Linkage Disequilibrium: Nonrandom association of linked genes. This is the tendency of the alleles of two separate but already linked loci to be found together more frequently than would be expected by chance alone.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Genetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Genetic Diseases, Inborn: Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Nuclear Family: A family composed of spouses and their children.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6: A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Epistasis, Genetic: A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes.Genetic Association Studies: The analysis of a sequence such as a region of a chromosome, a haplotype, a gene, or an allele for its involvement in controlling the phenotype of a specific trait, metabolic pathway, or disease.HapMap Project: A coordinated international effort to identify and catalog patterns of linked variations (HAPLOTYPES) found in the human genome across the entire human population.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Genotyping Techniques: Methods used to determine individuals' specific ALLELES or SNPS (single nucleotide polymorphisms).Sample Size: The number of units (persons, animals, patients, specified circumstances, etc.) in a population to be studied. The sample size should be big enough to have a high likelihood of detecting a true difference between two groups. (From Wassertheil-Smoller, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 1990, p95)African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Genetic Heterogeneity: The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.HLA-DRB1 Chains: A subtype of HLA-DRB beta chains that includes over one hundred allele variants. The HLA-DRB1 subtype is associated with several of the HLA-DR SEROLOGICAL SUBTYPES.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Physical Chromosome Mapping: Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.HLA-DQ beta-Chains: Transmembrane proteins that form the beta subunits of the HLA-DQ antigens.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Population: The total number of individuals inhabiting a particular region or area.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Introns: Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Chromosome Inversion: An aberration in which a chromosomal segment is deleted and reinserted in the same place but turned 180 degrees from its original orientation, so that the gene sequence for the segment is reversed with respect to that of the rest of the chromosome.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.HLA-DQ Antigens: A group of the D-related HLA antigens found to differ from the DR antigens in genetic locus and therefore inheritance. These antigens are polymorphic glycoproteins comprising alpha and beta chains and are found on lymphoid and other cells, often associated with certain diseases.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.EuropeAfricaFamily Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Jews: An ethnic group with historical ties to the land of ISRAEL and the religion of JUDAISM.Chromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Heterozygote Detection: Identification of genetic carriers for a given trait.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Siblings: Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)Principal Component Analysis: Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.FinlandGenomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.HLA-DQ alpha-Chains: Transmembrane proteins that form the alpha subunits of the HLA-DQ antigens.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Phosphoglucomutase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of alpha D-glucose 1-phosphate to alpha D-glucose 6-phosphate. EC 5.4.2.2.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Genetic Structures: The biological objects that contain genetic information and that are involved in transmitting genetically encoded traits from one organism to another.HLA-DR Antigens: A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Tandem Repeat Sequences: Copies of DNA sequences which lie adjacent to each other in the same orientation (direct tandem repeats) or in the opposite direction to each other (INVERTED TANDEM REPEATS).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Penetrance: The percent frequency with which a dominant or homozygous recessive gene or gene combination manifests itself in the phenotype of the carriers. (From Glossary of Genetics, 5th ed)Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.HLA-B Antigens: Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens encoded by more than 30 detectable alleles on locus B of the HLA complex, the most polymorphic of all the HLA specificities. Several of these antigens (e.g., HLA-B27, -B7, -B8) are strongly associated with predisposition to rheumatoid and other autoimmune disorders. Like other class I HLA determinants, they are involved in the cellular immune reactivity of cytolytic T lymphocytes.HLA-DR3 Antigen: An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*03 alleles.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Genetics, Medical: A subdiscipline of human genetics which entails the reliable prediction of certain human disorders as a function of the lineage and/or genetic makeup of an individual or of any two parents or potential parents.DNA, Satellite: Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.Multifactorial Inheritance: A phenotypic outcome (physical characteristic or disease predisposition) that is determined by more than one gene. Polygenic refers to those determined by many genes, while oligogenic refers to those determined by a few genes.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.JapanBiological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)HLA-DP beta-Chains: Transmembrane proteins that form the beta subunits of the HLA-DP antigens.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Major Histocompatibility Complex: The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Markov Chains: A stochastic process such that the conditional probability distribution for a state at any future instant, given the present state, is unaffected by any additional knowledge of the past history of the system.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.INDEL Mutation: A mutation named with the blend of insertion and deletion. It refers to a length difference between two ALLELES where it is unknowable if the difference was originally caused by a SEQUENCE INSERTION or by a SEQUENCE DELETION. If the number of nucleotides in the insertion/deletion is not divisible by three, and it occurs in a protein coding region, it is also a FRAMESHIFT MUTATION.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Haploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented once. Symbol: N.Genetic Drift: The fluctuation of the ALLELE FREQUENCY from one generation to the next.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Consanguinity: The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.HLA-C Antigens: Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) antigens encoded by a small cluster of structural genes at the C locus on chromosome 6. They have significantly lower immunogenicity than the HLA-A and -B determinants and are therefore of minor importance in donor/recipient crossmatching. Their primary role is their high-risk association with certain disease manifestations (e.g., spondylarthritis, psoriasis, multiple myeloma).