Plant Stomata: Closable openings in the epidermis of plants on the underside of leaves. They allow the exchange of gases between the internal tissues of the plant and the outside atmosphere.Vicia faba: A plant species of the genus VICIA, family FABACEAE. The edible beans are well known but they cause FAVISM in some individuals with GLUCOSEPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY. This plant contains vicine, convicine, Vicia lectins, unknown seed protein, AAP2 transport protein, and Vicia faba DNA-binding protein 1.Abscisic Acid: Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Protoplasts: The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plant Cells: Basic functional unit of plants.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Trifluralin: A microtubule-disrupting pre-emergence herbicide.Commelina: A plant genus of the family COMMELINACEAE of perennial herbs with blue flowers.Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Mouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Plant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Skating: Using ice skates, roller skates, or skateboards in racing or other competition or for recreation.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Anions: Negatively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the anode or positive pole during electrolysis.Naphthaleneacetic Acids: Naphthalene derivatives containing the -CH2CCO2H radical at the 1-position, the 2-position, or both. Compounds are used as plant growth regulators to delay sprouting, exert weed control, thin fruit, etc.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Tradescantia: A plant genus of the family COMMELINACEAE that is used in genotoxic bioassays.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Potassium Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that are selectively permeable to potassium ions. At least eight major groups of K channels exist and they are made up of dozens of different subunits.Ocimum basilicum: A plant species of the genus OCIMUM, family LAMIACEAE. It is a condiment with carminative properties.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Adiantum: A plant genus of the family Pteridaceae. Members contain TRITERPENES. Some species in this genus are called maidenhair fern which is also a common name occasionally used for Lygodium (FERNS) and POLYPODIUM.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying: Potassium channels where the flow of K+ ions into the cell is greater than the outward flow.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Iraq War, 2003-2011: An armed intervention involving multi-national forces in the country of IRAQ.Ferns: Seedless nonflowering plants of the class Filicinae. They reproduce by spores that appear as dots on the underside of feathery fronds. In earlier classifications the Pteridophyta included the club mosses, horsetails, ferns, and various fossil groups. In more recent classifications, pteridophytes and spermatophytes (seed-bearing plants) are classified in the Subkingdom Tracheobionta (also known as Tracheophyta).Sulfanilamides: Compounds based on 4-aminobenzenesulfonamide. The '-anil-' part of the name refers to aniline.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Darkness: The absence of light.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Marital Therapy: A form of psychotherapy involving the husband and wife and directed to improving the marital relationship.Carbonic Anhydrase I: A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme primarily expressed in ERYTHROCYTES, vascular endothelial cells, and the gastrointestinal mucosa. EC 4.2.1.-Vacuoles: Any spaces or cavities within a cell. They may function in digestion, storage, secretion, or excretion.Chloroplast Thioredoxins: A subtype of thioredoxins found primarily in CHLOROPLASTS.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Ion Channel Gating: The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits: The GTPase-containing subunits of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. When dissociated from the heterotrimeric complex these subunits interact with a variety of second messenger systems. Hydrolysis of GTP by the inherent GTPase activity of the subunit causes it to revert to its inactive (heterotrimeric) form. The GTP-Binding protein alpha subunits are grouped into families according to the type of action they have on second messenger systems.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Phototropism: The directional growth of organisms in response to light. In plants, aerial shoots usually grow towards light. The phototropic response is thought to be controlled by auxin (= AUXINS), a plant growth substance. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Diuron: A pre-emergent herbicide.MalatesEctodysplasins: Transmembrane proteins belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that play an essential role in the normal development of several ectodermally derived organs. Several isoforms of the ectodysplasins exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of the MRNA for the protein. The isoforms ectodysplasin A1 and ectodysplasin A2 are considered biologically active and each bind distinct ECTODYSPLASIN RECEPTORS. Genetic mutations that result in loss of function of ectodysplasin result in ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA 1, ANHIDROTIC.Selaginellaceae: A plant family of the order Selaginellales, class Lycopodiopsida, division Lycopodiophyta, subkingdom Tracheobionta. Members contain bilobetin. The rarely used common name of resurrection plant is mainly used with CRATEROSTIGMA.Proton-Translocating ATPases: Multisubunit enzymes that reversibly synthesize ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. They are coupled to the transport of protons across a membrane.Reactive Oxygen Species: Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.Hydrogen Peroxide: A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Rosales: An order of the ANGIOSPERMS, subclass Rosidae. Its members include some of the most known ornamental and edible plants of temperate zones including roses, apples, cherries, and peaches.Oxylipins: Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.Potassium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain potassium as an integral part of the molecule.Oenothera: A plant genus of the family ONAGRACEAE. Members contain oenotheins.