Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Chondrosarcoma: A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)CD4 Lymphocyte Count: The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.LithuaniaEducational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.United StatesLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Interleukin-11: A lymphohematopoietic cytokine that plays a role in regulating the proliferation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS. It induces maturation of MEGAKARYOCYTES which results in increased production of BLOOD PLATELETS. Interleukin-11 was also initially described as an inhibitor of ADIPOGENESIS of cultured preadipocytes.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Directive Counseling: Counseling during which a professional plays an active role in a client's or patient's decision making by offering advice, guidance, and/or recommendations.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.FinlandIntention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Great BritainStereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Aminopyrine: A pyrazolone with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties but has risk of AGRANULOCYTOSIS. A breath test with 13C-labeled aminopyrine has been used as a non-invasive measure of CYTOCHROME P-450 metabolic activity in LIVER FUNCTION TESTS.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Ascoviridae: A family of insect viruses causing disease in lepidopterous larvae, most commonly from species of the owlet moth family Noctuidae. There is one genus: Ascovirus.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Minority Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of members of minority groups.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Agonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Intervention Studies: Epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause-effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Sea-Blue Histiocyte Syndrome: A congenital disease caused by an inborn error involving APOLIPOPROTEINS E leading to abnormal LIPID METABOLISM and the accumulation of GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS, particularly SPHINGOMYELINS in the HISTIOCYTES. This disorder is characterized by SPLENOMEGALY and the sea-blue histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow after May Grunwald staining.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.EstoniaNorth CarolinaInternal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.

Physician advice and individual behaviors about cardiovascular disease risk reduction--seven states and Puerto Rico, 1997. (1/6426)

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) (e.g., heart disease and stroke) is the leading cause of death in the United States and accounted for 959,227 deaths in 1996. Strategies to reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke include lifestyle changes (e.g., eating fewer high-fat and high-cholesterol foods) and increasing physical activity. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that, as part of a preventive health examination, all primary-care providers counsel their patients about a healthy diet and regular physical activity. AHA also recommends low-dose aspirin use as a secondary preventive measure among persons with existing CVD. To determine the prevalence of physician counseling about cardiovascular health and changes in individual behaviors, CDC analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for seven states and Puerto Rico. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate a lower prevalence of counseling and behavior change among persons without than with a history of heart disease or stroke.  (+info)

Hygiene behaviour in rural Nicaragua in relation to diarrhoea. (2/6426)

BACKGROUND: Childhood diarrhoea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Nicaragua. Amongst the risk factors for its transmission are 'poor' hygiene practices. We investigated the effect of a large number of hygiene practices on diarrhoeal disease in children aged <2 years and validated the technique of direct observation of hygiene behaviour. METHODS: A prospective follow-up study was carried out in a rural zone of Nicaragua. From the database of a previously conducted case-control study on water and sanitation 172 families were recruited, half of which had experienced a higher than expected rate of diarrhoea in their children and the other half a lower rate. Hygiene behaviour was observed over two mornings and diarrhoea incidence was recorded with a calendar, filled out by the mother, and collected every week for 5 months. RESULTS: Of 46 'good' practices studied, 39 were associated with a lower risk of diarrhoea, five were unrelated and only for two a higher risk was observed. Washing of hands, domestic cleanliness (kitchen, living room, yard) and the use of a diaper/underclothes by the child had the strongest protective effect. Schooling (>3 years of primary school) and better economic position (possession of a radio) had a positive influence on general hygiene behaviour, education having a slightly stronger effect when a radio was present. Individual hygiene behaviour appeared to be highly variable in contrast with the consistent behaviour of the community as a whole. Feasible and appropriate indicators of hygiene behaviour were found to be domestic cleanliness and the use of a diaper or underclothes by the child. CONCLUSION: A consistent relationship between almost all hygiene practices and diarrhoea was detected, more schooling producing better hygiene behaviour. The high variability of hygiene behaviour at the individual level requires repeated observations (at least two) before and after the hygiene education in the event one wants to measure the impact of the campaign on the individual.  (+info)

Reliability of information on physical activity and other chronic disease risk factors among US women aged 40 years or older. (3/6426)

Data on chronic disease risk behaviors and related variables, including barriers to and attitudes toward physical activity, are lacking for women of some racial/ethnic groups. A test-retest study was conducted from July 1996 through June 1997 among US women (n = 199) aged 40 years or more who were white, black, American Indian/Alaska Native, or Hispanic. The sample was selected and interviews were conducted using a modified version of the methods of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For behavioral risk factors such as physical inactivity, smoking, and low fruit and vegetable consumption, group prevalences were generally similar between interviews 1 and 2. However, kappa values for selected physical activity variables ranged from 0.26 to 0.51 and tended to be lower for black women. Discordance was low for variables on cigarette smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (kappa = 0.64-0.92). Discordance was high (kappa = 0.33) for low consumption of fruits and vegetables. Additional variables for barriers to and access to exercise ranged widely across racial/ethnic groups and in terms of measures of agreement. These methods illustrate an efficient way to sample and assess the reliability of data collected from women of racial/ethnic minority groups.  (+info)

Women's interest in vaginal microbicides. (4/6426)

CONTEXT: Each year, an estimated 15 million new cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV, occur in the United States. Women are not only at a disadvantage because of their biological and social susceptibility, but also because of the methods that are available for prevention. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of 1,000 women aged 18-44 in the continental United States who had had sex with a man in the last 12 months were interviewed by telephone. Analyses identified levels and predictors of women's worry about STDs and interest in vaginal microbicides, as well as their preferences regarding method characteristics. Numbers of potential U.S. microbicide users were estimated. RESULTS: An estimated 21.3 million U.S. women have some potential current interest in using a microbicidal product. Depending upon product specifications and cost, as many as 6.0 million women who are worried about getting an STD would be very interested in current use of a microbicide. These women are most likely to be unmarried and not cohabiting, of low income and less education, and black or Hispanic. They also are more likely to have visited a doctor for STD symptoms or to have reduced their sexual activity because of STDs, to have a partner who had had other partners in the past year, to have no steady partner or to have ever used condoms for STD prevention. CONCLUSIONS: A significant minority of women in the United States are worried about STDs and think they would use vaginal microbicides. The development, testing and marketing of such products should be expedited.  (+info)

