Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Adult Stem Cells: Cells with high proliferative and self renewal capacities derived from adults.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Myeloablative Agonists: Agents that destroy bone marrow activity. They are used to prepare patients for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION or STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Graft vs Leukemia Effect: Immunological rejection of leukemia cells following bone marrow transplantation.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Embryonic Stem Cells: Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Chondrogenesis: The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Multipotent Stem Cells: Specialized stem cells that are committed to give rise to cells that have a particular function; examples are MYOBLASTS; MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS; and skin stem cells. (Stem Cells: A Primer [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health (US); 2000 May [cited 2002 Apr 5]. Available from: http://www.nih.gov/news/stemcell/primer.htm)Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Lymphocyte Depletion: Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Haploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented once. Symbol: N.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Antigens, CD34: Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.Vidarabine: A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Unrelated Donors: Providers of tissues for transplant to non-related individuals.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Lymphocyte Transfusion: The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Stem Cell Niche: A particular zone of tissue composed of a specialized microenvironment where stem cells are retained in a undifferentiated, self-renewable state.Pluripotent Stem Cells: Cells that can give rise to cells of the three different GERM LAYERS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization: The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.Adipogenesis: The differentiation of pre-adipocytes into mature ADIPOCYTES.Fetal Stem Cells: Cells derived from a FETUS that retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Siblings: Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Fetal Therapies: Prenatal interventions to correct fetal anomalies or treat FETAL DISEASES in utero. Fetal therapies include several major areas, such as open surgery; FETOSCOPY; pharmacological therapy; INTRAUTERINE TRANSFUSION; STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and GENETIC THERAPY.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy: Therapies that involve the TRANSPLANTATION of CELLS or TISSUES developed for the purpose of restoring the function of diseased or dysfunctional cells or tissues.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Neural Stem Cells: Self-renewing cells that generate the main phenotypes of the nervous system in both the embryo and adult. Neural stem cells are precursors to both NEURONS and NEUROGLIA.Cell SeparationAntilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Umbilical Cord: The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.Coculture Techniques: A technique of culturing mixed cell types in vitro to allow their synergistic or antagonistic interactions, such as on CELL DIFFERENTIATION or APOPTOSIS. Coculture can be of different types of cells, tissues, or organs from normal or disease states.Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Cells from adult organisms that have been reprogrammed into a pluripotential state similar to that of EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Receptors, KIR: A family of receptors found on NK CELLS that have specificity for a variety of HLA ANTIGENS. KIR receptors contain up to three different extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains referred to as D0, D1, and D2 and play an important role in blocking NK cell activation against cells expressing the appropriate HLA antigens thus preventing cell lysis. Although they are often referred to as being inhibitory receptors, a subset of KIR receptors may also play an activating role in NK cells.Mice, Inbred C57BLFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease: Liver disease that is caused by injuries to the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessels and subendothelial EDEMA, but not by THROMBOSIS. Extracellular matrix, rich in FIBRONECTINS, is usually deposited around the HEPATIC VEINS leading to venous outflow occlusion and sinusoidal obstruction.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Cell Tracking: Non-invasive imaging of cells that have been labeled non-destructively, such as with nanoemulsions or reporter genes that can be detected by molecular imaging, to monitor their location, viability, cell lineage expansion, response to drugs, movement, or other behaviors in vivo.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Graft vs Tumor Effect: Immunological rejection of tumor tissue/cells following bone marrow transplantation.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Cell Shape: The quality of surface form or outline of CELLS.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.
... blood stem cell transplantation 2005 Establishment of a rhesus haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell and mesenchymal stem cell ... stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal stem cells 2013 Haploidentical nonmyeloablative allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell ... stem cell transplantation 2007 Effects of mesenchymal stem cells on cell cycle and apoptosis of hematopoietic tissue cells in ... Cotransplant of HLA haploidentical peripehral blood stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells to treat a child with severe aplastic ...
"Fetomaternal Microchimerism Is Associated with Better Outcome in Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation". Blood ... mesenchymal stem cells, and placental-derived cells. A 2012 study at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, has ... Isolating cells in cultures can alter the properties of the stem cells, but in pregnancy the effects of fetal stem cells can be ... isolating stem cells can be accomplished through taking them from sources like the umbilical cord. These fetal stem cells can ...
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to support hematopoiesis in vivo and to display potent immunosuppressive effects ... Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) for severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is mainly limited by the ... Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) for severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is mainly limited by the ...