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Cladosporium: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including some economically important plant parasites. Teleomorphs include Mycosphaerella and Venturia.Chloroplasts: Plant cell inclusion bodies that contain the photosynthetic pigment CHLOROPHYLL, which is associated with the membrane of THYLAKOIDS. Chloroplasts occur in cells of leaves and young stems of plants. They are also found in some forms of PHYTOPLANKTON such as HAPTOPHYTA; DINOFLAGELLATES; DIATOMS; and CRYPTOPHYTA.Cyclopentanes: A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Phosphoprotein Phosphatases: A group of enzymes removing the SERINE- or THREONINE-bound phosphate groups from a wide range of phosphoproteins, including a number of enzymes which have been phosphorylated under the action of a kinase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Saudi ArabiaAmitrole: A non-selective post-emergence, translocated herbicide. According to the Seventh Annual Report on Carcinogens (PB95-109781, 1994) this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen. (From Merck Index, 12th ed) It is an irreversible inhibitor of CATALASE, and thus impairs activity of peroxisomes.Beta vulgaris: A species of the Beta genus. Cultivars are used as a source of beets (root) or chard (leaves).Cytosol: Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.Ribulosephosphates: Ribulose substituted by one or more phosphoric acid moieties.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Afghan Campaign 2001-: Multinational coalition military operation initiated in October 2001 to counter terrorism and bring security to AFGHANISTAN in collaboration with Afghan forces.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Indenes: A family of fused-ring hydrocarbons isolated from coal tar that act as intermediates in various chemical reactions and are used in the production of coumarone-indene resins.Ion Transport: The movement of ions across energy-transducing cell membranes. Transport can be active, passive or facilitated. Ions may travel by themselves (uniport), or as a group of two or more ions in the same (symport) or opposite (antiport) directions.Mesophyll Cells: Large and highly vacuolated cells possessing many chloroplasts occuring in the interior cross-section of leaves, juxtaposed between the epidermal layers.Calcium Chloride: A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Edar Receptor: A ectodysplasin receptor subtype that is specific for ECTODYSPLASIN A1. It signals via the specific signaling adaptor EDAR-ASSOCIATED DEATH DOMAIN PROTEIN. Loss of function of the edar receptor is associated with AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE ANHIDROTIC ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA and ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA 3, ANHIDROTIC.Spheniscidae: The sole family in the order Sphenisciformes, comprised of 17 species of penguins in six genera. They are flightless seabirds of the Southern Hemisphere, highly adapted for marine life.Onions: Herbaceous biennial plants and their edible bulbs, belonging to the Liliaceae.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.Combat Disorders: Neurotic reactions to unusual, severe, or overwhelming military stress.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Biolistics: Techniques where DNA is delivered directly into organelles at high speed using projectiles coated with nucleic acid, shot from a helium-powered gun (gene gun). One of these techniques involves immunization by DNA VACCINES, which delivers DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Plant Immunity: The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Cyclic ADP-Ribose: A pyridine nucleotide that mobilizes CALCIUM. It is synthesized from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by ADP RIBOSE CYCLASE.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Proton Pumps: Integral membrane proteins that transport protons across a membrane. This transport can be linked to the hydrolysis of ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. What is referred to as proton pump inhibitors frequently is about POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Luminescent Proteins: Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Peas: A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Calcium Signaling: Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins: GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that contain three non-identical subunits. They are found associated with members of the seven transmembrane domain superfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS. Upon activation the GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT of the complex dissociates leaving a dimer of a GTP-BINDING PROTEIN BETA SUBUNIT bound to a GTP-BINDING PROTEIN GAMMA SUBUNIT.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Hair Follicle: A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Hydroxides: Inorganic compounds that contain the OH- group.