Condom use and HIV risk behaviors among U.S. adults: data from a national survey. (5/6426)

CONTEXT: How much condom use among U.S. adults varies by type of partner or by risk behavior is unclear. Knowledge of such differentials would aid in evaluating the progress being made toward goals for levels of condom use as part of the Healthy People 2000 initiative. METHODS: Data were analyzed from the 1996 National Household Survey of Drug Abuse, an annual household-based probability sample of the noninstitutionalized population aged 12 and older that measures the use of illicit drugs, alcohol and tobacco. The personal behaviors module included 25 questions covering sexual activity in the past year, frequency of condom use in the past year, circumstances of the last sexual encounter and HIV testing. RESULTS: Sixty-two percent of adults reported using a condom at last intercourse outside of an ongoing relationship, while only 19% reported using condoms when the most recent intercourse occurred within a steady relationship. Within ongoing relationships, condom use was highest among respondents who were younger, black, of lower income and from large metropolitan areas. Forty percent of unmarried adults used a condom at last sex, compared with the health objective of 50% for the year 2000. Forty percent of injecting drug users used condoms at last intercourse, compared with the 60% condom use objective for high-risk individuals. Significantly, persons at increased risk for HIV because of their sexual behavior or drug use were not more likely to use condoms than were persons not at increased risk; only 22% used condoms during last intercourse within an ongoing relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial progress has been made toward national goals for increasing condom use. The rates of condom use by individuals at high risk of HIV need to be increased, however, particularly condom use with a steady partner.  (+info)

Follow-up care in general practice of patients with myocardial infarction or angina pectoris: initial results of the SHIP trial. Southampton Heart Integrated Care Project. (6/6426)

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the effectiveness of a nurse-led programme to ensure that follow-up care is provided in general practice after hospital diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) or angina pectoris. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial with stratified random allocation of practices to intervention and control groups within all 67 practices in Southampton and South-West Hampshire, England. The subjects were 422 adult patients with a MI and 175 patients with a new diagnosis of angina recruited during hospital admission or chest pain clinic attendance between April 1995 and September 1996. Intervention involved a programme of secondary preventive care led by specialist liaison nurses in which we sought to improve communication between hospital and general practice and to encourage general practice nurses to provide structured follow-up. The main outcome measures were: extent of general practice follow-up; attendance for cardiac rehabilitation; medication prescribed at hospital discharge; self-reported smoking, diet and exercise; and symptoms of chest pain and shortness of breath. Follow-ups of 90.1 % of subjects at 1 month and 80.6% at 4 months were carried out. RESULTS: Median attendance for nurse follow-up in the 4 months following diagnosis was 3 (IQR 2-5) in intervention practices and 0 (IQR 0-1) in control practices; the median number of visits to a doctor was the same in both groups. At hospital discharge, levels of prescribing of preventive medication were low in both intervention and control groups: aspirin 77 versus 74% (P = 0.32), cholesterol lowering agents 9 versus 10% (P = 0.8). Conversely, 1 month after diagnosis, the vast majority of patients in both groups reported healthy lifestyles: 90 versus 84% reported eating healthy food (P = 0.53); 73 versus 67% taking regular exercise (P = 0.13); 89 versus 92% not smoking (P = 0.77). Take up of cardiac rehabilitation was 37% in the intervention group and 22% in the control group (P = 0.001); the median number of sessions attended was also higher (5 versus 3 out of 6). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention of a liaison nurse is effective in ensuring that general practice nurses follow-up patients after hospital discharge. It does not alter the number of follow-up visits made by the patient to the doctor. Levels of prescribing and reported changes in behaviour at hospital discharge indicate that the main tasks facing practice nurses during follow-up are to help patients to sustain changes in behaviour, to encourage doctors to prescribe appropriate medication and to encourage patients to adhere to medication while returning to an active life. These are very different tasks to those traditionally undertaken by practice nurses in relation to primary prevention, where the emphasis has been on identifying risk and motivating change. Assessment of the effectiveness of practice nurses in undertaking these new tasks requires a longer follow-up.  (+info)

Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries. (7/6426)

In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance.  (+info)

Exercise clinical trials in cancer prevention research: a call to action. (8/6426)

The experimental study design can yield valuable information in measuring the association between physical activity and occurrence of cancers. Randomized clinical exercise trials can provide insight into the avenues through which physical activity might affect cancer development and can provide experience with diffusing an exercise intervention into certain populations. This report describes the potential utility of the randomized clinical trial design in providing answers about bias, mechanisms, behavior change, and dose-response in defining the causal pathway between physical activity and cancer. The challenges and limitations of exercise clinical trial are discussed. The research experience in cardiovascular disease and exercise is used as a model for developing a research agenda to explore the potential role of physical activity as a cancer-prevention modality. We recommend that a series of small clinical trials of exercise interventions be conducted to measure exercise change effects on biomarkers for cancer risk, to learn about exercise behavior change in individuals at risk for cancer, and to serve as feasibility studies for larger randomized controlled trials of cancer and precursor end points and for community intervention studies.  (+info)