4482 Donor-Derived Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Co-Transplantation Following Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell ... Haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) is associated with an increased risk of graft failure and ... The conditioning regimen for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consisted of busulfan (Bu), ... MSCs (1×106cells/kg) were administered by venous infusion within 6 h proceeding stem cell infusion on day 01 then on day +14 ( ...
HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is now one of the most commonly employed alternative donor ... Mesenchymal Stem Cell Infusion in Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Hematological ... stem cell transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide.". HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is ... Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation. Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species ( ...
Treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease with third party haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells. Lancet 2004;363: ... Mesenchymal stem cells can be differentiated into endothelial cells in vitro. Stem Cells 2004;22:377-84. ... Interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells and natural killer cells. Stem Cells 2006;24:74-85. ... Transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell ameliorates the autoimmune pathogenesis in MRL/lpr mice. Cell Mol ...
Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Read more about Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell ... Clinical applications of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe aplastic anemia. Author(s): ... Read more about Clinical applications of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe aplastic anemia ...
... therapeutic effects against ischemic stroke via transplantation of exogenous stem cells or stimulation of endogenous stem cells ... 2004) Treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease with third party haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells. Lancet 363: ... A potential role for mesenchymal stem cells. Graft 3: 324-328.. *Aggarwal S, Pittenger MF (2005) Human mesenchymal stem cells ... neuroteratocarcinoma cells (NT2N), xenogenic pig-derived cells, embryonic stem (ES) cells, adult stem cells (bone marrow, human ...
Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types, are being tested as ... Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types, are being tested as ... in the absence of donor derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the ... in the absence of donor derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the ...
... stem cells accelerates lymphocyte recovery and may reduce the risk of graft failure in haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell ... Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Yu-Hua Chao,1,2 Han-Ping Wu,3 Chin- ... "Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: adjuvants for human cell transplantation," Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, ... "Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to enhance engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells," Leukemia, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. ...
Stem Cell Engraftment in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease Undergoing Haploidentical Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation ... Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Haplo Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease. The safety and scientific ... autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) grown in platelet lysate-containing medium will modulate recipient T-cell immune ... Previous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). *Participation in a clinical trial in which the patient received an ...
Third-party mesenchymal stem cells as part of the management of graft-failure after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. ... Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated immunosuppression occurs via concerted action of chemokines and nitric oxide. Cell Stem Cell 2, ... Role for interferon-γ in the immunomodulatory activity of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells 24, 386-398 ( ... Mesenchymal stem cell-natural killer cell interactions: Evidence that activated NK cells are capable of killing MSCs, whereas ...
... into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and continue to maintain important hepatocyte functions in vivo after transplantation into ... They hence may serve as a novel source of hepatocyte-like cells suitable for cell therapy of acute liver diseases. ... Clusters of transplanted cells appeared predominantly in the periportal portion of the liver lobule and secreted human albumin ... Here, hMSC were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro (hMSC-HC) and transplanted into livers of immunodeficient ...
Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Immune reconstitution in patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia after haploidentical stem cell transplantation *X-Y Pei ... Comparable post-relapse outcomes between haploidentical and matched related donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation *Y-R Ma ...
... haemopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor lymphocyte infusion, immunosuppres- sive therapy, mesenchymal stem cells. Do we ... Transferring functional immune responses to pathogens after haploidentical hematopoietic trans- plantation. Blood, 106, 4397- ... Mesenchymal stem cells Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) are pluripotent stem cells capable of generating osteoblasts, myoblats, ... Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress allogeneic T cell responses in vitro: implications for allogeneic transplantation. Blood ...
... virus-specific T cells for targeting life-threating infections, and of CAR-engineered T cells to treat relapsed leukemia. ... virus-specific T cells for targeting life-threating infections, and of CAR-engineered T cells to treat relapsed leukemia. ... In this review we will discuss the recent scientific findings, clinical experiences, and technological advances for cell ... In this review we will discuss the recent scientific findings, clinical experiences, and technological advances for cell ...
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used in clinical trials for severe diabetes, a chronic disease with high morbidity and ... Treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease with third party haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells. Lancet, 2004, 363( ... Transplantation of insulin producing cells derived from umbilical cord stromal mesenchymal stem cells to treat NOD mice. Cell ... Human placenta-derived cells have mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell potential. Stem Cells, 2004, 22(5): 649-658PubMedCrossRef ...
Donor-Derived Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Co-Transplantation Following Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation ... CIBMTR Risk Score Stratification in 207 Consecutive Adults after Unmanipulated PBSC Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation ... 25Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. 26Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona, ... High Incidence of CMV Reactivation after Haploidentical Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Using High-Dose Post- ...
