A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.
A species of halophilic bacteria in the genus VIBRIO, which lives in warm SEAWATER. It can cause infections in those who eat raw contaminated seafood or have open wounds exposed to seawater.
A species of bacteria found in the marine environment, sea foods, and the feces of patients with acute enteritis.
Infections with bacteria of the genus VIBRIO.
The etiologic agent of CHOLERA.
A family of marine mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, commonly known as oysters. They have a rough irregular shell closed by a single adductor muscle.
Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.
Common name for an order (Anguilliformes) of voracious, elongate, snakelike teleost fishes.
The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus VIBRIO, isolated from SHELLFISH, as well as from human diarrheal stools and ear infections.
A species of gram-negative, halophilic bacteria, in the genus VIBRIO. It is considered part of normal marine flora and commonly associated with ear infections and superficial wounds exposed to contaminated water sources.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A family of gram-negative bacteria whose members predominate in the bacterial flora of PLANKTON; FISHES; and SEAWATER. Some members are important pathogens for humans and animals.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and Southeast Asia whose causative agent is VIBRIO CHOLERAE. This condition can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Strains of VIBRIO CHOLERAE containing O ANTIGENS group 1. All are CHOLERA-causing strains (serotypes). There are two biovars (biotypes): cholerae and eltor (El Tor).
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A family of extremely halophilic archaea found in environments with high salt concentrations, such as salt lakes, evaporated brines, or salted fish. Halobacteriaceae are either obligate aerobes or facultative anaerobes and are divided into at least twenty-six genera including: HALOARCULA; HALOBACTERIUM; HALOCOCCUS; HALOFERAX; HALORUBRUM; NATRONOBACTERIUM; and NATRONOCOCCUS.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped or pleomorphic bacteria which are halotolerant. Members of this genus are capable of growth in sodium chloride concentrations of up to 20% or more. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.
The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.
Strains of VIBRIO CHOLERAE containing O ANTIGENS group 139. This strain emerged in India in 1992 and caused a CHOLERA epidemic.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A species of halophilic archaea found in the Dead Sea.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.
Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.
A strain of the VIBRIO CHOLERAE bacteria belonging to serogroup non-O1, infecting humans and other PRIMATES. It is related to VIBRIO CHOLERAE O1, but causes a disease less severe than CHOLERA. Eating raw shellfish contaminated with the bacteria results in GASTROENTERITIS.
A family of bacteria which produce endospores. They are mostly saprophytes from soil, but a few are insect or animal parasites or pathogens.
Precipitin tests which occur over a narrow range of antigen-antibody ratio, due chiefly to peculiarities of the antibody (precipitin). (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A fulminating bacterial infection of the deep layers of the skin and FASCIA. It can be caused by many different organisms, with STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES being the most common.
A genus of HALOBACTERIACEAE whose growth requires a high concentration of salt. Binary fission is by constriction.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are common in the marine environment and on the surfaces and in the intestinal contents of marine animals. Some species are bioluminescent and are found as symbionts in specialized luminous organs of fish.
A complex of ferric oxyhydroxide with dextrans of 5000 to 7000 daltons in a viscous solution containing 50 mg/ml of iron. It is supplied as a parenteral preparation and is used as a hematinic. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1292)
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.
A genus of HALOBACTERIACEAE distinguished from other genera in the family by the presence of specific derivatives of TGD-2 polar lipids. Haloarcula are found in neutral saline environments such as salt lakes, marine salterns, and saline soils.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ALIIVIBRIO, which exhibits LUMINESCENCE. A. fischeri is found in a symbiotic relationship with the SQUID Euprymna scolopes.
An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.
A genus of oysters in the family OSTREIDAE, class BIVALVIA.
An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.
A genus of extremely halophilic HALOBACTERIACEAE which are chemoheterotropic and strictly aerobic. They are found in neutral saline environments such as salt lakes (especially the Dead Sea) and marine salterns.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of archaea.
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
A phenomenon where microorganisms communicate and coordinate their behavior by the accumulation of signaling molecules. A reaction occurs when a substance accumulates to a sufficient concentration. This is most commonly seen in bacteria.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A sub-class of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that act only near the ends of polypeptide chains.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Poisoning from toxins present in bivalve mollusks that have been ingested. Four distinct types of shellfish poisoning are recognized based on the toxin involved.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
An ENTEROTOXIN from VIBRIO CHOLERAE. It consists of two major protomers, the heavy (H) or A subunit and the B protomer which consists of 5 light (L) or B subunits. The catalytic A subunit is proteolytically cleaved into fragments A1 and A2. The A1 fragment is a MONO(ADP-RIBOSE) TRANSFERASE. The B protomer binds cholera toxin to intestinal epithelial cells, and facilitates the uptake of the A1 fragment. The A1 catalyzed transfer of ADP-RIBOSE to the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G PROTEINS activates the production of CYCLIC AMP. Increased levels of cyclic AMP are thought to modulate release of fluid and electrolytes from intestinal crypt cells.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
A family of CRUSTACEA, order DECAPODA, comprising the penaeid shrimp. Species of the genus Penaeus are the most important commercial shrimp throughout the world.
A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.
Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.
Substances produced from the reaction between acids and bases; compounds consisting of a metal (positive) and nonmetal (negative) radical. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.
Plasmids controlling the synthesis of hemolysin by bacteria.
ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. Hollis DG, Weaver RE, Baker CN, Thornsberry C (April 1976). "Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from ... Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio ... vulnificus at Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology CNN video on vibrio vulnificus Type strain of Vibrio vulnificus at ... "Vibrio Species Causing Vibriosis". Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved June 5, 2017. "Vibrio vulnificus". NCBI Genome ...
"Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from blood cultures" (PDF). J. Clin. Microbiol. 3 (4): 425-31. PMC 274318. PMID 1262454.. ... "Vibrio vulnificus". NCBI Genome Project. Retrieved 2005-09-01.. *^ a b "Vibrio Species Causing Vibriosis - Questions and ... Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio ... "lactose-positive vibrio".[6] It was subsequently given the name Beneckea vulnifica,[1] and finally Vibrio vulnificus by Farmer ...
Pathogenic Vibrio species include V. cholerae (the causative agent of cholera), V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. V. ... Joseph S, Colwell R, Kaper J (1982). "Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related halophilic Vibrios". Crit Rev Microbiol. 10 (1): 77- ... early-discovered Vibrio species, such as V. cholerae, have a single polar flagellum (monotrichous) with sheath. Some species, ... Vibrio is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria, possessing a curved-rod (comma) shape, several species of which can cause ...
ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. Hollis DG, Weaver RE, Baker CN, Thornsberry C (April 1976). "Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from ... Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio ... vulnificus at Todars Online Textbook of Bacteriology CNN video on vibrio vulnificus Type strain of Vibrio vulnificus at ... "Vibrio Species Causing Vibriosis". Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved June 5, 2017. "Vibrio vulnificus". NCBI Genome ...
"Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from blood cultures" (PDF). J. Clin. Microbiol. 3 (4): 425-31. PMC 274318. PMID 1262454.. ... "Vibrio vulnificus". NCBI Genome Project. Retrieved 2005-09-01.. *^ a b "Vibrio Species Causing Vibriosis - Questions and ... Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio ... "lactose-positive vibrio".[6] It was subsequently given the name Beneckea vulnifica,[1] and finally Vibrio vulnificus by Farmer ...
PubMed;Hollis DG, Weaver RE, Baker CN, Thornsberry C. Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from blood cultures. J Clin Microbiol ... From the Latin vibrio (to move) and vulnificus (causing wounds). Vibrio vulnificus is a virulent, gram-negative, comma-shaped, ... Männikkö N. Etymologia: Vibrio vulnificus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(1):137. doi:10.3201/eid1701.et1701.. ... Vibrio ("Beneckea") vulnificus, the bacterium associated with sepsis, septicaemia and the sea. Lancet. 1979;2:903. ...
