Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Vancomycin: Antibacterial obtained from Streptomyces orientalis. It is a glycopeptide related to RISTOCETIN that inhibits bacterial cell wall assembly and is toxic to kidneys and the inner ear.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Endocarditis, Bacterial: Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Catheter-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the use of catheters. Proper aseptic technique, site of catheter placement, material composition, and virulence of the organism are all factors that can influence possible infection.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Methicillin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Enterobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.Klebsiella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus KLEBSIELLA.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Actinomycetales Infections: Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.Enterococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria consisting of organisms causing variable hemolysis that are normal flora of the intestinal tract. Previously thought to be a member of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS, it is now recognized as a separate genus.Vancomycin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of VANCOMYCIN, an inhibitor of cell wall synthesis.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Great BritainPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Salmonella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Acinetobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACINETOBACTER.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Bartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Equipment Contamination: The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Klebsiella pneumoniae: Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Bartonella quintana: A species of gram-negative bacteria in which man is the primary host and the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, the principal vector. It is the etiological agent of TRENCH FEVER.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Viridans Streptococci: A large heterogeneous group of mostly alpha-hemolytic streptococci. They colonize the respiratory tract at birth and generally have a low degree of pathogenicity. This group of species includes STREPTOCOCCUS MITIS; STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS; STREPTOCOCCUS ORALIS; STREPTOCOCCUS SANGUIS; STREPTOCOCCUS SOBRINUS; and the STREPTOCOCCUS MILLERI GROUP. The latter are often beta-hemolytic and commonly produce invasive pyogenic infections including brain and abdominal abscesses.TaiwanDaptomycin: A cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic that inhibits GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIA.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Trench Fever: An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Endocarditis: Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Immunocompromised Host: A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.EnglandStreptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Coagulase: Enzymes that cause coagulation in plasma by forming a complex with human PROTHROMBIN. Coagulases are produced by certain STAPHYLOCOCCUS and YERSINIA PESTIS. Staphylococci produce two types of coagulase: Staphylocoagulase, a free coagulase that produces true clotting of plasma, and Staphylococcal clumping factor, a bound coagulase in the cell wall that induces clumping of cells in the presence of fibrinogen.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Haemophilus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.
"Results from the mandatory surveillance of MRSA bacteraemia". Health Protection Agency. 3 August 2011. Retrieved 12 October ... It was named by the Health Service Journal as one of the top hundred NHS trusts to work for in 2015. At that time it had 3852 ... MRSA bacteraemia rate per 100,000 bed days (year RUH:national average): 2008/9 6.8:4.3, 2009/10 2.6:2.7, 2010/11 0.9:1.8 " ... It also received a critical Commission for Health Improvement report and zero-star rating in 2002 after a determination of " ...
... and subsequent bacteremia, which can cause adverse health consequences. Some people, such as those with immune compromise, ... In certain cases there is a risk of bacteremia when probiotics are used. Currently, the probiotic strain, frequency, dose and ... Although probiotics are considered safe, they may cause bacteria-host interactions and adverse health consequences. ...
These infections can remain localized or become systemic (i.e. bacteremia). The severity of infection varies depending on the ... due to manipulation by health care workers. In either scenario, a high probability exists that the microbe will form a biofilm ...
Primary bacteraemia, infection without identifiable focal origin, comprises approximately 20% of the reported cases. Recently, ... Zoonoses and Public Health. 56 (4): 206-208. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2008.01213.x. ISSN 1863-1959. PMID 19309483. Chirico, J.; ... These properties may explain the tendency of recurrent bacteraemia observed in human SDSE-cases. In order to establish ... Sylvetsky, N; Raveh, D; Schlesinger, Y; Rudensky, B; Yinnon, AM (1 June 2002). "Bacteremia due to beta-hemolytic Streptococcus ...
Health Protection Report Vol. 5 No. 46 - 18 November 2011 ·. "Pyogenic and non-pyogenic streptococcal bacteraemia, England, ... Developed by the Women's Health Specialist Library (part of the National Library for Health), the learning package is based ... Bacteremia without a focus occurs in 80-85%, pneumonia in 10-15%, and meningitis in 5-10% of cases. The initial clinical ... In the UK, this is the method described by the Health Protection Agency After incubation, the enrichment broth can also be ...
