Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Ecological and Environmental Phenomena: Ecological and environmental entities, characteristics, properties, relationships and processes.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Endangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.Homing Behavior: Instinctual patterns of activity related to a specific area including ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances using navigational clues such as those used in migration (ANIMAL MIGRATION).Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Marine Biology: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.Pacific OceanBiota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.LizardsInsect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Snails: Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Human Activities: Activities performed by humans.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Islands: Tracts of land completely surrounded by water.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Invertebrates: Animals that have no spinal column.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Atlantic OceanPerciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Satellite Communications: Communications using an active or passive satellite to extend the range of radio, television, or other electronic transmission by returning signals to earth from an orbiting satellite.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Mediterranean SeaBiomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Ecological and Environmental Processes: Ecosystem and environmental activities, functions, or events.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.PanamaPlankton: Community of tiny aquatic PLANTS and ANIMALS, and photosynthetic BACTERIA, that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into PHYTOPLANKTON and ZOOPLANKTON.BrazilEstuaries: A partially enclosed body of water, and its surrounding coastal habitats, where saltwater from the ocean mixes with fresh water from rivers or streams. The resulting mixture of seawater and fresh water is called brackish water and its salinity can range from 0.5 to 35 ppt. (accessed http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/estuaries/estuaries01_whatis.html)Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Zooplankton: Minute free-floating animal organisms which live in practically all natural waters.Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Gastropoda: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of SNAILS and slugs. The former have coiled external shells and the latter usually lack shells.Herbivory: The act of feeding on plants by animals.Kelp: Large, robust forms of brown algae (PHAEOPHYCEAE) in the order Laminariales. They are a major component of the lower intertidal and sublittoral zones on rocky coasts in temperate and polar waters. Kelp, a kind of SEAWEED, usually refers to species in the genera LAMINARIA or MACROCYSTIS, but the term may also be used for species in FUCUS or Nereocystis.Oviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Daphnia: A diverse genus of minute freshwater CRUSTACEA, of the suborder CLADOCERA. They are a major food source for both young and adult freshwater fish.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Anopheles gambiae: A species of mosquito in the genus Anopheles and the principle vector of MALARIA in Africa.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Amphibians: VERTEBRATES belonging to the class amphibia such as frogs, toads, newts and salamanders that live in a semiaquatic environment.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Bahamas: A chain of islands, cays, and reefs in the West Indies, lying southeast of Florida and north of Cuba. It is an independent state, called also the Commonwealth of the Bahamas or the Bahama Islands. The name likely represents the local name Guanahani, itself of uncertain origin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p106 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p45)Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Sympatry: In evolutionary theory, overlapping geographic distribution of diverging species. In sympatric GENETIC SPECIATION, genetic diversion occurs without geographic separation.Bromelia: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE. Members contain karatasin and balansain (ENDOPEPTIDASES) and BROMELAINS.Mosquito Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Lynx: A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising felines with long legs, ear tufts, and a short tail.Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Ice Cover: A thick mass of ICE formed over large regions of land; RIVERS; LAKES; ponds; or SEAWATER.Floods: Sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. These include flash floods, seasonal river floods, and coastal floods, associated with CYCLONIC STORMS; TIDALWAVES; and storm surges.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Smegmamorpha: Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)Spatio-Temporal Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties and include the dimension of time in the analysis.Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Odonata: An order of insects comprising three suborders: Anisoptera, Zygoptera, and Anisozygoptera. They consist of dragonflies and damselflies.Charadriiformes: An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Amphipoda: An order of mostly marine CRUSTACEA containing more than 5500 species in over 100 families. Like ISOPODA, the other large order in the superorder Peracarida, members are shrimp-like in appearance, have sessile compound eyes, and no carapace. But unlike Isopoda, they possess thoracic gills and their bodies are laterally compressed.South AmericaCosta RicaFalconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Bivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.EcuadorArthropods: Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.WyomingTelemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.RNA, Ribosomal, 18S: Constituent of the 40S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 18S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Remote Sensing Technology: Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.Elasmobranchii: A subclass of cartilaginous fish comprising the SHARKS; rays; skates (SKATES (FISH);), and sawfish. Elasmobranchs are typically predaceous, relying more on smell (the olfactory capsules are relatively large) than sight (the eyes are relatively small) for obtaining their food.Lichens: Any of a group of plants formed by a symbiotic combination of a fungus with an algae or CYANOBACTERIA, and sometimes both. The fungal component makes up the bulk of the lichen and forms the basis for its name.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Madagascar: One of the Indian Ocean Islands off the southeast coast of Africa. Its capital is Antananarivo. It was formerly called the Malagasy Republic. