Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Great BritainUnited States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Postnatal Care: The care provided to women and their NEWBORNS for the first few months following CHILDBIRTH.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.IndiaDental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.EnglandUnited States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.United StatesEducational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.BangladeshTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Community Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Ethiopia: An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.NepalTransients and Migrants: People who frequently change their place of residence.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Lesotho: A kingdom in southern Africa, within the republic of SOUTH AFRICA. Its capital is Maseru.PakistanObstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.
  • Pat was Chair of the Women's Health/Clinical Care Group that led to Harlem Hospital Center becoming the first World Health Organization Baby Friendly Hospital in New York City. (midwife.org)
  • She served as a member of the ACTG 076 US Public Health Service Taskforce on The US Public Health Service Recommendation for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Counseling & Voluntary Testing for Pregnant Women in 1994-1995. (midwife.org)
  • With the Center for Women's Policy Studies and representing the Planning Workshop of The Office of AIDS Research at the National Institutes of Health, Pat participated in discussions relating to mandatory testing of pregnant women and partner notification. (midwife.org)
  • When you step up to the podium and highlight the criticalUpcoming Events 23 role of oral health, there is a fresh and revitalized visibility and importance givenEditor CAPT Stephen P. Torna to oral health and to dentistry's role in overall health promotion and diseaseEditor CAPT Suzanne Saville prevention. (slideshare.net)
  • We have had the good fortune toThe USPHS Dental Newsletter is published 3-4 be part of your public health priority areas: prevention, preparedness, healthtimes annually, and is distributed electronically literacy and health disparities. (slideshare.net)
  • She is a certified nurse-midwife and past Midwifery Service Director at Harlem Hospital Center who provided primary and reproductive health care to women while developing an expertise in providing care to women whose pregnancies were complicated by chemical dependency and/or HIV infection. (midwife.org)
  • However, ourSpecial Articles 17 efforts are amplified a thousand times over by the personal involvement and commitment of the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service to theAssociate Recruiting Program 19 nation's oral health. (slideshare.net)
  • Loftman testified around Unblinding The Results of HIV Testing of Newborns in New York City in 1995 and participated as a member of the United States Public Health Service Task Force on the Use of Zidovudine to Reduce Perinatal Transmission. (midwife.org)
  • KIGALI, Rwanda , Sept. 9, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The Ministry of Health of Rwanda , the non-profit organization Society for Family Health Rwanda and global healthcare company Abbott ( ABT ) are today announcing the grand opening of a second-generation health post in Gikundamvura Cell, Ruhuha Sector, Bugesera District. (yahoo.com)
  • Responding to this need, the Foundation launched a four-year (June 2015- September 2019) maternal health quality of care (MHQoC) strategy in June 2015, which aims to catalyze another paradigm shift, this time in the maternal health arena within India-changing the focus from increasing access to maternal health services to improving the quality of these services. (macfound.org)
  • While adverse events in the labor and delivery unit can happen at any time, a study in the international journal Risk Analysis from January 2019 is the most recent in a series of reports confirming what has been dubbed as the "weekend effect" in maternal care. (psqh.com)
  • This study, commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee examines issues related to access of vulnerable social groups to maternal health care services and midwifery in the EU. (europa.eu)
  • The Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery (Honours) course aims to produce dynamic graduate nurses and midwives who will be leaders in healthcare in the 21st century. (edu.au)
  • By reflecting contemporary nursing and midwifery knowledge and practice, clinical reasoning skills, research literacy and technology you will identify and effect change in health care. (edu.au)
  • Completion of this course produces a highly capable practitioner with a broad range of skills who is able to work within the interdisciplinary health team in nursing and midwifery practice settings. (edu.au)
  • Monash nursing and midwifery graduates are sought after worldwide because of our teaching quality, which ensures that our graduates possess valuable skills in clinical reasoning, client care, communication, clinical judgment and research literacy developed through extensive clinical experience in a variety of local and international health agencies. (edu.au)