... a recently described strain of the halophilic Vibriospecies, was isolated from the blood of a 73-year-old man, who developed ... Vibrio vulnificus, a recently described strain of the halophilicVibrio species, was isolated from the blood of a 73-year-old ... Twenty-one patients withVibrio vulnificus infection have been reported in the Japanese literature.Vibrio vulnificus most ... Hollis DG, Weaver RE, Baker CN, Thornsberry C. Halophilic vibrio species isolated from blood cultures. J Clin Microbiol 1976; 3 ...
She underwent emergency fasciotomy on the suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis by V. vulnificus infection. Finally, V. vulnificus ... Suspicion of V. vulnificus infection in vulnerable patients who ingest raw seafood is essential for prompt diagnosis, which ... We report a case of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis due to V. vulnificus in a patient undergoing CAPD ... However, cases of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis caused by V. vulnificus in patients undergoing ...
Vibrio - Free download as Powerpoint Presentation (.ppt), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or view presentation slides online ... Examination of seafood and seawater for halophilic vibrio. species after enrichment in alkaline peptone water with 1%. sodium ... V. vulnificus-. -Second most serious type of infection occur after. V. cholerae (fatality 20-30%). It is a marine,. halophilic ... Vibrio cholerae, which was discovered in 1884. by Robert Koch during a diarrheal outbreak in. Egypt.. The genus as 40 species ...
Infection with Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacillus found worldwide in warm coastal waters, can lead to ... Isolation of Vibrio vulnificus from Seawater and Emerging Vibrio vulnificus Septicemia on Jeju Island. Keun Hwa Lee; Sang Taek ... Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections and Sepsis Caused by Vibrio vulnificus Compared with Those Caused by Aeromonas Species. ... Vibrio vulnificus: an unusual mode of acquisition and novel use of rapid susceptibility testing. Partridge, D. G.; Townsend, R ...
Vibrio species. Vibrio organisms are Gram-negative, halophilic bacteria that are widespread and naturally present in marine and ... Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus are the species most commonly associated with reported infection. V. ... The genus Vibrio includes 30 species, of which at least 14 are recognized as pathogenic in humans. Vibrio infections are ... Shigella species. Shigella species are Gram-negative bacilli. Four species have been identified, and clinical presentations ...
Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic gram-negative bacterial species. In nature, V. vulnificus is present in marine environment ... Halophilic Vibrio species isolated from blood cultures. J Clin Microbiol 3:425-431.. 14. Horseman, M.A., and Surani, S. 2011. A ... The marine pathogen Vibrio vulnificus encodes a putative homologue of the Vibrio harveyi regulatory gene, luxR: a genetic and ... Regulation of metalloprotease gene expression in Vibrio vulnificus by a Vibrio harveyi LuxR homologue. J Bacteriol 183:1369- ...
Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed ... Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed ... Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal ... Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal ...
Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic estuarine bacterium, but this species causes fatal septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus may ... N2 - Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic estuarine bacterium, but this species causes fatal septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus ... AB - Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic estuarine bacterium, but this species causes fatal septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus ... "Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic estuarine bacterium, but this species causes fatal septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus may ...
Organism 1: Vibrio vulnificus *Organism 2: Campylobacter jejuni DISCUSSION. Vibrio vulnificus is a member of the Vibrio genus ... Several Vibrio species can be differentiated based on their ability to ferment the sucrose in TCBS (thiosulfate, citrate, bile ... Vibrios will grow easily on most isolation media, but as a halophilic organism, growth is enhanced by addition of 1% NaCl. On ... Final Diagnosis -- A 77 year-old male infected with Vibrio vulnificus and Campylobacter jejuni FINAL DIAGNOSIS. * ...
Vibrio Vuilificus is a halophilic species, the strains of which are similar to Vibrio Parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus ... Vibrio Vulnificus has been isolated from estuarine and marine waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast, east coast, and west coast; it was ... Other well-known vibriones are Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio Parahaemolyticus. Vibrio Parahaemolyticus is a common cause of ... Such bacteria as Vibrio Vulnificus live inmarine environment, especially in warm waters, usually higher than 25.degree. C.. ...
Browse through articles from peer-reviewed research publications that focus on the Vibrio species bacterial pathogen in food ... Here, we investigate the population dynamics of three Vibrio species: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio ... Expression and functional study of VpV262 Pol, a moderately halophilic DNA polymerase from the Vibrio parahaemolyticus phage ... Effect of Ploidy on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus Levels in Cultured Oysters ...
Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic vibrio is an estuarine gram-negative bacteria that is associated with severe and frequently ... Bacteriocins are defined as antibacterial substance produced by various species of bacteria which are usually active against ... Vibrio vulnificus , Vibrio , Wound Infection , Yersinia enterocolitica ... 25: 586.) to give the bacteriocins produced by V. vulnificus the name "vulnificins". In the present study, a total of 72 ...
Such effects have never been investigated in the marine pathogen Vibrio vulnificus , even though rifampicin-resistant strains ... In this work, effects on growth, stress response and virulence of V. vulnificus were investigated using a set of nine ... Moreover, spontaneous rifampicin-resistant strains of V. vulnificus have an important role in conjugation and mutagenesis ... spontaneous rifampicin-resistant derivatives of V. vulnificus CMCP6. Three different mutations (Q513K, S522L and H526Y) were ...
Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, or Vibrio fluvialis grown overnight on an LB-agar plate. This preparation was incubated ... Furthermore, spent media from cultures of other Vibrio species grown in 500 mM NaCl-MM alone also did not have an effect on ... Vibrio cholerae is a halophilic facultative human pathogen found in marine and estuarine environments. Accumulation of ... We first examined the genomes of other Vibrio species for homologs of the bet genes, which are responsible for glycine betaine ...
... vulnificus and other nine Vibrio species cause mild or severe syndromes in humans while other halophilic Vibrios occurring in ... bacteria of the genus Nocardia and Vibrio, Herpes and enteric viruses. Microbial GSK-3 species take part in the biogeochemical ... Besides well known model organisms, a number of invertebrate species differing in life cycles and adaptive strategies support ... For di?erent fungal species, the involvement of hydrolases, especially chitinases and glucanases but also proteases has been ...
l Among common pathogenic vibrio species belong: - V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. alginolyticus, V. ... into non-halophilic vibrios, including V. cholerae, that are able to grow in media without added salt, - and halophilic species ... l Vibrio, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas and Helicobacter species are gramnegative rods, that are all widely distributed ... Microsoft powerpoint - the genus vibrio_web [režim kompatibility]. THE GENUS VIBRIO, CAMPYLOBACTER. CAM. AND ASSOCIATED ...
Historically, the noncholera Vibrio species are classified as halophilic or nonhalophilic, depending on their requirement of ... Vibrio infections are largely classified into two distinct groups: Vibrio cholera infections and noncholera Vibrio infections. ... 6] Of note, the species most frequently isolated in these NFVIs was V vulnificus (35%), followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (29 ... With the exception of nonhalophilic Vibrio species, such as Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus, all Vibrio species require ...
Necrotizing Soft-tissue Infections and Sepsis Caused by Vibrio vulnificus Compared with Those Caused by Aeromonas Species. - ... Infections caused by halophilic marine Vibrio bacteria. - streptococci pyogenes infections: - isolation of group A ... vibrio (vulnificus): - typically the patient is exposed to sea water - course is measured in hours esp in alcoholics and ... Comparison of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Sepsis Caused by Vibrio vulnificus and Staphylococcus aureus ...
In 2007, infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus and other vibrio species became nationally notifiable. ... "halophilic" because they require salt. ... What is Vibrio vulnificus?. Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium ... How common is Vibrio vulnificus infection?. Vibrio vulnificus is a rare cause of disease, but it is also underreported. Between ... How do persons get infected with Vibrio vulnificus?. People can get infected with Vibrio vulnificus when they eat raw shellfish ...
