Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Chewing Gum: A preparation of chicle, sometimes mixed with other plastic substances, sweetened and flavored. It is masticated usually for pleasure as a candy substitute but it sometimes acts as a vehicle for the administration of medication.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Plant Gums: Polysaccharide gums from PLANTS.Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: Necrotic jaws or other maxillofacial skeleton necrosis associated with bisphosphonate use (see BISPHOSPHONATES). Injury, dental procedures, and trauma can trigger the necrotic process.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesBicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Gum Arabic: Powdered exudate from various Acacia species, especially A. senegal (Leguminosae). It forms mucilage or syrup in water. Gum arabic is used as a suspending agent, excipient, and emulsifier in foods and pharmaceuticals.OdontoblastsAmeloblasts: Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Jaw DiseasesTooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Enamel Organ: Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.MSX1 Transcription Factor: A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Mandibular DiseasesTooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Enamel Proteins: The proteins that are part of the dental enamel matrix.Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Tooth DiseasesTooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Amelogenesis: The elaboration of dental enamel by ameloblasts, beginning with its participation in the formation of the dentino-enamel junction to the production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992).Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Amelogenin: A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.Karaya Gum: Polysaccharide gum from Sterculia urens (STERCULIA). It is used as a suspending or stabilizing agent in foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals; a bulk-forming laxative; a surgical lubricant and adhesive; and in the treatment of skin ulcers.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Galactans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating galactose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4: A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Organ Culture Techniques: A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Hedgehog Proteins: A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Solid Phase Extraction: An extraction method that separates analytes using a solid phase and a liquid phase. It is used for preparative sample cleanup before analysis by CHROMATOGRAPHY and other analytical methods.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Mannans: Polysaccharides consisting of mannose units.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Wheat Germ Agglutinins: Lectins purified from the germinating seeds of common wheat (Triticum vulgare); these bind to certain carbohydrate moieties on cell surface glycoproteins and are used to identify certain cell populations and inhibit or promote some immunological or physiological activities. There are at least two isoforms of this lectin.
Therefore, a displaced primary tooth will be removed if it is found to have encroached upon the developing adult tooth germ.[8] ... They are mainly being fitted on the upper teeth as it has higher risk of dental trauma compared to the lower teeth. Gum shields ... Treatment options will be extraction for the primary tooth. For the permanent tooth, endodontic treatment can be considered. ... This is because the root apex of an injured primary tooth lies near the tooth germ of the adult tooth.[8] ...
... erupting teeth and missing teeth are left out in the scoring system and difficulties in judging conformity of each tooth to an ... Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) ... Extraction of teeth can be required in some cases to aid the orthodontic treatment. Starting the treatment process for overjets ... "How to Keep Your Teeth and Gums Healthy" (PDF). British Orthodontic Society. December 2008.. ...
Some of the common side effects involved in teeth whitening are increased sensitivity of the teeth, gum irritation, and ... This means that the tooth will have had the nerve of the tooth extirpated or removed through a root canal treatment at the ... Disturbances to the developing tooth germ during neonatal and early childhood stages such as maternal vitamin D deficiency, ... Gum depigmentation. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Carey, Clifton M. (June 2014). "Tooth ...
... is inflammation of the alveolar bone (i.e., the alveolar process of the maxilla or mandible). Classically, this occurs as a postoperative complication of tooth extraction. Alveolar osteitis usually occurs where the blood clot fails to form or is lost from the socket (i.e., the defect left in the gum when a tooth is taken out). This leaves an empty socket where bone is exposed to the oral cavity, causing a localized alveolar osteitis limited to the lamina dura (i.e., the bone which lines the socket). This specific type of alveolar osteitis is also known as dry socket or, less commonly, fibrinolytic alveolitis, and is associated with increased pain and delayed healing time. Dry socket occurs in about 0.5-5% of routine dental extractions, and in about 25-30% of extractions of impacted mandibular third molars (wisdom teeth which are buried in the bone). Since dry socket ...
... (from the Greek peri, "around", Latin corona "crown" and -itis, "inflammation") also known as operculitis, is inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding the crown of a partially erupted tooth, including the gingiva (gums) and the dental follicle. The soft tissue covering a partially erupted tooth is known as an operculum, an area which can be difficult to access with normal oral hygiene methods. The synonym operculitis technically refers to inflammation of the operculum alone. Pericoronitis is caused by an accumulation of bacteria and debris beneath the operculum, or by mechanical trauma (e.g. biting the operculum with the opposing tooth). Pericoronitis is often associated with partially erupted and impacted mandibular third molars (lower wisdom teeth), often occurring at the age of wisdom tooth eruption (15-24). Other common causes ...