... and clinical studies in all areas of stem cell biology and applications. The journal will consider basic, translational, and ... Stem Cells International is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, ... "Transplantation of ex-vivo culture-expanded parental haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells to promote engraftment in pediatric ... and coinfusion with a haploidentical T cell depleted graft [16, 17] or mesenchymal stem cells [18]. ...
Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Graft Failure and Improves Hematological Recovery in T-Cell Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell ... Co-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various sources (bone marrow, placenta) has been shown to marginally ... 2006) Mesenchymal stem cells as trophic mediators. J Cell Biochem 98(5):1076-84. ... 2003) Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells inhibit the response of naive and memory antigen-specific T cells to their cognate ...
... the major stem cells for cell therapy, have been used in the clinic for approximately 10 years. From animal models to clinical ... Although MSCs for cell therapy have been shown to be safe and effective, there are still challenges that need to be tackled ... In this review, we summarize the recent opinions on methods, timing and cell sources for MSC administration in clinical ... Application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in pediatric patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. ...
... lymphocyte recovery and may reduce the risk of graft failure in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blood ... Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated immunosuppression occurs via concerted action of chemokines and nitric oxide. Cell Stem Cell ... Susceptibility of human mesenchymal stem cells to tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid, and rapamycin. Transplantation 2008;86:1283-91 ... Treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease with third party haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells. Lancet 2004;363: ...
... including use of haploidentical donors, umbilical cord blood... ... a rare but life-threatening complication of hematopoietic cell ... Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to enhance engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells. Leukemia 21:1733-1738PubMed ... Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human placenta: comparison with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Cell Biol ... Cotransplantation of haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells to enhance engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells and to reduce the ...
Mesenchymal stem cell support which helps to reduce Graft versus host disease, aid engraftment and help speedy recovery of ... Unrelated Donor transplantation 7 days and for Haploidentical transplantation 9 days. Following a days rest the donor stem ... Autologous transplantation is the procedure of using the persons own stem cells. This method of transplantation is mainly used ... Once adequate number of stem cells are collected from the donor, stem cells will be sent to Altunizade Acıbadem Transplant ...
Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Cotransplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in ... Haploidentical stem cell transplantation with CD3+-/CD19+- depleted peripheral stem cells for patients with advanced stage ... Haploidentical stem cell transplantation cures autoimmune hepatitis and cerebrovascular disease in a patient with sickle cell ...
IDENTICAL SIBLING TRANSPLANTATION ; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; DONOR LYMPHOCYTE INFUSION ; MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS ; NATURAL ... Chang, Ying-Jun,et al."Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation Without T-Cell Depletion".SEMINARS IN ONCOLOGY 39.6(2012):653 ... Approaches for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) without T-cell depletion have been designed using new ... Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation Without T-Cell Depletion[J]. SEMINARS IN ONCOLOGY,2012,39(6):653-663. ...
2005) Use of mesenchymal stem cells for the prevention of immune complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. ... 2004) Treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease with third party haploidentical mesenchymal stem cells. Lancet 363: ... 2008) Murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cause mature dendritic cells to promote T-cell tolerance. Scand J Immunol 68: ... 2009) Mesenchymal stem cells prolong composite tissue allotransplant survival in a swine model. Transplantation 87:1769-1777. ...