  • The Nursing and Midwifery Programme is one of many programmes within Country Policies, Systems and Services in the Division of Country Support, WHO Regional Office for Europe. (who.int)
  • While the communities in the performance-based financing districts reported higher satisfaction with the local primary care facilities, and despite the improvements in quality, the findings suggest moderate effects on utilization: among the incentivized utilization indicators, only timely postnatal care and blood pressure measurements for adults were significantly impacted. (worldbank.org)
  • postnatal care was currently 18.4% and contraceptive use was estimated below one-fifth. (deepdyve.com)
  • 3 Attending ANC visits by skilled health providers are associated with an increase in institutional deliveries and use of postnatal services. (dovepress.com)
  • Midwives play a crucial role in maternity care provision working in partnership with women during pregnancy, birth and in the postnatal period. (edu.au)
  • This study shares hospital-based obstetric service losses in rural U.S. counties from 2014 to 2018. (ruralhealthresearch.org)
  • Despite Ethiopia's notable gains in reducing unsafe abortion, of the 571,000 abortions occurring in 2018, 47% are estimated to take place outside of health facilities and are potentially unsafe. (guttmacher.org)
  • Between 2017 and 2018, for example, the Alberta government will spend $21.4 billion to deliver health care to its residents. (alberta.ca)
  • This course entry applies to students commencing this course in 2018 and should be read in conjunction with information provided in the 'Faculty information' section of this Handbook by the Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. (edu.au)
  • WRA Tanzania's National Coordinator Rose Mlay expanded on just how successful their CEmONC budget campaign has been by sharing that, because of their advocacy efforts, the government's Minister of Health's "2017/2018 budget targets the availability of oxytocin, magnesium, sulphate, and safe blood services including blood banks and satellites for blood donation. (whiteribbonalliance.org)
  • Secondaryoutcomes were other modes of birth, postpartum anaemia, preterm birth, birthweight, and admission toneonatal intensive care unit.Findings:Statistically significant less women receiving the midwife-led model had unplanned caesareansections, 12·8% vs 15·9%, adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 0·80 (95% CI 0·64-0·99) and postpartum anaemia,19·8%vs 28·6%, aRR 0·72 (0·60-0·85). (uio.no)
  • Perinatal regionalized systems, including obstetrical transport and appropriate referral to neonatal intensive care, have been an important mechanism for improving outcomes for preterm and medically complex infants. (amchp.org)
  • Although some studies have shown a possible association between periodontal infection and preterm birth, evidence has failed to show any improvement in outcomes after dental treatment during pregnancy. (acog.org)
  • Background We tested the hypothesis that routine MRI would improve the care and well-being of preterm infants and their families. (bmj.com)
  • Prediction of neurological outcome in preterm infants is important but difficult, and although cerebral ultrasound is widely used to assign prognosis, it is highly insensitive. (bmj.com)
  • Using administrative data from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Data Oversight Council, researchers will measure NFP's short- and long-run impact on a wide range of health, economic, and other outcomes, starting with preterm births, birth spacing, and child injuries. (povertyactionlab.org)
  • In this study, we comparatively explored the utilization level of maternal health care, and examined disparities in the determinants of major maternal health outcomes. (deepdyve.com)
  • Additional data on the differences in the prevalence of various social determinants, health behaviors, and chronic diseases among Michigan's racial/ethnic populations. (michigan.gov)
  • Social determinants of health (SDOH) are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, paly, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life risks and outcomes. (ne.gov)
  • The Social Determinants of Health framework emphasizes the role of governance and government policies, the measures for which are rarely incorporated in single-level individual analysis. (nih.gov)
  • The overall aim of Spanish Core Contribution Grant for SDH is to strengthen leadership and stewardship role of Ministry of Health to addressing social and economic determinants of health. (who.int)
  • It supports documentation of country level experiences in using intersectoral actions aimed at addressing the key social determinants of priority public health conditions. (who.int)
  • An earlier draft of this case study was included in a special collection of global experiences on intersectoral actions which was widely disseminated during the World Conference on Social Determinants of Health held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2011. (who.int)
  • At the country level, the review process leading to the finalization of the case study generated multi- stakeholder policy and strategy discussions on implementing intersectoral actions to address social determinants of health. (who.int)
