Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Crown Ethers: Macrocyclic polyethers with the repeating unit of (-CH2-CH2-O)n where n is greater than 2 and some oxygens may be replaced by nitrogen, sulfur or phosphorus. These compounds are useful for coordinating CATIONS. The nomenclature uses a prefix to indicate the size of the ring and a suffix for the number of heteroatoms.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Crown Lengthening: Technique combining controlled eruptive tooth movement and incision of the supracrestal gingival attachment to allow for proper restoration of a destroyed or damaged crown of a tooth. Controlled eruption of the tooth is obtained using ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES. During this eruptive phase, repeated incisions are made at the junctional epithelium of the sulcus and the supracrestal connective tissue to prevent coronal displacement of the gingiva and of the attachment apparatus.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Veneers: The use of a layer of tooth-colored material, usually porcelain or acrylic resin, applied to the surface of natural teeth, crowns, or pontics by fusion, cementation, or mechanical retention.Metal Ceramic Alloys: The fusion of ceramics (porcelain) to an alloy of two or more metals for use in restorative and prosthodontic dentistry. Examples of metal alloys employed include cobalt-chromium, gold-palladium, gold-platinum-palladium, and nickel-based alloys.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Dental Casting Technique: The process of producing a form or impression made of metal or plaster using a mold.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Zinc Phosphate Cement: A material used for cementation of inlays, crowns, bridges, and orthodontic appliances and occasionally as a temporary restoration. It is prepared by mixing zinc oxide and magnesium oxide powders with a liquid consisting principally of phosphoric acid, water, and buffers. (From Bouchers' Clinical Dental Terminology, 3d ed)Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Dental Restoration Wear: Occlusal wear of the surfaces of restorations and surface wear of dentures.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Denture, Partial: A denture replacing one or more (but not all) natural teeth. It is supported and retained by underlying tissue and some or all of the remaining teeth.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Yttrium: An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Y, atomic number 39, and atomic weight 88.91. In conjunction with other rare earths, yttrium is used as a phosphor in television receivers and is a component of the yttrium-aluminum garnet (YAG) lasers.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Polycarboxylate Cement: Water-soluble low-molecular-weight polymers of acrylic or methacrylic acid that form solid, insoluble products when mixed with specially prepared ZnO powder. The resulting cement adheres to dental enamel and is also used as a luting agent.Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Dental Casting Investment: Material from which the casting mold is made in the fabrication of gold or cobalt-chromium castings. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p168)Prosthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Denture, Partial, Temporary: A partial denture intended for short-term use in a temporary or emergency situation.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Gold Alloys: Alloys that contain a high percentage of gold. They are used in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Periodontal Prosthesis: Any restorative and replacement device that is used as a therapeutic aid in the treatment of periodontal disease. It is an adjunct to other forms of periodontal therapy and does not cure periodontal disease by itself. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 3d ed)Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Agrobacterium tumefaciens: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Preparation: Procedures carried out with regard to the teeth or tooth structures preparatory to specified dental therapeutic and surgical measures.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Crown Compounds: Macrocyclic compounds analogous to CROWN ETHERS but which lack any OXYGEN atoms.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Glass Ionomer Cements: A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Denture Retention: The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Dental Prosthesis Repair: The process of reuniting or replacing a broken or worn dental prosthesis or its part.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesDentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Replica Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue specimens for visualization using an electron microscope, usually a scanning electron microscope. The methods involve the creation of exact copies of the specimens by making a mold or cast (i.e., replica) of the specimen.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Axial Length, Eye: The distance between the anterior and posterior poles of the eye, measured either by ULTRASONOGRAPHY or by partial coherence interferometry.Dental Implants, Single-Tooth: Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Dental Etching: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces, and of materials bonded to teeth or DENTAL IMPLANTS, with agents and methods which roughen the surface to facilitate adhesion. Agents include phosphoric or other acids (ACID ETCHING, DENTAL) and methods include LASERS.
The thrasher is 21.5 to 24 cm in length. The adult has a brown crown, back, shoulders, and rump that becomes more red in its ... The iris is yellow, the bill is grayish-brown, and the legs are brown with a dull tint. Juveniles' plumage have not been ... Primaries and secondaries are grayish-brown with warm rufous-brown outer webs. The retrices are also have a warm brown color. ... tint on its lower back and rump. Greater and lesser coverts are a warm brown with concealed white tips, preceded with a black ...
15.5 cm length. Crown, nape, lores, eye-stripe greyish brown. Mantle browner and more olive. Supercilium pale creamy extending ... Rump and uppertail coverts more yellowish or rufous brown. Graduated, white-tipped tail may appear rounded. Voice: Song; high- ...
This subspecies is large, with a short bill, has the back and rump olive with a greyish wash. It further differs from apache ... There are three migratory subspecies in the United States and Canada, differing in size, bill length, back and rump colours, ... ISBN 84-96553-06-X. Golden-crowned Kinglet Species Account - Cornell Lab of Ornithology Golden-crowned Kinglet - Regulus ... Its length, at 8 to 11 cm (3.1 to 4.3 in), is probably the shortest of any American passerine. However, its weight, which ...
