Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)AccidentsAccidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Insurance: Coverage by contract whereby one part indemnifies or guarantees another against loss by a specified contingency.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Insurance, Long-Term Care: Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Insurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: April 25th -26th, 1986 nuclear power accident that occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (Ukraine) located 80 miles north of Kiev.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Cuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Medical Tourism: Travel to another country for the purpose of medical treatment.OklahomaChiropractic: An occupational discipline founded by D.D. Palmer in the 1890's based on the relationship of the spine to health and disease.ExplosionsTerrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Manipulation, Chiropractic: Procedures used by chiropractors to treat neuromusculoskeletal complaints.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.National Health Insurance, United StatesUnited States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.United States Social Security Administration: An independent agency within the Executive Branch of the United States Government. It administers a national social insurance program whereby employees, employers, and the self-employed pay contributions into pooled trust funds. Part of the contributions go into a separate hospital insurance trust fund for workers at age 65 to provide help with medical expenses. Other programs include the supplemental social security income program for the aged, blind, and disabled and the Old Age Survivors and Disability Insurance Program. It became an independent agency March 31, 1995. It had previously been part of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, later the Department of Health and Human Services. (From United States Government Manual, 1994-95)State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.CaliforniaMyanmar: A republic of southeast Asia, northwest of Thailand, long familiar as Burma. Its capital is Yangon, formerly Rangoon. Inhabited by people of Mongolian stock and probably of Tibetan origin, by the 3d century A.D. it was settled by Hindus. The modern Burmese state was founded in the 18th century but was in conflict with the British during the 19th century. Made a crown colony of Great Britain in 1937, it was granted independence in 1947. In 1989 it became Myanmar. The name comes from myanma, meaning the strong, as applied to the Burmese people themselves. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p192 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p367)Perioperative Nursing: Nursing care of the surgical patient before, during, and after surgery.Consumer Organizations: Organized groups of users of goods and services.
  • 3. The 4% discount is applied to CUA Health premiums paid by direct debit from a CUA transaction account on any policy effective from 4 April 2018. (cua.com.au)
  • Although it requires your family to select and receive referrals from primary care physicians, they can then be referred to any specialist-regardless of whether or not they are in the POS plan's network. (vitalonehealth.com)
  • Benefits and Limitations: In case that the Insured sustains accidental injury or is stricken by acute diseases while the Policy is in force, the Insurance Company will deliver its benefit payment in accordance with the following provisions: 1. (chinahighlights.com)
  • One year of nursing experience in an acute care setting preferred. (willistonstatecollege.org)
  • These are plans that meet government requirements per the Affordable Care Act. (uhc.com)
  • An internationally known neurosurgeon and neuroscientist, Dr. Ondra has also served in some of the most senior positions in the Federal government, having an integral role in health reform efforts and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the White House, Ondra also served on the Implementation Deputies Group for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, an important provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Mental Health and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) in 2008, ensures that health insurance plans treat mental health and substance use disorders (MH/SUD) similarly to how they treat other health conditions. (illinois.gov)
  • However, the Affordable Care Act ended that practice. (insurance.com)
  • Imagine yourself lying on a bed in the pre-op area in your local hospital awaiting members of the surgical team to transport you into the operating room. (catholicmom.com)
  • Provider trusts are care deliverers, the main examples being the hospital trusts and the ambulance trusts which spend the money allocated to them by the commissioning trusts. (wikipedia.org)
  • With pet health insurance, pet parents never have to choose between an expensive but necessary treatment and a pet's life. (dogtime.com)
  • Regular health examinations, at least annually ensure that problems are picked up early as possible and treatment started. (gawa.org.uk)
  • Vein ligation and stripping is a surgical treatment for varicose veins. (cigna.com)
  • 4 A hospital does not include a rehabilitation center, nursing home, rest home, extended-care facility, convalescent home, a treatment c enter for drug and/or alcohol addiction(s) or a treatment center for mental health disorders, even if such facilities are affiliated with or adjoined to a hospital. (securian.com)
  • Learn the laws that protect you when you are seeking mental health and substance use disorder treatment. (illinois.gov)
  • Your primary care doctor in Longstreet, LA must deem it necessary for you to receive treatment from a specialist before you are able to meet with one. (wirefly.com)
  • Few of us consider that treatment for a single pet-health incident or condition can cost $1,000 or more -- a reason many cat owners give for surrendering their pets to shelters. (webvet.com)
  • Much depends on the severity of the sleep apnea -- mild, moderate or severe -- and compliance with treatment, says Ed Hinerman of the Hinerman Group, which specializes in impaired risk life insurance underwriting. (insurance.com)
  • Also top-of-mind for insurers are factors like your age at time of diagnosis, what you're doing for treatment, your blood pressure rate, your weight, whether you are a smoker or not, and other health problems you may have. (insurance.com)
  • They also do not have advanced surgical and non surgical equipment that can help in the treatment of life threatening situations. (papworthpeople.com)
  • In his view no question of a breach of legal obligation arises if the palliative care is administered with the informed consent of the patient and does not have the effect of hastening that patient's death. (mondaq.com)
  • The Surgical Technology program includes classroom courses in liberal arts, basic sciences, and surgical technology, along with clinical laboratory and supervised clinical experiences in community hospital operating rooms. (greatbay.edu)
  • In order to continue in the program all students must achieve a minimum of "C" in all major theory and science courses (Surgical Technology, Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II, and Microbiology) and a "Pass" in all clinical courses. (greatbay.edu)
  • Surgical Technology students must be CPR certified by the time of their first clinical practicum and maintain certification throughout their senior year. (greatbay.edu)
  • The goal of clinical research is to develop knowledge that improves human health, or increases understanding of human biology. (southwestminnesotastate.com)
  • At trial, a jury awarded Ms. Howell a total amount of $689,978.63, which included payment for all past medical care, and for her general pain and suffering damages. (legalpad.com)
  • The trial judge agreed, holding that Ms. Howell would receive a windfall if she received more money for past medical care than she would ever personally be liable for. (legalpad.com)
  • Medical care in the U.S. is extremely expensive. (sdsu.edu)
  • As the population ages, medical care will continue to expand. (surgical-technology.net)
  • Unfortunately, it is their own excess weight that's holding these overweight men, women, and children hostage from overall good health and even more criminally, from receiving urgent medical care of the direst lifesaving sort. (catholicmom.com)
  • However, no one can convincingly argue that if sudden urgent medical care is required that the obese are on a level playing field concerning surgical risks as their normal-weighted counterparts and the statistics prove it. (catholicmom.com)
  • 1. If an individual is covered by health insurance through his or her employment, does that individual lose eligibility for Healthy New York or Medicaid? (ny.gov)
  • Questions concern eligibility under Medicaid and its complementary program, Family Health Plus, should be addressed to the Health Department. (ny.gov)