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1500, its history has been tied predominantly to the French, becoming a French protectorate in 1882, a French colony in 1896, and a territory within the French union in 1946. The Malagasy Republic was established in the French Community in 1958 but it achieved independence in 1960. Its name was changed to Madagascar in 1975. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p714)DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Indian Ocean: A body of water covering approximately one-fifth of the total ocean area of the earth, extending amidst Africa in the west, Australia in the east, Asia in the north, and Antarctica in the south. Including the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, it constitutes the third largest ocean after the ATLANTIC OCEAN and the PACIFIC OCEAN. (New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 15th ed, 1990, p289)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Microclimate: The climate of a very small area.Caves: Geological formations consisting of underground enclosures with access from the surface.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Urbanization: The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.ArgentinaBayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Nitrogen Isotopes: Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.Borneo: An island in the Malay Archipelago, east of Sumatra, north of Java, and west of Celebes. It is the third largest island in the world. Its name is a Portuguese alteration of BRUNEI, located on it. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p163; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p73)Alismatidae: A plant subclass of the class Liliopsida (monocotyledons) in the Chronquist classification system. This is equivalent to the Alismatales order in the APG classification system. It is a primitive group of more or less aquatic plants.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Crustacea: A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).Parasites: Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Netherlands Antilles: Former Netherlands overseas territory in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies. It had included the islands of Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Saba, St. Eustatius, and the southern part of St. Martin. The Netherlands Antilles dissolved on October 10, 2010. Aruba, Curacao and Sint Maarten became autonomous territories of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius are under the direct administration of the Netherlands. (From US Department of State, Background Note)Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.ChileAustralia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Maps as Topic: Representations, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on the surface of the earth, the heavens, or celestial bodies.Phytoplankton: Free-floating minute organisms that are photosynthetic. The term is non-taxonomic and refers to a lifestyle (energy utilization and motility), rather than a particular type of organism. Most, but not all, are unicellular algae. Important groups include DIATOMS; DINOFLAGELLATES; CYANOBACTERIA; CHLOROPHYTA; HAPTOPHYTA; CRYPTOMONADS; and silicoflagellates.Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.North AmericaAedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Lemur: A genus of the family Lemuridae consisting of five species: L. catta (ring-tailed lemur), L. fulvus, L. macaco (acoumba or black lemur), L. mongoz (mongoose lemur), and L. variegatus (white lemur). Most members of this genus occur in forested areas on Madagascar and the Comoro Islands.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.
The habitat and ecology of this species is poorly known. Based on data for other members of Oligodon, O. annamensis is thought ...
"A Global Analysis of Traits Predicting Species Sensitivity to Habitat Fragmentation." Global Ecology and Biogeography, vol. 26 ... All species accounts have been reviewed and approved several times over, providing the most accurate data. ADW is highly ranked ... Curator of Mammals in the Museum of Zoology and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. · Myers has recently retired but ... In one certain study, they collected data to determine animals' sensitivity to fragmentation. The ADW and other databases ...
Habitat and trophic ecology of Southern Ocean cephalopods from stable isotope analyses. Marine Ecology Progress Series, ... New Data on the Squids (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) from the Scotia Sea. Malacologia 11(2): 391-406. Current Classification of ...
His studies focused on mammalian ecology and wildlife habitats. After graduating from Johns Hopkins, Flyger worked as a ... He collected extensive data on deer, which assisted in regulating the white-tailed deer population in the state. His methods of ... "Ecology" Vol. 41, No. 2, April 1960), pp. 365-369 Published by: Ecological Society of America The utilization of nesting boxes ... degree in wildlife management from Pennsylvania State University and in 1956 earned a doctoral degree in vertebrate ecology ...
In 2000, developer Rancher Viejo, which wished to build on a site that the toads used as a habitat, sued the Secretary of the ... Media related to Anaxyrus californicus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Anaxyrus californicus at Wikispecies. ... Journal of Animal Ecology 81.6 (2012): 1288-1297. Blumm, Michael C., and George A. Kimbrell. "Flies, Wolves, Spiders, Toads, ... "Habitat Use and Movement of the Endangered Arroyo Toad (Anaxyrus californicus) in Coastal Southern California." Journal of ...
Humans, fish, and wildlife depend on the rich ecology of the lake habitat. The complex ecosystem is subject to contamination of ... Additionally, KLA collects and publishes data about the lake level. The infestation of European zebra mussels, which has ...
"Phylogenetic signal and linear regression on species data". Methods in Ecology and Evolution. 1 (4): 319-329. doi:10.1111/j. ... "Evolutionary relationships between body shape and habitat use in lacertid lizards". Evolutionary Ecology Research. 1: 785-805. ... website Tree of Life American Naturalist Behavioral Ecology Ecology Evolution Evolutionary Ecology Research Functional Ecology ... are analyzed with the same statistical procedure that is used to analyze a real data set, then results for the simulated data ...
"A Comparison of Sound Propagation and Song Frequency in Temperate Marsh and Grassland Habitats". Behavioral Ecology and ... "Large-scale Bird-movement Patterns Evident in Eastern Australian atlas data". Emu. 102 (1): 99-125. doi:10.1071/MU01024. ... The noisy miner is found in open woodland habitats, where it is an advantage to call from the air so as to overcome sound ... Some habitat restoration and revegetation projects have inadvertently increased the problem of the noisy miner by establishing ...