The upper parts of the pigeon's body were greyish-black with iridescence except on wing and tail. Crown has a green-purple ... They averaged a length of 45 cm. This pigeon died out late in the 19th century as a result of deforestation, hunting, and ... iridescence, mantle to rump iridescent reflecting violet, amethyst and turquoise. Scapulars and remaining mantle glossed golden ... The Bonin wood pigeon was a medium-sized pigeon, with an average length of 45 cm. ...
... the flight feathers being brownish-black above and the underside of the wings being greyish-black. The crown, face, rump and ... No subspecies are known (monotypic). This woodpecker grows to a length of 24 to 27 cm (9.4 to 10.6 in). The mantle, back, wings ...
Juvenile: Pale greyish brown central crown stripe. Rump yellowish brown. Voice: Call 'sur-swee-ik' or 'tik'. Habitat: Open ... 15 cm length. Typically, the richest-coloured of the reed buntings, with the pinkest legs and bill in winter. Male: Dark back. ... Female: Buffy submoustachial and throat, and black malar stripes, crown dark brown streaked pale. ...
The white-browed coucal is a medium-sized species growing to 36 to 42 cm (14 to 17 in) in length. The sexes are similar, adults ... having a blackish crown and nape, a white supercilium, rufous-brown back, chestnut wings, blackish rump and black tail, glossed ... The underparts are creamy-white, the eyes red, the beak black, and the legs and feet greyish-black or black. Juveniles have ... rufous streaking on the crown, a faint buff supercilium, barred upper parts and darker underparts. The white-browed coucal is ...
The back is greyish and the rump is pale. The wings are black with a white patch and the tail is grey with black tips to the ... The head is also pinkish-brown with a pale silver crown and a dark stripe over the eye and across the forehead. ... 40 centimetres in length, including a long graduated tail, broad rounded wings and short weak legs. The underparts are pinkish- ...
Total length ca. 22 cm (8½ in). As other members of the Pyrrhura picta complex, it is a long-tailed mainly green parakeet with ... The cheeks and crown are dark dusky-maroon (often appears almost blackish). Unlike other members of the P. picta complex, it ... a dark red belly, rump and tail-tip (tail all dark red from below), pale grey scaling to the chest, a whitish or dull buff ... lacks any bright red or blue to the head (but see Taxonomy). The legs are dark greyish. It occurs in tropical humid lowland ...
The black-chinned siskin grows to a length of about 13 centimetres (5 in). The male has the crown and the centre of the upper ... The rump is yellow and the wings are black with two yellowish bars and a yellow patch on the primary feathers. The underparts ... The head and back are a greyish-olive above with pale yellowish-olive underparts and a whitish belly. The only other bird with ... and the female has a yellow rump. The black-chinned siskin is native to southern Chile and southern Argentina as far south as ...
12 cm length. Brownish upperparts with contrasting greyish-brown crown and nape. Whitish supercilium contrasts strongly, not ... White undertail coverts contrast with paler olive-brown rump and uppertail coverts, lacks greenish tinge. Breast and belly ...
... in length. Males are glossy black with a chestnut belly and white feathers on the rump and outer tail. Females are more greyish ... The last two are sometimes regarded as a separate species, the white-crowned shama (C. stricklandii). They typically weigh ... Juveniles have a greyish-brown colouration, similar to that of the females, with a blotchy or spotted chest. The white-rumped ...
The throat is greyish white while the center of the belly is white and the flanks are olive. The undertail coverts are rusty. ... Specimens measure 12-13 cm (4.7-5.1 in) in length, with a head of 39-44 mm (1.5-1.7 in) and tail of 55-61 mm (2.2-2.4 in). It ... The subspecies M. a. krishnarajui of the Eastern Ghats has a darker russet tail and rump than the Himalayan nominate subspecies ... Juvenile birds have dark rufescent-brown crowns and upperparts. The calls are distinctive. ...
... greyer on the crown of the head, darker on the side of the head and on the wings, and more olivaceous on the rump and tail. The ... The Matinan blue flycatcher is an unobtrusive small bird with an adult length of about 14.5 cm (5.7 in). The head and ... upperparts are greyish-brown, ...
The tail is darker, the breast, rump and head are lighter and tinged rufous, though the crown and cheek region are as dark as ... This roughly thrush-sized bird measures 15-17 cm in length and weighs 24-30 g. Its coloration is quite uniformly a rich ... the body, with some greyish hue to the cheeks. Its iris is dusky brown, the feet are blackish brown. The bill is very long and ... Similar to pullus; rump rich rufous-brown, throat dark and contrasting little with breast. The tawny-throated leaftosser ranges ...
The crown and most of the upperparts are greyish briwn and rather uniform contrasting with deep red lower rump and upper tail ... Juveniles are much duller with red being confined to the rump and upper tail coverts. 11 cm in length. The bar-breasted ...
T. c. sennitti is described with a grayish-brown crown with a rufous color appearing in the back, rump, rear, and shoulder. ... This bird is slender and long-tailed, averaging 26.5-29 cm (10.5-11.5 in) in length and about 70 g (2.5 oz) in weight. It is ... Juveniles have dusty streak marks on its rump, with buffy-white undertail coverts. This thrasher shares a striking resemblance ...