The health care provider may need to use topical anesthetic before accessing the port. Ports can be used for medications, ... Infections resulting in bacteremia from Staphylococcus aureus require removal of the catheter and antibiotics. If the catheter ... They cause a great deal of morbidity (harm) and deaths, and increase health care costs. Historically, a few CVC infections were ... National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (September 2002). "Technology appraisal: the clinical effectiveness and ...
World Health Organization. Archived from the original on 2012-05-23. World Health Organization: Streptococcus pneumoniae ... Fabrizio K, Groner A, Boes M, Pirofski L (2007). "A Human Monoclonal Immunoglobulin M Reduces Bacteremia and Inflammation in a ... The World Health Organization recommends the use of the conjugate vaccine in the routine immunizations given to children. This ... They are on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a ...
Public Health Agency of Canada, 2011. Web "Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety". Retrieved 8 April 2016. Ryan, ... In particular, S. aureus is one of the most common causes of bacteremia and infective endocarditis. Additionally, it can cause ... Some believe health-care workers' dogs should be considered a significant source of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus, especially ... Adjunctive rifampicin has been historically used in the management of S aureus bacteraemia, but randomised controlled trial ...
Marriott D, Stark D, Harkness J (February 2007). "Veillonella parvula discitis and secondary bacteremia: a rare infection ... International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 11 (7): 6979-7000. doi:10.3390/ijerph110706979. ISSN 1660- ...
1999). "Mycoplasma penetrans bacteremia and primary antiphospholipid syndrome". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 5 (1): 164-7. doi ... Pathogens with an Impact on Human Reproductive Healthogens with an Impact on Human Reproductive Health". Journal of Pathogens. ... Pathogens with an Impact on Human Reproductive Health". Journal of Pathogens. 2014 (183167): 1-15. doi:10.1155/2014/183167. PMC ...
... and bacteremia. In addition, infection of GAS may lead to further complications and health conditions, namely acute rheumatic ... Health Canada and the US CDC recommend close contacts see their doctor for full evaluation and may require antibiotics; current ... Public Health policies internationally reflect differing views of how the close contacts of people affected by severe Group A ... Health Protection Agency, Group A Streptococcus Working Group (2004). "Interim UK guidelines for management of close community ...
Everyday tooth brushing and flossing will similarly cause bacteremia, so a high standard of oral health should be adhered to at ... In the past, 1 in 8 cases of infective endocarditis were because of bacteremia caused by dental procedures (in most cases due ... In contrast, Staphylococcus blood stream infections are frequently acquired in a health care setting where they can enter the ... Risk factors for infective endocarditis are based on the premise that in a healthy individual, bacteremia (bacteria entering ...
The majority of Cronobacter cases occur in adults, most often bacteraemia and have not been studied in detail. However the ... Two cases of infants infected with Cronobacter sakazakii were reported to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services ... are associated as causative agents of neonatal bacteraemia, meningitis and necrotising enterocolitis. However, multilocus ...
Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 8. ISBN 0702039748. Grunau BE, Wiens MO, Brubacher JR (September 2010). "Dantrolene in the ... "Predictors of mortality in beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia: a population-based study". The Journal of infection. 58 (4 ... "Fever". National Institute of Health. Archived from the original on 30 April 2016. Guppy, MP; Mar, CB, Thorning, S, Rack, A; ... Craven, R and Hirnle, C. (2006). Fundamentals of nursing: Human health and function. Fourth edition. p. 1044 Lewis, SM, ...
"Living With MRSA" (PDF). Group Health Cooperative/Tacoma-Pierce County Health Dept./Washington State Dept. of Health. Retrieved ... concluded that MRSA bacteremia is associated with increased mortality as compared with MSSA bacteremia (odds ratio= 1.93; 95% ... Health, Safety and Welfare) Approved Code of Practice and Guidance L24, available from Health and Safety Executive Books. But ... Health Departments recommend that preventing the spread of MRSA in the home can be to: launder materials that have come into ...