... vulnificus. Aerobic, anaerobic, and mycobacterial tissue cultures were sent. Most Vibrio species can grow on standard media, ... Vibrio parahaemolyticus will grow on TCBS agar for V. cholerae and other enteric vibrios and, being halophilic, also grows on ... Media be used for detecting Vibrio in - Vibrio cholerae Sucrose ( + ) Vibrio parahemolyticus Sucrose ( )! For Vibrio cholerae ... Vibrio parahemolyticus Sucrose(-) Large Gram Negative Rods. Many Vibrio species have a curved or comma-shaped appearance on ...
Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Veterinary Measures Relating to Public Health on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio ... V. parahaemolyticus is a slightly halophilic bacterium. The optimum growth NaCl concentrations range from 2 to 4% and poor ... Vibrio Species. 4. Vibrio spp. are Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic motile curved rods with a single polar flagellum. ... VIBRIO SPECIES IN SEAFOOD. August 2005. Food and Environmental Hygiene Department. The Government of the Hong Kong Special ...
Vibrio vulnificus infection. ¤ clinical manifestations ¤ epidemiology ¤ pathogenesis genes toxins ¤ in vitro... ... Microbiology ---- Vibrio Vulnificus ---- ¤ Halophilic, Lactose (+) marine Vibrio species ¤ Missed as Aeromonas hydrophillia, ... Mouse Skin Damage Caused by Protease from Vibrio vulnificus and by V. vulnificus Infection 創傷弧菌蛋白質分解酵素及創傷弧菌感染在白老鼠引起的皮膚病變 Yin- ... 本文除了討論Vibrio vulnificus的感染經過、臨
Vibrio (Benecka) vulnificus is a recently recognized halophilic organism that may cause human infections. Patients infected ... Incidence of Vibrio species associated with blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) collected from Galveston Bay, Texas  Davis, J.W. ... Effect of temperature and salinity on Vibrio vulnificus occurrence in a Gulf coast, U.S.A., environment.  Kelly, M.T. (, 1982) ... Enterotoxigenic properties of Vibrio fluvialis (group F Vibrio) isolated from clinical and environmental sources  Huq, M.I.; ...
Approximately one-half (49-59%) of each species core genes were conserved in all three species, and 14-24% of the core genes ... The core genes of V. parahaemolyticus were also compared to those of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus, in order to delineate ... In addition, our analyses categorized genes that may be useful in differentiating pathogenic Vibrios at the species level. ... were species-specific and in different functional categories. Our data support the idea that the pandemic strains are closely ...
... and there was not a significant trend in the species composition of the vibrio community when interacting with oil. Even though ... parahaemolyticus pathogenicity and the vibrio community, with respect to V. cholera, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. ... halophilic bacteria that naturally occur in both shallow coastal waters and parts of the deepest oceans and are a known human ... the study was an innovative evaluation of the vibrio community and various oil concentration effects thereon. ...
... Flagellar stain of V. cholerae Scientific classification Kingdom: Bacteria Phylum: Proteobacteria Class: Gamma ... Pathogenic Vibrio include V. cholerae (the causative agent of cholera), V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. Vibrio cholerae ... Several species of Vibrio include clinically important human pathogens. Most disease causing strains are associated with ... Joseph S, Colwell R, Kaper J (1982). "Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related halophilic Vibrios". Crit Rev Microbiol 10 (1): 77- ...
... vulnificus and 6hr in PNCB broth after cultivating with blood mixed with V. vulnificus. One Vibrio species and another 3 ... BACKGROUND: Vibrio(V.) vulnificus is a halophilic, gram-negative bacillus that causes a fatal sepsis in patients with ... New Selective Medium for Rapid Identification of Vibrio vulnificus from Patients with V. vulnificus Sepsis / 대한피부과학회지 ... The selectivity and identification capacity of this new broth was tested by using other 6 Vibrio species and 14 strains of ...
  • Present in marine environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas, V. vulnificus is related to V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio cholerae, which was discovered in 1884 by Robert Koch during a diarrheal outbreak in Egypt. (scribd.com)
  • Most commonly isolated from clinical specimens are- V. cholerae, V. parahemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus & V. alginoliticus. (scribd.com)
  • Regulation of rugosity and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae: comparison of VpsT and VpsR regulons and epistasis analysis of vpsT, vpsR, and hapR. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • The major Vibrio cholerae autoinducer and its role in virulence factor production. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. (frontiersin.org)
  • Representative species in the former group are V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus , whereas V. vulnificus is the most important species in the latter group. (frontiersin.org)
  • Of human pathogenic vibrios, V. cholerae is the most extensively studied species because it is a causative agent of severe watery diarrheal disease, cholera. (frontiersin.org)
  • Other well-known vibriones are Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio Parahaemolyticus. (patentgenius.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, employs quorum sensing (QS) pathways to control the expression of virulence factors, including the production of cholera toxin and biofilm formation. (usda.gov)
  • Moreover, predator efficiency of the Halobacteriovorax isolates toward V. parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/O139 strains was tested. (usda.gov)
  • Vibrio cholerae is a halophilic facultative human pathogen found in marine and estuarine environments. (asm.org)
  • In fact, we have demonstrated that, in high-osmolarity medium, V. cholerae growth and biofilm development are enhanced by supplementation with either glycine betaine or spent media from other bacterial species. (asm.org)
  • Vibrio cholerae produces an enterotoxin that cause cholera, a profuse watery diarrhea that can rapidly lead to dehydration and death. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • into non-halophilic vibrios, including V. cholerae , that are able to grow in media without added salt, - and halophilic species which do not grow in these media, they require higher contents of salt. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • ear, wound, soft tissue and other extraintestinal infections, all uncommon Vibrio cholerae l Gramnegative, slim, curved rods about 2 to 4 mm long. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae l V. cholerae can grow aerobically or anaerobically on a l Vibrios grow at a very high pH (8.5 to 9.5) and are rapidly l In alkaline peptone water they produce a turbidity and surface membrane in six hours of incubation. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae is divided biotypes - causes severe forms of cholera with a high - does not hemolyse on blood agar,- does not agglutinate chicken, sheep or human - it is susceptible to polymyxin B. - all the properties has just opposited as given above. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae antigenic structure l Many cholera vibrios share a single heat-labile flagellar H antigen. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae antigenic structure l V. cholerae strains causing classical epidemic cholera belong into the O1 group. (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • With the exception of nonhalophilic Vibrio species, such as Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus , all Vibrio species require saline for growth. (medscape.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae resistance to third-generation cephalosporins is rarely reported. (arakuflavors.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae Sucrose(+) Vibrio parahemolyticus Sucrose(-) Large Gram Negative Rods. (arakuflavors.com)
  • [2] Most of these foodborne infections are caused by V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae , and to a lesser extent by V. vulnificus . (gov.hk)
  • Attachment of Vibrio cholerae to the mucosal surface of the intestine is considered to be an important virulence characteristic. (tdl.org)
  • The "core" genes of V. parahaemolyticus were also compared to those of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus , in order to delineate differences between these three pathogenic species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae is generally transmitted via contaminated water. (bionity.com)
  • The "typical", early-discovered vibrio such as V. cholerae have a single polar flagellum (monotrichous) with sheath. (bionity.com)
  • This chapter summarizes available information on the epidemiology of major clinically significant Vibrio species, including Vibrio cholerae , Vibrio parahaemolyticus , and Vibrio vulnificus with an especial emphasis on cholera. (asmscience.org)
  • 2004. Cholera in Mozambique, variant of Vibrio cholerae. (asmscience.org)
  • 1993. Epidemic of diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae non-O1 that produced heat-stable toxin among Khmers in a camp in Thailand. (asmscience.org)
  • and non-O1 Vibrio cholerae from estuarine waters along the Italian Adriatic coast. (asmscience.org)
  • 1995. Genesis of the novel epidemic Vibrio cholerae O139 strain: evidence for horizontal transfer of genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis. (asmscience.org)
  • The type VI nanomachine is critical for Vibrio cholerae to establish infections and to thrive in niches co‐occupied by competing bacteria. (usda.gov)
  • The latter include Vibrio cholerae , the causative agent of cholera, and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus , which together are responsible for most cases of fatal seafood poisoning ( 31 ). (asm.org)