  • Greater understanding will help in developing and reinforcing policies, practices, and programs that help students achieve their maximum potential and lower their risk for poor health outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • The objective of this paper is to determine the impact of lifestyle, diet behavior including vitamin supplement consumption, and food culture on diet quality outcomes as measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI) and total energy intake. (repec.org)
  • Participants in the model program workshops on healthy behavior experienced significant positive health outcomes and other changes, while control group patients did not. (rwjf.org)
  • The commonest and most persistent mental health condition is severe behaviour problems, and children with "conduct disorder" are at risk of all adult mental health conditions as well as poor educational and social outcomes. (eurekalert.org)
  • The empirical evidence presented suggests that differences in health costs may indeed partially explain behavioral differences, and ultimately health outcomes, between wealth groups. (rand.org)
  • Released in 2018, the Second Edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans highlights the importance of physical activity for improving a number of health outcomes. (acsm.org)
  • In this paper, we examine the relationship between measures of macroeconomic conditions and a large set of outcomes of health and health behaviors using data from BRFSS between 1990 and 2014 with an emphasis on the period enveloping the Great Recession. (nber.org)
  • Our results provide some support for the notion that weaker macroeconomic conditions are positively associated with health related outcomes, although the evidence is stronger for some of the outcomes (e.g., smoking and physical exercise) than others and is not present for some of the other outcomes (e.g., experiencing poor mental health) at all. (nber.org)
  • Describe genetic, physiologic and psychosocial factors that affect susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to environmental hazards. (albany.edu)
  • These risk factors also significantly affect pregnant and immediately postpartum mothers, doubling the health risk and economic burden by adversely affecting maternal and birth or infant outcomes. (springer.com)
  • This article outlines some of the critical variables in implementing an effective behavior-analytic intervention and addressing social validity concerns to change maternal behaviors in a sustainable manner, along with specific research topics needed in the field to prevent adverse maternal, birth, and infant outcomes. (springer.com)
  • Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs. (springer.com)
  • Recent research indicates the gut microbiome could be a potential determinant of how a child's environment ultimately impacts their neurobiological function and mental health outcomes. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • In this video, Neville Owen , PhD, explains the research linking sitting and negative health outcomes. (stanford.edu)
  • This study will determine the pathways between Mohawk cultural identification and specific behaviors related to pollutant exposure, and determine the effects of these factors and the pollutant exposure on physiologically and socially significant outcomes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The study will determine the relationship of congeners and their hydroxylated metabolites to thyroid function (levels of triiodothyronine, free triiodothyronine, thyroxine, free thyroxine, thyrotropin and anti-thyroid antibodies), and 2) psychosocial outcomes including school behavior and performance, hyperactivity, and adaptation to the community. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Health disparity refers to differences in providing treatment or access to healthcare facilities based on a person s sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status leading to marked differences in health outcomes and death rates. (medindia.net)
  • Using longitudinal data collected from 608 employees of a white-collar organization before and after a flexible workplace initiative was implemented, the study examined changes in health-promoting behaviors and health outcomes among the employees participating in the initiative compared to those who did not participate. (innovations-report.com)
  • In this 5-hour workshop, you will learn best practices in behavior-change science and explore how to practically apply cutting-edge coaching interventions that translate into meaningful lifestyle changes and improved health outcomes. (acefitness.org)
  • While culturally sensitive health care may help reduce racial and ethnic disparities, there is little empirical evidence of a link between such care and improved patient health. (rwjf.org)
  • During 2007-09 researchers at the University of Florida conducted a two-phase study designed to address health care disparities both through the development and testing of culturally sensitive assessment tools (phase one) and through a health promotion model program (phase two). (rwjf.org)
  • CFAH's Health Behavior News Service covers the latest peer-reviewed studies and systematic reviews on the effects of behavior on health, health disparities and patient engagement research. (cfah.org)
  • The way medical doctors initially assess, treat and refer racial and ethnic minority patients may contribute to known disparities in their use of mental health services, according to a new study in Health Services Research . (cfah.org)
  • Because of the persistence of health behavior disparities, using these classes to create specific health interventions and strategies could be valuable in addressing health problems especially among people of different socioeconomic status, race or geographic region. (eurekalert.org)
  • To me this is just the beginning point in that there are clear health disparities within the United States," Saint Onge said. (eurekalert.org)
  • It's this idea that there are disparities by gender, class, race, and ethnicity, so how do we identify patterns of behavior to address these? (eurekalert.org)
  • To share the latest research in effectively managing these problems, Stephen T. Higgins, professor of psychiatry and director of the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health (VCBH) at The Robert Larner College of Medicine at The University of Vermont, collaborated with experts on a third annual special issue of the journal Preventive Medicine , titled "Behavior change, health, and health disparities. (medindia.net)
  • And while these problems extend throughout the population, he adds, they disproportionately impact economically disadvantaged populations and other vulnerable populations and represent a major contributor to health disparities. (medindia.net)
  • The lead article, "American Health Improvement Depends upon Addressing Class Disparities," is written by Steven A. Schroeder, distinguished professor of Health and Health Care in the Department of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco and former president/CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (medindia.net)
  • However, until now there has been very limited population-based data about gender expansive students and their unique health risks and disparities. (pflag.org)
  • Better understand the health disparities and risk behaviors faced by gender expansive students. (pflag.org)
  • Topics include an international comparison of health care systems, a history of health care funding in the United States including the Affordable Care Act, the role of Federal Social Security Disability policy in chronic pain management, international medical tourism, and health care disparities in the United States. (rowman.com)
  • Their inability to do what is "right" about their health - whether by improving nutrition, engaging in exercise, taking preventive measures or dealing with acute or chronic health issues - impacts negatively not just on themselves, but also on the efficiency and profitability of their organizations. (shrm.org)
  • However, it's important to provide a quantitative review of this literature to determine if, overall, self-affirmation impacts on health behavior change. (spsp.org)