In 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommended piperacillin-tazobactam as first line therapy for ... "Carbapenems versus alternative antibiotics for the treatment of bacteraemia due to Enterobacteriaceae producing extended- ... Am J Health Syst Pharm. 67 (23): 2015-24. doi:10.2146/ajhp090672. PMID 21098373. Pei G, Yin W, Zhang Y, Wang T, Mao Y, Sun Y ( ... Health Sciences Centre. 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2017. PRIMAXIN (Brand Name Drug) FDA Application No. (NDA) 050587 Drug Details ...
Slemons conducted research and published in the area of pregnancy and prenatal health. His most widely-known work, "The ... Slemons, J. Morris, M.D. (1915) Bacteremia. Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol LXV, No. 15: 1265-1268. Slemons, J ... designed to answer common questions and provide practical health information. In addition, he published a number of research ...
... are born with bacteremia caused by genital Mycoplasmas". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 198 (1): 1-3. doi: ... Value Health. 10 (5): 358-66. doi:10.1111/j.1524-4733.2007.00189.x. PMID 17888100. "Prevention - STD Information from CDC". ... endometritis chorioamnionitis surgical and nonsurgical wound infections bacteremia pneumonia meningitis salpingitis urethritis ...
Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN 1416065016. Vandamme, P.; Hommez, J.; Snauwaert, C.; Hoste, B.; Cleenwerck, I.; Lefebvre, K.; ... Lau, S K P (1 March 2006). "Globicatella bacteraemia identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing". Journal of Clinical ...
Health care facilities routinely track their infection rates according to the guidelines issued by the Joint Commission. The ... MRSA Bacteremia, and C.difficile laboratory-identified events. The public reporting of these data is an effort by the ... Utah Department of Health. 2017. Retrieved 2017-01-09. "Group A Streptococcus Calculator". Centers for Disease Control and ... Department of Health and Human Services. For meaningful comparisons of infection rates, populations must be very similar ...
Bacteremia Candidiasis Mycosis Finding the "Missing 50%" of Invasive Candidiasis: How Nonculture Diagnostics Will Improve ... 2013-04-04 Oxford Journals, Medicine & Health, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Volume 56, Issue 9 Pp. 1284-1292 see online: http ...
London: Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN 1-4557-1210-8. Neilson, Alasdair H.; Allard, Ann-Sofie (2013). Organic chemicals in the ... "Bacteremia Due to Dietzia maris in an Immunocompromised Patient". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 29 (5): 1338-1340. doi:10.1086/ ...
Thirty-fourth World Health Assembly, Agenda item 23.2. World Health Organization. World Health Organization(Organisation ... bacteremia, bacterial meningitis, botulism, urinary tract infection and necrotizing enterocolitis. Breastfeeding may protect ... Ministry of Health Health Promotion Council. "Guideline for Management of Child Screening in Primary Care Settings and ... World Health Organization. (2003). Global strategy for infant and young child feeding (PDF). Geneva, Switzerland: World Health ...
Bacteraemia is a condition in which bacteria are present in the blood and may cause disease, including systemic disease such as ... Elsevier Health Sciences APAC. 2014. p. 173. ISBN 978-81-312-3800-4. "Teeth whitening". bowriverdental.ca. 10 February 2014. ... If the bacteria involved in the bacteraemia reach the cardiac tissue, infective (or bacterial) endocarditis can develop, with ... Some dental treatments may cause bacteraemia, such as tooth extractions, subgingival scaling or even simple aggressive tooth ...
... occult febrile bacteremia, meningitis, epiglottitis, septic arthritis, cellulitis, otitis media, purulent pericarditis, and ... The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC), administers a health care delivery system for over 50 rural communities in the ... Additionally, the Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) provides village-based primary health care in 47 village clinics in the ... the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation was born from a vision of retaining more control over the provision of health care ...
Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section Office of Public Health, Louisiana Dept of Health & Hospitals. 8 September 2008.. ... Chewning JH (July 2011). "Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium bacteremia successfully treated with high-dose ampicillin- ... whether the body fluids are excreted and how frequently health care providers touch these body sites. Patients infected or ...