  • Vibrio cholerae , V. parahaemolyticus , V. vulnificus and V. mimicus , are pathogens for humans. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Among the 32 Vibrio species tested in our study, several T3SS2-related genes were detected in three species, V. cholerae , V. mimicus and V. hollisae , and most of the essential genes for type III secretion were present in T3SS2-positive V. cholerae and V. mimicus strains. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Bashford and colleagues [ 6 ] announced that they had recovered Vibrio cholerae from streams and drainage ditches, including sites with negligible chance of sewage contamination. (hindawi.com)
  • 7 ] also found Vibrio cholerae in Maryland, USA. (hindawi.com)
  • Growth inhibition was achieved against Listeria monocytogenes (supplier or indication or source), Staphylococcus aureus , Vibrio vulnificus , Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa, Vibrio cholerae NO 01 and Salmonella enterica subsp. (pjmonline.org)
  • 8 ]). The diversity of ecologies represented by members of Vibrionaceae has led to enthusiastic genome sequencing in the group, which has focused most heavily on pathogenic species (more than 31 strains of V. cholerae are available on GenBank as of 2012). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nagamune K, Yamamoto K, Honda T. Cloning and sequencing of a novel hemolysis gene of Vibrio cholerae. (labome.org)
  • In this study, we have cloned and characterized a V. vulnificus type IV pilin (PilA) that shares extensive homology to group A type IV pilins expressed by many pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae (PilA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PilA), and Aeromonas hydrophila (TapA). (asm.org)
  • In this study, we report the completion of sequencing and characterization of a pilABCD gene cluster similar to those found in other gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( 36 ), Aeromonas hydrophila ( 41 ), and Vibrio cholerae ( 10 , 67 ). (asm.org)
  • During this placement I worked on a pilot project to develop methods to detect pathogenic Vibrio species in shellfish such as V. cholerae , V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus . (exeter.ac.uk)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus as 40 species to which 12 are responsible for intestinal and extra intestinal infections in man. (scribd.com)
  • Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. (frontiersin.org)
  • Bacteria in the genus Vibrio are normal habitants of aquatic environments and play important roles in maintaining the aquatic ecosystem. (frontiersin.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a member of the Vibrio genus of the Vibrionaceae family of gram negative, motile, curved bacillary bacteria (1,3). (upmc.edu)
  • It was first described in 1931 by Jones and colleagues as an agent of bovine dysentery that appeared similar to another member of the Vibrio genus . (upmc.edu)
  • The genus Salmonella can be divided into two species (S. enterica and S. bongori), based on their phenotypic profile. (arakuflavors.com)
  • Among the members of the genus, 12 species have so far been reported to be pathogenic to humans, where eight of these may be associated with foodborne infections of the gastrointestinal tract. (gov.hk)
  • Vibrio is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria, possessing a curved-rod (comma) shape, several species of which can cause foodborne infection, usually associated with eating undercooked seafood. (wikipedia.org)
  • O. F. Müller (1773, 1786) described eight species of the genus Vibrio (included in Infusoria), three of which were spirilliforms. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, Vibrio Müller, 1773 became regarded as the name of a zoological genus, and the name of the bacterial genus became Vibrio Pacini, 1854. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quantitative PCR (QPCR) with primers specific for the genus Vibrio was combined with separation and quantification of amplicons by constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE). (asm.org)
  • The genus Vibrio encompasses a diverse group of heterotrophic marine bacteria including many facultative symbiotic and pathogenic strains. (asm.org)
  • Most studies on Vibrio ecology to date have focused on specific members of the genus, leading to an extensive body of literature on their genetics and ecology. (asm.org)
  • Screening of available marine vibrios showed that the PR gene, and thus the potential for PR phototrophy, is found in at least three different clusters in the genus Vibrio. (diva-portal.org)
  • A species of gram-negative, halophilic bacteria, in the genus VIBRIO. (bvsalud.org)
  • Strain 96-237 T , a Gram-reaction-negative, curved- to spiral-shaped motile bacterium, isolated from coastal marine water, was found to be related to species of the genus Grimontia by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, sharing 98.3 % similarity to Grimontia marina CECT 8713 T and 98.8 % to ' Grimontiaindica ' AK16. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Bacteriovorax is the halophilic genus of the obligate bacterial predators, Bdellovibrio and like organisms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Species of the genus Acinetobacter are strictly aerobic, non fermentative, Gram-negative bacilli. (deskuenvis.nic.in)
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the most commonly studied species in this genus. (deskuenvis.nic.in)
  • On the contrary, when strains belonging to different species of the genus Bacillus were included in these tests, remarkable antagonistic activities were recorded. (bvsalud.org)
  • V. vulnificus bacteria can enter the body through open wounds when swimming or wading in infected waters, or by puncture wounds from the spines of fishes such as stingrays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endotoxin: Like all gram negative bacteria, V. vulnificus has LPS (lipopolysaccharide as the major component of its outer membrane). (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron: Growth of V. vulnificus is dependent on the amount of iron that is accessible to the bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • V. vulnificus bacteria can enter the body through open wounds when swimming or wading in infected waters, [4] or by puncture wounds from the spines of fish such as stingrays . (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the clinical symptoms and signs of necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis caused by these two bacteria are similar, the purposes of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics of Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas infections, to analyze the risk factors for death, and to compare the effects of surgical treatment on the outcome. (ebscohost.com)
  • Such bacteria as Vibrio Vulnificus live inmarine environment, especially in warm waters, usually higher than 25.degree. (patentgenius.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus are naturally occuring human pathogenic bacteria commonly found in estuarine environments where oysters are cultured. (usda.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic vibrio is an estuarine gram-negative bacteria that is associated with severe and frequently fatal wound infections and life-threatening septicemia. (bvsalud.org)
  • Bacteriocins are defined as antibacterial substance produced by various species of bacteria which are usually active against closely related organisms. (bvsalud.org)
  • The cytoplasm of halophilic or salt-loving bacteria contains enzymes that function best at elevated ionic strength. (asm.org)
  • Agglutination of bacteria and erythrocytes by serum from six species of marine molluscs. (tdl.org)
  • Vibrio spp are gram-negative, halophilic bacteria that naturally occur in both shallow coastal waters and parts of the deepest oceans and are a known human pathogen. (lsu.edu)
  • To examine the rapid identification and selectivity of this basal medium according to various conditions, V. vulnificus was tested by using saline and normal human blood containing these bacteria(1, 000 bacteria/ml), respectively at 37degrees C. A positive reaction(V. vulnificus growth) appeared as color change. (bvsalud.org)
  • The selectivity and identification capacity of this new broth was tested by using other 6 Vibrio species and 14 strains of other bacteria. (bvsalud.org)
  • One Vibrio species and another 3 bacteria produced color change. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vibrio species typically possess two chromosomes, which is unusual for bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • When ingested Vibrio bacteria can primarily result in watery diarrhea along with other secondary symptoms.The pathogenic features can be linked to quorum sensing, where bacteria are able to express their virulence factor via their signalling molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, high densities of disease causing bacteria in the watersheds are regularly reported including incidences of emerging Vibrio fluvialis. (mdpi.com)
  • The newly described bacteria possessed phenotypic properties intermediate between those of Vibrio spp. (mdpi.com)
  • Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to occur frequently in bacteria in nature and to play an important role in bacterial evolution, contributing to the formation of new species. (asm.org)
  • Most of the bacteria that enter VBNC state are gram-negative species belonging to the gamma subclass of the proteobacteria branch, except for Rhizobium , Agrobacterium, and Helicobacter-Campylobacter species [ 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Vibrio bacteria exist normally in salt water and generally only affect people with compromised immune systems, they say. (blogspot.com)
  • Aeromonas hydrophila is a species of gram-negative bacteria. (deskuenvis.nic.in)
  • A close relative of the bacteria infamous for seafood contaminations that often lead to fatal disease, the microbe Vibrio parahaemolyticus, is common in warm coastal waters like the Gulf. (blogspot.com)
