Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Hibernation: The dormant state in which some warm-blooded animal species pass the winter. It is characterized by narcosis and by sharp reduction in body temperature and metabolic activity and by a depression of vital signs.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Space Flight: Travel beyond the earth's atmosphere.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Hepatitis Viruses: Any of the viruses that cause inflammation of the liver. They include both DNA and RNA viruses as well viruses from humans and animals.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Humpback Whale: The species Megaptera novaeangliae, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by its huge flippers and the arching of their back when diving. They are also known for their breaching and singing.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Orthohepadnavirus: A genus of HEPADNAVIRIDAE causing hepatitis in humans, woodchucks (HEPATITIS B VIRUS, WOODCHUCK) and ground squirrels. hepatitis b virus is the type species.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Distance Perception: The act of knowing or the recognition of a distance by recollective thought, or by means of a sensory process which is under the influence of set and of prior experience.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Satellite Communications: Communications using an active or passive satellite to extend the range of radio, television, or other electronic transmission by returning signals to earth from an orbiting satellite.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Groundwater: Liquid water present beneath the surface of the earth.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Food Irradiation: Treatment of food with RADIATION.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Atlantic OceanFood Storage: Keeping food for later consumption.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Flax: A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.Quantum Theory: The theory that the radiation and absorption of energy take place in definite quantities called quanta (E) which vary in size and are defined by the equation E=hv in which h is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the radiation.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Frozen FoodsAcceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Spacecraft: Devices, manned and unmanned, which are designed to be placed into an orbit about the Earth or into a trajectory to another celestial body. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Beak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Sloths: Slow-moving exclusively arboreal mammals that inhabit the tropical forests of South and Central America.Photoreceptors, Microbial: Light absorbing proteins and protein prosthetic groups found in certain microorganisms. Some microbial photoreceptors initiate specific chemical reactions which signal a change in the environment, while others generate energy by pumping specific ions across a cellular membrane.Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Hepatitis, Viral, Animal: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in animals due to viral infection.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Charadriiformes: An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.Cosmic Radiation: High-energy radiation or particles from extraterrestrial space that strike the earth, its atmosphere, or spacecraft and may create secondary radiation as a result of collisions with the atmosphere or spacecraft.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Homing Behavior: Instinctual patterns of activity related to a specific area including ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances using navigational clues such as those used in migration (ANIMAL MIGRATION).Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Remote Sensing Technology: Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Extraterrestrial Environment: The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.EcuadorSpecies Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Mesons: Short-lived elementary particles found in cosmic radiation or produced from nuclear disintegration. Their mass is between that of protons and electrons and they can be negative, positive, or neutral. pi-Mesons (pions) are heavier than mu-mesons (muons) and are proposed for cancer radiotherapy because their capture and disintegration by matter produces powerful, but short-lived, secondary radiation.Marmota: A genus of Sciuridae consisting of 14 species. They are shortlegged, burrowing rodents which hibernate in winter.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Cemeteries: Areas set apart as burial grounds.Caragana: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members contain STILBENES.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Halorhodospira halophila: A species of Halorhodospira distinguished by its ability to grow optimally in an environment of 15-20% salinity. It was formerly called Ectothiorhodospira halophila.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Festuca: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of fescue is also used with some other grasses.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Crotalus: A genus of snakes of the family VIPERIDAE, one of the pit vipers, so-called from the pit hollowing out the maxillary bone, opening between the eye and the nostril. They are distinctively American serpents. Most of the 25 recognized species are found in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Several species are found as far north as Canada and east of the Mississippi, including southern Appalachia. They are named for the jointed rattle (Greek krotalon) at the tip of their tail. (Goin, Goin, and Zug: Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed; Moore: Poisonous Snakes of the World, 1980, p335)Anseriformes: An order of BIRDS comprising the waterfowl, particularly DUCKS; GEESE; swans; and screamers.