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Sheep, Domestic: A species of sheep, Ovis aries, descended from Near Eastern wild forms, especially mouflon.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Apolipoproteins C: A group of apolipoproteins that can readily exchange among the various classes of lipoproteins (HDL; VLDL; CHYLOMICRONS). After lipolysis of TRIGLYCERIDES on VLDL and chylomicrons, Apo-C proteins are normally transferred to HDL. The subtypes can modulate remnant binding to receptors, LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE, or LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Friedreich Ataxia: An autosomal recessive disease, usually of childhood onset, characterized pathologically by degeneration of the spinocerebellar tracts, posterior columns, and to a lesser extent the corticospinal tracts. Clinical manifestations include GAIT ATAXIA, pes cavus, speech impairment, lateral curvature of spine, rhythmic head tremor, kyphoscoliosis, congestive heart failure (secondary to a cardiomyopathy), and lower extremity weakness. Most forms of this condition are associated with a mutation in a gene on chromosome 9, at band q13, which codes for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1081; N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75) The severity of Friedreich ataxia associated with expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the frataxin gene correlates with the number of trinucleotide repeats. (From Durr et al, N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75)Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Genetic Techniques: Chromosomal, biochemical, intracellular, and other methods used in the study of genetics.HLA-B8 Antigen: A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*08 allele family.Pan troglodytes: The common chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. It lives in Africa, primarily in the tropical rainforests. There are a number of recognized subspecies.Gene Conversion: The asymmetrical segregation of genes during replication which leads to the production of non-reciprocal recombinant strands and the apparent conversion of one allele into another. Thus, e.g., the meiotic products of an Aa individual may be AAAa or aaaA instead of AAaa, i.e., the A allele has been converted into the a allele or vice versa.Matched-Pair Analysis: A type of analysis in which subjects in a study group and a comparison group are made comparable with respect to extraneous factors by individually pairing study subjects with the comparison group subjects (e.g., age-matched controls).Chromosomes, Artificial, Yeast: Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Psoriasis: A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.HLA-A Antigens: Polymorphic class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens present on almost all nucleated cells. At least 20 antigens have been identified which are encoded by the A locus of multiple alleles on chromosome 6. They serve as targets for T-cell cytolytic responses and are involved with acceptance or rejection of tissue/organ grafts.Lipoxygenases: Dioxygenases that catalyze the peroxidation of methylene-interrupted UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS.Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Gene Components: The parts of the gene sequence that carry out the different functions of the GENES.Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Genealogy and HeraldryItalyStatistical Distributions: The complete summaries of the frequencies of the values or categories of a measurement made on a group of items, a population, or other collection of data. The distribution tells either how many or what proportion of the group was found to have each value (or each range of values) out of all the possible values that the quantitative measure can have.Inheritance Patterns: The different ways GENES and their ALLELES interact during the transmission of genetic traits that effect the outcome of GENE EXPRESSION.Apolipoprotein C-III: A 9-kDa protein component of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS and CHYLOMICRON REMNANTS. Apo C-III, synthesized in the liver, is an inhibitor of LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE. Apo C-III modulates the binding of chylomicron remnants and VLDL to receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) thus decreases the uptake of triglyceride-rich particles by the liver cells and subsequent degradation. The normal Apo C-III is glycosylated. There are several polymorphic forms with varying amounts of SIALIC ACID (Apo C-III-0, Apo C-III-1, and Apo C-III-2).EsterasesApolipoprotein C-I: A 6.6-kDa protein component of VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; INTERMEDIATE-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. Apo C-I displaces APO E from lipoproteins, modulate their binding to receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL), and thereby decrease their clearance from plasma. Elevated Apo C-I levels are associated with HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA and ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.HLA-DP alpha-Chains: Transmembrane proteins that form the alpha subunits of the HLA-DP antigens.Picea: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen, pyramidal trees with whorled branches and thin, scaly bark. Each of the linear, spirally arranged leaves is jointed near the stem on a separate woody base.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.North AmericaRegression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Genes, MHC Class II: Genetic loci in the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex that encode polymorphic products which control the immune response to specific antigens. The genes are found in the HLA-D region in humans and in the I region in mice.Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Africa, Northern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ALGERIA; EGYPT; LIBYA; MOROCCO; and TUNISIA. It includes also the vast deserts and oases of the Sahara. It is often referred to as North Africa, French-speaking Africa, or the Maghreb. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p856)Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific: Enzyme systems containing a single subunit and requiring only magnesium for endonucleolytic activity. The corresponding modification methylases are separate enzymes. The systems recognize specific short DNA sequences and cleave either within, or at a short specific distance from, the recognition sequence to give specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. Enzymes from different microorganisms with the same specificity are called isoschizomers. EC 3.1.21.4.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
"Evaluation of Ancestry and Linkage Disequilibrium Sharing in Admixed Population in Mexico". ASHG. Retrieved July 18, 2012. " ... lines between ethnic groups are historically fluid), the mestiço (Portuguese pronunciation: [meʃˈt(ʃ)isu], [miʃˈt(ʃ)isu]) group ... The first group is composed of the culturally assimilated Amerindians as well as the brown-skinned descendants or children of ... The last group is composed of descendants of Amerindians or caboclos and blacks or other cafuzos. Finally, those whose origins ...