  • There's no question bacteria, in general, increase following spills, and this includes Vibrios," said Jim Oliver, a Vibrio specialist at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. (blogspot.com)
  • V. vulnificus is an extremely virulent bacterium that can cause three types of infections: Acute gastroenteritis from eating raw or undercooked shellfish: V. vulnificus causes an infection often incurred after eating seafood, especially raw or undercooked oysters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a virulent, gram-negative, comma-shaped, motile bacterium that belongs to the family Vibrionaceae. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of its association with blistering skin infections, the bacterium was named Vibrio vulnificus in 1979. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio ("Beneckea") vulnificus, the bacterium associated with sepsis, septicaemia and the sea. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic estuarine bacterium, but this species causes fatal septicemia in humans. (elsevier.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios that are called "halophilic" because they require salt. (visitflorida.org)
  • Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is essential for the dispersal of biofilms formed by the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus CPS production is induced by the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator SmcR when biofilms mature. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The halophilic pathogenic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus also expresses orthologs of RNase E and RraA-RNase EV, RraAV1, and RraAV2 (herein renamed as VvRNase E, VvRraA1, and VvRraA2). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Vibrio fluvialis is a halophilic Gram-negative bacterium. (mdpi.com)
  • Vibrio anguillarum is a biofilm forming Gram-negative bacterium that survives prolonged periods in seawater and causes vibriosis in marine life. (diva-portal.org)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an aquatic, halophilic, Gram-negative bacterium, first discovered in 1950 in Japan during a food-poisoning outbreak. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophilic, Gram-negative bacterium, first discovered in 1950 during a food poisoning outbreak in Osaka, Japan. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic, aerobic bacterium that is distributed in marine and estuarine environments worldwide [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The ubiquitous marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of illness associated with seafood consumption. (elementascience.org)
  • Vibrio anguillarum strain NB10 serotype O1 is a Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped bacterium, isolated from a diseased fish on the Swedish coast of the Gulf of Bothnia, and is slightly halophilic. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The bacterium forms yellow colonies on the vibrio-selective medium thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar indicating the fermentation of sucrose. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophilic Gram-negative bacterium and one of the most important seafood-borne pathogens worldwide. (asm.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus , a halophilic, estuarine bacterium, is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing fatal primary septicemias or necrotizing wound infections ( 60 ). (asm.org)
  • The diagnosis: vibrio vulnificus (vih-BREE'-oh VUHL'-nihf-ih-kus), an infection caused by a bacterium found in warm salt water. (blogspot.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterium that is present in the marine environment and can be found in seawater, shellfish (such as oysters and mussels) and in crustacea (such as crab). (exeter.ac.uk)
  • The most harmful strains of V. vulnificus documented have been observed in three different forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio Vuilificus is a halophilic species, the strains of which are similar to Vibrio Parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus. (patentgenius.com)
  • The aims of this study were to follow the biofilm formation dynamics of Vibrio strains isolated from samples of seafood and food contact surfaces (FCS) and to propose a new BFI. (usda.gov)
  • This research aimed to study the abundance and molecular diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus-specific Halobacteriovorax strains isolated from seawater of the Adriatic Sea and the relationship between predator and prey abundances. (usda.gov)
  • In the present study, a total of 72 strains of V. vulnificus isolated from patients and oysters were subjected to screen potential producers and indicators of vulnificin, applying ultraviolet induction method. (bvsalud.org)
  • All the tested strains of V. vulnificus produced vulnificins active against indicator strains with various different inhibitory patterns. (bvsalud.org)
  • These strains can be employed efficiently for establishing vulnificin typing scheme of V. vulnificus and for the detection of bacteriocinogeny and sensitivity in V. vulnificus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Such effects have never been investigated in the marine pathogen Vibrio vulnificus , even though rifampicin-resistant strains of V. vulnificus have been isolated previously. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Moreover, spontaneous rifampicin-resistant strains of V. vulnificus have an important role in conjugation and mutagenesis protocols, with poor consideration of the effects of rpoB mutations. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Subsequently, results of a numerical taxonomy study of 154 strains of Vibrio spp. (mdpi.com)
  • Three hundred three luminous strains, most of which were recently isolated from nature and which represent 11 Aliivibrio , Photobacterium , and Vibrio species, were screened for incongruence of phylogenies based on a representative housekeeping gene ( gyrB or pyrH ) and a representative lux gene ( luxA ). (asm.org)
  • Southern blot analysis demonstrates the widespread presence of both pilA and pilD in clinical as well as environmental strains of V. vulnificus . (asm.org)
  • Clinicians should therefore consider the possibility of Vibrio vulnificus infection in the differential diagnosis of severe wound infections. (springer.com)
  • Clinical manifestations of halophilic non-cholera vibrio infections. (springer.com)
  • Role of iron in the pathogenesis of Vibrio vulnificus infections. (springer.com)
  • The main clinical manifestations of V. vulnificus infections are gastrointestinal illness, primary septicemia, and wound infections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Methods: The cases of thirty-two patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infections and sepsis caused by Vibrio vulnificus (seventeen patients) and Aeromonas species (fifteen patients) were retrospectively reviewed over a four-year period. (ebscohost.com)
  • The patients with Vibrio vulnificus infections had a significantly lower systolic blood pressure at presentation (p = 0.006). (ebscohost.com)
  • The patients with Aeromonas infections who died had significantly lower white blood-cell counts (p = 0.03) with significantly fewer numbers of segmented white blood cells than those who died in the Vibrio vulnificus group (p = 0.01). (ebscohost.com)
  • Clinical features of Vibrio vulnificus infections in the coastal areas of the Ariake Sea, Japan. (ebscohost.com)
  • In nature, V. vulnificus is present in marine environment and causes opportunistic infections in humans including septicemia and wound infection. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus , produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. (frontiersin.org)
  • Although this disease is unusual, V. vulnificus infections have increased in incidence by 41% between 1996 and 2005 (1). (upmc.edu)
  • Vibrio cholera infections and noncholera Vibrio infections. (medscape.com)
  • Because most Vibrio infections are associated with the consumption of contaminated food, these infections are often considered a foodborne disease. (medscape.com)
  • The prevalence of noncholera Vibrio infections in the United States appears to have increased in recent years. (medscape.com)
  • Since 1988, the CDC has maintained a voluntary surveillance system for culture-confirmed Vibrio infections in the Gulf Coast region (Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas). (medscape.com)
  • In 2007, the surveillance was expanded to national notification of infections caused by any Vibrio species. (medscape.com)
  • In 2011, the CDC estimated about 8,000 cases of Vibrio infections in the United States annually, including 4,500 cases of Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection and approximately 100 cases of Vibrio vulnificus infection. (medscape.com)
  • Based on data comparing statistics from 2006-2008 to statistics from 2013, the rate of reported Vibrio infections rose 75% and were at the highest level observed since active tracking began in 1996, according to a recent CDC report. (medscape.com)
  • A review of Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance (COVIS) data from 1997-2006 reported that of 4754 Vibrio species-related illnesses, 1210 (25%) were nonfoodborne Vibrio infections (NFVIs). (medscape.com)
  • In the event of a natural disaster, the disturbance to the environment may increase the risk of infectious diseases such as Vibrio infections. (medscape.com)
  • During the 2 weeks following Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, the CDC reported 22 new cases of Vibrio infections in Louisiana and Mississippi. (medscape.com)
  • V vulnificus accounted for most (82%) of these wound-associated infections. (medscape.com)