... DENTAL NEWSLETTER A publication of the Dental Prof… ... in collaboration with the IHSmassive bacteremia, prostaglandins, and other inflammatory Maternal and Child Health and Health ... United States Public Health Service * 1. United States Public Health Service DENTAL NEWSLETTER A publication of the Dental ... "Dental public health is the science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting dental health through ...
... has provided the following bacteremias and sepsis information. ... The Antimicrobial Stewardship Team at UW Health in Madison, ... Bacteremias and Sepsis. The Antimicrobial Stewardship Team at UW Health in Madison, Wisconsin, has provided the following ... All UW Health Clinical Practice Guidelines. Current guidelines at UW Health include: ... Bacteremias and Catheter Related Infections. *Mermel LA, Allon M, Bouza E, et al. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the ...
Australian public hospitals reported 1,502 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) at a rate of ... Australias health 2020 Australias health 2020 is the AIHWs 17th biennial report on the health of Australians. ... Australias health performance The latest on Australias health and health system performance ... Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2017. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian hospitals 2016-17. Cat. no. ...
The present study was designed to provide preliminary information on the outcomes of S. aureus bacteraemia in ... Bacteraemia had its onset in the community in 59.6% (865/1,449) of cases (Table 2). Of these, 30.9% were health-care associated ... Bacteraemia had a community onset in 60% of cases, although 31% of these were health-care associated. Overall, 57% of episodes ... J Paediatr Child Health 2002;38:290-294.. 18. Denniston S, Riordan FA. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in children and ...
Australias health 2018 Australias health 2018 is the AIHWs 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It… ... Building the evidence on primary health care The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare is developing a National Primary ... Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nKPI and OSR Review The AIHW has been funded by the Department of Health to undertake a ... Australias welfare 2017 Australias welfare 2017 is the 13th biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health… ...
Published article number: 1463 - Injections that kill: nosocomial bacteraemia and degedege in Tanzania ... Public Health 1980; 94: 229-234.. 21. Van de Wetering M, Poole J, Friedland I, Caron H. Bacteremia in a paediatric oncology ... Reid S. Injections that kill: nosocomial bacteraemia and degedege in Tanzania. Rural and Remote Health 2010; 10: 1463. ... A follow-up study at public health facilities in the same region found that of sick children given chloroquine at the health ...
This guide is for district health boards in New Zealand to use so that they can report on HA-SAB consistently, contributing to ... Implementation guide for the surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB). 28 Aug 2017 , Infection Prevention & ... Implementation guide for the surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) (3 MB, pdf) ... Whakapai i ngā mahi hauora hinengaro waranga hoki Mental Health & Addiction Quality Improvement ...
A seven-day course of antibiotic treatment for Gram-negative bacteraemia (GNB), a serious infection that occurs when bacteria ... More in Medicine & Health. * A Trojan Horse delivery for treating a rare, potentially deadly, blood-clotting disorder ... Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemia. European Society of Clinical ... Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemia Research presented at 28th ...
Bacteraemia associated with health care. In the US, the association between previous health care and admission bacteraemia with ... The Department of Health requires reductions in MRSA bacteraemia rates in hospital by 60%.6 To decide where to target ... Thus, we believe that acquisition associated with health care remains critical for MRSA bacteraemia on arrival. ... "Admission S aureus bacteraemia" was defined as those cases of S aureus bacteraemia detected in the first two days after ...
2010-2019 Health Improvement and Innovation Resource Centre. Terms and Conditions • Privacy • Contact ... The role of echocardiography in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at Auckland City Hospital. NZ Literature Abstract. posted by ...
Provide basic health services in remote villages to eliminate malaria * Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health ... Bacteremia in Pregnant Women, Thailand-Myanmar Border, 2011 Turner P., Willemse C., Phakaudom K., Zin TW., Nosten F., McGready ... Medicine Quality & Public Health Conference * New age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block malaria ... Pioneering Medicine Quality & Public Health Conference coming to Oxford * Quick test can predict anaemia in malaria patients ...