This occurs because there is a strong linkage disequilibrium that exists between DLA class II loci. The pattern displayed by ... the genetic differences among human ethnic groups is analogous to the pattern displayed by the distribution of DLA types in ... It could be associated with particular DLA alleles/haplotypes or caused by the strong linkage disequilibrium. Angles, J. M., ...
Under these parameters a linkage disequilibrium of more than 50% means there is a possible link to the gene allele and ... "On estimating the relation between blood group and disease". Ann Human Genet 19:251-253 Ott J (1989) statistical properties of ... "Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: the insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)". Am J Hum ... method is a family-based method for determining gene allele association to a disease in the presence of actual genetic linkage ...
... that represent recent mixtures of geographically separated ancestral groups can exhibit longer-range linkage disequilibrium ... Genetic studies can use this admixture linkage disequilibrium to search for disease alleles with fewer markers than would be ... Association studies also can take advantage of the contrasting experiences of racial or ethnic groups, including migrant groups ... However, groups could harbor different, though perhaps overlapping, sets of rare variants, which would reduce contrasts between ...
After mapping torsion dystonia by linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis he found it was genetically dominant and was a founder ... Risch has worked on the genetic structure of human groups, for instance multiple levels of structure above the level of the ... He has translated these results into theoretical impacts on, for instance, rate of decay of linkage disequilibrium, and ... The reason that Risch's study failed to find linkage is unknown, but he continued to criticize this area of research in his ...
... in a region of the genome with high linkage disequilibrium that represents a group of SNPs called a haplotype. It is possible ... On a population level, processes that influence linkage disequilibrium include genetic linkage, epistatic natural selection, ... If the alleles at those loci are non-randomly inherited then we say that they are at linkage disequilibrium (LD). LD is most ... Users can upload HapMap genotype data or pedigree format and the linkage disequilibrium patterns will be calculated. Tagger ...
... which is called their linkage disequilibrium. A set of alleles that is usually inherited in a group is called a haplotype. This ... Other processes that may promote cooperation include group selection, where cooperation provides benefits to a group of ... London: Nature Publishing Group on behalf of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. 12 (3b): 541-547. doi:10.1038/eye.1998.143 ... London: Nature Publishing Group on behalf of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences. 18 (10): 985-996. doi:10.1038/cr. ...
... software for the fine-scale mapping of linkage disequilibrium mapping of disease genes using coalescent theory based on an ... The mathematical theory of the coalescent was developed independently by several groups in the early 1980s as a natural ... Linkage mapping methods, including Coalescent theory can be put to work on these diseases, since they use family pedigrees to ... The international SNP map working group. 2001. A map of human genome variation containing 1.42 million single nucleotide ...
"Evaluation of Ancestry and Linkage Disequilibrium Sharing in Admixed Population in Mexico". ASHG. Retrieved July 18, 2012. " ... and an indigenous group, the Zapotecs. The same study found that the Mexico's haplogroup was most similar to the European group ... The inhabitants of Latin America are from a variety of ancestries, ethnic groups and races, making the region one of the most ... With the growth of other groups, they now compose a majority only in Bolivia. In Guatemala, Native Americans are a large ...
... the authors believe that there is a strong linkage disequilibrium between the two genes. FAM63A was identified as one of 39 ... genes exclusively expressed in CML cells, grouped with four other genes believed to function in protein ligation. GRCh38: ...