  • [ 7 ] The increased incidence of Vibrio wound infections in the residents of Gulf Coast states was most likely associated with the exposure of skin and soft-tissue injuries to the contaminated floodwaters. (medscape.com)
  • Symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus in wound infections typically include swelling, pain and redness at the wound site. (visitflorida.org)
  • Between 1988 and 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received reports of more than 900 Vibrio vulnificus infections from the Gulf Coast states, where most cases occur. (visitflorida.org)
  • In 2007, infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus and other vibrio species became nationally notifiable. (visitflorida.org)
  • What are some tips for preventing Vibrio vulnificus infections? (visitflorida.org)
  • http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/vibrio-infections/vibrio-vulnificus/ and http://www.cdc.gov/vibrio/vibriov.html or call your local county health department. (visitflorida.org)
  • Foodborne infections with Vibrio spp. (gov.hk)
  • Table1.Clinical characteristics of 84 patients with V. vulnificus infections who were treated at three major hospitals in Taiwan from 1995 to 2000. (slideserve.com)
  • Vibrio (Benecka) vulnificus is a recently recognized halophilic organism that may cause human infections. (tdl.org)
  • As of 2013 in the United States, Vibrio infections as a whole were up 43% when compared with the rates observed in 2006-2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foodborne Vibrio infections are most often associated with eating raw shellfish. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the major aquatic bacterial genera responsible for human infections from seafood is Vibrio, especially from oysters. (usda.gov)
  • Vibrio infections are not limited to humans, as recently highlighted by reports of Vibrio species capable of killing coral tissue ( 3 , 27 ), and vibrios represent a major source of concern in aquaculture facilities and marine aquaria ( 11 , 40 , 47 ). (asm.org)
  • Infection with V. vulnificus leads to rapidly expanding cellulitis or sepsis. (wikipedia.org)
  • While men have been shown to be more at risk from this infection than women, co-morbidities such as alcoholic cirrhosis and diseases affecting the endocrine system (diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) put a person far more at risk to develop infection from V. vulnificus. (wikipedia.org)
  • These toxins are not part of the infection that V. vulnificus causes but instead they are part of a secondary infection in the GI tract that most certainly will lead to systemic infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • V. vulnificus causes an infection often incurred after eating seafood , especially raw or undercooked oysters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus , a recently described strain of the halophilic Vibrio species, was isolated from the blood of a 73-year-old man, who developed rapidly progressive wound infection and fatal septicemia. (springer.com)
  • Twenty-one patients with Vibrio vulnificus infection have been reported in the Japanese literature. (springer.com)
  • Leg gangrene and endotoxic shock due to Vibrio parahemolyticusan infection acquired in New England coastal water. (springer.com)
  • Yoshida S, Tanabe T, Yamamoto S, Tiba S, Mizuguchi Y. Fetal Vibrio vulnificus infection in a patient with aplastic anemia. (springer.com)
  • Chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal disease, has been identified as a possible risk factor for primary septicemia and wound infection by Vibrio vulnificus . (biomedcentral.com)
  • She underwent emergency fasciotomy on the suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis by V. vulnificus infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Suspicion of V. vulnificus infection in vulnerable patients who ingest raw seafood is essential for prompt diagnosis, which could significantly improve patient outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pre-existing renal disease has been especially regarded as a risk factor for V. vulnificus infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Conclusions: The contact history of patients with a rapid onset of cellulitis can alert clinicians to a differential diagnosis of soft-tissue infection with Vibrio vulnificus (contact with seawater or raw seafood) or Aeromonas species (contact with fresh or brackish water, soil, or wood). (ebscohost.com)
  • Infection with Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacillus found worldwide in warm coastal waters, can lead to severe complications, particularly among patients with chronic liver. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus Infection: Diagnosis and Treatment. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection is the leading cause of death related to seafood consumption in the United States. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection can result in necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis and is associated with high mortality. (ebscohost.com)
  • The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus , a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. (frontiersin.org)
  • To prevent infection by V. vulnificus , one should avoid exposure of open wounds or broken skin to warm salt water and properly and thoroughly cook all shellfish. (upmc.edu)
  • however, Vibrio infection should still be kept in mind as oysters are shipped widely. (upmc.edu)
  • Although V parahaemolyticus is the most common noncholera Vibrio species reported to cause infection, V vulnificus is associated with up to 94% of noncholera Vibrio infection-related deaths. (medscape.com)
  • How common is Vibrio vulnificus infection? (visitflorida.org)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus Wound Infection Associated with Brackish Water. (arakuflavors.com)
  • The mechanism and location of injury of the patient presented in this case initially raised concern for a wound infection with a waterborne pathogen, and the rapid progression of a local infection with development of systemic illness was characteristic of infection with V. parahaemolyticus or V. vulnificus. (arakuflavors.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection. (slideserve.com)
  • Estimated prevalence (per 106 population) and annual number of cases of Vibrio vulnificus infection reported from 1985 to 2000 in Taiwan. (slideserve.com)
  • Because V. vulnificus infection has a fulminant course and high mortality rate, early recognition and rapid diagnosis with prompt therapy are necessary to improve survival rate. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1994. Severe gastroenteritis associated with Vibrio hollisae infection: report of two cases and review. (asmscience.org)
  • Pathogenic Vibrio species can cause foodborne illness (infection), usually associated with eating undercooked seafood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with noncholera Vibrio wound infection or sepsis are much more ill and frequently have other medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The method we developed in this study could be a simple and convenient diagnostic tool for field detection of Vibrio infection in fish. (springeropen.com)
  • 2005 ). Many Vibrio species have been recognized as fish pathogens that can cause infection with various symptoms. (springeropen.com)
  • For example, Vibrio scophthalmi infection results in hemorrhage on fish body surface and inner surface of the abdomen, severe enteritis, and ascites (Qiao et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Vibrio ichthyoenteri infection cause opaque intestines and necrotizing fasciitis with high mortality rates (Ishimaru et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Vibrio fluvialis infection remains among those infectious diseases posing a potentially serious threat to public health. (mdpi.com)
  • Good manufacturing practices should always be observed by the trade to minimise the risk of cholera and vibrio food poisoning associated with the consumption of seafood products. (gov.hk)
  • The purpose of the two studies presented was to determine changes in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity and the vibrio community, with respect to V. cholera, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. (lsu.edu)
  • In 1854, FilippoFacini named the cholera bacilli as Vibrio cholera, which was isolated in pure form by Robert Koch in 1884. (slideserve.com)
  • She and her coworkers showed that, in artificial sea water, Vibrio cholera and E. coli remained viable though they lost the capacity to form colonies on culture media [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The first successful documented treatment of fulminant V. vulnificus sepsis was in 1995. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sepsis with Bullous Necrotizing Skin Lesions due to Vibrio vulnificus Acquired Through Recreational Activities in the Baltic Sea. (ebscohost.com)
  • Even with early diagnosis and aggressive therapy, Vibrio sepsis is fatal in approximately 50% of cases. (upmc.edu)
  • Vibrio species can produce multiple extracellular cytotoxins and enzymes that are associated with extensive tissue damage and that may play a major role in the development of sepsis (see Table 1). (medscape.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Vibrio(V.) vulnificus is a halophilic, gram-negative bacillus that causes a fatal sepsis in patients with underlying chronic disease such as liver cirrhosis and alcoholic abuse. (bvsalud.org)
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a new selective medium for rapid identification of V. vulnificus through color change of medium according to pH from patients suspected of having V. vulnificus sepsis. (bvsalud.org)
  • So we confirmed that the final composition and pH of PNCB broth medium was 5% peptone, 1% NaCl, 0.2% cellobiose, 0.0004% bromthymol blue and 0.0004% thymol blue [pH 7.5] CONCLUSIONS: PNCB broth could be used as a selective and differential medium for rapid isolation and identification of V. vulnificus in patients with V. vulnificus sepsis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a zoonotic pathogen able to cause diseases in humans and fish that occasionally result in sepsis and death. (usda.gov)