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)ShoesCynodon: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is considered a lawn grass by some and a weed by others. It contains allergen Cyn d 7.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Galliformes: An order of heavy-bodied, largely terrestrial BIRDS including pheasants, TURKEYS, grouse, QUAIL, and CHICKENS.Ecological Systems, Closed: Systems that provide for the maintenance of life in an isolated living chamber through reutilization of the material available, in particular, by means of a cycle wherein exhaled carbon dioxide, urine, and other waste matter are converted chemically or by photosynthesis into oxygen, water, and food. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Bacteriorhodopsins: Rhodopsins found in the PURPLE MEMBRANE of halophilic archaea such as HALOBACTERIUM HALOBIUM. Bacteriorhodopsins function as an energy transducers, converting light energy into electrochemical energy via PROTON PUMPS.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration: An independent Federal agency established in 1958. It conducts research for the solution of problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere and develops, constructs, tests, and operates aeronautical and space vehicles. (From U.S. Government Manual, 1993)Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Phosphines: Inorganic or organic compounds derived from phosphine (PH3) by the replacement of H atoms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Spectroscopy, Mossbauer: A spectroscopic technique which uses the Mossbauer effect (inelastic scattering of gamma radiation resulting from interaction with heavy nuclei) to monitor the small variations in the interaction between an atomic nucleus and its environment. Such variations may be induced by changes in temperature, pressure, chemical state, molecular conformation, molecular interaction, or physical site. It is particularly useful for studies of structure-activity relationship in metalloproteins, mobility of heavy metals, and the state of whole tissue and cell membranes.Gadus morhua: A species of fish in the cod family GADIDAE, known as the Atlantic cod. It is one of the most important commercial FISHES.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Germ Layers: The three primary germinal layers (ECTODERM; ENDODERM; and MESODERM) developed during GASTRULATION that provide tissues and body plan of a mature organism. They derive from two early layers, hypoblast and epiblast.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Refuse Disposal: The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Lower Extremity: The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Whales: Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Dipodomys: A genus of the family Heteromyidae which contains 22 species. Their physiology is adapted for the conservation of water, and they seldom drink water. They are found in arid or desert habitats and travel by hopping on their hind limbs.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Arthropods: Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Photochemical Processes: Chemical reactions effected by light.
The model was also adopted by Common Ground, an advocacy organization in New York City which promulgated the vulnerability ... Common Ground. Retrieved 25 May 2013. O'Connor, James, Unpublished public forum presentation,University of Santa Barbara,Santa ...
LLC, Common Ground. "Common Ground". "Competitively Awarded Homeless Programs (Continuum of Care)". Hud.gov. Archived from the ... A national drive is underway by Common Ground to piggy back data collection for the VI onto the bi-annual homeless enumeration ... "Vulnerability Index". A Brief Preview of Registry Week "Chicago Central Referral System Assessment Tool". Common Ground Au ... In its formulation as currently promulgated by Common Ground, the index includes these factors: hospitalizations/emergency room ...
Common Ground. pp. 19, 26. ISBN 1-86335-071-3. Eva Heiskanen (2000). Dematerialisation: the potential of service-orientation ...
Common Ground. Retrieved 27 December 2010. Briggs, Katharine (1976). An Encyclopedia of Fairies. Pantheon Books. pp. 9-10. ISBN ...
Quarmby, Lynne (October 2014). "Ten things we can do to take action on Climate Change". Common Ground. Retrieved 26 February ...
Common Ground. 4. American Universities Field Staff. 1978. p. 67. Retrieved 24 April 2014. Liu, Jennifer Li-chia (2004). ... Shaobing is a common breakfast item. Filled shaobing are usually eaten with soy milk and tea, while unfilled ones are usually ... Some common stuffings include red bean paste, black sesame paste, stir-fried mung beans with egg and tofu, braised beef, smoked ...
The essay Common Ground from Incidental Findings was selected by Oliver Sacks for Best American Science Writing 2003 and given ... Ofri, Danielle (2003). "Common Ground". Best American Science Writing. 2003. HarperCollins Publisher. pp. 213-221. Menand, ...
"Free John Graham · BC Supreme Court set to decide Graham's extradition fate". Common Ground. September 2007. Retrieved 17 ... the former common-law wife of AIM leader Dennis Banks, was forbidden by Circuit Court Judge John Delaney from telling jurors ...
Common Ground. pp. 151-180. ISBN 978-1-863-35017-4. Petersen, Eskild; Chen, Lin Hwei; Schlagenhauf-Lawlor, Patricia (2017). ...
"Common ground". observer.theguardian.com. 5 May 2002. Retrieved 21 December 2013. "Edmundo, una vita in dribbling" (in Italian ...
"Cherokee Park's teepee , Common Ground". Louisvillemetroparks.wordpress.com. March 2, 2010. Retrieved September 25, 2013. ... plug welding and then grinding smooth, whereas the commencement of encasing beams #2 and #4 with ¼" steel began. Additionally a ...