... populations that represent recent mixtures of separated ancestral groups can exhibit longer-range linkage disequilibrium ... Association studies also can take advantage of the contrasting experiences of racial or ethnic groups, including migrant groups ... Groups may differ in how a disease progresses. Black men who were diagnosed with HIV generally fared worse than their white and ... On the other hand, some of those who are critical of race as a biological concept see race as socially meaningful group that is ...
With this reference point, the linkage disequilibrium in the Ashkenazi Jewish population was interpreted as "matches signs of ... group. Both Ashkenazi Jews as well as Sephardic Jews showed >85% membership in the "southern" group. Referring to the Jews ... All three groups shared many genetic features, suggesting a common origin dating back more than 2,000 years. The study did find ... According to the results "The 40 participants in the Jewish study group were found to match an average of 24.8 or 62.0 % of the ...
... this is known as genetic linkage. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) is a term used in the study of population genetics for the non- ... A difference in the frequency of an allele or genotype of the polymorphism under test between the two groups indicates that the ... mapping Family based QTL mapping Genetic epidemiology Genetic linkage Genome-wide association study Linkage disequilibrium ... or be in linkage disequilibrium with a polymorphism which does. Haplotypes can also show association with a disease or trait. ...
2013): "We report genome-wide data from 73 groups from the Indian subcontinent and analyze linkage disequilibrium to estimate ... Small groups can change a larger cultural area, and elite male dominance by small groups may have led to a language shift in ... Small groups can change a larger cultural area, and elite male dominance by small groups may have led to a language shift in ... Indo-Iranian peoples are a grouping of ethnic groups consisting of the Indo-Aryan, Iranian, Dardic and Nuristani peoples; that ...
... of structural mutations and the promoter polymorphisms that are in strong linkage disequilibrium vary among ethnic groups ...
A34 is an excellent example, appearing to have expanded from the middle east, with linkage disequilibrium with B alleles into ... Austronesia, South Pacific, Philippines and as far north as Taiwan (where it is found in the Taiwan Ami and Yami tribal groups ...
When dealing with haplotypes, if one assumes that linkage disequilibrium is random, then one can estimate the time of ... For A33, the alpha "A" chain are encoded by the HLA-A*33 allele group and the β-chain are encoded by B2M locus. A33 and A*33 ... In Japan it is 4.8% and can be extended to DPB1 at 3.6%. While clearly not showing the level of disequilibrium of the Super B8 ... The parsis of Pakistan lack A33-B58, as with groups to the far west of Pakistan. The A33-B58-DR3-DQ2 haplotype appears to have ...
On the basis of linkage disequilibrium patterns, a recent admixture event is likewise confirmed by the data. From the extent of ... North African groups share a similar excess of derived alleles with Neanderthals as do non-African populations, whereas Sub- ... 05 from the linkage disequilibrium, consistent with the estimated 98% of those modern humans who carried B*73 also carried C*15 ... unusual patterns of linkage disequilibrium, and small basal clade size) in 61 non-coding regions from two hunter-gatherer ...
Using the information, they narrowed the search down to the 46 kb linkage disequilibrium block, and within that region found a ... To find exactly which portion of the gene led to the higher levels of risk, one group of researchers performed a sliding window ... Researchers used this information to conclude that the linkage disequilibrium block of the FTO gene acts upon IRX3. These ... Type 2 diabetes associated sequence polymorphisms have been identified[citation needed] in 30 linkage disequilibrium (LD) ...
... formed by the mixture of previously separate ancestral groups can have unusually high levels of linkage disequilibrium Gabriel ... Second, new polymorphisms that arose in one group were less likely to be transmitted to other groups as gene flow was ... Approximately 10% of the variance in skin color occurs within groups, and ~90% occurs between groups (Relethford 2002). This ... Populations in Africa tend to have lower amounts of linkage disequilibrium than do populations outside Africa, partly because ...
One explanation for the mixed results is the possibility of other variants which are in linkage disequilibrium with the 118A>G ... with associations shown in a number of study groups, but negative results in other groups. ... For this group of patients, diamorphine treatment has proven superior in improving their social and health situation. ... a method for long-term preventative care is attendance at 12-step groups such as Narcotics Anonymous. Some evidence supports ...
2013): "We report genome-wide data from 73 groups from the Indian subcontinent and analyze linkage disequilibrium to estimate ... These two distinct groups, which had split ca. 50,000 years ago, formed the basis for the present population of India. A follow ... 2013) revealed that the two groups mixed between 1,900 and 4,200 years ago (2200 BCE-100 CE), where-after a shift to endogamy ... 2013): "Most Indian groups descend from a mixture of two genetically divergent populations: Ancestral North Indians (ANI) ...