Epidemiology of Bacteremia in Young Hospitalized Infants in Vientiane, Laos, 2000-2011 ... Epidemiology of Bacteremia in Young Hospitalized Infants in Vientiane, Laos, 2000-2011 ...
Gram-negative bacteraemia and C. difficile infection bi-annually reported by independent sector organisations, with ... Public health Collection *Staphylococcus aureus: guidance, data and analysis. *Klebsiella species: guidance, data and analysis ... counts of E. coli bacteraemia (table 4). *[P. aeruginosa] Pseudomonas aeruginosa *[Klebsiella spp.] Klebsiella species *[HCAI ... counts of P. aeruginosa bacteraemia (table 6). April 2014. Healthcare associated infection (HCAI) surveillance data on ...
... of a 56-year-old man with a history of splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who developed persistent bacteremia ... Ethics and Best Practice Guidelines for Training Experiences in Global Health John A. Crump, Jeremy Sugarman and the Working ... f REPORT OF AN UNUSUAL CASE OF PERSISTENT BACTEREMIA BY BARTONELLA BACILLIFORMIS IN A SPLENECTOMIZED PATIENT * CÉSAR HENRÍQUEZ1 ... REPORT OF AN UNUSUAL CASE OF PERSISTENT BACTEREMIA BY BARTONELLA BACILLIFORMIS IN A SPLENECTOMIZED PATIENT ...
... or lapses in public health. We report the first case of seroconversion to R. prowazekii in a homeless person of Marseilles, ... This was associated with B. quintana bacteremia. Although no outbreaks of typhus have been notified yet in the homeless ... Ethics and Best Practice Guidelines for Training Experiences in Global Health John A. Crump, Jeremy Sugarman and the Working ... Bartonella quintana Bacteremia among homeless people. Clin Infect Dis 35 : 684-689.. [Google Scholar] ...
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health Search database. All Databases. Assembly. Biocollections. ... Enterobacter bacteremia: clinical features and emergence of antibiotic resistance during therapy.. Chow JW1, Fine MJ, Shlaes DM ... Prospective, observational study of consecutive patients with Enterobacter bacteremia.. SETTING: Three university tertiary care ... which in turn may result in a lower mortality for Enterobacter bacteremia. When Enterobacter organisms are isolated from blood ...
Keywords provided by Mohamed O Othman, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso: ... Prospective Study of the Risk of Bacteremia in Directed Cholangioscopic Examination of the CBD. The safety and scientific ... the frequency of bacteremia after ERCP with direct cholangioscopic examination of the CBD [ Time Frame: 5 minutes and 30 ... To measure the frequency of bacteremia after ERCP with direct cholangioscopic examination of the CBD by obtaining blood culture ...
Objectives Enterococcal bacteremia can be complicated by infective endocarditis (IE) and when suspected, transesophageal ... Community and health-care site of acquisition was defined as previously described [10], whereas nosocomial acquisition was ... Enterococcal bacteremia is a relatively common condition and has a mortality rate of around 20% [2, 3]. A substantial ... Bacteremia with enterococci is a condition which can be complicated by IE, and tools to aid clinicians, to decide whether ...
On July 14, 1989, CDC notified state and territorial health officials of a possible increase in severe group A streptococcal ... While a direct comparison of the GABHS bacteremia incidence rate in Denver for 1989 and for previous years is not possible ... The descriptive epidemiology of GABHS bacteremia in the Denver patients is similar to that in previous reports (9,10). Even ... Factors contributing to the apparent recent increase in GABHS bacteremia are unclear. No single serotype, to suggest a common ...
Transient bacteremia can result after dental procedures or brushing of teeth. Bacteremia can have several important health ... Bacteremia (also bacteraemia) is the presence of bacteria in the blood. Blood is normally a sterile environment, so the ... Bacteremia is typically transient and is quickly removed from the blood by the immune system. Bacteremia frequently evokes a ... Bacteremia is defined as either a primary or secondary process. In primary bacteremia, bacteria have been directly introduced ...