Common Ground, an award-winning weekly radio program on world affairs, ran from 1980 to 2004. The Stanley Foundation's current ... "Common Ground". The Stanley Foundation. "Climate Change". The Stanley Foundation. "Nuclear Material Security". The Stanley ...
1943). "Fresno Heroes". Common Ground. Common Council for American Unity. 4: 105. ...
Common Ground. Archived from the original on July 21, 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2015. ...
Kidd, Sue (June 1, 2005). "Common Ground". The News Tribune. Retrieved 10 September 2014. Devlin, Eric (February 26, 2013). " ...
Common Ground. ISBN 978-1-86335-800-2. Neil deGrasse Tyson. 2012. Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier. W. W. Norton ... The two most common in favor of colonization are survival of human civilization and the biosphere in the event of a planetary- ... The most common objections to colonization include concerns that the commodification of the cosmos may be likely to enhance the ... For locations on Earth, this method of getting power is extremely benign, with zero emissions and far less ground area required ...
Wilson, E. O. (Nov-Dec 2006). "Common Ground". Science & Spirit. 17 (6): 56-60. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) "Science ...
"The Power of One" (PDF). Common Ground. March 2007. p. 5. Retrieved April 9, 2007. "Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition ...
Common Ground. Venice, 2012 Renovation of the Museum of Natural History, Berlin, Germany, 1995-; Karlin Residential and Office ... Venice, 2002; "Common Pavilions", Project presented by Diener & Diener at the 13th International Architecture Exhibition. ...
Common Ground. ISBN 1-86335-569-3. Harley, James (2006). "Review: 'Paul Doornbusch: The Music of CSIRAC: Australia's First ... Common Ground. ISBN 1-86335-569-3. Fildes, Jonathan (17 June 2008). "'Oldest' computer music unveiled". BBC. Retrieved 22 ...
Ellenson, Ruth Andrew (2006-10-29). "Common ground". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-01-22. "Prisoners: A ...
"Common Ground". Brownbook, September 8, 2012. Colin Simpson, "Dubai Art District to Double in Size", The National, March 21, ...
"Common Ground". The Leaf Label. 2010-10-25. Retrieved 2015-02-06. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 12 September ... In 2010, the band released Peepers and mini-album Common Ground, a collaboration with Portuguese-born, London-based rapper ... Collaborations Common Ground with Jyager (Leaf, 2010) Cuckoo with Jin Jin (Leaf, 2014) Sherwin, Adam (10 July 2004). "BBC ...
"Common ground". Observer.guardian.co.uk. 13 February 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2012. Rice, Simon (21 October 2009). "The Ten ... Roy's first season at the City Ground was a success, as he provided a strong partner for Stan Collymore. He helped the newly ... Foggia's Dutchman set for City Ground as Clark prepares to break club record". The Independent. Retrieved 4 August 2012. ...
Since 1987, Bill Cope has been the Director of Common Ground Publishing. Bill Cope is the author or co-author of 16 books, 47 ... "People". Common Ground. Archived from the original on 3 November 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-05. "Bill Cope". Kalantzis and Cope. ... Kalantzis, Mary and Bill Cope, Just Spaghetti and Polka? An Introduction to Australian Multicultural Education, Common Ground, ... Kalantzis, Mary and Bill Cope (eds), Transformations in Language and Learning: Perspectives on Multiliteracies, Common Ground, ...
They arose in response to a feeling as to the inadequacy of the orthodox Sunday Schools as a training ground for the children ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ...
The Colorado potato beetles that burrowed into the ground as adults come out of hibernation when the temperature of the soil ... In the home garden there are many other common insects eating the leaves of plants. ...
Common Ground Dove at Encyclopedia of Life "Common Ground-dove media". Internet Bird Collection. Common Ground-Dove photo ... To hear the call of the common ground dove see the external links for a link to a website. The common ground dove is a ground ... The common ground dove does not migrate and is a year-long resident in the areas they are found. The common ground dove lives ... The common ground dove can have 2-3 broods in any given year. The common ground dove lays on average two white eggs that are ...
Common Ground Festival is a not-for-profit punk rock festival held in the United Kingdom every September since 2004. Profits go ... commongroundfestival.co.uk Official site of Common Ground Festival pumpkinrecords.co.uk Official site of Pumpkin Records. ... "The Dirty Weekend Festival finds Common Ground". link2wales. Retrieved 2016-01-06. ... Common Ground Festival. Extreme Noise Terror Oi Polloi Inner Terrestrials Neville Staple The Restarts Culture Shock Antisect ...