... linkage disequilibrium - the co-inheritance of SNPs through generations - and the actual loci themselves. Predictive genomics ... Lyssenko, V.; Almgren, P.; Anevski, D.; Orho-Melander, M.; Sjögren, M.; Saloranta, C.; Tuomi, T.; Groop, L. (2005). "Genetic ... Furthermore, ethnic specific GWA studies show that each group has varied detectability of variants in terms of: frequency, ... a comprehensive case-control GWA study with approximately 77,000 observations involving 18 international research groups from ...
... incorporation of linkage disequilibrium in multipoint analysis". Genomics. 16 (3): 720-5. doi:10.1006/geno.1993.1253. PMID ... This enzyme removes thioester-linked fatty acyl groups such as palmitate from cysteine residues. Defects in this gene are a ...
The haplotype frequencies in Europeans are in strong linkage disequilibrium. This means there are much higher frequencies of ... These broad antigen groups, like A9 and B5, were subdivided into "split" antigen groups, A23 & A24 and B51 & B52, respectively ... This linkage disequilibrium in Europeans explains why A1, A2, A3, "A7"[B7], and "A8"[B8] were identified, first. It would have ... creating groups in which no more than two antigens per cluster were found in a given person. Serotype group "A" consisted HL-A1 ...
Hiller C, Bischoff M, Schmidt A, Bender K (April 1978). "Analysis of the HLA-ABC linkage disequilibrium: decreasing strength of ... To segregate disease groups have attempted to further define population to earliest onset (presumbably most susceptibility) and ... And while the level of A-B linkage in general was nowhere near Cw-B linkage, the linkage between A1-Cw7-B8 was reasonably ... Thus, A1::DQ2 haplotype is both long and shows greater deficiency of recombination (called linkage disequilibrium). ...
Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed on 9 of 16 linkage groups of a parental-specific map. The genome structures were ... Comparative Genetic Mapping and Discovery of Linkage Disequilibrium Across Linkage Groups in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.) ... Comparative Genetic Mapping and Discovery of Linkage Disequilibrium Across Linkage Groups in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.) ... Comparative Genetic Mapping and Discovery of Linkage Disequilibrium Across Linkage Groups in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.) ...
Nature Publishing Group. Other Literature Sources. *Cited by Patents in - The Lens ... Recently, attention has focused on the use of whole-genome linkage disequilibrium (LD) studies to map common disease genes. ... Prospects for whole-genome linkage disequilibrium mapping of common disease genes.. Kruglyak L1. ...
Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and allele frequencies in this region are highly differentiated across broad geographical ... Linkage disequilibrium and age of HLA region SNPs in relation to classic HLA gene alleles within Europe. ... Linkage disequilibrium and age of HLA region SNPs in relation to classic HLA gene alleles within Europe. ... Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and allele frequencies in this region are highly differentiated across broad geographical ...
European Continental Ancestry Group * Genetic Diseases, Inborn / genetics* * Homozygote * Humans * Linkage Disequilibrium / ... The algorithm is based on the r(2) linkage disequilibrium (LD) statistic, because r(2) is directly related to statistical power ... Selecting a maximally informative set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association analyses using linkage disequilibrium ...
HLA constitutes a group of cell surface antigens as MHC of humans. Because HLA genes are located at adjacent loci on the ... The level of linkage disequilibrium between A and B can be quantified by the coefficient of linkage disequilibrium D A B {\ ... The coefficient of linkage disequilibrium D {\displaystyle D} is not always a convenient measure of linkage disequilibrium ... Other pairs of alleles at those same two loci may have different coefficients of linkage disequilibrium. Linkage disequilibrium ...
Animal Breeding and Genetics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.. Abstract. Many of the economically ... Extent of linkage disequilibrium in chicken.. Aerts J1, Megens HJ, Veenendaal T, Ovcharenko I, Crooijmans R, Gordon L, Stubbs L ... density to identify these QTLs in linkage and association studies is largely determined by the extent of linkage disequilibrium ...
However, DArTs appeared more robust in terms of data resolution and bayesian group assignment. Whole genome linkage ... Genetic structure, linkage disequilibrium and signature of selection in sorghum; lessons from physically anchored DArT markers ... Genetic structure, linkage disequilibrium and signature of selection in sorghum; lessons from physically anchored DArT markers ... Population structure, extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) as well as signatures of selection were investigated in sorghum ...
