healthcare and business leaders together to examine how medical costs can be better controled. (app.com)
  • UnitedHealth warned last week that medical costs would likely increase in the second half of the year. (reuters.com)
  • Women in the study had higher overall medical costs across all BMI categories, but men saw a sharper increase in medical costs the higher their BMIs rose. (medindia.net)
  • The ACA includes a number of strict regulations that put tremendous pressure on HCOs to reduce medical costs. (sas.com)
  • As health care costs rise, policymakers and industry leaders are increasingly interested in developing accurate ways to measure and, ultimately, to try to reduce them for the individual patient as well as for society as a whole. (rand.org)
  • State and federal policymakers are considering adding state-backed public options to the individual market in an effort to expand health coverage and improve affordability. (rand.org)
  • The ultimate value of this research is for policymakers, who are well aware of the substantial costs involved with cleaning up water pollution, but need to know the other side of the equation--the costs associated with not cleaning up the water, Dwight says. (scientificamerican.com)
  • But every year his insurance premium costs rise another 10 or 20 percent, and England worries about the day when the fees will overwhelm him. (cnn.com)
  • Employees are expected to pay 30 percent of those costs. (aarp.org)
  • Health care costs for smokers at a given age are as much as 40 percent higher than those for nonsmokers, but in a population in which no one smoked the costs would be 7 percent higher among men and 4 percent higher among women than the costs in the current mixed population of smokers and nonsmokers. (nih.gov)
  • According to an analysis in the American Journal of Public Health , as little as a 5 percent reduction in the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension would save almost $25 billion annually in medium-term health care costs. (brookings.edu)
  • A hospital visit in this ski town costs about 40 percent more than a visit less than 100 miles away in Denver. (denverpost.com)
  • In 2015, an overnight hospital stay cost 80 percent more, according to a study commissioned by the Summit Foundation, a local community group with a mission to help working families. (denverpost.com)
  • The Tampa-Lakeland area reported an increase of 17 percent in their cost of treatment of psychoses,' Bracher said. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • There may have been more complicated patients,' said Ken Peltzie, a vice president at Bethesda Memorial Hospital in Boynton Beach, on why the cost of the average treatment of back pain rose at his hospital by about 20 percent, to $2,410. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The obesity elasticity with respect to cost is only .0115 percent. (nber.org)
  • Health expenditure accounts for between 4 and 15 percent of GDP in OECD countries and constitutes one of the most important expenditure items. (nber.org)
  • Effective primary care can reduce the number of hospital admissions for chronic illness by 25 percent or more. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Take into account health care costs and the figure drops further, to 55 percent of average career earnings. (yahoo.com)
  • A recent survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute found that overall, 53 percent of workers said they'd like to tear up their time cards for good, but they'll likely have to continue to punch the clock because they need to keep their employer-sponsored health insurance. (yahoo.com)
  • The money in the account rolls over, is 100 percent portable and can be used anytime during your lifetime to pay for health care as well as long-term care. (yahoo.com)
  • About 80 percent of the cost of treating victims of gun violence in 2010 was borne in part by taxpayers, according to an analysis of hospital and insurance data by researchers at the nonpartisan think tank. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Seventy-seven percent of U.S. wealthy investors say health is more important than wealth, and 57% are worried their health will deteriorate in the next 10 years. (plansponsor.com)
  • For families whose earning fell in the bottom 90 percent, total premium costs as a share of their earnings doubled over the same period, from 25.6 to 51.7 percent. (nymag.com)
  • Over the past three years, the percentage of companies indicating that their health care costs went up has remained about the same, yet high, at 69 percent to 74 percent. (shrm.org)
  • Each year between 1980 and 1990, costs rose an average of 11 percent. (brookings.edu)
  • From 2000-2007, annual costs grew by an average of 7.6 percent. (brookings.edu)
  • But since 2009, costs have escalated by just 3.9 percent each year , , and have been trending downward since 2002. (brookings.edu)
  • Those veterans accounted for only about 6 percent of all patients in 2009 and 3 percent of the total dollars obligated for veterans' health care in that year. (cbo.gov)
  • Annual total health care costs were 19 percent higher in women with a history of IPV ($439 annually) compared to women without IPV in their backgrounds. (medindia.net)
  • This estimate is based on prevalence for IPV of 44 percent - a figure established in a study the Group Health/UW team published in 2005. (medindia.net)
  • The main question,' he said, 'is why are health care costs going up at 2.4 percent a year faster than GDP? (typepad.com)
  • When provided with prices of tests, doctors' testing costs dropped by almost 9 percent. (eurekalert.org)
  • The average patient at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital cost Medicare $18,708, or 4 percent above the national median. (kentucky.com)
  • The survey found that employees continue to cover more of their plan costs at an average 23.7 percent of the individual premium and 27.8 percent of the family premium. (bizjournals.com)