ISBN 0-89658-503-4. Powell, Roger A (1997). Ecology and Behaviour of North American Black Bears: Home Ranges, Habitat, and ... Sarnacki, Aislinn (10 July 2014). "Maine Bear Management Program Releases Data, Says Baiting, Trapping and Hounding Necessary ... Throughout their range, habitats preferred by American black bears have a few shared characteristics. They are often found in ... In the northeast part of the range (United States and Canada), prime habitat consists of a forest canopy of hardwoods such as ...
Ecology. 97 (8): 1949-1960. 2016. doi:10.1890/15-1759.1. two recent data meta-analyses have found that species richness is ... habitat diversity or even biodiversity vs. habitat d.) or different subcategories (e.g. phylogenetic diversity, species ... "Biological diversity and habitat diversity: a matter of Science and perception" (PDF). "Estimating local biodiversity change: a ... Major factors for biotic stress and the ensuing accelerating loss rate are, amongst other threats: Habitat loss and degradation ...
The major threat to this species is the loss and degradation of its coral reef habitat. Further research is required in order ... Choeroichthys latispinosus is listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. ... to understand the species full range, ecology, abundance, and trend in population size. Fiegenbaum, H. & Pollom, R. (2015). " ...
"Geographical data - administrative territorial division". Government of Lithuania. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. ... The lake is a notable waterfowl habitat; populations of great crested grebes, greylag goose, and the globally near-threatened ... Vilnius University Institute of Ecology. Retrieved 2008-05-01. ...
... 's preferred habitat was thought to included lots of canopy cover and a cooler environment. These assumptions were ... Another interpretation of this data was that Diademodon may have had hippo-like behavior, that is, it remained in deep pools of ... It was these sources which allowed for a multitude of inferences to be made of Diademodon's ecology. ...
The ecology and fisheries have a very high sensitivity to changes in water flow. River Hertford The River Hertford starts close ... The area contains a wide diversity of habitats and a number of designated sites. Special Protection Areas provide protection to ... An electronic communications link provides data remotely to the UK Environment Agency. The main river, its tributaries and ... Special Areas of Conservation contribute to biodiversity by maintaining and restoring habitats and species other than birds.( ...
... waterhole's remote and inaccessible location has limited the gathering of survey data and other information on the ecology of ... Full surveys of flora, fauna and wetland habitats have not yet been fully documented. In a fact sheet developed by the ... These waterholes also provide vital habitat for land mammals, reptiles, frogs and woodland birds that need to live near ... Rockholes, ledges, overhangs and riparian zones at the waterhole provide a range of habitats for native flora and fauna, ...
It is listed as Data Deficient because it is known only from the type specimen collected in 1901. Adequate surveys have not ... It is threatened by habitat conversion due to agriculture and logging. There are no conservation measures in place. Further ... studies are needed into the taxonomy, distribution, abundance, reproduction and ecology of this species. Duckworth, J. W. & ...
2002). "Lizard home ranges revisited: effects of sex, body size, diet, habitat, and phylogeny" (PDF). Ecology. 83 (7): 1870- ... "Re-assessment of varanid evolution based on new data from Saniwa ensidens Leidy, 1870 (Squamata, Reptilia)" (PDF). American ...
Gold and tin mining upriver are affecting the ecology of the region by destroying fish and bird habitat. Wetlands [1] Geese and ... eider Effects of mining on the habitat of the region Geographical data Tourist information Siberian Cranes Coordinates: 71°41′ ... providing a favorable habitat for many rare animals. The region is practically uninhabited and full of lakes and marshes. Wild ...
Molecular Ecology. 13(9): 2667-2677. Data related to Rana aurora at Wikispecies Identification and habitat of the northern red- ... The still waters of ponds, marshes or stream pools are essential for northern red-legged frog breeding habitat; moreover, this ... Ecology 54:741-758 (1973) Hillis, D. M. & Wilcox, T. P. (2005): Phylogeny of the New World true frogs (Rana). Mol. Phylogenet. ... species of frog is considered unusually highly oriented to its aquatic habitat, with a clear preference for thickly vegetated ...
Data on feeding ecology and behaviour of large-spotted civet do not exist. The large-spotted civet is threatened due to habitat ... degradation, habitat loss, and hunting with snares and dogs. The population is thought to have been steadily declining ...
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 2:529-536. Watson, J. R., S. Mitarai, D. A. Siegel, J. E. Caselle, C. Dong, and J. C. ... It is composed of four main modules: graph building, including loading the initial landscape data and identification of the ... Appreciating ecological complexity: habitat contours as a conceptual landscape model. Conservation Biology, 18: 1245-1253. ... Journal of Applied Ecology, 46: 964-969. McRae, B. H., Hall, S. A., Beier, P., Theobald, D. M. 2012. Where to Restore ...