  • GvHD is thought to be caused by donor T cells reacting against host allo-antigens: this may well be the case, but the mechanism underlying such immune reaction are quite complex (Teshima & Ferrara, 2002a). (slideshare.net)
  • Therefore host APC participate in activating donor T cells to kill host cells and the age of host APC seems relevant (in keeping with the notion that older patients have more GvHD) (Ordemann et al, 2002). (slideshare.net)
  • In this review, we will discuss the recent scientific findings, clinical experiences, and technological advances for cell processing toward the application of mesenchymal stromal cells as a therapy for treatment of severe GvHD, virus-specific T cells for targeting life-threating infections, and of chimeric antigen receptors-engineered T cells to treat relapsed leukemia. (frontiersin.org)
  • The incidence and severity of GvHD can be reduced by ex vivo T cell removal either achieved via CD34 + hematopoietic stem cell enrichment or active depletion of T cells, but these approaches have been associated with the risk for occurrence of graft rejection, relapse, and infections due to the missing T cells. (frontiersin.org)
  • Modifiable factors have been identified, such as HLA, cell dose, and others related to the graft choice or factors related to conditioning regimen [ 26 ] or GVHD prophylaxis [ 27 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Determine the safety of donor mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) infusion in patients with acute or extensive chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) after undergoing HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplant. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In GVHD the host tissue is damaged by the myeloablative chemotherapy and release pro-inflammatory cytokines andantigen-presenting cells(APCs) which then trigger donor T-cell activation and proliferation leading to GVHD. (clinicalresearch.my)
  • The use of multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (MMSC) for the amelioration of GVHD has shown promise as a therapeutic intervention. (scirp.org)
  • We describe a murine model of GVHD in the presence of leukemic cells (L1210). (scirp.org)
  • Acute GVHD was induced in DBA mice by transplanting bone marrow and spleen cells from C57Bl/6J mice with or without prior injection of L1210 cells. (scirp.org)
  • The results without L1210 cells, demonstrated that mice treated with primary MMSC that had developed moderate GVHD had increased long-term survival when compared to controls. (scirp.org)
  • The group treated with OMA-AD cells showed minimal GVHD so cloned OMA-AD MMSC cells provided a significant protective effect against GVHD, and the survival rate was superior to that of animals treated with primary MMSC on the same day. (scirp.org)
  • Moreover, we used cell-based therapies (n=239) for Post-myocardial Infarction, Multiple Sclerosis, Cirrhosis, Head of Femur Necrosis, Diabetes Mellitus and GvHD treatment. (clytoconferences.com)
  • So, if we can find a way to promote implantation meanwhile prevent or reduce GVHD , the efficacy of HLA-mismatched related donors transplantation can improve. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In 2010, more than 1150 CBTs were facilitated by the NMDP, which represents 22% of the total number of NMDP transplantations in match between donor and patient, 8 this reduced incidence of GVHD with partially HLA-mismatched CB is likely due to the lower numbers of T cells and the relatively immunologically naive status of the lymphocytes in CB. (docplayer.net)
  • The aims of the transplant fellowship training program are focused on assessing the status of patients' before transplantation, identifying and selecting stem cell sources, using donor registries, utilizing different methods of HLA typing and cryopreservation for storing stem cells, identifying indications for transplantation, administering high-dose chemotherapies, managing neutropenic fever and bacterial/viral/fungal diseases in patients, and diagnosing and managing acute/chronic GvHD and regimen-related toxicities. (ac.ir)
  • Researchers compared chronic GvHD incidence, immunosuppression burden and late infections and hospitalizations in consecutive patients undergoing cord blood transplantation versus peripheral blood matched unrelated donors transplant at their center between June 2009 and April 2014. (cordbloodresearchnews.com)
  • We aimed to assess whether mesenchymal stem cells could ameliorate GVHD after haemopoietic-stem-cell transplantation. (thd.org.tr)
  • Patients with steroid-resistant, severe, acute GVHD were treated with mesenchymal stem cells, derived with the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation ex-vivo expansion procedure, in a multicentre, phase II experimental study. (thd.org.tr)
  • Infusion of mesenchymal stem cells expanded in vitro, irrespective of the donor, might be an effective therapy for patients with steroid-resistant, acute GVHD. (thd.org.tr)
  • 5 Over the last several decades, the introduction of calcineurin inhibitors, T-cell depletion strategies, and immunomodulators has helped to prevent GVHD, but at a cost - with inhibition of the donor-specific immune response including the graft-versus-tumor/leukemia (GVL) effect. (haematologica.org)
  • An analysis of 2254 patients receiving bone marrow transplants for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia showed lower rates of relapse in patients with non-T-cell-depleted allografts with GVHD, compared to those receiving T-cell-depleted allografts without GVHD. (haematologica.org)
  • Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cell lines may eradicate the relapsed hematological malignancy and can separate the antileukemic effect from GVHD ( 4 ). (rupress.org)
  • However, within a period of 25 days after the second cell injection, the clinical scores had returned to baseline, indicating complete resolution of GvHD. (biospectrumindia.com)
  • Mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow (hMSC) have the potential to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and continue to maintain important hepatocyte functions in vivo after transplantation into host mouse livers. (mdpi.com)
  • As shown by our group and others, MSC from bone marrow and adipose tissue are capable of differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo [ 18 - 23 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • Elimination of reperfusion-induced microcirculatory alterations in vivo by adiposederived stem cell supernatant without adipose-derived stem cells. (stembook.org)