  • A total of 202 firms were surveyed during January and February, which found that only 2.4 percent of respondents were planning to discontinue their health care plan after the new state health insurance exchanges become operational in 2014. (bizjournals.com)
  • Retail and hospitality industries, which typically employ larger numbers of part-time workers, are bracing for the biggest increase in costs - 46 percent said they're expecting costs to increase by a minimum of 3 percent. (wnd.com)
  • The health care industry is close behind, with 40 percent expecting that increase in costs. (wnd.com)
  • 1 The ACA changed the health care landscape considerably by providing significant financial assistance to help people with low and moderate incomes afford coverage and associated cost sharing. (kff.org)
  • Therein lies a problem, however: Most people have no idea how much medical care actually costs. (kiplinger.com)
  • If a gas station tried to charge you $10 for a gallon of gas, you'd walk away," says Jeffrey Rice, a physician and founder of the Healthcare Blue Book, a Web site that helps people compare prices for medical procedures. (kiplinger.com)
  • In fact, employees with more risk factors, including being overweight, smoking and having diabetes, cost more to insure and pay more for health care than people with fewer risk factors. (cdc.gov)
  • In the U.S., 30 million people have no health insurance and another 40 million are underinsured. (sfbayview.com)
  • Altman calls this cost shift a 'quiet revolution in health insurance,' obscured in recent years by the health care overhaul's coverage expansion for people who don't have coverage through work. (cnbc.com)
  • Employer-sponsored health insurance is the most common form of coverage in the United States, with about 147 million people enrolled. (cnbc.com)
  • Childhood obesity means more chronic disease will begin earlier in life for more people-driving up lifetime costs considerably. (brookings.edu)
  • But people here are fed up with health care costs that seem unreasonably high. (denverpost.com)
  • But those costs can be much higher for people who are suffering from certain health conditions. (yahoo.com)
  • And people are always afraid that this will be the year that actual costs go in the other direction. (cfo.com)
  • It's easy to get confused about this because ordinary people seem to be very worried about the rising cost of health care. (slate.com)
  • The cost people care about is the price that they personally pay. (slate.com)
  • People care about co-pays. (slate.com)
  • What people do not care about is the underlying price trajectory of the service. (slate.com)
  • But even though people sometimes say they're worried about inflation, in fact people only care about the cost of living. (slate.com)
  • So if you model the micro-economics of how much diabetes cost the country and if you stop people from getting diabetes by modifying their diet or lifestyle, it's a massive economic impact," Gordon said. (iol.co.za)
  • In addition, only people who have a high deductible health insurance plan qualify for the accounts. (brighthub.com)
  • Dr. Henry Jacobs, president of the Connecticut State Medical Society, says soaring prescription drug costs have forced many people to make difficult decisions. (wshu.org)
  • Telling an invitation-only audience that putting the federal government in charge of health care would be 'bad medicine for the American people,' Bush argued for private solutions instead. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The ideas 'all aim at empowering people to make decisions for themselves, owning their own health care plan, and at the same time, bringing some demand control into the cost of health care,' Bush said. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Empty words from the president cannot mask a four-year record of failure,' Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, said in a statement, noting that the number of people without health insurance has grown by 1 million over each of the past four years, to 45 million. (baltimoresun.com)
  • She noted their training, knowledge and community accessibility perhaps makes them the ideal health professionals to help people learn how and why to take their medications. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The anger over the botched rollout of the Affordable Care Act's federal health insurance exchange - and over the conflicting explanations about whether people can keep their coverage - has been bipartisan and well-deserved. (washingtonpost.com)
  • As of the middle of last week, about 150,000 people had been hospitalized, almost half of which were in New York, and more than 45,000 required intensive care, Evercore ISI analyst Michael Newshel said. (reuters.com)
  • Some healthcare appointments that are canceled because of the pandemic will not return because people will decide not to have surgery, or will not need a sick visit, Nimmer said. (reuters.com)
  • And many people within the industry are still wedded to the status quo, said Dr. Michael W. Cropp, the chief executive of Independent Health, an insurer in Buffalo. (nytimes.com)
  • Personalized, smarter-with-use, online health programs that empowers people to achieve the health and happiness they deserve. (slideshare.net)
  • Instead of providing tax credits based on income and cost of living in an area - like the ACA does - the AHCA would give flat credits to people based on age, ranging from $2,000 for those under 30 to $4,900 for people aged 60 to 64. (businessinsider.com)
  • After all, if everyone worked hard and became successful they'd be able to afford health care and the only ones out of work would be Democratic Congress people. (newstimes.com)
  • In contrast to the recent evidence relating to mortality, which concluded that only more obese people were at a higher risk of death, the current findings suggest that the occurrence of obesity-related illnesses and related costs begin increasing at a healthy weight. (medindia.net)