Next, each student must collect data for his or her project; data analysis follows. Finally, students write a final paper on ... Ecology is also offered at the field school. This course offers an opportunity to study the unique elfin forest in Nicaragua. ... This forest is part of the famous cloud forests, which are habitats that are globally endangered. These mountain forests are ... The conservancy runs a primate field school at Ometepe which has such courses as "Primate Behavior and Ecology", "Advanced ...
Spatial Ecology: Analysis of local habitat use. Different projects have been developed taking these basic areas into account: ... It analyses the air layers and collects the data required for forecasting. Visitors can also enjoy a replica of Euskalmet´s ... In addition, the center manages and maintains the habitat. To increase the knowledge of birds and their habitats in the ... Among the many habitats, wetlands provide an essential source of food and shelter for waterfowl. They are one of the most ...
Skole, D. & Tucker, C. J. 1993 Tropical deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the Amazon: satellite data from 1978 to 1988 ... Schnitzer, S. A. & Bongers, F. 2002 The ecology of lianas and their role in forests. Trends Ecol. Evol. 17, 223-230. ... Data collected from pollen core samples has shown that what is now semideciduous/evergreen forest used to be savanna/ ... Because there is such a wide range of different habitats that exist in the park, this number is split into different sections ...
... and analysis of 2004 habitat integrity and population monitoring data. BLM, Idaho Dept Fish & Game, Idaho Conservation Data ... Center, and Institute for Applied Ecology. Mancuso, M. (2000). Field investigation for Lepidium pappiliferum (Slickspot ... It is endemic to Idaho in the United States, where it is mostly limited to a specific habitat type in the southwestern part of ... Slick spot habitat in its limited area has been degraded by agriculture, grazing of cattle, urban development, and wildfire. ...
According to a report published in the Journal of Ecology a combination of the disease and emerald ash borer attacks could wipe ... mature trees would not be removed because of the implications for wildlife who depend on the trees for their natural habitat. ... "National Biodiversity Data Centre. Retrieved 5 November 2012.. *^ http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/forestservice/ashdiebackchalara ... Fungal Ecology. 5 (2): 147-153. doi:10.1016/j.funeco.2011.10.004.. ...
Feeding ecology and growth of neonate and juvenile blacktip sharks Carcharhinus limbatus in the Timbalier-Terrebone Bay complex ... Descriptions of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico reef fish bottom longline and vertical line fisheries based on observer data ... Spatial and habitat-mediated food web dynamics in an oyster-dominated estuary ... All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for ...
Baseline data were collected for three Marine Protected Areas that were established by the State of California in September ... The physical structure of kelp provides vertical habitat similar to trees on land; it is used by numerous fishes and ... Kelp forests are considered an important nursery habitat for nearshore rockfishes and serve as a primary foraging area for many ... This masters thesis studied kelp canopy cover data collected from 1985-1991 along a 65 km stretch of coastline spanning the ...
Gain skills to create high quality and spatially accurate habitat classification maps from data you have captured using your ... He is a qualified RPA-S pilot, and proficient in the use of UAV derived imagery to generate high-resolution habitat ... bring together the data collected by your aircraft into a spatially accurate and informative map suitable for mapping habitats ... ESRI/ArcGIS for the spatial data aspects. *PhotoScan for a demonstration of the photogrammetric processing of digital images. ...
Data from: Butterfly community ecology: the influences of habitat type, weather patterns, and dominant species in a temperate ... Data from: Butterfly community ecology: the influences of habitat type, weather patterns, and dominant species in a temperate ... Robinson N, Armstead S, Bowers MD (2012) Data from: Butterfly community ecology: the influences of habitat type, weather ... Robinson N, Armstead S, Bowers MD (2012) Butterfly community ecology: the influences of habitat type, weather patterns, and ...
... the natural history and ecology of phytotelmata. [Roger Laurence Kitching] ... More info about Linked Data. Primary Entity. # Food webs and container habitats the ... Food webs and container habitats : the natural history and ecology of phytotelmata. Author:. Roger Laurence Kitching. ... schema:name "Food webs and container habitats the natural history and ecology of phytotelmata" ;. schema:productID "839918581 ...
Forest wildlife ecology and habitat management. [David R Patton] -- Across the continental United States, one can identify 20 ... ecology> ; # Forest ecology. schema:about data/355153805#Topic/animal_ecology> ; # ... ecology_and_habitat_management>. a schema:CreativeWork ;. rdfs:label "Forest wildlife ecology and habitat management." ;. ... ecology_and_habitat_management> ;. schema:name "Forest wildlife ecology and habitat management"@en ;. schema:productID " ...