  • One is indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which, by catalyzing the conversion from tryptophan to kynurenine, exerts a major immunosuppressive effect on T-cell responses to autoantigens and fetal alloantigens in vivo. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Several strategies have been assayed to overcome relatively limited number of stem cells, such as multiple UCB transplants and ex vivo expansion of HSCs. (scidoc.org)
  • Several protocols (with or without ex vivo T-cell depletion (TCD)) have been established worldwide. (hep.com.cn)
  • 6. Gronthos S, Mankani M, Brahim J, Robey PG, Shi S. Postnatal human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in vivo. (ac.ir)
  • Mesenchymal stem cells modulate immune responses in vitro and in vivo. (thd.org.tr)
  • Ex vivo-isolated NK cells neoexpressed the activation Ag CD69 and released IFN-γ and TNF-α upon binding with BMSC. (jimmunol.org)
  • Compared to other cells, both T cells and NK cells are amenable to ex vivo manipulation, making them excellent sources of biological therapeutics. (haematologica.org)
  • Generation of T cells with dual specificity may lead to survival of these TCR-transferred T cells for prolonged periods of time in vivo due to transactivation of the endogenous TCR of the tumor-reactive T cells by the latent presence of viral antigens. (rupress.org)
  • Scientists describe the generation in vivo of a human T cell leukemia that recapitulated T-ALL in patients, which arose de novo in immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic progenitors ectopically expressing active NOTCH1 . (hematopoiesisnews.com)
  • The authors investigated the effects of S. imbricatus polysaccharides on hematopoietic function and identified the underlying mechanisms using in vitro experiments with CHRF, K562, and bone marrow mononuclear cells and in vivo experiments with a mouse model of cyclophosphamide-induced hematopoietic dysfunction. (hematopoiesisnews.com)
  • Bortolotti F, Ukovich L, Razban V, Martinelli V, Ruozi G, Pelos B, Dore F, Giacca M, Zacchigna S (2015) In vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells depends on the source and the isolation procedure. (springer.com)
  • We summarize current evidence that suggests an important in vivo function of these cells in terms of their regenerative potential that may indicate a new target cell for endogenous tissue regeneration and repair. (springeropen.com)
  • It can also be used in a number of chemotherapy unresponsive Oncological cancers such as testicular cancer, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma and Congenital disorders such as Thalassemia, Sickle cell disease, Porphyrias, severe immunudeficiency disorders. (acibademinternational.com)
  • Sickle cell disease is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders characterized by abnormal hemoglobin (hemoglobin S). Normally these cells are disc-shaped, giving it the flexibility to easily move throughout the body to deliver oxygen. (georgiactsa.org)
  • Sickle cell disease is a life-long illness, and while its severity differs from person to person, the average life expectancy of a patient in the United States is decreased significantly at 40-60 years. (georgiactsa.org)
  • Sickle cell disease affects approximately 100,000 Americans and millions worldwide. (georgiactsa.org)
  • Sox2 is a transcription factor, which is highly essential in keeping the ability of self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ECs) according to previous reports [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Researchers from the lab of Pran K. Datta (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA) recently set out to investigate the functional role of the WD‐domain protein Strap (serine-threonine kinase receptor‐associated protein) in the pluripotency and lineage commitment of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs). (stemcellsportal.com)
  • Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and can differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This requires the use of porcine cells to prevent immune rejection. (wiley.com)
  • Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types and regulating immune cell response. (wiley.com)
  • These data suggest that SHED are an accessible and feasible mesenchymal stem cell source for treating immune disorders like SLE. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These cells have the potential to support donor hematopoiesis, the proliferation of new blood cells in the body, and to inhibit the residual recipient immune system that drive rejection. (georgiactsa.org)
  • However, TCD is associated with prolonged immune deficiencies, increased risks of infectious complications, and high transplantation-related mortality. (hep.com.cn)
  • Apparently, only activated NK cells lyse self-DC and, in some instances ( 13 ), only immature DC, suggesting that physiologically, this killing occurs during viral infections when NK cells are activated and that this phenomenon may regulate the adaptive immune response. (jimmunol.org)
  • T-cells are the most important cells in adaptive immune system. (ajmb.org)
  • These cells can improve experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis in a model of multiple sclerosis and enhance the survival in a model of allotransplantation in baboon 14 . (ajmb.org)
  • T cells (right) and NK cells (left) are among the principal cellular effectors of the adaptive and innate immune responses, respectively. (haematologica.org)
  • T cells, along with B cells, comprise the major cellular components of the adaptive immune system (Figure 1). (haematologica.org)
  • Following recognition, T cells either directly lyse their targets by secreting powerful perforins and granzymes, or orchestrate a more potent immune response by secreting inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. (haematologica.org)
  • After giving birth, about 50-75% of women carry fetal immune cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal immune cells are also found in the offspring yielding in maternal→fetal microchimerism, though this phenomenon is about half as frequent as the former. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, fetal immune cells have also been frequently found in breast cancer stroma as compared to samples taken from healthy women. (wikipedia.org)