  • As health care systems in the United States and other industrialized countries are adapting to accommodate these increasing negative impacts, science is turning to personal behavior change for solutions. (medindia.net)
  • However, the way in which gut microbes might influence a host animal's behavior isn't well understood. (nih.gov)
  • We are studying the nature versus nurture problem: how much of the brain's wiring and the animal's behavior is determined by genetics versus experience," Anderson explains. (nih.gov)
  • Cognitive coaching involves helping a client challenge potential negative beliefs that lead to disruptive behaviors. (acefitness.org)
  • Intimidating and disruptive behaviors are such a serious issue that, in addition to addressing it in the new Sentinel Event Alert, The Joint Commission is introducing new standards requiring more than 15,000 accredited health care organizations to create a code of conduct that defines acceptable and unacceptable behaviors and to establish a formal process for managing unacceptable behavior. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Health care leaders and caregivers have known for years that intimidating and disruptive behaviors are a serious problem. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Develop a system to detect and receive reports of unprofessional behavior, and use non-confrontational interaction strategies to address intimidating and disruptive behaviors within the context of an organizational commitment to the health and well-being of all staff and patients. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Many health organizations, including the World Health Organization and the CDC, often use these types of negatively worded, norm-based messages, but this is the first experimental study that tested the influence of social norms on behavior. (psychcentral.com)
  • During this period, Health Education Monographs was printed by various small publishing companies or cooperatively by SOPHE and the World Health Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the World Health Organization [ 5 ], physical activity is defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that require energy expenditure. (hindawi.com)
  • World Health Organization. (who.int)
  • Regional Office for Europe (‎ World Health Organization. (who.int)
  • Harel, Yossi (‎ World Health Organization. (who.int)
  • Data from the 2019 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) show that students with higher grades are less likely than their peers with lower grades to suffer from certain health conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • These results from the YRBS provide evidence of a significant association between academic grades and some health behaviors and conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • In the fall of 2012 the Virginia Department of Health's Lord Fairfax Health District, in collaboration with the local school systems, administered the 2011 version of the YRBS to eighth and 11th grade students in the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Page and Warren, and the City of Winchester. (virginia.gov)
  • We utilize a results-oriented approach called applied behavior analysis (ABA therapy), which involves observing how our clients react to their environment and how they respond to people around them. (simplyhired.com)
  • Despite a federal directive requiring Medicaid to cover treatments like applied behavior analysis, at least one state appears to be finding ways to deny the therapy. (disabilityscoop.com)
  • A new study in the American Journal of Public Health finds that high-quality weight loss information often appears after the first page of search engine results. (cfah.org)
  • Results: On the basis of our literature search, we identified fluoride use and control of dental plaque levels (eg, tooth brushing and proxy brush usage) as target behaviors for preventing caries. (tudelft.nl)
  • The Health Behavior News Service (HBNS), a division of the Center for Advancing Health, brings you the latest health behavior and patient engagement research from selected peer-reviewed journals. (cfah.org)
  • The Center for Advancing Health was a nonprofit organization founded in 1992, supported by individuals and foundations and based in Washington, D.C. until its closing in 2014. (cfah.org)
  • The George Washington University (GW) owns copyrights to materials created by Jessie Gruman, PhD and/or the Center for Advancing Health (CFAH) which are available at www.cfah.org . (cfah.org)
  • Physical Activity and Health: Does Sedentary Behavior Make a Difference? (acsm.org)
  • However, a new twist in the recommendations and the accompanying 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report is the consideration of sedentary behavior (i.e. sitting) as having a potential role to play in the association between physical activity and health. (acsm.org)
  • While the evidence is still accumulating, it appears as though the effects of sedentary behavior on health may not be completely independent of physical activity (and vice versa). (acsm.org)
  • In order to address this question, the Committee turned to a large pooled meta-analysis of over one million people studying the joint associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior and mortality. (acsm.org)
  • In my opinion, people who spend a large part of their day sitting should aim for the higher end of the range (i.e. 300 minutes per week) in order to help negate the effects of excessive levels of sedentary behavior. (acsm.org)
  • Following the talk, Owen took questions from the audience and discussed the effects of prolonged sitting on children and offered recommendations for changing the work environment to reduce sedentary behavior. (stanford.edu)
  • An analysis of more than 36,000 adults found that daily activities like cooking, mowing the lawn, and doing dishes are better for your health than sedentary time spent on the couch. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Selected variables include demographic and socioeconomic factors, as well as a large number of dietary, health indicators, and lifestyle-related information. (repec.org)
  • An analysis of nearly 25 years of data for about 10,000 civil servants in London finds an association between socioeconomic position and risk of death, with much of this relation accounted for by health behaviors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity, according to a study in the March 24/31 issue of JAMA. (redorbit.com)
  • of the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France and colleagues examined the role of health behaviors in the association between socioeconomic position and mortality. (redorbit.com)
  • for example information that suggests that our lifestyle choices are bad for our health would indicate that we were not adaptively adequate (after all, why would someone intentionally continue to do something that is harmful to their health). (spsp.org)
  • What's really interesting about self-affirmation theory is that it suggests a technique for overcoming defensiveness to threatening health-risk information. (spsp.org)
  • Those behaviors-as well as 24 other, seemingly unrelated habits-might actually prove you're pretty brigh t, a new study published in Personality and Individual Differences suggests. (menshealth.com)
  • A new study suggests the mood or tone of a restaurant can influence healthy behaviors (even in a fast food joint). (psychcentral.com)
  • Children and adolescents who ate foods high in saturated fats, refined carbohydrates and processed foods appear to experience more depression and low moods, suggests a new systematic research review in the American Journal of Public Health . (cfah.org)
  • This study suggests that health behaviors explain a substantial part of social inequalities in mortality and demonstrates the importance of taking into account changes over time in health behaviors when examining their role in social inequalities. (redorbit.com)
  • A growing body of research suggests that prolonged sitting throughout the day may be harmful to your health. (stanford.edu)