  • The fact that we see the combined costs of pharmacy and medical more than double for people with BMIs of 45 compared with those of 19 suggests that interventions on weight are warranted," said Marissa Stroo, a co-investigator on the study. (medindia.net)
  • In 2004, a few states such as Idaho, Kansas and North Carolina enacted or expanded tax incentives for people who purchase long-term care insurance, according to the Virginia-based Health Policy Tracking Service. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Only 23% of respondents expect to offer virtual care in that area next year, but an additional 38% are considering to do so by 2022. (cfo.com)
  • Respondents to a survey from Mercer reported preferences for policies to mitigate costs. (plansponsor.com)
  • While 57% of respondents rate the quality of medical care positively versus the global average of 65%, 71% think it isn't affordable - 45 percentage points above 26% globally. (yahoo.com)
  • Pew Center on the States Managing Director Sue Urahn analyzes the latest findings on state funding of pensions and retiree health care. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Consumers have much more skin in the game, and that may be fine if you're healthier and don't use a lot of health care. (cnbc.com)
  • By emphasizing routine primary care screenings, healthier lifestyles, and working with individuals at a grass-roots community level, more progress can be made towards creating healthier societies, thereby fulfilling the "proactive" approach. (forbes.com)
  • Some advanced primary care provider networks back their promise to deliver healthier populations at attractive costs by taking on some degree of risk: if they don't deliver, they're paid less. (cfo.com)
  • The solutions are meant to provide education and support in the areas of behavioral health, physical therapy, digital coaching, condition management, medical decision support, and sleep, among others. (cfo.com)
  • The share of economic activity (gross domestic product, or GDP) devoted to health care has increased from 7.2% in 1970 to 17.9% in 2009 and 2010. (kff.org)
  • Choose a primary care provider who helps guide you to only the tests and procedures you need. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The RAND Corp. found that improved access to primary care could have avoided many hospital admissions in our state. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Fortunately, new models of primary care called 'medical homes' are emerging that support extra time and support for the chronically ill. (baltimoresun.com)
  • We will seek to build on these efforts so that all insurance companies can participate and all primary care clinicians and patients can benefit. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Another rising area of cost-management activity is advanced primary care. (cfo.com)
  • There are various approaches to advanced primary care. (cfo.com)
  • If you're referred to hospital or other NHS premises for specialist NHS treatment or diagnostic tests by your doctor, dentist or another primary care health professional, you may be able to claim a refund of reasonable travel costs under the Healthcare Travel Costs Scheme (HTCS). (www.nhs.uk)
  • If it's not urgent, it's usually best to visit your primary care doctor or an urgent care center. (doctoroz.com)
  • Also shown are Dr. Marc Feingold (center), a primary care physician, and Dr. James Matera from CentraState Medical Center. (app.com)
  • We analyzed what would happen if public options became available in U.S. health insurance exchanges. (rand.org)
  • Promote improvements in the health of the state's population through investments in public health initiatives and also encourage individuals to be responsible for their decisions on lifestyle and health care, including end-of-life planning. (rwjf.org)
  • Although smoking cessation is desirable from a public health perspective, its consequences with respect to health care costs are still debated. (nih.gov)
  • Perhaps the most pressing public health challenge for the United States today is the epidemic of overweight and obesity, which is linked to an array of costly and debilitating health consequences. (brookings.edu)
  • To me, that has been the big missed opportunity," one of the study's co-authors, Ashish Jha of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told the Washington Pos t at the time. (nymag.com)
  • The public sector cost for eligible countries, which include South Africa, has fallen to $17 500 for the machine and $9.98 for the cartridge. (iol.co.za)
  • The initiative was taken since a large number of pregnant women who made use of public health facilities did not report for any antenatal visits and saw a doctor for the first time when they gave birth, the minister said. (iol.co.za)
  • Have you checked to see if you are eligible for public health insurance programs? (brighthub.com)
  • The biggest reason is that other countries understand that health care is a public good, not a commodity. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • A study of two California beaches indicates that illnesses associated with swimming in contaminated waters cost the public more than $3 million annually. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Indeed, the researchers calculate that the total public health costs would exceed $7 million annually if the coastal water quality had the maximum pollution levels allowed under EPA standards for the entire year. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This untapped resource could be harnessed and used to improve public health and reduce overall health care costs,' Dr. Pringle noted. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Improving medication adherence rates improves quality, public health and saves money, and this study demonstrates the value pharmacists can add. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • As an important local public hospital and trauma center, UNC Health Care needed more space. (upenn.edu)
  • Some expect a gradual return of patients for conditions other than COVID-19 and treatments delayed by the public health emergency. (reuters.com)