US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health Search database. All Databases. Assembly. Biocollections. ... and monitored them for development of bacteraemia. Nosocomial S aureus bacteraemia was three times more frequent in S aureus ... Risk and outcome of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in nasal carriers versus non-carriers.. Wertheim HF1, Vos MC, ... Genotyping revealed that 80% of strains causing bacteraemia in carriers were endogenous. ...
... of 1,130 patients with bacteremia, 198 (17.5%) were positive for S. aureus. S. aureus bacteremia incidence was 78 (95% CI 67-91 ... The case-fatality ratio was 14.1% (95% CI 9.6%-19.8%). Interventions are needed to reduce the S. aureus bacteremia burden in ... Using a population-based surveillance system for pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis, we estimated S. aureus bacteremia incidence ... Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a substantial cause of childhood disease and death, but few studies have described its ...
We examined 699 episodes of MRSA bacteremia involving 603 patients admitted to an academic medical center in New York City ... We found that older age, residence in a nursing home, severe bacteremia, and organ impairment were independently associated ... bacteremia is often fatal. To determine predictors of risk for death, we conducted a retrospective cohort study. ... We divided health care-associated MRSA cases into community onset or hospital onset. Cases were health care-associated ...
World Health Organization. (‎1975)‎. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERAEMIA = BACTÉRIÉMIE À STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS. Weekly ...
Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our ... Duration of Antibiotics for the Treatment of Gram-negative Bacilli Bacteremia. The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Gram Negative Bacteremia Drug: short-course antibiotic treatment Drug: accepted prolonged antibiotic treatment ... Relapse: a recurrent bacteraemia due to the same microorganism occurring from day of randomization and until day 9013 ...
  • for us theSenior Dental Spotlight 10 importance and value of oral health to general health and well-being is secondJunior Dental Spotlight 12 nature. (slideshare.net)
  • However, ourSpecial Articles 17 efforts are amplified a thousand times over by the personal involvement and commitment of the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service to theAssociate Recruiting Program 19 nation's oral health. (slideshare.net)
  • When you step up to the podium and highlight the criticalUpcoming Events 23 role of oral health, there is a fresh and revitalized visibility and importance givenEditor CAPT Stephen P. Torna to oral health and to dentistry's role in overall health promotion and diseaseEditor CAPT Suzanne Saville prevention. (slideshare.net)
  • We appreciate your readiness to open new venues for oral health. (slideshare.net)
  • Call to Action to Promote Oral Health represented the first Call to Action under your tenure. (slideshare.net)
  • We have had the good fortune toThe USPHS Dental Newsletter is published 3-4 be part of your public health priority areas: prevention, preparedness, healthtimes annually, and is distributed electronically literacy and health disparities. (slideshare.net)
  • 0.1 CEU provided with this option This program is sponsored by the North Dakota Society of Health-System Pharmacists and was initially released December 13, 2016. (ndshp.org)
  • This program is sponsored by the North Dakota Society of Health-System Pharmacists and was initially released December 13, 2016. (ndshp.org)
  • We report a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who developed persistent bacteremia in the acute phase of human bartonellosis. (ajtmh.org)
  • 2011) Dy- namics of procalcitonin and bacteremia in neutropenic adults with acute myeloid leukemia. (scirp.org)
  • In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL −1 and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. (ersjournals.com)
  • In addition, during 1989, CDC received an increased number of reports of GABHS bacteremia from other areas in the United States and serotyped strains from several Scandinavian countries that have increased rates of GABHS bacteremia. (cdc.gov)
  • Gram-negative bacteremia is one of its most common manifestations that occur from intestinal mucosa damage secondary to filariform larvae invasion. (omicsonline.org)
  • Severe immune responses to bacteremia may result in septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, which are potentially fatal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe granulocytopenia was present at the time blood cultures were positive in 27 of 31 episodes of bacteremia. (elsevier.com)
  • Our observation showed that hypocalcaemic children more often presented with severe form of wasting and bacteraemia compared to those without hypocalcaemia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Because most Latin American hospitals still use externally vented fluid containers, switching to nonvented bags could substantially reduce rates of nosocomial bacteremia. (nih.gov)