  • This finding suggests that although fighting and mating behaviors are instinctive, they require that the mouse's brain learn to distinguish between males and females. (nih.gov)
  • This finding suggests that socialization with a female alone is sufficient for triggering attack behavior with an intruder male mouse. (nih.gov)
  • Convincing a person to receive a vaccination to benefit their health is a growing struggle for public health and medical clinicians. (psychcentral.com)
  • How effective are public health departments at preventing mortality? (repec.org)
  • Public Health Reports. (hhs.gov)
  • It is an official journal of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). (wikipedia.org)
  • Behavior change, in the context of public health, refers to efforts to change people's personal habits to prevent disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Behavior change in public health is also known as social and behavior change communication (SBCC). (wikipedia.org)
  • A good public health intervention is not only defined by the results they create, but also the number of levels it hits on the socioecological model (individual, interpersonal, community and/or environment). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 , 3 The expanding influence of Eastern and Arab cultures in the United States and Europe places WPS as a potentially important public health issue for adolescents in these countries. (aappublications.org)
  • Describe the roles biostatistics serves in the discipline of public health. (albany.edu)
  • Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public health data. (albany.edu)
  • Apply basic informatics techniques with vital statistics and public health records in the description of public health characteristics and in public health research and evaluation. (albany.edu)
  • Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies. (albany.edu)
  • Develop written and oral presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences. (albany.edu)
  • Identify the principles and limitations of public health screening programs. (albany.edu)
  • Describe a public health problem in terms of magnitude, person, time and place. (albany.edu)
  • Identify the main components and issues of the organization, financing and delivery of health services and public health systems in the US. (albany.edu)
  • Describe the legal and ethical bases for public health and health services. (albany.edu)
  • Apply principles of strategic planning and marketing to public health. (albany.edu)
  • Describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and solution of public health problems. (albany.edu)
  • Apply via the School of Public Health. (sc.edu)
  • LAWRENCE -- For the most part, public health initiatives focus on stemming one type of unhealthy behavior: Anti-smoking campaigns, curbing alcohol abuse, or ramping up exercise, for example. (eurekalert.org)
  • Looking at the more holistic picture of their health habits, would give medical or public health advocates a clearer picture and allow them to prescribe a plan of action that might be more likely to succeed, Saint Onge said. (eurekalert.org)
  • These findings have lead to an increasing recognition of disordered gambling as a significant public health problem. (washington.edu)
  • Lee Hae-kook, a psychiatrist who served as a consultant on a WHO task force for mental health, said the gaming disorder classification followed a "thorough review of its public health implications. (koreaherald.com)
  • Lee said while he "understand(s) the concerns of the game industry," there were no considerations -- political or economic -- involved in the decision other than protection of public health. (koreaherald.com)
  • This paper presents results that are part of a larger study carried out in five districts of the eastern Indian state of Orissa, where endemic malaria represents one of the most serious public health concerns. (rand.org)
  • The Department of Health, Behavior and Society offers a number of certificate programs that provide academic training to students seeking targeted education in a specific area of public health. (jhsph.edu)
  • When it comes to public health communications and social marketing campaigns, digital communication is an increasingly powerful influence that reaches across demographics, across borders, and beyond traditional spheres of influence. (air.org)
  • With over 2.8 billion Internet users, many professional communicators engaged in large-scale public health campaigns recognize the value of engaging audiences through digital media. (air.org)
  • Digital platforms have forged a new frontier for public health campaigns, giving us many tools for promoting health communication initiatives that seek to encourage healthy lifestyles and move people to specific health behaviors. (air.org)
  • The Fast Track Master of Public Health (5th Year Program) provides an exceptional educational experience to undergraduate students. (uab.edu)
  • This University-wide program will allow students to receive exceptional training in Public Health from our trained faculty. (uab.edu)
  • Upon graduation, students will complete their departmental requirements, electives, PUH 697: Internship, and PUH 695: Public Health Integrative Experience. (uab.edu)
  • If you have questions regarding the Fast Track MPH Program, please contact the School of Public Health at 205-934-4993 or at [email protected] . (uab.edu)
  • Public Health Fast Track (MPH). (uab.edu)
  • Scheduling will resume once more is known about the duration of the shelter-in-place and related public-health guidance. (acefitness.org)
  • While providing current information in common areas addressed in health psychology such as stress, chronic pain, cigarette smoking and sleep disorders, the book examines cross-cultural dimensions in wellness and health care as well as health communication ranging from clinician and patient to the social marketing models used in public health. (rowman.com)
  • He received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Saint Louis University and later received a Master's in Public Health from the Saint Louis University School of Public Health. (rowman.com)
  • Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. (repec.org)
  • Older adults with mental health conditions, such as depression or cognitive impairment, have a higher risk of readmission within 30 days after a hospital stay for pneumonia, heart attack or congestive heart failure, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine . (cfah.org)
  • The proposed study will clarify the causal pathways between culturally identifying behavior, PCB exposure and body burden, thyroid functioning, cognitive functioning, social behavior and school functioning while identifying activities that are important to maintain cultural identify and unrelated to exposure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • DBT was originally developed by psychologist Marsha M. Linehan as a response to the limitations of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). (prweb.com)
  • Wife's Sexual Behavior. (medhelp.org)
  • Now, researchers at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom have done a new study , published October 18 in the medical journal JCI Insight , that has found that the hormone may also be involved in regulating sexual behavior . (everydayhealth.com)
  • Saint Onge, also a professor of health policy and management at KU Medical Center, is the lead author of a new study published in Social Science Medicine -- Population Health that has used national health statistics and identified how seven health behavior patterns based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (eurekalert.org)
  • All health behaviors taken together at baseline explained 29 percent of the gradient for cardiovascular mortality and 45 percent when they were entered as time-dependent covariates. (redorbit.com)
  • By working together, education and health agencies, parents, and communities can ensure that students are healthy and ready to learn in school. (cdc.gov)
  • Find out more about the connection between health and academic achievement on CDC's Healthy Schools Health and Academics website . (cdc.gov)
  • The health cost increases with wealth and the degree of unhealthiness, leading wealthier individuals to consume more healthy and moderately unhealthy, but fewer severely unhealthy goods. (rand.org)
