Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Hand Bones: The CARPAL BONES; METACARPAL BONES; and FINGER PHALANGES. In each hand there are eight carpal bones, five metacarpal bones, and 14 phalanges.Age Determination by Skeleton: Establishment of the age of an individual by examination of their skeletal structure.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Lunate Bone: A moon-shaped carpal bone which is located between the SCAPHOID BONE and TRIQUETRUM BONE.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Metacarpophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Joint DiseasesAnkle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Hand Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the hand.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.Carpal Joints: The articulations between the various CARPAL BONES. This does not include the WRIST JOINT which consists of the articulations between the RADIUS; ULNA; and proximal CARPAL BONES.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Joint Capsule: The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Sacroiliac Joint: The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Tenosynovitis: Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.Ganglion Cysts: Nodular tumor-like lesions or mucoid flesh, arising from tendon sheaths, LIGAMENTS, or JOINT CAPSULE, especially of the hands, wrists, or feet. They are not true cysts as they lack epithelial wall. They are distinguished from SYNOVIAL CYSTS by the lack of communication with a joint cavity or the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Hand Joints: The articulations extending from the WRIST distally to the FINGERS. These include the WRIST JOINT; CARPAL JOINTS; METACARPOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and FINGER JOINT.Synovial Cyst: Non-neoplastic tumor-like lesions at joints, developed from the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE of a joint through the JOINT CAPSULE into the periarticular tissues. They are filled with SYNOVIAL FLUID with a smooth and translucent appearance. A synovial cyst can develop from any joint, but most commonly at the back of the knee, where it is known as POPLITEAL CYST.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
  • Optimotion Orthopaedics is located in Orlando, FL and Kissimmee, FL and is widely recognized as the regional leader in ambulatory total joint replacement, lateral approach total knee replacement and anterior robotic hip replacement. (orthosports.info)
  • Movements available at the knee joint are knee flexion (bending), knee extension (straightening) and a small amount of rotation. (sportsinjuryclinic.net)
  • Topical capsaicin (the active substance in capsaicin is hot chili pepper) can help with hand and knee OA. (medicinenet.com)
  • Dr. Wheeless enjoys and performs all types of orthopaedic surgery but is renowned for his expertise in total joint arthroplasty (Hip and Knee replacement) as well as complex joint infections. (wheelessonline.com)
  • The wrist is a more complicated joint than the hip or the knee. (aaos.org)
  • The wrestler then locks both hands together, forcing the opponent's knee toward his face, and rolls the opponent over onto his back. (wikipedia.org)
  • A complete range of motion examination, where we look at your joint range of motion and the effects wear and tear have had on your problem. (chiromatrixbase.com)
  • It's the "wear and tear" that happens when your joints are overused. (webmd.com)
  • They can also recommend assistive devices such as braces and splints to support joints and shoe inserts to relieve stress on the lower extremities. (arthritis.org)
  • Raynaud's phenomenon is a condition characterized by a narrowing of the blood vessels to the extremities, usually the hands, in response to cold temperatures or stress. (arthritis.org)
  • Between periods of exercise, a splint may be worn to provide rest for the joint, or one may be worn to assist in regaining motion. (jointpainsite.com)
  • The patented ws6 compression wrist Sleeve is a one-of-a-kind wrist brace designed to stabilize without immobilizing for relief while active. (oremal.com)
  • The ulnar nerve crosses the wrist through an area called Guyon's canal and branches to provide sensation to the little finger and half of the ring finger. (woc.com.au)
  • The ulnar artery travels next to the ulnar nerve through the Guyon's canal in the wrist. (woc.com.au)
  • What movements is the midcarpal joint best able to conduct? (cram.com)
  • What are the movements of the Mp joints of 2-5? (cram.com)
  • Complement contribution of different proprioceptive receptors (muscle, joint, and skin receptors) seems to be crucial for accuracy to reproduce passive movements, since the capacity of any individual class of receptor to deliver information about movement and position of the limbs is limited. (diva-portal.org)
  • RSI or Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) is a condition that results from repetitive, awkward, and forceful hand movements. (infobarrel.com)
  • Although the exact cause of a ganglion cyst remains unknown some theories suggest that small cysts are formed when trauma damages the tissue of a joint. (josephnewcomermd.com)
  • Other contributing factors include trauma or injury to the wrist that cause swelling. (scribd.com)
  • Through the Medical College of Wisconsin Hand Trauma Association, the department's experts collaborate with their counterparts in plastic surgery. (mcw.edu)
  • It is important to understand the normal anatomy of the hand to learn more about diseases and conditions that can affect our hands. (woc.com.au)
  • Normal ultrasound anatomy of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist: a study on cadavers and on healthy subjects. (medscape.com)
  • The triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist--anatomy and function. (medscape.com)
  • Newer implant designs try to replicate the anatomy of the wrist. (aaos.org)
  • Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease, meaning the body's immune system creates antibodies that attack healthy tissues, including the joints. (arthritis.org)
  • Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) applied to the skin over the joint and are usually tried before oral NSAIDs (pills or tablets). (medicinenet.com)
  • Scimera Bioscience, develops cutting-edge Bioceuticals that address cardiovascular disease, immune health, degenerative joint disease, respiratory ailments, and a wide array of health issues. (angieslist.com)