  • Some species such as V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus have both a single polar flagellum with sheath and thin flagella projecting in all direction (peritrichous), and the other species such as V. fischeri have tufts of polar flagella with sheath (lophotrichous). (bionity.com)
  • Using Vibrio alginolyticus as a model system we demonstrate that ethanolamine is better utilized as a nitrogen source than as a carbon source. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In 1976, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control identified it as a Vibrio sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Initially called lactose-positive Vibrio by Hollis in 1976, V. vulnificus is associated with disease in people who ingest contaminated seafood (classically, raw oysters) or are exposed to seawater (2). (upmc.edu)
  • Two species, V. damsela and V. vulnificus , are also fish pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • 3. In contrast to most other foodborne pathogens, Vibrio spp. (gov.hk)
  • Several species of Vibrio include clinically important human pathogens . (bionity.com)
  • Several species of Vibrio are pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rapid identification of the vibriosis pathogens to the species level is useful for research and epidemiological studies because identification can help with determining the exact source of any outbreak and in developing strategies to reduce the severity of the disease. (springeropen.com)
  • 2008 ). An array of molecular techniques has been gaining popularity for the identification of different aquaculture-related bacterial pathogens and includes the following: PCR-based identification methods for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among vibrio species, including V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus , etc. (springeropen.com)
  • Because all of these pathogens appear to maintain planktonic populations, considerable interest exists in understanding the prevalence and dynamics of specific Vibrio populations in the environment. (asm.org)
  • Pathogens differ in their host specificities, with species infecting a unique host (specialist pathogens) and others having a wide host range (generalists). (life-science-alliance.org)
  • Certain pathogens are highly species-specific, whereas others affect a broad range of hosts. (life-science-alliance.org)
  • Background: Vibrio and Aeromonas species, which can cause necrotizing fasciitis and primary septicemia, are members of the Vibrionaceae family and thrive in aquatic environments. (ebscohost.com)
  • Results: Six patients in the Vibrio vulnificus group and four patients in the Aeromonas group died. (ebscohost.com)
  • The Vibrionaceae family includes the genera Vibrio, Plesiomonas , and Aeromonas . (medscape.com)
  • Fourteen species of Aeromonas have been described, most of which have been associated with human diseases. (foodelphi.com)
  • Aeromonas hydrophila is a member of the family Aeromonadaceae , and is only one of six species Aeromonas species that are known to be pathogenic in humans. (deskuenvis.nic.in)
  • Vibrio vulnificus most frequently causes primary septicemia and necrotising cellulitis after the eating of raw fish or shellfish or after exposure to seawater. (springer.com)
  • Fulminating Vibrio parahemolyticus septicemia. (springer.com)
  • Lactose-positive vibrio in seawater: A case of pneumonia and septicemia in a drowning victim. (springer.com)
  • Takeshita Z, Onizuka H, Yonezawa S, Muto M. A fetal case of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia. (springer.com)
  • However, cases of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis caused by V. vulnificus in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) have not been described. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We report a case of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis due to V. vulnificus in a patient undergoing CAPD after ingesting raw seafood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we report a case of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis due to V. vulnificus, which was identified by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequencing, in a patient undergoing CAPD after ingesting raw seafood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio anguillarum causes a fatal hemorrhagic septicemia in marine fish that leads to great economical losses in aquaculture world-wide. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio ecology, pathogenesis and evolution. (frontiersin.org)
  • A number of individual bacterial surface factors and extracellular proteins have been implicated in the virulence and pathogenesis of V. vulnificus , including an exopolysaccharide capsule, lipopolysaccharide, metalloprotease, cytolysin, phospholipase, and siderophores (reviewed in reference 60 ). (asm.org)
  • However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. (frontiersin.org)
  • Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this work, effects on growth, stress response and virulence of V. vulnificus were investigated using a set of nine spontaneous rifampicin-resistant derivatives of V. vulnificus CMCP6. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Preventive measures to interrupt transmission of pathogenic vibrios and thus reduce the disease burden are possibly the most effective disruption to the emergence or rapid evolution of Vibrio species toward enhanced virulence. (asmscience.org)
  • Inactivation of pilA reduces the ability of V. vulnificus to form biofilms and significantly decreases adherence to HEp-2 cells and virulence in iron dextran-treated mice. (asm.org)
  • Increasingly, experimental evidence suggests that virulence of V. vulnificus is multifactorial ( 60 ) and that the coordinate regulation and expression of several virulence factors are likely controlled by global regulatory systems such as the LuxS quorum-sensing system, the ToxR regulatory system, and the general stress regulator, rpoS- encoded sigma factor ( 15 , 20 , 27 , 31 ). (asm.org)
  • This chapter discusses the specific roles of integrons in the adaptive capacity of the Vibrionaceae , with emphasis on pathogenic Vibrio species and antibiotic resistance. (asmscience.org)
  • Phylogenetic results for both the 19-taxon and 44-taxon datasets corroborate previous hypotheses about the placement of Photobacterium and Aliivibrio within Vibrionaceae and also highlight problems with how Photobacterium is delimited and indicate that it likely should be dissolved into Vibrio to produce a phylogenetic taxonomy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While the analysis presented in [ 9 ] for Vibrionaceae was the most comprehensive to date (eight gene loci for 95 Vibrionaceae species) and provided the a hypothesis for a phylogenetic taxonomy for the group, the number of genomes already sequenced for Vibrionaceae lends itself to a genome-level analysis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus inhabits commonly coastal and estuary areas in the tropical and temperate regions, but this species has been recognized to cause gastroenteritis following consumption of seafood. (frontiersin.org)
  • Vibrio Parahaemolyticus is a common cause of gastroenteritis in some cultures, whereconsumption of food is particularly high, such as for example Japan. (patentgenius.com)
  • gastroenteritis, possibly extraintestinal - other ( V. mimicus , V. vulnificus . (onlinepdfcatalog.com)
  • Because clinical laboratories do not routinely use the selective medium thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) for stool culture, many cases of Vibrio gastroenteritis are not identified. (medscape.com)
  • Because Vibrio gastroenteritis is self-limited in most patients, no specific medical therapy is required. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is abundant in the aquatic environment particularly in warmer waters and is the leading cause of seafood borne gastroenteritis worldwide. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Identification of Vibrio hollisae associated with severe gastroenteritis after consumption of raw oysters. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is recognized as a cause of food-borne gastroenteritis, particularly in the Far East, where raw seafood consumption is high. (asm.org)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important causative agent of gastroenteritis, with the consumption of contaminated seafood being the major transmission route. (asm.org)
  • A total of 45 cases of Vibrio vulnificus were reported during 2015 resulting in 14 deaths. (visitflorida.org)
  • Pathogenic Vibrio are can cause food poisoning , usually associated with eating undercooked seafood. (bionity.com)
  • Acinetobacter species are not motile and oxidase-negative, and occur in pairs under magnification. (deskuenvis.nic.in)
  • Elgaml, A & Miyoshi, SI 2015, ' Presence of nitric oxide-sensing systems in the human pathogen vibrio vulnificus ', Biocontrol science , vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 199-203. (elsevier.com)
  • At least one strain of V. vulnificus is bioluminescent. (wikipedia.org)
  • V. vulnificus, the most severe strain, has not increased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenotypic analysis revealed that strain 96-237 T is slightly halophilic, mesophilic and facultatively anaerobic, fermenting d -glucose, d -ribose, d -mannose, d -mannitol, maltose and sucrose. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Thus, the strain represents a novel species for which we propose the name Grimontia celer and 96-237 T (=CECT 9029 T =KCTC 42960 T =LMG 29238 T ) as the type strain. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • In none of these cases of apparent HGT, however, did acquisition of the lux genes correlate with phylogenetic divergence of the recipient strain from other members of its species. (asm.org)