  • The purpose of this initiative is to invite applications for research projects that will expand our knowledge of basic decision-making processes underlying initiation and long-term maintenance of healthy lifestyle behaviors that may reduce one's risk of cancer and other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and addiction. (nih.gov)
  • Such programs include providing incentives for healthy behaviors, such as extra days off work for meeting exercise and weight goals, which the Arkansas health plan offers, he said. (medindia.net)
  • Understanding how a healthy nervous system works to produce certain behaviors will help shed light on problems that can lead to brain disorders. (nih.gov)
  • Our study shows that moving from viewing time at the office as a sign of productivity, to emphasizing actual results can create a work environment that fosters healthy behavior and well-being," says Moen. (innovations-report.com)
  • In the first phase, the researchers administered the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Inventory (which was designed by the research team) and other assessment measures at 67 health care sites nationwide. (rwjf.org)
  • Researchers also administered a Health Care Site Characteristics Questionnaire to 67 site administrators. (rwjf.org)
  • In the second phase, the researchers tested the effectiveness of a Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care and Health Promoting Model Program on the health status of patients with type 2 diabetes. (rwjf.org)
  • When the researchers looked at the other personality types, they also found some interesting behaviors there, too. (menshealth.com)
  • A gene that affects the brain's dopamine system appears to have influenced mothers' behavior during a recent economic downturn, researchers say. (npr.org)
  • Anxiety in Health Behavior and Physical Illness is a comprehensive resource to be read not only by clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, and, other health professionals, but also by researchers and graduate students on the cutting edge of the field. (springer.com)
  • This imaging technology enabled the researchers to tell which neurons were associated with attack or mating behaviors. (nih.gov)
  • The two methods allowed the researchers to compare normal brain activity and behavior with their responses while getting the hormone. (everydayhealth.com)
  • To achieve this, our communication science and health behavior experts conduct comprehensive formative and summative evaluations and deliver solutions that are grounded in theory and evidence. (rti.org)
  • Overall, we found no evidence that the Great Recession had a significant influence on the existing trends in health and health behaviors. (nber.org)
  • Is there evidence that digital strategies, such as social media engagement, can affect online patient/consumer behavior? (air.org)
  • Develop evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention programs. (uab.edu)
  • To support adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances and for promoting oral health behavior, we developed a theory- and evidence-based mHealth program, the WhiteTeeth app. (tudelft.nl)
  • Over forty experts examine reciprocal roles of anxiety and medical illness as causal or exacerbating factors in each other's onset and development, describe forms of anxiety typical to major disease entities, discuss common health behaviors as they impact anxiety, recast anxiety disorders as chronic illness, and identify patients for whom new forms of treatment may be warranted. (springer.com)
  • However, there is the development of HealthyPeople 2020 that has national objectives aimed to accomplish in 10 years to improve the health of all Americans. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the focus is on quantitative measures, the editors argue that these measures are centrally important to the study of health communication. (peterlang.com)
  • The study appears in the journal Health Communication . (psychcentral.com)
  • A new study from the U.K. finds emotional awareness training is a valuable tool in moderating the behavior of young toughs. (psmag.com)
  • The Supporting Teachers and Children in Schools (STARS) study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula, and aimed to promote social and emotional wellbeing, against a backdrop of Government figures that show 10% of children have a mental health condition. (eurekalert.org)
  • The aim of the study is to evaluate the differences in the behavior and attitudes of male and female lawyers regarding their lifestyles and health habits. (hindawi.com)
  • And the study does have some limitations, mainly that the behaviors were self-reported. (menshealth.com)
  • A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that U.S. military culture perpetuates the notion that using tobacco provides stress relief. (cfah.org)
  • Getting support from a chronic care coordinator increases blood-glucose testing and foot and eye exams in people with type 2 diabetes, but it may not improve blood-sugar control, a new study in the journal Health Services Research indicates. (cfah.org)
  • The study appears in the American Journal of Health Behavior . (cfah.org)
  • Older women living in the most deprived areas of the U.S. Appalachia had higher rates of late stage breast cancer than women in more affluent areas, finds a new study in Health Services Research . (cfah.org)
  • Schell LM, Tarbell AM. A partnership study of PCBs and the health of Mohawk youth: lessons from our past and guidelines for our future. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A large study of members of the Arkansas State and Public School Employees Health Plan finds that health care costs are higher for those who report they are obese, are smokers or are physically inactive. (medindia.net)
  • Although the findings are not startling, this study took in an unusual site for such research, and demonstrated that personal health habits are a big indicator of costs, said lead author Rhonda Hill. (medindia.net)
  • The study was supported in part by NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). (nih.gov)
  • A flexible workplace initiative improved employees' health behavior and well-being, including a rise in the amount and quality of sleep and better health management, according to a new study by University of Minnesota sociology professors Erin Kelly and Phyllis Moen, which appears in the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. (innovations-report.com)
  • He adds, "What drives us toward behaviors is that it has importance to us, it has salience, and the study shows that the hormone is associated with the salient network of the brain. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Then both groups are given health-risk information to read before completing dependent variables such as measures of message acceptance, intentions and actual behavior. (spsp.org)
  • The roster also includes speakers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, University of Michigan and National Jewish Health, in addition to scientists from Emory and Georgia Tech. (emory.edu)
  • The findings give insight into how gut microbes may affect behavior in simple organisms. (nih.gov)
  • These findings show how a neurotransmitter produced by gut bacteria can influence behavior. (nih.gov)
  • Professor Tamsin Ford, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "Our findings suggest that this training potentially improves all children's mental health but it's particularly exciting to see the larger benefit on the children who were initially struggling. (eurekalert.org)
  • This might explain inconsistencies in research findings as the commonly used methods may not correctly represent the spatial area in which the behavior in question occurs ( 5 , 10 , 11 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • These taxa and functional groups represent potential mechanisms through which the microbiome interacts with the psychosocial environment and, if replicated, potentially influence the development of behavior. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • Within the realm of health behaviors specifically, the TPB has helped explain variance in intentions to perform health behaviors ranging from physical activity (Armitage, 2005) to sunscreen use (Allom, Mullan, & Sebastian, 2013). (peterlang.com)