  • While this includes their decisions about Medicaid and the other important health care programs they administer, it also includes a wide array of budget and policy decisions that affect the "social determinants of health" - the conditions in which people live, work, learn, and play. (cbpp.org)
  • Public health practitioners and researchers typically evaluate the effects of the social determinants of health by examining the health outcomes of various groups that make up a population. (cbpp.org)
  • We publish many of the most prestigious journals in Public Health, including a number of fully open access journals. (springer.com)
  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol. (academicjournals.org)
  • CDC LOCATe data can be combined with public health surveillance data, including vital records and hospital discharge data. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC LOCATe is designed to be used by public health decision makers. (cdc.gov)
  • However, in the early 1980s, an epidemiologic transition was taking place, and non-communicable diseases became of greater public health concern ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This assessment helps us better understand past trends and inform policy on current infectious diseases of public health concern. (cdc.gov)
  • Death-related data were obtained from a published series called the Report of Public Health Statistics (Bureau of Policy and Strategy, Ministry of Public Health [MOPH], Nonthaburi, Thailand). (cdc.gov)
  • the MOPH is responsible for processing vital statistics data for the whole country and for disseminating the information on an annual basis through publication of the Report of Public Health Statistics. (cdc.gov)
  • Using data from 1958-2009, we created an electronic database from the series of Report of Public Health Statistics. (cdc.gov)
  • A health professional may also be a public health or community health practitioner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another way to categorize healthcare practitioners is according to the sub-field in which they practice, such as mental health care, pregnancy and childbirth care, surgical care, rehabilitation care, or public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Across the developing world, public health systems struggle to provide high-quality care to the populations they are tasked to serve. (worldbank.org)
  • Describe the main components and issues regarding organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the U.S. (uab.edu)
  • Apply basic planning, management, and leadership skills for successful administration of health care organizations and the execution of public health programs. (uab.edu)
  • Apply "systems thinking" and systems analysis for resolving organizational and public health practice issues. (uab.edu)
  • Apply organizational theory and organizational behavior theory to professional practice by examining organization structure, management, finance and budgeting, human resources, contracts, negotiation, and operations research in health care and public health settings. (uab.edu)
  • Synthesize core MCH concepts, theories, and knowledge into the understanding of public health programs, practice, and policies related to women, children, children and youth with special health care needs, families, and other MCH populations. (uab.edu)
  • Describe the public health policy-making process in the U.S. (uab.edu)
  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the core areas of public health theory, policy, and practice. (uab.edu)
  • Evaluate information to develop appropriate strategies to address public health challenges in an area of specialization. (uab.edu)
  • To receive news and publication updates for Journal of Environmental and Public Health, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • An article by public health specialists at University Research Co, LLC describes how Ecuador successfully introduced a modern delivery practice nationwide within six years, transforming its approach to maternal health in the process. (prweb.com)
  • The article suggests that public health practitioners and ministries of health can use CQI to introduce and scale up AMTSL and other best practices that would improve the health and welfare of people worldwide. (prweb.com)
  • The findings, however, do highlight a need for further initiatives to improve the continuity of maternity care and service provision with a greater focus on socially disadvantaged women, as well as better targeted maternal public health education. (eurekalert.org)
  • 3) NICORE is a joint initiative between the Public Health Agency (PHA) and Queen's University Belfast (QUB) and is funded by the Department of Health, Social Service and Public Safety (DHSSPS). (qub.ac.uk)
  • The goal of eliminating neonatal tetanus as a public health problem was also met and sustained. (cdc.gov)
  • She has been on the faculty of UAB since 1988 and teaches a course in Social and Ethical Issues in Public Health. (uab.edu)
  • From public health nurses and social workers to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technicians and hospital administrators, jobs in this industry can take many forms. (alberta.ca)