For those who labored in the mills and made the short walk home to the company boardinghouses of Lowell, Massachusetts, "the Boott" was both workplace and living quarters. Skilled and unskilled alike toiled 12 hours a day, six days a week, seldom straying beyond the confines of the town. Today, beneath the streets, parking lots, and backyards of the modern city, their story awaits ...
The public has spoken: save our forests for future generations. At the U.S. Forest Service, that means taking a more holistic view of Americas woodlands their past as well as their present. Enter archeology.. The Forest Service eastern region is using archeology as part of a larger plan that recognizes the complexity and interconnections of all the resources in the national forests. This strategy encourages collaborations among biologists, silviculturists, and archeologists, who in the past may have focused only on their own discipline.. With this initiative, archeologists not only reconstruct and interpret how people shaped past ecosystems, but also look at how this information can help restore and sustain them in the future. Although this applied approach is not new to the discipline, it is quite an innovation at the Forest Service. Traditionally, the archeologists job was to ensure that projects that could potentially destroy sites, such as road building, followed the myriad federal ...
Common Ground Dove- These photos of a juvenile Common Ground Dove (Columbina passerina) were taken by Martin Reid on Goforth ... Common Ground Dove. December 17, 1977. Irving, Dallas County. Dallas Christmas Bird Count ...
Helping people in need for more than 40 years, Common Ground serves more than 70,000 individuals per year. The majority of ... Common Ground provides a lifeline for individuals and families in crisis, victims of crime, persons with mental illness, people ... Common Ground wrote -. Common Ground provides a lifeline for individuals and families in crisis, victims of crime, persons with ... this donation is to show that I am also donating to Common Ground because I not only work for this agency, but I am also an ...
Ground beetles. Large, long-legged, shiny blue-black or brown beetles that hide under rocks and logs during the day, and are ... Weve listed the most common beneficial insects along with tips on attracting them to your yard. Ladybugs. The familiar round, ... Rove beetles resemble earwigs without pincers, and feed on many insect pests and like similar conditions to ground beetles. ... Attract them by providing perennial ground covers, stones, or logs. ...
At the player end of the transaction, there has to be a certain commitment to exceeding common belief. ...
Common Ground, helped 31 state and local public health agencies improve their information systems and their system performance ... In 2006, when Common Ground was launched, many agencies lacked the ability to collect, store, analyze, and share the ... Most grantee agencies reported that Common Ground had increased their understanding of business-process analysis and almost all ... Common Ground tools are being used help public health agencies prepare for tsunami of data ...
The Common Ground Hutt Public Art Festival has commissioned five projects that relate to water. Central to Johanna Mechen and ... Water/Art at Common Ground festival. From Standing Room Only, 1:45 pm on 29 January 2017 ... The Common Ground Hutt Public Art Festival has commissioned five projects that relate to water. ...
Title: Common Ground November 2013, Author: Common Ground Magazine Canada, Name: Common Ground November 2013, Length: 40 pages ... From plumbers to publishers, hippies to generation whatever, this place has special appeal." - Owen Williams, Common Ground ...
The opinions expressed in Peter DeWitts Finding Common Ground are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the ... New textbooks that are aligned to the Common Core State Standards...check. Professional Development so teachers understand the ... Common Core...check. New state mandated teacher and administrator evaluation tools...check. Regional training to become ...
After 15 years of the Common Ground Music Festival, organizers are open to more changes so it stays competitive and keeps ... Common Ground Music Festival. *. Storms possible as Common Ground festival opens. Ken Palmer ... Common Ground Festival considers lineup, format changes. LANSING - After 15 years of the Common Ground Music Festival, ... Common Ground Festival considers lineup, format changes LANSING - After 15 years of the Common Ground Music Festival, ...
You are here: Home / Politics & Government / Grassley hopes for common ground. Grassley hopes for common ground. January 20, ... as Grassley hopes theyll share a lot of common ground and common goals. Grassley says Barack Obama has made many overtures ...
The Common Ground enable the poor people in the region to develop and use technologies and methods of BIA which give more ... The Common Ground seeks to pursue its focus through the programs that feeds the hungry, educates the public and restores the ... Common Ground Program. P.O Box 2487,Kitale, 30200 Kenya. Tel. 011-254-325-44205. Fax. 011-254-325-30177. [email protected] ... The Common Ground Program is a Kenyan non-governmental community-based organization formally known as the Pilot Follow Up ...
Common Ground Publishing. 3152 West 8th Avenue. Vancouver, BC V6K 2C3. Canada ...