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Galactans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating galactose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Xenopus: An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.Time: The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.GlucuronidasePromoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)14-3-3 Proteins: A large family of signal-transducing adaptor proteins present in wide variety of eukaryotes. They are PHOSPHOSERINE and PHOSPHOTHREONINE binding proteins involved in important cellular processes including SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION; CELL CYCLE control; APOPTOSIS; and cellular stress responses. 14-3-3 proteins function by interacting with other signal-transducing proteins and effecting changes in their enzymatic activity and subcellular localization. The name 14-3-3 derives from numerical designations used in the original fractionation patterns of the proteins.Chitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Microelectrodes: Electrodes with an extremely small tip, used in a voltage clamp or other apparatus to stimulate or record bioelectric potentials of single cells intracellularly or extracellularly. (Dorland, 28th ed)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Xylans: Polysaccharides consisting of xylose units.Chitin: A linear polysaccharide of beta-1->4 linked units of ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE. It is the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, found especially in INSECTS and FUNGI. When deacetylated it is called CHITOSAN.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Xenopus laevis: The commonest and widest ranging species of the clawed "frog" (Xenopus) in Africa. This species is used extensively in research. There is now a significant population in California derived from escaped laboratory animals.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Fumarates: Compounds based on fumaric acid.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Fluorescence: The property of emitting radiation while being irradiated. The radiation emitted is usually of longer wavelength than that incident or absorbed, e.g., a substance can be irradiated with invisible radiation and emit visible light. X-ray fluorescence is used in diagnosis.Catalase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of HYDROGEN PEROXIDE to water and oxygen. It is present in many animal cells. A deficiency of this enzyme results in ACATALASIA.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Cations: Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.Chloride Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that form channels to selectively pass chloride ions. Nonselective blockers include FENAMATES; ETHACRYNIC ACID; and TAMOXIFEN.United StatesRecombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Protons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes: Complexes containing CHLOROPHYLL and other photosensitive molecules. They serve to capture energy in the form of PHOTONS and are generally found as components of the PHOTOSYSTEM I PROTEIN COMPLEX or the PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN COMPLEX.
The "Open Guard" rule[edit]. Cage Rage was the home of a unique rule in the world of cage-based MMA; the "open guard" rule. ... Unless an open guard has been called, these strikes were fouls. This rule was introduced at Cage Rage 13 and was designed to ... As of Cage Rage 13, amendments to the Unified Rules have been made, most notably the "Open Guard" rule and the banning of elbow ... Kicking the head of a grounded opponent, unless an open guard has been called (as of 10 September 2005). ...
Chaplains of the Marine Corps and Coast Guard[edit]. As the Marine Corps and Coast Guard do not commission chaplains, the ... Chaplain of the United States Coast Guard. April 12, 2018 See also[edit]. *International Military Chiefs of Chaplains ... and a senior Navy Chaplain holding the rank of Navy Captain serves as Chaplain of the Coast Guard. The current chaplains are: ...
... is a New Hampshire Air National Guard base located at Portsmouth International Airport at Pease ... National Guard of the United States.. *^ Currier, Amanda (October 8, 2009). "Pease partners with McConnell, stands up active- ... Air National Guard Base[edit]. The majority of Pease AFB was transferred to the Pease Development Authority, who now operate ... Pease Air National Guard Base is approximately 220 acres (89 ha) in size, and as of September 2014 included 46 structures.[6] ...
Security/Guard Dog[edit]. Currently, the ROC Air Force is considering the Formosan Dog for military purposes. At this time the ... Ming Jie, Xu of Formosan Dog & Guard Dogs Breeding Center (台灣犬護衛犬繁殖中心) described a typical Formosan as having almond eyes, firm ... Due to the breed's alertness, these dogs can make good guard dogs; if not well-trained, the Formosan can become overly ... Notwithstanding these adaptations, Formosans retained the potential to be trained, and are now used as hunting dogs, guard dogs ...
National guard aviation pioneer[edit]. In the summer of 1915 Bolling, along with his brother-in-law and seven New York ... He also joined the New York National Guard. He and his wife had four daughters and a son, one of whom, Cecelia Raynal Bolling, ... "First Aero Company New York National Guard. Northern Lights Associates. 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-02-19. ... Although not a member of the national guard, Tex Millman was one of the company's pilots during the maneuvers. The 22-year-old ...
Indoor Color Guard[edit]. In 2012 the L-S Indoor Color Guard competed in: *WGI (World Guard International) - Scholastic A Guard ... TIA (Tournament of Bands Indoor Association) - Scholastic A Guard. *CIDA (Cavalcade Indoor Drill Association) - Scholastic A ...