  • This study highlights the role of strengthening public health infrastructure at district level in the study area, and promoting awareness about available healthcare services and subsidized schemes in the community. (nih.gov)
  • Advice and initial procedures were categorized based on the recommendations of the US Public Health Service Expert Panel on the Content of Prenatal Care. (unc.edu)
  • Despite the heavy burden of neonatal deaths related to neonatal sepsis, research shows that neonatal sepsis receives less substantial international investment as a public health priority compared with other major conditions [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A large body of domestic and international research conducted over the last half century has led to broad agreement among policy and public health researchers, clinicians, health systems, and insurers that many factors beyond health care access and quality shape population health. (cbpp.org)
  • Health First Colorado (Colorado's Medicaid Program) is a public health assistance program for Coloradans who qualify. (colorado.gov)
  • Special thanks to the Iowa Department of Public Health for making the data used in this study available for my dissertation. (springer.com)
  • Public Health Nursing, 20 (5), 349-360. (springer.com)
  • Public Health Nursing, 11 (6), 392-398. (springer.com)
  • Public Health Nursing, 21 (3), 207-219. (springer.com)
  • The rationale for a telephone helpline was that improved access to maternity services would benefit the targeted vulnerable groups identified above. (hsj.co.uk)
  • In addition a telephone helpline addresses the recommendation that "women have easy access to supportive, high quality maternity services, designed around their individual needs and those of their babies" Department of Health (DoH) (2004) and DoH (2007). (hsj.co.uk)
  • Researched exploring the experiences and outcomes of maternity services among migrant and ethnic minority women across UK, Germany and Canada. (shu.ac.uk)
  • Service providers (such as primary and secondary care including maternity services) ensure that processes are in place for women with a BMI of 30 or more after childbirth to be offered a structured weight‑loss programme. (nice.org.uk)
  • The World Health Assembly designated 2020 the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife . (nwfilmforum.org)
  • The South African National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan 2013-2020 was adopted to address the country's substantial burden and inadequate treatment of mental illness. (springer.com)
  • It outlines measures toward the goal of full integration of mental health services into primary care by 2020. (springer.com)
  • These included increasing the proportion of women receiving at least four prenatal care visits to 95% and increasing the proportion of deliveries with a skilled birth attendant to 90% by 2020. (guttmacher.org)
  • In this commentary, the authors discuss why integrating HIV testing, treatment and care into child survival platforms is important, as well as its potential to advance progress towards global targets that call for, by 2020, 90% of children living with HIV to know their status, 90% of those diagnosed to be on treatment and 90% of those on treatment to be virally suppressed (90-90-90). (msh.org)
  • ABSTRACT A field-based assessment was conducted to assess maternal and newborn health-care services, perinatal and newborn outcomes and associated risk factors at Bint Al-Huda Maternal and Newborn Teaching Hospital, a large referral hospital in southern Iraq. (who.int)
  • Abbott is funding the construction of eight second-generation health posts in Bugesera, as part of a program to assess the sustainability of an expanded treatment and care model. (yahoo.com)
  • Clinic nurses and mental health practitioners (MHPs) completed a quantitative questionnaire to assess their engagement with stepped care for patients with mental illness. (springer.com)
  • Assess the individual, comm unity, and systems-level needs of the women, children, children and youth with special health care needs, families, and other MCH populations, including agencies and organizations that serve these populations. (uab.edu)
  • Objectives To assess self reported outcomes and adverse events after self sourced medical abortion through online telemedicine. (bmj.com)
  • Methodologically, areas for further development include how to properly assess costs from a societal perspective rather than just through the lens of the cost to government and accounting for non-tangible costs and non-health benefits commonly associated with CHWs. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors and maternal and perinatal outcome in patients with eclampsia in order to get reliable data that helps in reducing the incidence and improving the outcome in an area with high incidence of eclampsia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study is to assess the risk factors and to study the maternal and perinatal outcome of in eclamptic patients at a tertiary hospital in Minia, Egypt as one of the low resource countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To assess the performance of primary care physicians from the patient perspective. (ahrq.gov)