... , also known as dental pain, is pain in the teeth and/or their supporting structures, caused by dental diseases or pain referred to the teeth by non-dental diseases. Common causes include inflammation of the pulp, usually in response to tooth decay, dental trauma, or other factors, dentin hypersensitivity (short, sharp pain, usually associated with exposed root surfaces), apical periodontitis (inflammation of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone around the root apex), dental abscesses (localized collections of pus, such as apical abscess, pericoronal abscess, and periodontal abscess), alveolar osteitis ("dry socket", a possible complication of tooth extraction, with loss of the blood clot and exposure of bone), acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (a gum infection, also called "trenchmouth"), temporomandibular disorder and others. Pulpitis is classified as reversible when the ...
An oilseed press is a machine that lies at the center of vegetable oil extraction. This is due to the fact that this technology is designed to release oil from oilseeds. Multiple oilseed press layouts have been developed over time to complete this process, with each having its own distinct set of advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, the products that are created by oilseed presses, namely oil and oilseed meal, possess great nutritive benefits for humans and livestock respectively. The oilseed press, being at the center of the oil-extraction process, is joined with various other pieces of equipment and procedures that form a pre- and post-extraction system. Breaking it down to its simplest formulation, the process that oilseed presses carry out appears is quite simple. Oilseed presses essentially extrude or 'press' vegetable oil from oil-bearing seeds, which include soybean, sunflower, peanut, safflower, canola, sesame, niger, castor bean, linseed, ...
Socket preservation or alveolar ridge preservation (ARP)[1] is a procedure to reduce bone loss after tooth extraction to preserve the dental alveolus (tooth socket) in the alveolar bone. A platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)[2] membrane containing bone growth enhancing elements can be stitched over the wound or a graft material or scaffold is placed in the socket of an extracted tooth.[3][4] The socket is then directly closed with stitches or covered with a non-resorbable or resorbable membrane and sutured.[5]. ...
Socket preservation or alveolar ridge preservation (ARP)[1] is a procedure to reduce bone loss after tooth extraction to preserve the dental alveolus (tooth socket) in the alveolar bone. A platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)[2] membrane containing bone growth enhancing elements can be stitched over the wound or a graft material or scaffold is placed in the socket of an extracted tooth.[3][4] The socket is then directly closed with stitches or covered with a non-resorbable or resorbable membrane and sutured.[5] ...
... /mɛˈpɪvəkeɪn/ is a local anesthetic of the amide type. Mepivacaine has a reasonably rapid onset (more rapid than that of procaine) and medium duration of action (shorter than that of procaine) and is marketed under various trade names including Carbocaine and Polocaine. Mepivacaine became available in the United States in the 1960s. Mepivacaine is used in any infiltration and regional anesthesia. It is supplied as the hydrochloride salt of the racemate, which consists of R(-)-mepivacaine and S(+)-mepivacaine in equal proportions. These two enantiomers have markedly different pharmacokinetic properties. Porto GG, Vasconcelos BC, Gomes AC, Albert D (January 2007). "Evaluation of lidocaine and mepivacaine for inferior third molar surgery" (PDF). Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 12 (1): E60-4. PMID 17195831. Burm AG, Cohen IM, van Kleef JW, Vletter AA, Olieman W, Groen K (January 1997). "Pharmacokinetics of the enantiomers of mepivacaine after intravenous administration of the ...
... , also called lockjaw, is reduced opening of the jaws (limited jaw range of motion). It may be caused by spasm of the muscles of mastication or a variety of other causes. Temporary trismus occurs much more frequently than permanent trismus. It is known to interfere with eating, speaking, and maintaining proper oral hygiene. This interference, specifically with the patient's ability to swallow properly, results in an increased risk of aspiration. In some instances, trismus presents with altered facial appearance. The condition may be distressing and painful for the patient. Examination and treatments requiring access to the oral cavity can be limited, or in some cases impossible, due to the nature of the condition itself. Trismus is defined as difficulty in opening the mouth due to a muscle spasm resulting from a disturbance in the trigeminal nerve, however it can also refer to limited mouth opening of any cause. Another definition of trismus is simply a limitation of movement. ...