USGS, USFWS, and cooperators at Arizona State University collected data sets from the literature and rabbit hunt data from 17 ... and the impacts to their habitats. USGS will collect baseline data for future comparisons of changes in plant and animal ... and their habitats. Species and habitat modeling are powerful tools used by researchers to answer natural resource management ... Changes to the habitat of the fringe-toed lizard may result from the type of land management prescribed across the range of the ...
Fauchald P, Tveraa T. Using first-passage time in the analysis of area-restricted search and habitat selection. Ecology. 2003; ... We investigated habitat use and foraging habitats of ringed seals (n = 26) with satellite telemetry in the northern Baltic Sea ... Data of individual KU13 contained 4 outlier locations even after filtering and they were removed. To complement the GPS data, ... Foraging habitat characteristics. To investigate the characteristics of foraging habitat, the depth and distance to the ...
Habitat selection and nest survival in two Great Plains shorebirds. Avian Conservation and Ecology 15(1):3. https://doi.org/ ... determined using pond count data from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Waterfowl Breeding Pair and Habitat Suitability data); ... and ecological variables derived from remotely sensed data and broad-scale survey data. Our habitat selection models indicated ... How does data quality affect nest survival estimates?. *How do habitat characteristics and temporal variation in predator and ...
Habitat and Ecology [top] Habitat and Ecology:. Found in upland moor along stream sides (3,580-4,000 m asl).. ... Data Organization. *Red List API. *Spatial Data Download. *Information Sources and Quality ... However, this is a high altitude species and its habitat potentially is threatened by climate change. ... The population occurs in less than five locations and potentially is susceptible to habitat loss due to climate change. There ...
Habitat and Ecology [top] Habitat and Ecology:. Apparently occurring in evergreen rainforest. ... Data Organization. *Red List API. *Spatial Data Download. *Information Sources and Quality ...
3 Distribution and habitat. *4 Ecology. *5 References. Description. It grows as an erect shrub from 20 centimetres to 1.5 ... Ecology. The species is not considered threatened.[1]. References. Wikisource has original text related to this article:. A ... Distribution and habitat. It occurs throughout western parts of Western Australias Southwest Botanical Province, ranging from ...
... habitat, and status of rare, threatened and endangered species of mammals and information on their native countries: ... 4. Data on Biology and Ecology (Size and Weight, Habitat, Age to Maturity, Gestation Period, Birth Season, Birth Rate, Early ... Data on Biology and Ecology. Size and Weight:. The male wild yak can weigh up to 1000 kg (2200 lb); females are 1/3 that size. ... The wild yak has lost most of the best alpine meadow and steppe habitat to pastoralists. Problems are also caused by habitat ...
... habitat, and status of rare, threatened and endangered species of mammals and information on their native countries: ... 4. Data on Biology and Ecology (Size and Weight, Habitat, Age to Maturity, Gestation Period, Birth Season, Birth Rate, Early ... Data on Biology and Ecology. Size and Weight:. The head and body length of the aye-aye is about 30 - 37 cm (12 - 15). The tail ... Habitat:. The aye-aye has been found to be widely distributed in a variety of native forest types. It has been recorded at ...
GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT BRANCH Show Additional Record Data Hide Additional Record Data ... Florida seagrass habitat evaluation: A comparative survey for chemical quality. Contact. National Health and Environmental ... Florida seagrass habitat evaluation: A comparative survey for chemical quality. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION. Elsevier Science Ltd, ... EPA Home » Science Inventory » Florida seagrass habitat evaluation: A comparative survey for chemical quality ...
Habitat and Ecology [top] Habitat and Ecology:. The Southern River Otter is distributed in the southern temperate forest of ... A phylogenetic study of the Lutrinae (Carnivora; Mustelidae) using morphological data. Canadian Journal of Zoology 65: 2536- ... Habitat use and spatial behaviour of the endangered Southern river otter (Lontra provocax) in riparian habitats of Chile: ... freshwater habitats). For the subpopulations using the southern fjords and islands (marine habitats) of Chile the population ...
ecology literature. *URI: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/RO_0002303. *Definition: x has habitat y if: x is an organism, y is a ... show all ecology literature Fairbairn 2013 Global Biotic Interactions NCBI GGBN GBIF BHL BOLDS data coverage OBIS environmental ... Definition: x has habitat y if: x is an organism, y is a habitat, and y can sustain and allow the growth of a population of x ... show all eats ecomorphological guild habitat is eaten by latitude longitude motility number of DNA Records In GGBN number of ...
MID-CONTINENT ECOLOGY DIVISION Show Additional Record Data Hide Additional Record Data ... Depth gradients in food web processes linking large lake habitats -presentation. Contact. National Health and Environmental ... Support of whole-lake food webs through trophic linkages among pelagic, profundal, and littoral habitats appears to be integral ... Sierszen, M. Depth gradients in food web processes linking large lake habitats -presentation. Presented at Joint Aquatic ...