Comparison of linkage disequilibrium within and between ethnic groups Hall D., Cho J., Hill A., Spedini G., Ober C., Di Rienzo ...
LDlink is a suite of web-based applications designed to easily and efficiently interrogate linkage disequilibrium in population ... Input is two RS numbers and a population group.. LDpop: Investigate allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium patterns ... linkage disequilibrium statistics. Input is a list of variant RS numbers (one per line) and a population group.. LDpair: ... Prune a list of variants by linkage disequilibrium. Input is a list of variant RS numbers (one per line) and a population group ...
Scatter plots describing the decay of linkage disequilibrium in northern and central European geographical groups of P. ... Linkage disequilibrium and recombination:. The decay of intragenic linkage disequilibrium is presented in Figure 3. The ... 0.005/bp in all groups. There was some evidence that linkage disequilibrium extended further in northern Europe than in central ... Brown, G. R., G. P. Gill, R. J. Kuntz, C. H. Langley and D. B. Neale, 2004 Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in ...
Model-Based Groups within AM Population and Linkage Disequilibrium. The genetic relationships among the accessions were ... Linkage Disequilibrium. The pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) among the pairs of SSR loci was analyzed in according to Witt ... Wang, R.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Shi, Y.; Song, Y.; Wang, T.; Li, Y. Population structure and linkage disequilibrium of a mini core ... Somers, D.J.; Banks, T.; DePauw, R.; Fox, S.; Clarke, J.; Pozniak, C.; McCartney, C. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium ...
All markers with q* ≤ 0.20 belong to a group for which the proportion of false positives is no greater than 0.20. Only markers ... Nordborg, M., J. O. Borevitz, J. Bergelson, C. C. Berry, J. Chory et al., 2002 The extent of linkage disequilibrium in ... Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping of Yield and Yield Stability in Modern Spring Barley Cultivars. *Arnold T. W. Kraakman, ... Remington, D. L., J. M. Thornsberry, Y. Matsuola, L. M. Wilson, S. R. Whitt et al., 2001 Structure of linkage disequilibrium ...
... nine nuclear genes that have an association with CMS in Tibetans have been analyzed by using pairwise linkage disequilibrium ( ... linkage disequilibrium, and chronic mountain sickness in Tibetan Chinese Norman E Buroker,1 Xue-Han Ning,1,2,† Zhao-Nian Zhou,3 ... Dove Medical Press is part of Taylor & Francis Group, the Academic Publishing Division of Informa PLC Copyright 2017 Informa ... nine nuclear genes that have an association with CMS in Tibetans have been analyzed by using pairwise linkage disequilibrium ( ...
... and Linkage Disequilibrium. The proportion of membership in each of the 10 cacao ancestral genetic groups (Motamayor et al., ... 2015). Assessing microsatellite linkage disequilibrium in wild, cultivated, and mapping populations of Theobroma cacao L. and ... FIGURE 4. Mean pairwise SNP intra-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium (LD) by inter-SNP distance for three populations of cacao ... In contrast to ancestry and PCA, linkage disequilibrium breakdown did show some important distinctions between populations ( ...
"Genetic diversity and the structure of linkage disequilibrium in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus, Russian Journal ... Statistically significant genetic differences between the population group of Southern Kyrgyzes and the other groups, as well ... Genetic diversity and the structure of linkage disequilibrium in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus. Trifonova, E.; ... Recombination Hotspots and Block Structure of Linkage Disequilibrium in the Human Genome Exemplified by Detailed Analysis of ...
Linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. Nature 2001;411:199-204.. *. Altshuler D, Pollara V, Cowles C et al. An SNP map of ... London, BMJ Publishing Group, 1996.. *. Liddle, J., Williamson, M., and Irwig, L. Method for evaluating research and guideline ... Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: the insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). American ... Teng J, Risch N. The relative power of family-based and case-control designs for linkage disequilibrium studies of complex ...
Results. All five samples and five groups have residual variance V among values of x that is greater than the variance v among ... The other two maps are purely genetic, the linkage map in Morgans or centimorgans (cM) and the map of linkage disequilibrium ( ... Genetic maps in linkage disequilibrium (LD) units play the same role for association mapping as maps in centimorgans provide at ... Abbreviations: LD, linkage disequilibrium; LDU, LD unit; kya, thousand years ago; SNP, single-nucleotide polymorphism; cM, ...