Mate guarding is a common defensive post-copulatory behavior in birds. It is a behavior in which males attempt to prevent ... Mate guarding behavior is negatively correlated with foraging behavior and body condition. An increase in the number of males ... Males that exhibit higher levels of mate guarding behavior have a higher chance of paternity following copulation.[6] One mate ... Another form of mate guarding which is more common is for the male to increase in-pair copulations by increasing the females ...
Coast Guard Port Security Units are sent overseas to guard the security of ports and other assets. The Coast Guard also jointly ... United States Coast Guard[edit]. Although the Posse Comitatus Act, which prevents federal military personnel from acting in a ... In times of war, or when directed by the President, the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy and is subject to the ... "14 USC 3 - Department in which the Coast Guard operates". Legal Information Institute. Cornell University Law School. Retrieved ...
Palace guards[edit]. *Cheng Kun (成坤; Chéng Kūn) is a palace guard commander loyal to the Taichang Emperor. He is arrested and ... Jin Qianyan (金千岩; Jīn Dàyán; Gam1 Daai6-ngaam4) is an imperial guard and Jin Duyi's nephew. He learns the 'Yin Wind Venomous ... Yun Yanping (雲燕平; 云燕平; Yún Yànpíng) is an imperial guard. He specialises in using a Tibetan style of "soft" attack. ... Wang Tingfu (王廷福; Wáng Tíngfú) is a palace guard tasked with escorting Tangnu. He collaborates with Ying Xiuyang to rob Tangnu ...
Controversy: antisemitism and links with the Iron Guard[edit]. Early statements[edit]. The early years in Eliade's public ... One year later, a text, accompanied by his picture, was featured as answer to an inquiry by the Iron Guard's Buna Vestire about ... But, in any case, I am led to believe that he was closer to the Iron Guard than I would have liked to believe."[263] ... Eliade's articles before and after his adherence to the principles of the Iron Guard (or, as it was usually known at the time, ...
Guard(s) at Jesus' tomb[edit]. Name: Petronius. Source: Apocryphal Gospel of Peter. Names: Issachar, Gad, Matthias, Barnabas, ...
Indian Coast Guard Air Station, Daman is the premier air station of the Coast Guard with all the airfield facilities, air ... A larger fort was built in Moti Daman in the 16th century to guard against the Mughals who ruled the area until the Portuguese ... "Indian Coast Guard". Archived from the original on 4 November 2012. Retrieved 4 November 2012.. ...
Puerto Rico National Guard Readiness Center[edit]. A $33.5 million Readiness Center for the Puerto Rico National Guard at Fort ... It served as a target range and maneuver area for the U.S. Army and National Guard troops from 1923 to 1939. The 1st Battalion ... The Puerto Rico National Guard is also present on the base. The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) has held leadership labs ... This National Guard Readiness Center at Fort Buchanan includes a Metal Storage Building/Maintenance Training Bay, Simulation ...
Border guards of the inner German border[edit]. Main article: Border guards of the inner German border ... Victim and Border Guard (2009). Deutsche Welle documentary reuniting an East German border guard and an attempted escapee who ... It was patrolled by 50,000 armed East German guards who faced tens of thousands of West German, British, and US guards and ... It was also a problem for many of the East German guards and was the motivating factor behind a number of escapes, when guards ...
Coast Guard[edit]. The United States Coast Guard does not use the military occupational specialty concept either, instead ... Main article: List of United States Coast Guard ratings. The Coast Guard indicates its "ratings" by a two or three character ...
"Two-bit" security guard comment[edit]. McHenry stirred further controversy with his remarks on April 1, 2008, regarding a trip ... McHenry calls U.S. soldier in Iraq a 'two-bit security guard.' - ThinkProgress". ThinkProgress. Retrieved 19 February 2015.. ... I was not very happy with this two bit security guard. So you know, I said, "I want to see your supervisor." Thirty minutes ... Well, sure enough, the guard wouldn't let me in. Said I didn't have the correct credentials. It's 5:00 in the morning. I ...
Air National Guard[edit]. In the Air National Guard, the ACC-gained New York Air National Guard's 106th Rescue Wing at Francis ... The Alaska Air National Guard's 176th Wing, a PACAF-gained composite wing formerly located at Kulis Air National Guard Base and ... Two additional "hybrid" rescue units are also present in the Air National Guard. The California Air National Guard's 129th ... The 102 RQS is also the oldest Air National Guard unit in the United States, tracing its roots back to the 1st Aero Squadron ...