  • This is a great role for people who are looking to advance their careers in occupational therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy, behavior-based therapy, and other psychology specialties. (simplyhired.com)
  • Physical therapists and physical therapist assistants have long been asking patients and clients to change some of their behaviors, either for the short term or for the long term and for reasons that will improve their functional status or quality of life or prevent decline. (apta.org)
  • Is long-term maintenance of health-related physical activity possible? (hhs.gov)
  • This program examines the relationship between mind and body, and some of the ways psychological factors affect our physical health and immune system. (learner.org)
  • The combination of these mental and physical health risks results in potentially serious health problems that cannot be treated effectively without examining their psychological causes. (learner.org)
  • Regarding health, it is worth pointing out that students of all ages tend to focus on the physical aspects of health and pay less attention to the mental and social aspects. (sciencenetlinks.com)
  • The 3-4-50 concept outlines that there are 3 behaviors (poor diet, little to no physical activity, and smoking), that lead to four diseases (heart disease/stroke, diabetes, cancer, pulmonary disease), that account for 50% of deaths worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, behavior change steps to include more physical activity can improve one's life expectancy, control weight, and boost mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • These recommendations were largely based upon decades of observational and experimental studies documenting the health effects associated with moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity. (acsm.org)
  • Therefore, in formulating the questions to be examined by the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, there was considerable interest in understanding whether the amount of time spent sitting modifies the association between physical activity and health. (acsm.org)
  • The new guidelines emphasize that for substantial health benefits, adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes to 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes to 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity (or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous activity). (acsm.org)
  • It is a well-known fact that an inactive lifestyle connected with a little physical activity has become a severe health concern. (hindawi.com)
  • A new systematic review in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that providing public parks and walking and biking trails is the most cost-effective strategy to increase physical activity among large populations in urban areas. (cfah.org)
  • There is little to no reason that patients with asthma should not fully participate in regular physical activity,' said Felix S.F. Ram, Ph.D., of Massey University's College of Health in Auckland, New Zealand. (cfah.org)
  • Because their overall physical health is good, due to age, they might not be thinking about long-term physical effects such as liver and heart disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • The difference between the baseline only and repeated assessments of health behaviors was mostly due to an increased explanatory power of diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. (redorbit.com)
  • Other topics include questions about family composition, the student's physical health, and other health behaviors and attitudes. (umich.edu)
  • How well you cope with life - your mental health - is just as important as your physical health. (sharecare.com)
  • Anxiety in Health Behavior and Physical Illness explores complex relationships between medical and anxiety pathology on the theoretical, research, and practical fronts. (springer.com)
  • Unfortunately, most Americans are doing a fairly poor job at caring for their health and well-being, as evidenced by the rising rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular risk, stress, anxiety and other lifestyle-related conditions. (shrm.org)
  • Disordered gambling has been associated with a host of serious consequences for the gambler and society, including financial, legal, social, familial, and work/educational difficulties as well as elevated rates of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation and behavior. (washington.edu)
  • He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont and Director of the Anxiety and Health Research Laboratory and Clinic. (springer.com)
  • His work is funded through the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, and Anxiety Disorder Association of America. (springer.com)
  • The status quo of medicine focused on 'illness care' rather than 'health care' is not sustainable. (emory.edu)
  • This is done with the utmost care after sufficient rapport has been established so that the client doesn't feel the need to defend his behavior. (acefitness.org)
  • He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. (psychcentral.com)
  • The Institute of Medicine has identified patient-centered care as an important dimension of health care quality. (rwjf.org)
  • Patient-centered, 'culturally sensitive' health care addresses patients' cultural preferences and tailors care to the patient's cultural needs. (rwjf.org)
  • The higher the percentage of racially and ethnically diverse staff members employed at a health care facility, the more satisfaction patients reported about their care. (rwjf.org)
  • Improving health care in ways that matter most to patients, families, and caregivers. (rwjf.org)
  • Therefore, this trend presents a new challenge for adolescent health care providers. (aappublications.org)
  • This trend, reflecting globalization's impact on developed nations, presents a new challenge for adolescent health care providers. (aappublications.org)
  • And a survey of doctors and other health care providers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia found that even though 95 percent of them thought showing up to work sick puts patients at risk, 83 percent of them did it anyway. (npr.org)
  • The vast majority of health care providers said they were worried about letting down colleagues or patients if they stayed home. (npr.org)
  • We all feel pressured to deny our own needs (often giving up meals, bathroom breaks, and yes, caring for our own illnesses) in order to meet the high pressure/high demand/productivity of the health care system," one doctor wrote. (npr.org)
  • And this is despite the fact that numerous outbreaks in health care facilities have been caused by infected workers. (npr.org)
  • If you can afford to lose the opportunity to take care of your infants or lose a mating opportunity, then you can act on the sickness behavior cues without too much of a loss. (npr.org)
  • Health care is a high-stakes, pressure-packed environment that can test the limits of civility in the workplace. (emaxhealth.com)
  • A new alert issued today by The Joint Commission warns that rude language and hostile behavior among health care professionals goes beyond being unpleasant and poses a serious threat to patient safety and the overall quality of care. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Addressing unprofessional behavior among health care professionals is part of a series of Alerts issued by the Joint Commission. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Previous Alerts have addressed pediatric medication errors, wrong-site surgery, medication mix-ups, health care-associated infections and patient suicides, among others. (emaxhealth.com)
  • between the immediate gratification factor and the pressure from pharmaceuticals (everywhere you go in the health care field you see clocks, stickie notepads, pens, rollodexes, all with insignias of various medications). (behavior.net)
  • Our goal is to present the facts for readers to understand and use to make informed choices about health and health care. (cfah.org)