Ohtas D-statistics were used to partition the total variance of dilocus linkage disequilibrium into within-population and ... The observed total variance in disequilibrium (0.0339), averaged over 66 locus-pairs, was significantly greater than would be ... The magnitude of dilocus disequilibrium apparently is unrelated to the chromosomal distance between loci. This and other ... exhibited the specific dual relationship among components expected when random factors are generating disequilibrium, but 20% ...
"Evaluation of Ancestry and Linkage Disequilibrium Sharing in Admixed Population in Mexico". ASHG. Retrieved July 18, 2012. " ... and an indigenous group, the Zapotecs. The same study found that the Mexicos haplogroup was most similar to the European group ... The inhabitants of Latin America are from a variety of ancestries, ethnic groups and races, making the region one of the most ... With the growth of other groups, they now compose a majority only in Bolivia. In Guatemala, Native Americans are a large ...
Topics and introduction , Group , Publications HPM and TreeDT -- Data Mining in Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping. Gene ... Data mining applied to linkage disequilibrium mapping by Toivonen HTT, Onkamo P, Vasko K, Ollikainen V, Sevon P, Mannila H, ... "Data mining applied to linkage disequilibrium mapping" by Toivonen et al.). The source files are provided "as is" without any ... TreeDT: Gene mapping by tree disequilibrium test by Petteri Sevon, Hannu TT Toivonen, and Vesa Ollikainen. In The Seventh ACM ...
Linkage disequilibrium between the rs9939609 and rs9930506 SNPs was assessed by calculating the disequilibrium statistics Δ [20 ... Group A mean age. years, Group B mean age. years, Group C mean age. years, = NS). ... The two SNPs showed a strong linkage disequilibrium (. , = 0.90, ). Nevertheless, because of a different effect observed in ... W. G. Hill and A. Robertson, "Linkage disequilibrium in finite populations," Theoretical and Applied Genetics, vol. 38, no. 6, ...
Ethnic Groups / genetics * Female * Genotype * Humans * Linkage Disequilibrium * Liver / pathology * Malabsorption Syndromes / ...
Linkage Disequilibrium. *Risk Factors. *Asian Continental Ancestry Group. *Multigene Family. *Up-Regulation ... low-risk group (*1/*1 + *1/*6 vs. *6/*6). Odds ratios estimated through logistic regression modeling were 1.25 (95% CI 0.68- ... We genotyped 310 patients with non-small cell lung cancer and a control group of 348 cancer-free individuals for seven sequence ... Each SNP in analyzed groups was assessed by allele frequency, genotype distribution and haplotype analysis.. KEY FINDINGS: The ...
Known HLA linkage disequilibrium. Some HLA alleles are known to be in linkage disequilibrium and commonly occur on the same ... We found the following disequilibria to be equally represented in both the SP and RP groups: A29-C16, B8-C7, B14-C8, B27-C1, ... which are in positive linkage disequilibrium (Table I⇑). Among C alleles, only C14 had a stronger individual effect (p = 0.03) ... Interestingly, the only two patients in the RP group carrying the CCR5-Δ32 mutation were DR11+. We could not analyze the effect ...
2015) Modeling linkage disequilibrium increases accuracy of polygenic risk scores. Am J Hum Genet 97(4):576-592. ... A group of evolutionary biologists sees evidence for a hologenome. Others dismiss it entirely. One things certain: The debate ... LDpred uses a prior on the SNPs effect sizes and adjusts summary statistics for linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNPs to ... Vilhjálmsson BJ, et al., Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Discovery, Biology, and Risk of ...