Yeomen of the Guard[edit]. Captain[edit]. 5 August 1952: The Right Honourable William Arthur Bampfylde, Earl of Onslow, MC, TD ...
National Guard[edit]. Gonzales is home to the 922nd Horizontal Engineer Company, which is part of the 769th Engineer Battalion ... The HSUS and other animal rescue groups along with the National Guard made a fairground in Gonzales their main search and ...
National Guard[edit]. 921st Engineer Company (Horizontal) part of the 528th Engineer Battalion which belongs to the 225th ...
Officers: Air National Guard of the United States *^ [5] 10 USC 12107. Army National Guard of United States; Air National Guard ... The National Guard maintains two subcomponents: the Army National Guard[1] for the Army and the Air Force's Air National Guard. ... Active Guard/Reserve (AGR) are National Guard or Reserve members of the Selected Reserve who are ordered to active duty or full ... Inactive National Guard (ING) are National Guard personnel in an inactive status in the Ready Reserve, not in the Selected ...
U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard astronauts[edit]. The naval astronaut insignias are issued in a single degree to naval ... However, the Coast Guard only issues the naval flight officer version of the astronaut insignia to its astronauts.[13] ... U.S. Coast Guard Uniform Regulations, COMDTINST M1020.6I, page 4-22, US Department of Homeland Security, United States Coast ... aviators and flight officers from the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard, with ...
... and the guard cells of stomata. Palisade mesophyll cells can contain 30-70 chloroplasts per cell, while stomatal guard cells ... Guard cell chloroplasts. This section needs expansion with: determined functions, controversial functions, characteristics and ... Unlike most epidermal cells, the guard cells of plant stomata contain relatively well-developed chloroplasts.[139] However, ... Zeiger, E.; Talbott, L. D.; Frechilla, S.; Srivastava, A.; Zhu, J. (2002). "The guard cell chloroplast: A perspective for the ...
In the days before helmets, players often wore nose guards or "nose masks" or "nose armor".[2] Football was a brutal sport ... and mouth guard. The shell is constructed of hard plastic with thick padding on the inside, a face mask made of one or more ...
Mao personally mingled with Red Guards and threw his weight behind their cause, donning a Red Guard armband himself.[38] ... most of whom were Red Guards, participated.[37] The government bore the expenses of Red Guards travelling around the country ... Red Guard slogans were of the most violent nature, such as "Strike the enemy down on the floor and step on him with a foot", " ... Children of Mao: Personality Development and Political Activism in the Red Guard Generation. Seattle: University of Washington ...
... , also known as sports guards or athletic mouth protectors, are crucial pieces of equipment for any ... stock mouth guards, boil and bite mouth guards, and customized mouth guards. ... Stock mouth guards - These mouth guards can be bought directly off the shelf and immediately fitted into the childs mouth. The ... Customized mouth guards - These mouth guards offer the greatest degree of protection, and are custom-made by the dentist. First ...
About "Boil and Bite" mouth guards. A "boil and bite" mouth guard is a type of guard that is bought off the shelf in one of a ... The athlete then takes the mouth guard home and customizes the fit of the guard to their mouth. Boil and bite mouth guards are ... Wondering about our No mouth guard, no play Policy?. Mouth guards can provide protection to the athlete in three different ... The most important function of the mouth guard is in preventing of concussions and brain injuries. A mouth guard with the ...
The Canadian Coast Guard services support government priorities and economic prosperity and contribute to ... ... Coast Guard Ice Reconnaissance Flight - Duration: 2 minutes, 1 second.. *403 views ... 58th Anniversary of the Canadian Coast Guard - Duration: 28 seconds.. *239 views ... The Official Canadian Coast Guard YouTube channel. ... Canadian Coast Guard SubscribeSubscribedUnsubscribe. 2.21K ...
The Karate Guard at The Big Cartoon DataBase The Karate Guard on IMDb. ... The Karate Guard is a 2005 Tom and Jerry cartoon short directed by Joseph Barbera and Spike Brandt. It was the last Tom and ... The Karate Guard is available as a bonus short on the DVDs Tom and Jerry Spotlight Collection Volume 3 and Tom and Jerry Deluxe ... Tom dings to show Jerry that his guard cant hear his gong. Tom dings the gong close to Spikes ear. Spike wakens and shoots ...