"This ponderous book not only uses an enormous amount of literature data, but takes advantage from the life-span experience of ... In A Resource-Based Habitat View for Conservation Roger Dennis introduces a novel approach to the understanding of habitats ... The book explores principles underlying this new definition of habitat, and the impact of habitat components on populations, ... Landscape components and their influence on butterfly habitat distributions 167. Substrate chemistry and butterfly habitats 167 ...
Data on the biology of migratory sharks are fragmentary or even absent. The delimitation of critical habitats is crucial to ... Migratory sharks in the Gulf of Gabès: by-catch, ecology and critical habitats. Project description. Investigation conducted in ... Migratory sharks in the Gulf of Gabès: by-catch, ecology and critical habitats ... Collection of biological data (diet, reproductive biology…) *Investigation of the presence of critical areas (nurseries) for ...
Learn more about pursuing a degree in ecology today! ... Habitat data analysis. * Population ecology. * Ecology ... Ecology Degree. Ecology is the scientific study of living organisms and their environments; or the study of environmental ... Ecology Degree Programs. Ecology degree programs are available at a variety of different educational levels, depending on what ... Ph.D. in Ecology. A Ph.D. in ecology is an interdisciplinary study of a number of different components of environmental ...
... but habitat data (species? presence data and related habitat suitability models) and genetic data are the... ... Ecology, Ecosystems, & Environment (8) Apply Ecology, Ecosystems, & Environment filter *Animal ecology (6) Apply Animal ecology ... Effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on amphibians: A review and prospectus. Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the ... Estimating effective landscape distances and movement corridors: Comparison of habitat and genetic data. Resistance models ...
Moisture as a determinant of habitat quality for a nonbreeding neotropical migratory songbird. Ecology 91 (10) (OCT): 2874-82. ... Birds occupying drier habitats declined in body mass over the study period, while those occupying wetter habitats increased in ... The habitat-linked variation in performance we observed suggests that habitat limitation could impact individual and population ... The linkage between moisture and habitat quality for a migratory bird indicates that the availability of high-quality habitats ...
"Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology, Ecological Modelling" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for ... Decision-tree and rule-induction approach to integration of remotely sensed and GIS data in mapping vegetation in disturbed or ... Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology Guisan, Antoine; ... Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. Guisan, Antoine; Zimmermann, Niklaus E. Ecological Modelling. , Volume 135 ( ...
6.0122 HABITAT AND ECOLOGY. 6.0123 HYDROCARBON ACCUMULATION IN SOILS. 6.0124 STUDY OF THE MECHANISMS OF FORMATION OF NITRIC ... 4.0067 DATA ON OBTAINING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FROM DRY HOT ROCK. 4.0068 TEST AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER FOR A SOLAR HEATED PUBIC ... 6.0009 PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY AND THE EFFECTS OF CRUDE OILS ON ARCTIC MARINE INVERTEBRATES TO INCLUDE ADDITIONAL RELATED STUDIES ... 4.0218 RADIATION CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR INVESTIGATIONS CONCERNING THE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN SWEDEN ...
  • Although it is difficult to distinguish the two species using remotely sensed data (e.g., aerial photographs or hyperspectral images), long-term patterns of kelp canopy cover are persistent throughout the sanctuary. (sanctuarysimon.org)
  • Surveys showed that kelp cover was not tightly correlated with habitat quality and species richness. (sanctuarysimon.org)
  • However, current and past monitoring efforts, including the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO) and the Cooperative Research and Assessment of Nearshore Ecosystems (CRANE) programs, will improve our understanding of kelp forest habitats in the sanctuary. (sanctuarysimon.org)
  • Although kelp forests are a familiar and iconic habitat within the sanctuary, kelp canopy cover typically encompasses about 25 square miles, or less than 0.5% of the total surface area within the sanctuary. (sanctuarysimon.org)
  • Prior to SCUBA surveys, sites with persistent kelp canopy cover (based on California Department of Fish and Game remote-sensing data) were assumed to be relatively similar. (sanctuarysimon.org)
  • I thought you might be interested in this item at http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/839918581 Title: Food webs and container habitats : the natural history and ecology of phytotelmata Author: Roger Laurence Kitching Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2000. (worldcat.org)
  • We use a time series of three lidar data acquisitions across a 12-year period (2000-2012). (nerc.ac.uk)
  • Zimmermann, Niklaus E. 2000-12-05 00:00:00 With the rise of new powerful statistical techniques and GIS tools, the development of predictive habitat distribution models has rapidly increased in ecology. (deepdyve.com)
  • This data set, Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment (LBA-ECO) LC-39 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Active Fire and Frequency Data for South America: 2000-2007, provides active fire locations and estimates of annual fire frequencies. (ornl.gov)
  • Data from the MODIS sensors aboard the Terra (2000-2007) and Aqua (2003-2007) satellite platforms were analyzed to determine spatial and temporal patterns in satellite fire detections. (ornl.gov)
  • Movement Ecology, http://link.springer.com/journal/40462 and Animal Biotelemetry https://link.springer.com/journal/40317 ) and symposia largely dedicated to animal movement ( https://www.bio-logging.net/Symposium/ ). (frontiersin.org)