  • Propensity score (PS)-adjusted odds ratios (ORs), and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were calculated to assess the risk of each outcome by PCM dosage and the dichotomous PCM exposure measure. (springer.com)
  • The GDG comprised of a group of independent experts, who used the evidence profiles to assess evidence on effects on the pre-specified outcomes. (who.int)
  • Optimal maternal oral hygiene during the perinatal period may decrease the amount of caries-producing oral bacteria transmitted to the infant during common parenting behavior, such as sharing spoons. (acog.org)
  • Unfortunately, that risk is the reality within many labor and delivery units-a major concern for physicians, nurse midwives, and other essential providers who strive for optimal health outcomes. (psqh.com)
  • Early intervention programs are the key to optimal outcomes for children with hypotonia. (lightlink.com)
  • Early intervention programs and the use of Individual Family Service plans (IFSP) are the key to optimal outcomes for children identified with hypotonia. (lightlink.com)
  • This is reflected in the overall health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their babies. (health.gov.au)
  • The results from CDC LOCATe are a starting point for discussions about how states can improve health outcomes for women and infants. (cdc.gov)
  • And while the vast majority of countries have reduced their maternal mortality ratios, for the past 25 years the numbers of women lost during pregnancy, birth or postpartum have increased dramatically in the US. (nwfilmforum.org)
  • Women of color are less likely to go into pregnancy in good health because of a lack of access to primary health care services. (nwfilmforum.org)
  • Black women are by far the largest demographic to suffer these outcomes. (nwfilmforum.org)
  • Educated women, those from households of high wealth index and women currently working were more likely to utilize maternal health care services, compared to women with no formal education, from poorest households or not currently employed. (deepdyve.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Women in Nigeria face some of the highest maternal mortality risks in the world. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Our results support the integration of AMU as a complementary model of care for low-risk women. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, the care of women in labor is shared by the attending midwife and obstetrician. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A maternal and newborn health practitioner is a health worker who deals with the care of women and their children before, during and after pregnancy and childbirth. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some developing countries, traditional birth attendants , or traditional midwives, are the primary source of pregnancy and childbirth care for many women and families, although they are not certified or licensed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Babies of women with GDM had lower rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia and special care nursery admissions after the change, suggesting a milder spectrum of disease. (bmj.com)
  • The goal of these recommendations is to improve the health of women and couples, before conception of a first or subsequent pregnancy. (cdc.gov)
  • Improving preconception health among the approximately 62 million women of childbearing age will require multistrategic, action-oriented initiatives. (cdc.gov)
  • YWCA supports efforts to improve maternal health outcomes for women of color. (ywca.org)
  • Results Two hundred women answered the questionnaire, 100 who received the midwife-led model and 100 who received regular care. (uio.no)
  • A statistically significant higher proportion of women who received the midwife-led continuity model of care were still exclusively breastfeeding at the time point of interview, 67% versus 46% in the group receiving regular care, an adjusted OR of 2.56 (1.35 to 4.88) p=0.004. (uio.no)
  • Data from rural women, with singleton preg-nancies and mixed risk status, who either lived in villages that offered the midwife-led continuity modeland had registered at the governmental clinic, or who lived in villages without the midwife-led modeland received regular care, were compared. (uio.no)
  • Additional data on various health outcomes and risk behaviors that can impact the overall health of women, infants, and children within the State of Michigan. (michigan.gov)
  • Describe the historical and scientific basis for current MCH programs, policies, and practices for agencies and programs that serve women,children, children and youth with special health care needs, families, and other MCH populations. (uab.edu)
  • Attendance on a structured weight‑loss programme for women who have a BMI of 30 or more after childbirth can improve the woman's health. (nice.org.uk)
  • Proportion of women with a BMI of 30 or more after childbirth attending their baby's 6-8 week health visitor appointment who receive a structured weight‑loss programme. (nice.org.uk)
  • Healthcare professionals ensure that they offer women with a BMI of 30 or more after childbirth a structured weight‑loss programme. (nice.org.uk)