Many common issues within both departments are failure to communicate, failure to prioritize, failure to take ownership and ... prioritization and teamwork will alleviate these common issues. ...
About Common Dreams. Our Mission:. To inform. To inspire.. To ignite change for the common good. ... from Ground Zero, endorsing the project on religious freedom grounds.. "As a citizen, and as president, I believe that Muslims ... Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We dont survive on clicks. We dont want advertising dollars. We want the world to ... Common Dreams is a small nonprofit with a big mission. Every day of the week, we publish the most important breaking news & ...
RebalanceMD 2016: Finding Common Ground with Your Clientele. By: Brandon Watson , Student Kinesiologist ...
Common Ground System supports the latest generation of U.S., European and Japanese polar-orbiting satellites designed to ... The JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS) is a flexible, cost-effective global system ... Raytheon Common Ground System reduces risk of weather data gap. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System now serving ... Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Multi-mission support for environmental missions The Joint Polar Satellite ...
Common Ground Publishing. 3152 West 8th Avenue. Vancouver, BC V6K 2C3. CANADA ...
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says presidential front-runner Donald Trump and the GOP will find common ... ground ahead of the general election. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). ... Republicans will find common ground with Trump: party chairman. Posted Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus ... says presidential front-runner Donald Trump and the GOP will find common ground ahead of the general election. Rough Cut (no ...
Learn how Common Ground/New Haven Ecology Project is working to preserve and protect our environment. Connect with them through ... Common Ground/New Haven Ecology Project New Haven, Connecticut, United States Donate Sign Up ... Common Ground is a center for learning and leadership, inviting people across ages and identities to connect to their urban ...
New knowledge structures or just common ground? by Per Fredrik Ilsaas Pharo; 1 edition; Subjects: Diplomacy, International ... New knowledge structures or just common ground? breakthroughs in international negotiations Per Fr. I. Pharo. Published 2003 by ... Are you sure you want to remove New knowledge structures or just common ground? from your list? ... New knowledge structures or just common ground? ,author = Per Fredrik Ilsaas Pharo ,publication-date = 2003 }}. ...
  • Larner College of Medicine community members Tiffany Delaney, MA.Ed., director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and Michael Cross, custodial maintenance worker, each received a 2017 "Our Common Ground" award at a special breakfast held on May 8, 2017 and hosted by President Tom Sullivan in the University of Vermont's Davis Center. (uvm.edu)
  • Unity - Tickets for the 2017 Common Ground Country Fair are on sale at retail outlets throughout Maine and online through brownpapertickets.com . (villagesoup.com)
  • WASHINGTON - US President Barack Obama has waded into a bitter controversy over a plan by Muslims to build a mosque just blocks from Ground Zero, endorsing the project on religious freedom grounds. (commondreams.org)
  • Remember that the candidacy of the president was grounded in 'birtherism,' the outlandish argument that Barack Obama was not born in the U.S., was ineligible to assume the presidency, and was in fact a Muslim plant. (cg.org)
  • MANILA, Philippines - President Duterte is seeking common ground with Beijing on the planned joint exploration in Philippine waters and has not abandoned the 2016 arbitral court ruling favoring the Philippine position on the South China Sea, Malacañang told Vice President Leni Robredo yesterday. (philstar.com)
  • The new tool (part of the company's CloudFixer product line) will evaluate a nonprofit's objectives and usage of the Common Ground platform to helping determine the best replacement CRM platform. (prweb.com)
  • Common Ground is the company's innovative, web-based constituent relationship management (CRM) system for tracking all interactions with donors and other supporters. (nptechnews.com)
  • A better approach would be to see Nepal as fertile ground for trilateral cooperation between New Delhi, Kathmandu and Beijing. (indiatimes.com)
  • He explained that the current status quo won't prevent the Philippines from pursuing common understanding with Beijing - such as a possible joint oil exploration. (philstar.com)
  • Natural carbon storage, for instance, is a win-win for Wisconsin's citizens, our land, and the global climate, and the type of common sense solution we can all get behind. (wisconsinacademy.org)
  • But they should also seek common ground, encourage friendship between one another's citizens, and work together when it is for their common benefit. (eurekastreet.com.au)
  • Istanbul - Turkey and Russia signed an agreement on Monday for the construction of a major undersea gas pipeline and vowed to seek common ground on the war in Syria, accelerating a normalization in ties nearly a year after Turkey shot down a Russian warplane. (csmonitor.com)