... (also termed tooth staining) is abnormal tooth color, hue or translucency. External discoloration is accumulation of stains on the tooth surface. Internal discoloration is due to absorption of pigment particles into tooth structure. Sometimes there are several different co-existent factors responsible for discoloration. The appearance and perception of a tooth is the result of a complex interaction of factors such as lighting conditions, translucency, opacity, light scattering, gloss and the human eye and brain. Of these, the intrinsic pigmentation of a tooth is the most influential, which in turn is determined by genetic and natural factors. Light hitting a tooth undergoes reflection, absorption and transmission by varying degrees in each tissue layer of the ...
A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for hunting or for defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness. The cellular tissues that ultimately become teeth originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm. The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are ...
Before the treatment, the clinician should examine the patient: taking a health and dental history (including allergies and sensitivities), observe hard and soft tissues, placement and conditions of restorations, and sometimes x-rays to determine the nature and depth of possible irregularities. If this is not completed prior to the whitening agents being applied to the tooth surface, excessive sensitivity and other complications may occur. The whitening shade guides are used to measure tooth colour. These shades determine the effectiveness of the whitening procedure, which may vary from two to seven shades.[33] These shades may be reached after a single in office appointment, or may take longer, depending on the individual. The effects of bleaching can last for several months, but may vary depending on the lifestyle of the patient. Consuming tooth staining foods or drinks that have a strong colour may ...
... is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in humans and many other animals, including some species of fish. It makes up the normally visible part of the tooth, covering the crown. The other major tissues are dentin, cementum, and dental pulp. It is a very hard, white to off-white, highly mineralised substance that acts as a barrier to protect the tooth but can become susceptible to degradation, especially by acids from food and drink. Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and contains the highest percentage of minerals, 96%, with water and organic material composing the rest. The primary mineral is hydroxyapatite, which is a crystalline calcium phosphate. Enamel is formed on the tooth while the tooth is developing within the gum, before it erupts into the mouth. Once fully formed, it does not contain blood ...
... often wear in specific patterns, based on the way the horse eats its food, and these patterns are often used to conjecture on the age of the horse after it has developed a full mouth. As with aging through observing tooth eruption, this can be imprecise, and may be affected by diet, natural abnormalities, and vices such as cribbing. The importance of dentition in assessing the age of horses led to veterinary dentistry techniques being used as a method of fraud, with owners and traders altering the teeth of horses to mimic the tooth shapes and characteristics of horses younger than the actual age of the equine.[3]. Equine teeth are designed to wear against the tooth above or below as the horse chews, thus preventing excess growth. The upper jaw is wider than the lower one. In some cases, sharp edges can occur on the outside of the upper molars and the inside of the lower ...
Extraction of coconut oil. Coconut oil has antimicrobial properties for your teeth and gums. It is a natural tooth whitener. ... How to remove tooth discolorations. People with tooth discolorations no longer have to hide their smiles more when taking ... Hydrogen peroxide, which is an anti-bacterial agent, in this case, keeps the mouth and gums free of germs. Do not do every day ... Effects of tooth discoloration. A bright white set of teeth can increase your self-confidence, while teeth that are discolored ...
... gum disease, trauma or overcrowded teeth. Depending on the method used to remove the tooth and how bad the damage was, the ... Unfortunately, tooth extraction leaves an empty socket with a wound which is vulnerable to germs and consequently an infection ... Treatment of teeth gums. Presence of anaerobic bacteria on teeth that result in gum disease and teeth decay are eliminated by ... Gum Disease The sensitivity of the gums is a characteristic symptom of gum disease. Gum disease involves infection of the tooth ...
Twice daily brushing with a fluoride toothpaste keeps teeth white and bright as it removes plaque, bacteria, germs, food ... A few simple solutions can reduce the risk of problems such as gingivitis, gum disease, and even the need for tooth extraction ... Category: tooth extraction near me new braunfels. 5 Tips to Keep Your Smile Healthy & Beautiful. Your smile is the first thing ... Brush the teeth for two minutes each time you brush. Dont forget to brush the back of the teeth and the tongue, too. ...