  • Through blogs and comments, patients and experts explore what it takes to find good health care and make the most of it. (cfah.org)
  • Overall, we found counties that are struggling economically tend to have inadequate health care resources or infrastructure and have the highest rates of later-stage breast cancer,' said Roger Anderson, Ph.D., of Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. (cfah.org)
  • The BBB Program and the Health Care Management Department of the Wharton School have jointly sponsored this effort. (upenn.edu)
  • Students interested in the minor should contact Ms. June Kinney in the Health Care Systems Office at [email protected] or in her office 205 Colonial Penn Center (3641 Locust Walk) for advising and signature before declaring the minor with the BBB Office. (upenn.edu)
  • HCMG 101, Health Care Systems, is a basic course and would ordinarily be taken first in the sequence of health management course (although it is not technically a prerequisite for other HCMG courses). (upenn.edu)
  • Neonatal health care costs related to smoking during pregnancy. (springer.com)
  • And many of these offerings, especially those intended for use outside a clinic or hospital, "are only going to be effective if they can change behavior-change health care-for a long period of time," McCray said. (xconomy.com)
  • Effectively promoting health-related behavior change needs to be a key component of health care research and policy. (medindia.net)
  • Participants who admitted they had high risks had average annual health care costs of $4432, but average annual costs were $2382 for those who did not. (medindia.net)
  • Attitude, perceived behaviour control, social support and social norm, and the level of satisfaction with Dutch health care proved to be directly associated with screening intention. (tudelft.nl)
  • The book departs from traditional health psychology and health behavior textbook with its attention to public policy and international dimensions of health care. (rowman.com)
  • primary care medicine, and cross-cultural issues in health care. (rowman.com)
  • Gray's Social Stories follow a specific format and are designed especially for children on the autism spectrum to teach social cues and related behaviors and emotions that children with autism are unable to define and deal with appropriately. (empowher.com)
  • Lawyers are found to have unfavorable health practices related to use of tobacco and alcohol, exercise, diet, sleeping habits, and stress. (hindawi.com)
  • Although some of these practices may be transient in nature, other "habits" could persevere into middle and old age to cause health hazards later in life. (hindawi.com)
  • Behavior modification refers to a treatment approach that focuses on changing maladaptive behaviors and breaking bad habits. (sharecare.com)
  • Identify the symptoms and characteristics of a bipolar disorder and more with information from a licensed mental health counselor in this free video series on mental health conditions. (ehow.com)
  • Predictive health is a new paradigm that defines the unique characteristics that predict disease risk for individuals and populations and uses new discoveries in biomedicine to emphasize health maintenance and health recovery rather than treatment of disease. (emory.edu)
  • In these circumstances we act defensively to avoid accepting the health information and the fact that we might be behaving irrationally and putting our health at risk. (spsp.org)
  • Affirming" the self (i.e., reflecting on positive aspects of the self) gives a sense that our self-integrity is intact which acts as a buffer when threatening health-risk information is presented. (spsp.org)
  • This allows us to accept there is a risk and change our behavior accordingly. (spsp.org)
  • Several published studies have shown promising results, with self-affirmation leading to more appropriate responses to risk information about a range of health issues, including alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption, unsafe sex, poor diet, and cigarette smoking. (spsp.org)
  • It is possible that self-affirmation, in addition to reducing the threat from the health risk information, also reduced stereotype threat that may be felt by non-white participants who may regard some health behaviors as less typical of themselves than of white people ( Oyserman, Fryberg & Yoder, 2007 ). (spsp.org)
  • Specific aims are: 1) Evaluate relative efficacy of in-person vs. web-based PFIs in comparison to assessment only, in reducing gambling behavior, AOD use, and related consequences of at-risk college student gamblers with SUDs. (washington.edu)
  • Students who ever used synthetic cannabinoids had a significantly greater likelihood of engaging in each of the behaviors in the substance use and sexual risk domains compared with students who ever used marijuana only. (aappublications.org)
  • All three behaviors are risk factors for medical conditions including heart disease and diabetes. (medindia.net)
  • Obesity is a condition where there is excess accumulation of body fat which poses a risk to the health of the individual. (medindia.net)
  • This webinar will present data from a newly released report , based on the sites that used the optional gender expression Youth Risk Behavior Survey question in 2013 and 2015, to examine the associations between gender nonconformity and various health risk behaviors. (pflag.org)
  • Research in Health Behavior (1-10 cr. (indiana.edu)
  • Research projects in the area of health behavior are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. (indiana.edu)
  • Further research is warranted to determine whether lower grades in school lead to these health behaviors and conditions, if these health behaviors and conditions lead to lower grades, or some other factors lead to these health behaviors and conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Education, Cognition, Health Knowledge, and Health Behavior ," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1310, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum. (repec.org)
  • New research finds that when it comes to vaccination, words matter as do perceptions of what is normal behavior. (psychcentral.com)
  • To explore the influence of gut microbes on behavior, a research team, led Drs. Michael O'Donnell and Piali Sengupta of Brandeis University studied Caenorhabditis elegans , a type of worm. (nih.gov)
  • Health Behavior and Policy Review is a rigorously peer-reviewed scholarly bi-monthly publication that seeks manuscripts on health behavior or policy topics that represent original research, including papers that examine the development, advocacy, implementation, or evaluation of policies around specific health issues. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Daniela Friedman, chair of Health Promotion, Education, & Behavior (HPEB) gives an overview of degrees, research areas and opportunities for students within HPEB. (sc.edu)
  • "The role of the gut microbiome in mental health is a rapidly emerging field of research, however more research is needed into the role of 'psychobiotics' in mental health treatment," ​ said Dr. Joseph Firth, Senior Research Fellow at NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University. (nutraingredients-usa.com)
  • This type of research is essential to understanding the key drivers in rising health costs. (medindia.net)
  • A research team led by Dr. David J. Anderson of Caltech examined the activity of neural circuits within the ventromedial hypothalamus of mice to explore whether certain aggression and mating behaviors that are considered instinctive are truly hard wired rather than learned. (nih.gov)
  • How can we use digital analytics and other research methods to understand the relationship of online and offline patient/consumer behavior? (air.org)
  • What issues of privacy and human subject research should we address, given the nature of personal health data? (air.org)
  • Graduates of our health behavior program are well positioned for opportunities in local, state, and federal agencies, non-profit/community based organizations, private research foundations, as well as the academic setting. (uab.edu)