  • The author examines the issues surrounding the challenges inherent in maintaining a high level of quality in health care while containing costs in public programs and trying to strike the right balance in monitoring and regulating the quality of health care in the private sector. (urban.org)
  • The rising costs of these state liabilities threaten to crowd out resources for other priorities like education and public safety. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Governors also will be filmed in a town hall meeting with about 200 Seattle-area senior citizens and caregivers that will be broadcast across the country this fall as part of a public television series on care giving called, "And Thou Shalt Honor. (pewtrusts.org)
  • I'm not in the business of trying to find out how to provide health coverage and how to get the right sort of plan. (cnn.com)
  • England, however, said he would like to see a government health care plan and an emphasis on preventative care. (cnn.com)
  • College professor Bill Cantor said he's seen his premium fall to only $95 a month for family coverage from around $300 since he switched to a high-deductible health plan a few years ago. (cnbc.com)
  • When you choose a health plan, you need to understand what your out-of-pocket costs may be. (medlineplus.gov)
  • For an 80/20 plan, you pay 20% of the cost for each service you receive. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The plan pays the remaining 80% of the cost. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Keep in mind that your plan may have a maximum allowable limit for each cost of service. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Choose the right type of health plan based on your location, health, and other preferences. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Now local leaders are working on a plan to drive down prices that could be a model for the state and other places facing high health care costs. (denverpost.com)
  • For a sixth consecutive year, large companies responding to an annual survey projected that their health care costs will go up by exactly 6% next year unless they implement plan-design alterations and other remedies. (cfo.com)
  • Josh Bivens, EPI's director of research, concluded that the total cost of a family insurance plan provided by a member's employer more than tripled between 1999 and 2016, jumping from an average of $5,791 to $18,142. (nymag.com)
  • Look into discounts or incentives from your health plan or employer for things like gym memberships, weight-loss programs, vision care and smoking cessation. (doctoroz.com)
  • Your health plan may ask you to go through additional tests or get a second opinion before undergoing a costly surgical procedure or treatment. (doctoroz.com)
  • While the extremes of the Ryan-Boehner budget have been widely decried, the underlying assumption behind their Medicare privatization plan is too often accepted by a broad array of health policy advisers. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The latest study from the Segal Group includes plan sponsors' picks for the top five cost-management strategies. (plansponsor.com)
  • WASHINGTON - President Bush, laying out his domestic priorities in the days leading up to his State of the Union address, visited the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda yesterday to promote his plan to control health care costs. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, Bush's Democratic rival in last year's election, criticized Bush in an e-mail to supporters, pushing instead his own plan to expand existing government health programs to cover virtually all the nation's children. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Plan ahead by knowing which urgent care center is near you. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You pay less to see providers who are in-network, because they have a contract with your health plan. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 7. Choose a Health Plan That is Right for You. (medlineplus.gov)
  • When choosing a plan , think about the health needs of you and your family. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you rarely need medical care, then you may want to choose a plan with a higher deductible. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The Pennsylvania Project demonstrated that realizing untapped clinical performance value from a network of pharmacies is as much about the ability of a health plan to foster a supportive environment as it is about the ability of a pharmacy to execute an improvement effort,' said study co-author Mark Conklin, Pharm.D., vice president at Pharmacy Quality Solutions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • New hearing aids cost them about $6,000 and the premium for their supplemental Medicare plan jumped by about $19 a month. (cnn.com)
  • The estimated excess costs to the health plan due to IPV are approximately $19.3 million per year for every 100,000 women enrollee aged 18-64. (medindia.net)
  • The study avoided limitations of previous studies by analyzing a random sample from a large health plan that was representative of the community. (medindia.net)
  • How many of your health plan participants can correctly define the terms "deductible" or "copay? (ifebp.org)
  • Plan sponsors can take steps to control these costs but must be mindful of mental health parity requirements when enacting changes. (ifebp.org)
  • Democratic lawmakers and the governor have made the problem of ballooning hospital costs a major focus this year, and the plan is one element of their mission to reduce those costs. (denverpost.com)
  • What happens to your health care plan when you retire? (edwardjones.com)
  • In 2010, the U.S. spent $2.6 trillion on health care, an average of $8,402 per person. (kff.org)
  • Pay-for-performance is most often used to encourage providers to follow recommended guidelines or meet treatment goals for high-cost conditions (e.g., heart disease) or preventive care (e.g., immunizations). (ncsl.org)