Learn the complications smoking can cause after your wisdom teeth have been pulled. ... Smoking after getting a wisdom teeth extraction is a bad idea. ... put an incision into the gums and remove the tooth or teeth in ... Wisdom teeth that only partially emerge or come in crooked can also lead to painful crowding and disease. Because teeth removed ... Can an Odontectomy Relieve an Impacted Tooth? Is an odontectomy the right procedure for you to remove an impacted tooth? Find ...
... and what to expect after it.Learn more about wisdom teeth removal in Colgate oral care center. ... Read more about Wisdom tooth extraction, how this surgical process is done, ... put an incision into the gums and remove the tooth or teeth in sections in order to minimize the amount of bone being removed. ... Wisdom teeth are typically removed through a wisdom tooth extraction when theres evidence of:. *Healthy teeth adjacent to ...
Affordable tooth extraction in the area. Learn how to maximize your dental insurance and PPO benefits. Find a family dentist in ... Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are removed by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ... A. Wisdom teeth are the third molars.. Q. Why is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?. A. It is necessary to remove wisdom ...
From Tooth extraction, fillings, check-ups & more. Prevention is better than cure so book your ultimate Dental Check today! ... Scaling also removes trapped food and plaque containing millions of germs, which can cause tooth decay and gum disease. Stains ... Scaling removes the hard tartar which forms on your teeth like scale inside a kettle. You cant remove it just by brushing your ... Tooth Extraction & Oral Surgery A tooth, which is very decayed, damaged or loose because of gum disease, may have to be ...
Gum disease can affect one or many teeth. Gum disease starts with bacteria growing in your mouth. While its normal to have ... It also contains menthol that soothes and reduces mouth irritations from tooth extractions, injuries and braces.. With its ... It is also critical that you see a dentist on a fairly regular basis to have the build up on your teeth removed professionally ... Tongue germs, fungi and bacteria can be a huge threat to your oral health and breath. Its important to clean your tongue every ...
Root planing removes rough spots on the tooth root where the germs gather, and can help remove bacteria that contribute to gum ... Extractions After reviewing all of the available treatment options available for your damaged teeth, your dentist may determine ... Tooth Colored Fillings. Tooth Colored Fillings provide your Dentist with the means to match the color of your existing teeth. ... On occasion, teeth may be removed as a prerequisite for Orthodontia (properly aligning the teeth). ...
... visiting their dentist when they have damaged tooth or if they require a tooth extraction.we provide Multiple Tooth Extractions ... The Extraction Process. At Optima Dental, we can extra your teeth one at a time, or we can remove all 4 wisdom teeth at once. ... When it only partially breaks through the gum line, a flap of gum tissue can grow over the wisdom tooth. Germs and food bits ... Optima Dental , Multiple Tooth Extractions Single or Multiple Tooth Extractions. Some people make the mistake of only visiting ...
A variety of conditions (extensive tooth decay, broken teeth, i... ... Tooth Extractions Tooth extraction is a very common procedure at our office in Hillsboro, OR. ... This molars also tend to become impacted (partially trapped beneath the gums), which creates a space for bacteria and germs to ... Baby teeth not falling out in time. No matter why you need a tooth extracted, our dentists are trained to remove teeth safely ...
Once a tooth has been extracted, bacteria will still be alive in the mouth, even more so with those who have bad oral hygiene. ... If you go to the dentist before the extraction experienced swelling of the face, swollen gums, pain in your teeth under light ... Infections are very common following extractions. Depending on how bad the tooth was that the dentist removed, he may prescribe ... If your mouth is clean and you don?t have a lot of germs, you can normally heal the would by taking care of it. Rinsing your ...
Your Health Online A to Z directory of dealing with dental care for healthy teeth Health Problems & Self Care Strategies for ... During a simple extraction, the dentist will remove the tooth by loosening the gums around the socket. He will grasp the tooth ... If your mouth is clean and you dont have a lot of germs, you can normally heal the would by taking care of it. Rinsing your ... FAQs On Tooth Whitening What Is Tooth Whitening? Tooth whitening is a process that "bleaches" the teeth, removing it of stains ...
Germs can leak under the gums at the place where the enamel of the second molar contacts the enamel of the wisdom tooth, ... Wisdom teeth (and why they should be removed). Wisdom teeth are known as third molars in dentistry. In the X-ray film on the ... Extractions page 2-DoctorSpiller.com. Table of Contents. *1 All about Wisdom Teeth*1.1 Wisdom teeth (and why they should be ... You might think that a tooth that is totally buried under the gums should not come into contact with germs from the mouth, and ...