  • Women from some ethnic groups may have an increased risk of obesity at a lower BMI, for example, women of South Asian or East Asian family origin, and this should be considered by their healthcare professionals. (nice.org.uk)
  • Most women in Ecuador go to health facilities to deliver, but most health facilities did not apply AMTSL until HCI and the Ministry of Health introduced the practice in 2003. (prweb.com)
  • By the project's end, 138 health facilities, 37 health centers, and 101 hospitals applied AMTSL to women who delivered under their care at least 90% of the time. (prweb.com)
  • Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published today (17 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ( BJOG ). (eurekalert.org)
  • The Oxford University study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, explores outcomes and experiences of maternity care amongst women from different socioeconomic groups in order to improve understanding of why socially disadvantaged women have poorer maternal health outcomes in the UK. (eurekalert.org)
  • The findings from our analysis suggest that several factors may collectively contribute towards poorer maternal outcomes amongst women from the lowest socioeconomic groups. (eurekalert.org)
  • In particular, financial support from the husband was considered important in improving the use of ANC4+ services by women in rural areas. (dovepress.com)
  • The study asserted an inadequacy for ANC4+ utilization and can contribute to missed opportunities to achieve better maternal outcomes for women in rural areas of Vietnam. (dovepress.com)
  • Political commitment to expand coverage and reach children and women who generally do not receive health services is important to the success of this initiative. (cdc.gov)
  • Maternal healthcare in Texas refers to the provision of family planning services, abortion options, pregnancy -related services, and physical and mental well-being care for women during the prenatal and postpartum periods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Program provided family planning services for women from the ages of 18-44 whose incomes were 185% below the federal poverty level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Population 1000 women who underwent self sourced medical abortion through Women on Web (WoW), an online telemedicine service, between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. (bmj.com)
  • Main outcome measures Successful medical abortion: the proportion of women who reported ending their pregnancy without surgical intervention. (bmj.com)
  • None of the five women who did not seek medical attention reported experiencing an adverse outcome. (bmj.com)
  • Globally, each year an estimated 43000 women die as a result of lack of access to safe legal abortion services through their countries' formal healthcare systems. (bmj.com)
  • Many of the 3.3 million women who give birth each year do not receive the essential components of maternal and newborn care recommended by WHO and the Ethiopia Ministry of Health. (guttmacher.org)
  • If successful, such a payment model could improve efficiency and extend affordable maternity care to low-income women in developing regions. (springer.com)
  • It is important to have women health practitioners in rural areas and support them to remain in rural communities as their place of practice. (mn.us)
  • That is the key takeaway from a new, comprehensive report, Blueprint for Advancing High-Value Maternity Care Through Physiologic Childbearing , authored by 17 leading maternity experts and released today by the National Partnership for Women & Families. (nationalpartnership.org)
  • Maternal and newborn health outcomes are worse than in other high-income nations, costs are high and many women cannot access safe, evidence-based maternity care that truly reflects their needs and preferences," said Debra L. Ness, president of the National Partnership. (nationalpartnership.org)
  • Meaningfully engage women and families in maternity care. (nationalpartnership.org)
  • Consistent, widespread use of shared care planning and shared decision-making, among other tools, would help ensure that women and families are at the center of - and fully engaged in - efforts to improve maternity care. (nationalpartnership.org)
  • To address the growing shortage of maternity care providers in United States and better meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of childbearing women, we need to better retain and deploy physicians, increase use of midwives and build a workforce that better reflects the diversity of childbearing families. (nationalpartnership.org)
  • Despite recognition that immigrant women face significant health challenges, addressing the healthcare needs of immigrants is a source of debate in the United States. (uio.no)
  • At the community level, the odds of maternal healthcare utilization were lower in rural areas and in communities with a high concentration of poor and illiterate women. (nih.gov)
  • Your donation supports health programs for women, children and their communities around the world. (cmmb.org)