  • An intermediate view is that HGT occurs frequently between bacterial lineages, contributing various strain-specific genes and thereby increasing the pan-genome of a bacterial species, but that the bacterium's core genome is inherited vertically and rarely perturbed by HGT ( 15 , 41 , 50 , 51 , 58 ). (asm.org)
  • Xu M, Iida T, Yamamoto K, Takarada Y, Miwatani T, Honda T. Demonstration and characterization of simultaneous production of a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH/I) and a TDH-related hemolysin (TRHx) by a clinically isolated Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain, TH3766. (labome.org)
  • So far this year, 31 people across Florida have been infected by the severe strain of vibrio, and 10 have died. (blogspot.com)
  • [11] Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm this finding, but in vitro data support the supposition that this combination is synergistic against V. vulnificus . (wikipedia.org)
  • yellow colored colonies of Vibrio cholorae in TCBS culture medium Thiosulfate Citrate bile salts sucrose (TCBS) agar is a selective as well as differential culture medium used for selective isolation of Vibrio spp from a variety of clinical and nonclinical specimens. (arakuflavors.com)
  • People can get infected with Vibrio vulnificus when they eat raw shellfish, particularly oysters. (visitflorida.org)
  • and Vibrio vulnificus has been associated with vibriosis outbreaks in fish and shellfish (Haenen et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Low incidence of Vibrio vulnificus among Vibrio isolates from sea water and shellfish of the western Mediterranean coast. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • While parahaemolyticus rarely causes serious disease, another Vibrio species, vulnificus, kills dozens of Americans each year, largely through seafood contamination. (blogspot.com)
  • Chromogenic CHROMagar Vibrio agar (CHROMagar Microbiology, Paris, France) is particularly useful for distinguishing V. parahaemolyticus, which appears as mauve colonies, from other species of Vibrio, which appear as blue or colorless colonies (4). (arakuflavors.com)
  • 2003. Comparative genome analysis of Vibrio vulnificus, a marine pathogen. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • We identified 7 regions ranging in size from 10 kb to 81 kb that had the characteristics of GIs such as aberrant base composition compared to the core genome, presence of phage-like integrases, flanked by direct repeats and the absence of these regions from closely related species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We performed a four-way BLAST analysis on the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, an O3:K6 isolate from Japan recovered in 1996, versus the genomes of four published Vibrio species and constructed genome BLAST atlases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Genotype to phenotype: identification of diagnostic Vibrio phenotypes using whole genome sequences. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Three of the genomes included in the 44 taxon dataset, those of Vibrio gazogenes , Salinivibrio costicola , and Aliivibrio logei have been newly sequenced and their genome sequences are documented here. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on the availability of genome data for many bacterial species on GenBank, many other bacterial groups would also be amenable to similar genome-scale phylogenetic analyses even when present in multiple contigs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Taken together, the present study demonstrated that all of the isolates of V. vulnificus produced vulnificins and that 8 good vulnificin producers and 10 good indicators were detected. (bvsalud.org)
  • Characterization of endophytic bacterial isolates revealed that the majority belonged to different species of the genera Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, Micrococcus and Curtobacterium. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vibrios will grow easily on most isolation media, but as a halophilic organism, growth is enhanced by addition of 1% NaCl. (upmc.edu)
  • In addition, our analyses categorized genes that may be useful in differentiating pathogenic Vibrios at the species level. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because the occurrence of specific vibrios has frequently been linked to the temperature, salinity, and nutrient status of water, we hypothesized that seasonal changes in coastal water bodies lead to distinct vibrio communities and sought to characterize their level of differentiation. (asm.org)
  • Vibrios, which include more than 100 species, are ubiquitous in marine and estuarine environments, and several of them e.g. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Name 2 species of Campylobacter that are infectious. (cram.com)
  • This finding thus provides a new insight into the pathogenicity of the V. mimicus species. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Our data show that there is considerable genomic flux in this species and that the new highly virulent clone arose from an O3:K6 isolate that acquired at least seven novel regions, which included both a T3SS and a T6SS. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Individuals with liver disease, including Hepatitis C and cirrhosis, are most at risk for developing serious illness from Vibrio vulnificus obtained from eating raw oysters. (visitflorida.org)
  • Vibrio fischeri , V. phosphoreum , and V. harveyi are notable not for any pathogenic abilities, but for their ability to communicate. (bionity.com)
  • 2010 ), a multipex PCR method was developed by using the rpo B gene to make the identificationg of Vibrio harveyi , V. ichthyoenteri , and Photobacterium damselae (Myoung et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Exotoxin: V. vulnificus produces a number of extracellular toxins such as metalloprotease VvpE, cytolysin/hemolysin VvhA, and the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This gene-which we initially designated vvpD but will now call pilD to follow a more standardized nomenclature ( 10 , 36 , 67 ) and to avoid confusion with the subsequent designation of the V. vulnificus metalloprotease as VVP ( 16 , 27 )-was shown to be located immediately downstream of two other genes encoding proteins homologous to type IV pilus biogenesis factors, pilB and pilC . (asm.org)
  • These 24 regions included an integron, f237 phage, 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS), a type VI secretion system (T6SS) and 7 Vibrio parahaemolyticus genomic islands (VPaI-1 to VPaI-7). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Occurring naturally in the warm coastal waters, particularly during the summer months, Vibrio vulnificus has the potential to cause serious illness. (visitflorida.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic gram-negative bacterial species. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • Purification and characterization of an extracellular cytolysin produced by Vibrio vulnificus. (nsysu.edu.tw)
  • Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing fasciitis associated with acupuncture. (ebscohost.com)
  • The results showed that there was an insignificant change in V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity, and there was not a significant trend in the species composition of the vibrio community when interacting with oil. (lsu.edu)
  • 1999. Occurrence, diversity, and pathogenicity of halophilic Vibrio spp. (asmscience.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus expresses a multitude of cell-associated and secreted factors that potentially contribute to pathogenicity, although the specific roles of most of these factors have been difficult to define. (asm.org)
  • Approximately one-half (49-59%) of each species' core genes were conserved in all three species, and 14-24% of the core genes were species-specific and in different functional categories. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In nearly all cases, housekeeping gene and lux gene phylogenies were congruent, and there was no instance in which the lux genes of one luminous species had replaced the lux genes of another luminous species. (asm.org)
  • However, whether T3SS2-related genes are present in other Vibrio species remains unclear. (beds.ac.uk)
  • The V. vulnificus pilA gene is part of an operon and is clustered with three other pilus biogenesis genes, pilBCD . (asm.org)
  • Our comparative genomics study reveals the presence of genes that are involved in ethanolamine utilization in several Vibrio species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Kitamura T, Azuma I, Harada N. Isolation of the lactose positive vibrio from the spinal fluid. (springer.com)
  • suitable for salmonella , shigella & vibrio. (scribd.com)
  • [1] [2] Typically found in saltwater, Vibrio are facultative anaerobes that test positive for oxidase and do not form spores. (bionity.com)
  • These findings are consistent with evidence of upregulation of rRNA transcription during exponential growth in E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) (Nomura, 1999) and with microarray data from halophilic archaea showing that ribosomal protein gene transcription is higher during exponential growth than in the stationary phase (Lange et al. (alkgene.com)
  • Biochemical differentiation of the clinically significant Vibrio species into groups is shown in Table 1 (3). (upmc.edu)
  • This report describes the case of a 59-year-old woman with a history of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed bacteremia with Vibrio vulnificus. (ebscohost.com)
  • Human pathogenic species can be classified into two groups according to types of infectious diseases: the group causing gastrointestinal diseases and that causing extra-intestinal diseases. (frontiersin.org)