... the gums that surrounded the teeth seemed to recede down the tooth exposing more and more of the roots. Thus, the teeth looked ... The two central teeth had become mobile and painful and were removed for the comfort of the patient. The images on the right ... What happens to your teeth when you are a serious addict?. Plaque is incredibly toxic. The germs that naturally thrive in your ... show one of them after extraction. It has been turned so that you are viewing the tooth from the right side (not front-on as ...
CA tooth extraction. Affordable tooth extraction in Anaheim, CA. Learn how to maximize your dental insurance and PPO benefits. ... Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are removed by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ... A. Wisdom teeth are the third molars.. Q. Why is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?. A. It is necessary to remove wisdom ...
Learn about oral surgery treatment options for impacted teeth. Find a wisdom tooth dentist in your area with cost saving offers ... Find a local oral surgeon or dentist near you for quick wisdom tooth removal. ... What you need to know about when to remove wisdom teeth in the area. ... Impacted wisdom teeth may cause problems. Impacted wisdom teeth can result in infection, decay of adjacent teeth, gum disease ...
Karen J. Lee Dentistry offers root canal therapy to save an ailing tooth from incurring further damage. Call your Kitchener ... Have you noticed an increase in pain, sensitivity or even decay in one of your teeth? Is the pain below the gum lines? If so, ... A root canal may be a necessary step to avoid the extraction of a tooth, an undesirable outcome to decay or injury, as well as ... For this reason, a root canal therapy may need to be performed to remove the infected dental pulp. The inner pulp chamber is ...
Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are remove by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... Tooth Extraction. Round the tooth to be drawn, he fastened a strong piece of catgut; to its other end he affixed a bullet. ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ... Q. Why is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?. A. It is necessary to remove wisdom teeth to avoid problems, such as an ...
Before modern dentistry, tooth pain was just as common, but people... ... Tooth pain is one of the most common complaints that dentists hear in their offices. ... Its even used in modern dentistry to relieve gum pain and kill germs during extractions, fillings, and root canals. One study ... Preventing Tooth Pain. Regular tooth hygiene is important to prevent many of the causes of tooth pain. Brush your teeth twice a ...
... maxillofacial and oral surgeons can perform wisdom tooth extraction, a procedure that is sometimes carried out in a hospital in ... Wisdom teeth that break through gums in an improper direction, trapping germs and food. ... Tissue that connects bone to tooth is separated and then the tooth is removed. It is possible to have the tooth cut into ... Why Wisdom Tooth Extraction?. Most people are not even aware of the fact that wisdom teeth can be extracted. This is quite ...
CA tooth extraction - Heath Information. Find a local dentist near you. Learn about tooth extraction in Los Altos, CA from a ... Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are removed by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ... A. Wisdom teeth are the third molars.. Q. Why is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?. A. It is necessary to remove wisdom ...
MO for tooth extraction? Find a local Fulton, MO area dentist to help your entire family. Learn about tooth extraction, new ... Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are removed by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ... A. Wisdom teeth are the third molars.. Q. Why is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?. A. It is necessary to remove wisdom ...
Learn about tooth extraction in the 10002 area from a dentist who will listen to your concerns and can explain your treatment ... Tooth extraction 10002 - Heath Information. Find a local dentist near you. ... Q. How is a wisdom tooth removed?. A. Wisdom teeth are removed by surgery. The gum tissue over the tooth is removed, the ... A. Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs that may cause infection. Cysts and tumors may ...
MOST TEETH CAN BE SAVED BY ENDODONTIC TREATMENT BUT TOOTH EXTRACTION MAY BE NECESSARY IF:. *Roots are severely fractured ... As long as you continue to care for your teeth and gums with regular brushing, flossing, and checkups, your restored tooth can ... Without the proper treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.. TEETH THAT REQUIRE ENDODONTIC TREATMENT ARE NOT ALWAYS ... When a tooth is cracked or has a deep cavity, bacteria can enter the pulp tissue and germs can cause an infection inside the ...
  • Some studies have demonstrated that the complication risk increases slightly when wisdom teeth removal is completed on the upper jaw, instead of the top jaw. (weebly.com)