  • As the study points out, this access is affected by the interplay of health systems, law, policies, socio-economic factors and attitudes of health professionals and users which leads to barriers to access and consequently to worse health outcomes for those women, as evidence demonstrates. (europa.eu)
  • This study critically discusses the issues, analyses the causes, surveys the literature for best practices and makes policy recommendations, aiming at improving the situation for vulnerable women and contributing to reduction of health inequalities. (europa.eu)
  • the poorest women are least likely to have received dental care. (acog.org)
  • To potentiate general health and well-being, women should routinely be counseled about the maintenance of good oral health habits throughout their lives as well as the safety and importance of oral health care during pregnancy. (acog.org)
  • The study indicates that women from tribal PHCs are exposed to higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in the form of stillbirths. (springer.com)
  • Just how crucial simultaneous investments in family planning and pregnancy-related care are to saving the lives of women and babies worldwide was underscored by a December 2009 study by the Guttmacher Institute and UNFPA . (guttmacher.org)
  • Women of color are also most likely to experience racism and discrimination within the U.S. health care system. (americanprogress.org)
  • UNICEF supported a pilot of MomConnect between 2011 and 2014 in collaboration with the Kwa Zulu Natal provincial department of health and partners, in select sites across two districts to explore innovative solutions towards effective PMTCT programmes and reaching all women with key messages. (unicef.org)
  • Beyond the examination room: Primary care performance and the patient-physician relationship for low-income women. (ahrq.gov)
  • In a previous study conducted by the lead author [ 5 ] in the Awutu-Senya District, some women raised the concern that their husbands were indifferent towards assisting in maternal healthcare. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The impact of home visits on enrollment patterns in pregnancy-related services among low-income women. (springer.com)
  • Among 41 Mexican immigrant women interviewed soon after giving birth, everyday pregnancy care (often family-influenced) guided maternal behaviors in pregnancy and positively affected birth weight. (ed.gov)
  • Many women report mistreatment from healthcare personnel as an additional reason to avoid seeking professional care during pregnancy and labor. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study also found that a majority of Ugandan women lack health literacy and in turn seek care in more traditional or homeopathic ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allied health professionals, also referred to as "health associate professionals" in the International Standard Classification of Occupations , support implementation of health care, treatment and referral plans usually established by medical, nursing, respiratory care, and other health professionals, and usually require formal qualifications to practice their profession. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even as donor support waned in late 2008, this rate remained constant, demonstrating that health facilities had institutionalized the practice. (prweb.com)
  • Through CQI, facility-based teams of health care workers adapt, integrate into their regular work, and disseminate one or more best practices (in this case, AMTSL) by testing innovative ways to overcome any obstacles they encounter in trying to implement the practice. (prweb.com)
  • It is clear that rural obstetric services are largely provided by family practice doctors. (mn.us)
  • Diane Muckenhirn (Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, Hutchinson Medical Center) - There needs to be an emphasis on nurse practitioners working at the top of their license as primary care and physician extenders. (mn.us)
  • Midlevel and primary care practice is integrated. (mn.us)
  • The versatility of the nurse and midwife has become increasingly important in Australian and international health services and the two qualifications will make you highly employable in any practice setting, especially in rural and remote areas where being multi-skilled can save lives. (edu.au)
  • Contribution  First RCT that evaluates the effectiveness of SMS based appointment reminders on attendance to pre-natal appointments, behavioral changes during pregnancy and newborns' health  Using the intervention as an instrument for number of pre-natal controls attended, we provide the first experimental evidence on the effects of controls attended on birth weight, gestation and maternal weight gain. (issuu.com)
  • States varied in infant gestational age and birth weight criteria, healthcare provider criteria, transport responsibilities, and, enforcement of standards used. (amchp.org)
  • Preventing low birth weight in Illinois: Outcomes of the family case management program. (springer.com)
  • This project helped transform the ministry's approach to maternal health care, prompting us to prioritize and launch a national plan to reduce maternal deaths in childbirth," said Bernarda Salas, co-author of the paper and National Director of Standardization at the Ecuadorian Ministry of Health from 2007 to 2009. (prweb.com)