  • The Baltic ringed seal ( Phoca hispida botnica ) interacts with anthropogenic activities and knowledge of its spatial ecology is needed for planning population management and mitigating interactions with coastal fisheries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Learn how to bring together the data collected by your aircraft into a spatially accurate and informative map suitable for mapping habitats and change. (ceh.ac.uk)
  • Across habitats and years, butterfly abundance was consistently high at Plains Riparian and Foothills Riparian sites, and richness and diversity were consistently high in Foothills Riparian areas These two habitats may be highly suitable for butterflies in this ecosystem, regardless of weather conditions. (datadryad.org)
  • Further surveys in these areas may uncover the species' presence, therefore its range has been projected beyond known sites to include these areas of suitable habitat. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Locations: 845 long-term permanent plots in terrestrial habitats across the Netherlands. (wur.nl)
  • Based on data for other members of Oligodon, O. annamensis is thought to be oviparous, or egg-laying, and terrestrial in its habits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using high resolution aerial images taken by drones, Jan C. Habel of the Terrestrial Ecology Research Group at the TUM investigated the larval microhabitats of two declining butterfly species. (tum.de)
  • Generally low abundance and species richness in Montane Woodlands sites, particularly in 2002, suggested low suitability of the habitat to butterflies in this ecosystem, and this may be especially important during drought-like conditions. (datadryad.org)
  • We use models to assist in identifying plant and animal priority sites, species and communities that are vulnerable to climate change, produce high quality habitat models for managing species of concern, and investigate ecosystem responses to land use change and climate change. (usgs.gov)
  • This paper investigates the significance of lidar data characteristics when modelling organism-habitat relationships, taking a single species case study in a mature woodland ecosystem. (nerc.ac.uk)
  • Drawing on resilience science, regional data, and local expertise, we will develop the vision and tools that will allow stakeholders in the region ensure that local actions contribute toward the creation of a high-functioning and resilient Silicon Valley ecosystem. (sfei.org)
  • Fire ecology research has shown that many plant and animal species benefit from the rejuvenating effects of fire. (nps.gov)
  • Fire managers use monitoring data and the latest fire ecology research to guide their efforts to restore the natural fire regimes at Grand Canyon National Park. (nps.gov)
  • Dr. Todd Esque and researchers at USGS WERC are identifying key reptile and amphibian species throughout the DLCC region that are at-risk of being exposed to substantial habitat loss due to potential climate change. (usgs.gov)
  • The environment is changing faster than at any time in recorded history, due to a range of factors including climate change, habitat loss, renewable energy developments, pollution and over-exploitation of natural resources. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Their Origin and Establishment' (1977), 'Butterflies and Climate Change' (1993), joint author of 'Butterflies on British and Irish Offshore Islands' (1996) and edited 'The Ecology of Butterflies in Britain' (1992). (wiley.com)
  • Results: Local above-ground persistence is determined by both functional traits (especially the ability to form long-lived clonal connections) and habitat preferences (especially nutrient requirements). (wur.nl)
  • Its presence is important for wildlife habitat, nutrient recycling, plant diversity, and overall landscape health. (nps.gov)
  • The project is designed to expand upon the existing historical ecology studies carried out through the SCVWD Watershed Stewardship Project in 2004-5, the Coyote Creek Historical Ecology Study , and the South Santa Clara Valley Historical Ecology Study . (sfei.org)
  • These habitats were classified by the local Open Space consortium as: Grasslands, Tallgrass, Foothills Grasslands, Foothills Riparian, Plains Riparian, and Montane Woodland. (datadryad.org)
  • Among habitats, butterfly abundance was higher in Plains Riparian sites than in Montane Woodland or Grassland sites, though diversity was lowest in Plains Riparian areas. (datadryad.org)
  • Hinsley, Shelley A. . 2015 Airborne lidar for woodland habitat quality monitoring: exploring the significance of lidar data characteristics when modelling organism-habitat relationships [in special issue: Remote sensing and GIS for habitat quality monitoring] Remote Sensing , 7 (4). (nerc.ac.uk)
  • Overall, our results suggest that for relatively stable woodland habitats, ecologists should not feel prohibited in using lidar data to explore or monitor organism-habitat relationships because of perceived data quality issues, as long as the questions investigated, the scale of analysis, and the interpretation of findings are appropriate for the data available. (nerc.ac.uk)
  • WERC's Dr. Todd Esque, field researchers, and collaborators are using models, monitoring plans, and decision-support tools to provide land managers with the resources they need to answer questions about how environmental change influences plants, animals, and their habitats. (usgs.gov)
  • This is resulting in a population that is becoming increasingly fragmented and more susceptible to local extinctions through habitat destruction, human disturbance, predation by domestic dogs, and demographic or environmental stochastic events. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Relate ecological conditions to chemical stressors (such as nutrients and pesticides) and physical disturbances (such as habitat and hydrologic alterations) in the context of different environmental settings and land uses. (usgs.gov)
  • However, certain patches serve as sources and others serve as sinks (lower quality habitat), leading to a weaker relationship between environmental conditions and the population sizes of some species (Holyoak et al. (uwstout.edu)