  • We believe there is an opportunity for Congress and President Obama to seek common ground. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The award recognizes six staff members who exemplify the qualities of UVM's Our Common Ground , the statement of aspirations and shared values for the UVM Community and have made extraordinary contributions and had a significant impact on the University. (uvm.edu)
  • In the current experiment we investigated how and when common ground affects speech planning by tracking speakers' eye movements while they played a referential communication game. (mpi.nl)
  • Blackbaud made the announcement in September and says Common Ground will be supported through March 2014, but all customers must transition by then. (prweb.com)
  • In 2006, when Common Ground was launched, many agencies lacked the ability to collect, store, analyze, and share the information needed for a coordinated response to disease prevention and control and large-scale health crises. (rwjf.org)
  • In order to communicate successfully, speakers have to take into account which information they share with their addressee, i.e. common ground. (mpi.nl)
  • In fighting poverty, the Common Ground Program & Mini- Ag Center (CGP) is improving lives in some of the poorest communities in Kenya. (cityfarmer.org)
  • Obama acknowledged that the site where the World Trade Center towers once stood remains "hallowed ground," and that 9/11 attacks "were a deeply traumatic event for our country. (commondreams.org)
  • ground based processing and dissemination of weather data to users around the globe, such as NOAA's National Weather Service and the National Hurricane Center. (raytheon.com)
  • Problem is, if pro-lifers want to head East towards life and pro-aborts want to move West towards the death of unborn children , any turning to the center of common ground by pro-lifers is movement in the wrong direction. (opposingviews.com)
  • This year's event will run Friday through Sunday, Sept. 22 through 24, at MOFGA's Common Ground Education Center. (villagesoup.com)
  • The Common Ground Program is a Kenyan non-governmental community-based organization formally known as the Pilot Follow Up Project founded in 1995. (cityfarmer.org)
  • Developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) , the JPSS program integrates future civilian and military polar-orbiting environmental satellite space and ground segments with a single ground system. (raytheon.com)
  • Common Ground is a group program for JMU students who want to explore, evaluate, or have questions about the role of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in their life. (jmu.edu)
  • Therefore, it's no surprise that one of the major points of agreement between the scientists at Oldways Common Ground is the need to include sustainability in dietary guidelines. (oldwayspt.org)
  • Common Ground provides a lifeline for individuals and families in crisis, victims of crime, persons with mental illness, people trying to cope with critical situations and runaway and homeless youths. (crowdrise.com)
  • Keith, who is also the Lansing Entertainment & Public Facilities Authority's president and CEO, didn't want to speculate how this year's Common Ground was affected by first-day headliner Meghan Trainor's cancellation for health reasons. (lansingstatejournal.com)
  • We are pleased that organizations of all sizes and structures -- from larger, multi-affiliates to those with one staff person -- are adopting Common Ground to more easily manage their most important relationships," said Tom Krackeler, vice president, Common Ground. (nptechnews.com)
  • Instead, it is argued that Spitzer's remark utilized the architecture of the situation to engage participants in a joint activity of maximizing the common ground. (ssrn.com)
  • This essay explores the role of a shared common ground in layered communication situations which enables participants to understand speaker construals. (ssrn.com)
  • Common Ground is empowering the participants in these enterprises by giving them ownership, responsibility and decision-making authority to run the businesses and make their enterprises viable, meeting a double bottom line of financial and social success. (canadahelps.org)
  • Fight Colorectal Cancer (FightCRC), a leading national colorectal cancer advocacy organization, used the CloudFixer Common Ground Analyzer tool to rapidly and deeply explore their usage of the Salesforce platform and Blackbaud's Common Ground product. (prweb.com)
  • this donation is to show that I am also donating to Common Ground because I not only work for this agency, but I am also an advocate for the people we serve. (crowdrise.com)
  • This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution International License (CC BY 4.0). (scirp.org)
  • Members of MOFGA get free daily admission to the Common Ground Country Fair, as do fair volunteers, children younger than 13, handicapped citizens and (Friday only) school groups. (villagesoup.com)
  • Noted food safety attorney Fred Pritzker, who has represented many clients in lawsuits against food producers, processors, grocery store chains, and restaurants, said, "Everyone who cooks ground beef should be made aware of these risks from Salmonella and E. coli. (foodpoisoningbulletin.com)
  • The preparedness team published an article in the American Journal of Public Health describing the preparedness framework: "The Common Ground Preparedness Framework: A Comprehensive Description of Public Health Emergency Preparedness. (rwjf.org)