  • Additionally, most GG (rs3087404) genotypes were linkage GG-AG (44/77, 80/140) in the CIN III and CSCCs, while most GG (rs2029167) genotypes were linkage genotype AG-GG (79/145, 112/184) in the CIN III and CSCCs, respectively. (jcancer.org)
  • After Bonferroni correction, genotype analysis of both rs8190315 and rs2072392 showed association between the OPLL group and the control group in the codominant model ( P = 0.042, OR 1.86, 95 % CI 1.10-3.15). (springer.com)
  • Genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the control groups. (ovid.com)
  • RESULTS: The genotype distribution of eNOS 27-bp repeat polymorphism was found to significantly differ (p=0.015) between the two groups, whereas the genotype distribution of eNOS T(-786)C did not differ (p=0.984) between the groups. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The haplotype estimations based on the detected genotype distributions showed that the prevalence of aT and bT haplotypes was significantly increased in the group treated for ROP. (biomedsearch.com)
  • genotype groups differed by ≈5 to 6 mm Hg, and the polymorphism accounted for ≈1.8% of population diastolic blood pressure variance, although a significant gene-by-sex interaction existed, with an enhanced effect in men. (ahajournals.org)
  • The greater frequency of significant gametic disequilibrium in our study is probably due to the larger number of genomes sampled. (escholarship.org)
  • In plain English, a genetically distant non-Han group which practices rice agriculture has a high frequency of derived ADH1B , and a Han group which does not has a low frequency of ADH1B . (scienceblogs.com)
  • Most haplotype and linkage disequilibrium analysis programs use iteration-based algorithms which substitute an estimate of haplotype frequency into the equation, producing a new estimate which is repeatedly fed back into the equation until the values converge to a maximum likelihood estimate (expectation-maximisation). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Among the chemokine receptor genotypes, only the frequency of the CCR5-▵32 allele was significantly higher in LT-NP compared with the group of standard progressors. (bloodjournal.org)
  • However, in the CAD group, frequency of ACE D allele was significantly higher in patients with angiographically defined multi-vessel disease compared to patients with single vessel CAD ( p = 0.013). (ahajournals.org)
  • Ethnic group distribution was: Chinese 50.6% (n=120), Malay 21.1% (n=50), Iban 19.0% (n=45) and other races 9.3% (n=22) The allelic frequency of the CYP2C19 *1, *2, *3 and *17 were 63.0% (95% CI 62.1% to 59.0%), 29.0% (95% CI 28.7% to 29.3%), 6.0% (95% CI 5.9% to 6.1%) and 2% (95% CI 1.6% to 2.4%), respectively. (bmj.com)
  • The shift is to use the term "variant" rather than the term "mutation" to describe a difference that exists between the person or group being studied and the reference sequence. (cancer.gov)
  • However, no changes in CYP3A4 activity have been found in CYP3A4*1B carriers, suggesting that its association with disease may simply reflect linkage disequilibrium with another functional variant. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Most geneticists are familiar with subsequent refinements and use of linkage, which was introduced to human genetics by Bernstein ( 3 ) and subsequently evolved into current maps reliable to a resolution of ≈1 cM or ≈1 Mb ( 4 , 5 ). (pnas.org)
  • An implementation of the HPM method (in C programming language) is available at http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/group/genetics/licentia_final.zip . (helsinki.fi)
  • An implementation of the TreeDT method (in C programming language) is available at http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/group/genetics/treedt.tar . (helsinki.fi)
  • Data mining applied to linkage disequilibrium mapping by Toivonen HTT, Onkamo P, Vasko K, Ollikainen V, Sevon P, Mannila H, Herr M and Kere J. American Journal of Human Genetics 67:133-145, 2000. (helsinki.fi)
  • Comparative Genetic Mapping and Discovery of Linkage Disequilibrium Across Linkage Groups in White Clover (Trifolium repens L. (g3journal.org)
  • Genetic maps in linkage disequilibrium (LD) units play the same role for association mapping as maps in centimorgans provide at much lower resolution for linkage mapping. (pnas.org)
  • Tested measures of relative efficiency, support intervals, and localization error determine the operating characteristics of LD maps that are applicable to every sexually reproducing species, with implications for association mapping, high-resolution linkage maps, evolutionary inference, and identification of recombinogenic sequences. (pnas.org)
  • The source files may be used freely for non-commercial purposes as long as you give credit to the first reference below ("Data mining applied to linkage disequilibrium mapping" by Toivonen et al. (helsinki.fi)
  • These results suggest that similar errors exist in pseudomolecules from other large genomes that have been assembled using only linkage maps to predict scaffold arrangement, and these errors can be corrected using FISH and/or optical mapping. (wur.nl)
  • Overall, we find that T. vaporariorum forms a single large group, with evidence of further diversification consisting primarily of Kenyan sequences and one sequence from the Netherlands forming a well-supported clade. (cambridge.org)
  • In addition, one infection-associated Toll5B SNP was in linkage disequilibrium with a SNP in sequence encoding a mitogen-activated protein kinase that has been associated with Toll signaling in mammalian cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We were surprised to find evidence that Ashkenazi Jews have higher heterozygosity than Europeans, contradicting the widely-held presumption that they have been a largely isolated group," says first author Steven Bray, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in Warren's laboratory. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • However, DArTs appeared more robust in terms of data resolution and bayesian group assignment. (www.gov.uk)
  • The ENIGMA-MDD Working Group is an international collaboration evaluating neuroimaging and clinical data from thousands of individuals collected by research groups from around the world. (nature.com)
  • Long-distance colonizations undertaken by relatively large and admixed groups of colonizers can help to explain the low levels of genetic structure over vast areas that are characteristic of most oceanic seabird species. (plos.org)