"National Security Guard website". Retrieved 12 February 2020.. *^ a b "National Security Guard". Ministry Of Home Affairs. NSG. ... "NATIONAL SECURITY GUARDs RAISING DAY-2019" (PDF). National Security Guard (press release). Archived (PDF) from the original on ... "National Security Guards". Bharat Rakshak: Land Forces. Bharat Rakshak. Archived from the original on 6 October 2012. Retrieved ... The National Security Guard (NSG) is an elite counter-terrorism unit under the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA). It was ...
... On 20 December 1996, NATO transitioned its operation in support of the Dayton Peace Accords in Bosnia ... On 20 June 1998, the decision was made to scale down the size of SFOR and NATO transitioned from Operation Joint Guard to ... As a result, Operation Joint Endeavor ended and Operation Joint Guard began. NATOs Implementation Force (IFOR) was similarly ... authority for more than 1,300 United States Air Force personnel stationed throughout Europe in support of Operation Joint Guard ...
Sales at on-base grocery stores have fallen six percent in the past year, 21.3 percent since 2012, putting the shopping benef ...
An inventive study of relations between the National Guard and the Regular Army during World War II, Guard Wars follows the ... Mobilizing the National Guard along with the Regular Army was a basic assumption of national defense planning, and as far as ... One obvious question for the end of a book that examines the transformation of a National Guard division into an infantry ... The broader story, spanning the years 1939--1945, sheds light on the National Guard, the U.S. Army, and American identities and ...
K-State Color Guard. Congratulations!. 2017-2018 Color Guard. Amy Dundas Amber Montgomery. Whitney Dill Madeline Lane. Zoey ... Color Guard positions are considered a1-yearposition. All Color Guard members must re-audition for each season. We will choose ... Dear prospective Color Guard member, The purpose of this letter is to invite you to audition for the Kansas State University ... Color Guard members must purchase:​ Secondary uniforms to include but not limited to:shoes, shorts, t-shirt, long-sleeved cold ...
The United States Coast Guard Band is the premier band representing the United States Coast Guard and the Department of ... N. Y. Light Guards Quickstep - Francis H. Brown , U.S. Coast Guard Band - Duration: 2 minutes, 53 seconds.. *16 views ... Into the Oceans and the Air - MUC Sean Nelson , U.S. Coast Guard Band - Duration: 2 minutes, 12 seconds.. *22 views ... We thought we would do something special with the official march of the U.S. Coast Guard, Semper Paratus. Why not tell the ...
Washington, DC: U.S. Coast Guard. 9. U.S. Coast Guard. l992 Fact File. Washington, DC: U.S. Coast Guard, 1992. 10. 1992 U.S. ... Above are some Coast Guard facts. Here are some Coast Guard myths: Myth 1: that the Coast Guard is in the Treasury Department. ... 7. U.S. Coast Guard. Budget in Brief. Washington, DC: U.S. Coast Guard, 1992. 8. U.S. Coast Guard. A Disticent Instrument of ... What is the Coast Guards mission? Admiral J. William Kime, the Commandant of the Coast Guard, issued the following Coast Guard ...
... freshman point guard, the season is over.In a crippling loss only days before UCLAs third-round South Regional match-up ... UCLA plays on in the NCAA tournament, but for Baron Davis, the Bruins freshman point guard, the season is over. ... Against the Wolverines, fellow freshman starter Earl Watson became the stalwart guard in Davis absence, bouncing back from a ... NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT : These Two Teams Have Guards Up : Loyola Marymount: Terrell Lowery, the Lions sixth man, has taken ...
The Guard and its soldiers and airmen are extensively involved in local community organizations and often participate in, or ... The National Guard, as a government institution, refrains from endorsing specific organizations or events that it does not ... In many cases, Air Guard units handle their own requests for support, in which case your request will be forwarded to the unit ... The New Jersey National Guard is proud to be a member of the more than 34 communities throughout New Jersey in which our ...
The Other Coast Guard. For more than 80 years Audubon Texass coastal wardens have been safeguarding the magnificent birds that ... So Overstreet is forced to guard the birds at gunpoint.. When we reach Green Island, Overstreet ties up the boat and leads me ...