  • The genetic modification of bacteria from natural and managed habitats will impact on the management of agricultural and environmental settings. (sciencemag.org)
  • UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) atmospheric nitrogen chemistry data: 1993-2015. (ceh.ac.uk)
  • UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) frog data: 1994-2015. (ceh.ac.uk)
  • We present a novel framework for participatory development of spatially explicit scenarios at national scale that model socioeconomic and environmental dynamics by reconciling local stakeholder perspectives and national spatial data. (ecologyandsociety.org)
  • Freelance Consultant, specialising in environmental monitoring and data analysis. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • Is habitat variation, characterised by environmental parameters, a good surrogate for intra- and interspecific diversity? (wsl.ch)
  • Nonbreeding migratory birds in the neotropics occupy a range of habitat types that vary with respect to moisture. (upenn.edu)
  • Birds occupying drier habitats declined in body mass over the study period, while those occupying wetter habitats increased in body mass. (upenn.edu)
  • Regardless of habitat, birds lost an average of 7.6% of their mass at night, and mass recovery during the day trended lower in dry compared with wet habitats. (upenn.edu)
  • Carex buekii is a tall sedge, forming large stands in wetlands, particularly in river floodplains across Central Europe and thus on many sites determining the typical appearance of riverine habitats. (nature.com)
  • Our paper aims at increasing the knowledge on ecology of C. buekii and its role in the wetlands. (nature.com)
  • We will also use bioenergetic simulation models to estimate the contribution of seagrasses and wetlands to offshore secondary production and examine the predicted effects of the continued loss of these habitats. (ucsb.edu)
  • This species is among 24 different reptiles and amphibians for which habitat models are being constructed by various research groups for a comparison of methods and to consider how these species will do under projected climate scenarios. (usgs.gov)
  • Due to extensive research and laboratory work necessary with these courses, there are no exclusively online ecology programs available. (excite.com)
  • Mange av disse er fritt tilgjengelig på nett, blant annet vårt vitenskapelige tidsskrift « Polar Research » og en del rapporter. (npolar.no)
  • Today, the study of the ecology of non-human animal (hereafter, animal) movement is a well-established field of science ( Nathan, 2008 ) encompassing a coherent research community with dedicated publication outlets (e.g. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this activity, students will use trail camera data to answer a scientific research question about the impacts of humans on species diversity in Gorongosa. (hhmi.org)
  • In December, I blogged about the beta release of Layerscape, a free set of research tools from Microsoft that enable earth scientists to visualize and tell stories around large, complex data sets. (microsoft.com)
  • Results are presented from the Data Curation Profiles project research, on who is willing to share what data with whom and when. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • This research indicates that data curation services will need to accommodate a wide range of subdisciplinary data characteristics and sharing practices. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • As part of a larger set of strategies emerging across academic institutions, institutional repositories (IRs) will contribute to the stewardship and mobilization of scientific research data for e-Research and learning. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Findings from this study elucidate scientists' views on 'sharable' forms of data-the particular representation that they view as most valued for reuse by others within their own research areas-and the anticipated duration for such reuse. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • In sciences served by disciplinary or nationally scoped infrastructure initiatives, sharing research data is considered to be an inevitable trend. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • At present, a number of research and development efforts are focused on solutions for small-science data (e.g. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Butterfly species richness was higher in Foothills Riparian sites than it was in all but one other habitat (Tallgrass). (datadryad.org)
  • The Upper Penitencia Creek Historical Ecology Assessment documents aspects of Upper Penitencia Creek's hydrogeomorphology and riparian ecology prior to major Euro-American modification. (sfei.org)
  • Researchers monitored the succession of the microbial community in the Gulf of Mexico using data from before, during, and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (hhmi.org)
  • Nonetheless, over the long term, small-science researchers, who span many fields and produce many different forms of highly valuable data, are expected to produce more data than researchers in big-science fields ( Carlson 2006 ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The unique qualities of researchers' data and their sharing requirements will necessitate tailoring of data curation services, while keeping development in alignment with the growing, global e-Science and curation infrastructure. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • is investigating what data researchers are willing to share, when and with whom, and researchers' needs and requirements for sharing those data through an IR. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The researchers at the Reserve used the data that the students collected to monitor the local sea turtle population. (adventuresmithexplorations.com)
  • Movements and habitat use of feral house cats Felis catus , stoats Mstela erminea and ferrets Mustela furo , in grassland surrounding yellow-eyed penguin Megadyptes antipodes breeding areas in spring. (publish.csiro.au)