In curling, a guard is a stone that comes to rest properly in play, in front the house. The role of the guard is usually to ... guardroom or guard room; guard duty. Advanced guard, Coast guard, etc. See under Advanced, Coast, etc. -- Grand guard Mil., one ... On guard, serving in the capacity of a guard; doing duty as a guard or sentinel; watching. -- On ones guard, in a watchful ... Guard chamber, a guardroom. -- Guard detail (Mil.men from a company regiment etc., detailed for guard duty. -- Guard duty Mil. ...
This is part-time seasonal school crossing guard duty. An employee in this class is responsible for directing traffic at an ...
Its a little-known fact that poor pool maintenance can damage tooth enamel. Heres how to protect your pearly whites when you head to the pool this summer.
He then apparently disrobed the guard, a military veteran and 10-year employee of the corrections department. The guard was ... Sheriff: Jail guard jumped, beaten and choked. What authorities do know is based on video, other evidence and interviews with ... Illinois jail escape: Convicted murderer overpowers guard, drives off in his SUV. By Greg Botelho, CNN ... Taylor beat up the guard, put on his uniform and took his keys. ... concerned because the guard hadnt responded to calls -- found ...
Glenn Wood and several other retirees lean on a wood rail on the second story balcony of the Golden Lion Caf -- a beachside pub and restaurant in northern Florida.
Point guard, or "playmaker" Shooting guard, or "off guard" Combo guard, combining both point and shooting guard Color guard ( ... "Guard" All pages with a title containing Guard Civic Guard (disambiguation) Civil Guard (disambiguation) The Guard ( ... Guard or guards may refer to: Bodyguard, who protects an individual from personal assault Crossing guard, who stops traffic so ... Guard (surname) Guards (band), an American rock band Guard (computer science), in programming language, an expression that ...
Guarding Tess (1994) PG-13 , 1h 36min , Comedy, Drama , 11 March 1994 (USA) ... She is very difficult to guard and makes her detail crazy with her whims and demands. Doug returns with no idea of how to ... Although Nicolas Cage showed a new range and talent in Leaving Las Vegas, I think it is roles like this one in Guarding Tess ...
1, Jeff Illk and one other district security guard will carry a sidearm as they do their jobs at the high school and middle ... The Emporia School District voted in January to allow the security guards at its schools to be armed with pistols starting Feb ... Emporia High School security guard Jeff Illk walks through a locker room while making his rounds at the school. ... The school district has put some regulations in place that ensure that only security guards with prior law enforcement ...
Privacy and Disclosure: New Jersey National Guard Family Programs respects your right to privacy; however, the staff members DO ...
2,000 bonus to Guard members who get a buddy to sign up. Its the latest sign that dangerous wartime deployments make this a ... The Army National Guard in New Hampshire and 21 other states is offering a $ ... National Guard Struggles to Recruit The Army National Guard in New Hampshire and 21 other states is offering a $2,000 bonus to ... The Army National Guard in New Hampshire and 21 other states is offering a $2,000 bonus to Guard members who get a buddy to ...
Guard against malware. Malware is malicious software that attacks your computer or mobile device. It takes control of functions ...
  • Fitting snugly over the upper teeth, mouth guards protect the entire oral region from traumatic injury, preserving both the esthetic appearance and the health of the smile. (franklinvilledental.com)
  • In addition, mouth guards are sometimes used to prevent tooth damage in children who grind (brux) their teeth at night. (franklinvilledental.com)
  • Though mouth guards are primarily designed to protect the teeth, they can also vastly reduce the degree of force transmitted from a trauma impact point (jaw) to the central nervous system (base of the brain). (franklinvilledental.com)
  • First, the dentist makes an impression of the child's teeth using special material, and then the mouth guard is constructed over the mold. (franklinvilledental.com)
  • A mouth guard with the proper thickness of 3 to 5 mm between the teeth can reduce the rate of concussion, by preventing the condyle (lower jaw hinge) from being forced into the base of the brain (temporal bone) at impact. (dbpirates.com)
  • The athlete then uses their fingers, lips, tongue and biting pressure to seat the guard over their teeth and form its contours. (dbpirates.com)
  • There is still some potential that an athlete will feel that they must clench their teeth together so to hold the guard in place. (dbpirates.com)
  • During the customization process care must be taken so the thickness of the plastic that covers the chewing surfaces or biting edges of the teeth does not become thinned out, or else the level of protection provided by the guard will be compromised. (dbpirates.com)
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