Juvenile birds resemble adults but have greyish napes and more chestnut in the crown, and the feathers of the back, rump and ... The bird is 12.5 to 13 cm (4.9-5.1 in) in length, with whitish undersides, a black crown, and grey-brown upperparts. The sexes ... The nape is pale grey with a grey-white to white band separating the crown from the back. The wings are dusky greyish brown ... The face, lores, throat, breast, belly and rump of this species are white; the undersides are tinged with grey on the chest and ...
The rump is black and not red as in the greater flameback. The underparts are white with dark chevron markings. The black ... The head is whitish with a black nape and throat, and there is a greyish eye patch. Unlike the greater flameback it has no dark ... The adult male has a red crown and crest. Females have a black forecrown spotted with white, with red only on the rear crest. ... The black-rumped flameback is a large species at 26-29 cm in length. It has a typical woodpecker shape, and the golden yellow ...
The wing-coverts, mantle, nape and crown are dull iridescent green, the rump is pale rufous, the belly and flanks are buff, and ... With a total length of 9-10 cm (3.5-3.9 in) and a weight of 2-3 g (0.071-0.106 oz), it is among the smaller species of hermits ... the central underparts and throat are pale greyish brown, the latter with small dark streaks that often are faint and difficult ...
In the nominate subspecies the female is duller than the male with a buff belly and rump, no line between the throat and belly ... In the nominate subspecies the male has a dark slate-grey crown, face and nape, a white throat, ochraceous-yellow belly and ... Females of some other subspecies have a yellow belly, and a greyish, brownish or olive throat. It inhabits humid forest, ... in length and weighing 18-25 grams (0.63-0.88 oz), though some subspecies are larger. ...
There are some small, bristle-like feathers located on the crown that can be erected. Behind the crown, the species' bare skin ... The grey-necked rockfowl's mantle, back, rump, and uppertail coverts are all grey. The feathers on the rump are long, dense, ... This beak is unusually large and crow-like at 30 millimetres (1.2 in) in length and is also decurved. ... though the flanks can sometimes appear to be greyish. The wing is grey, though the wing's remiges are black, forming a line ...
... rich chestnut rump and mostly black tail with pale tips, pale mottled ear-coverts and rufous suffusion on forehead and crown. ... Length: 9.8 cm (9-11); wing span 15.5 cm (14-16.5); weight: 6 g. Mid-sized thornbill similar in size and shape to inland ... Iris is slightly duller, cream or greyish white. Nearly fledged juveniles have pale yellow gape. Endemic to mainland Australia ... Specially named for its pale-chestnut rump from mediaeval Latin uropygium, the rump. Its other names include chestnut-tailed or ...
Upperparts are turquoise-blue, slightly duller on crown and brighter on rump. Underparts largely bright yellow but the vent is ... The blue-throated macaw is about 85 cm (33 in) long including the length of its tail feathers and has a wingspan of ... glacous Latin for greyish-blue or green) + gularis (Latin: throat). The Blue-throated macaw is one of 8 extant species (and a ... It can be separated from the slightly larger blue-and-yellow macaw by the blue (not black) throat, the blue (not green) crown ...
The adult female is similar to the male but has a black crown and red nape. The juvenile has a black crown with white and red ... The rump is greenish-yellow, with some red on the feather tips, and the upper side of the tail is black with red upper-tail ... The Hispaniolan woodpecker is a gold and black barred bird growing to a length of from 22 to 28 cm (8.7 to 11.0 in). The adult ... The underside of the wings is greyish-brown with pale spotting and barring, and the underside of the tail is grey or olive. The ...
... coarser grayish down, which is usually darker on the crown, underparts and flanks. The legs and cere at this young nestling age ... the hatchlings have a creamy white down which is longest and whitest on the head and often dirty grayish on wings and rump. ... which imparts a somewhat longer total length that the white-tailed eagle, and a longer mean tarsal length.[3][9][35][36] ... tail and tarsal length, or body mass rather than wingspan or total length. As expected for many widely distributed animals of ...
The thrasher is 21.5 to 24 cm in length. The adult has a brown crown, back, shoulders, and rump that becomes more red in its ... The iris is yellow, the bill is grayish-brown, and the legs are brown with a dull tint. Juveniles plumage have not been ... Primaries and secondaries are grayish-brown with warm rufous-brown outer webs. The retrices are also have a warm brown color. ... tint on its lower back and rump. Greater and lesser coverts are a warm brown with concealed white tips, preceded with a black ...
15.5 cm length. Crown, nape, lores, eye-stripe greyish brown. Mantle browner and more olive. Supercilium pale creamy extending ... Rump and uppertail coverts more yellowish or rufous brown. Graduated, white-tipped tail may appear rounded. Voice: Song; high- ...
Description Length: 30-32 cm , 36-42 cm . Plumage: tail, rump, back and wings dark greyish brown; mantle pale greyish brown; ... Plumage: tail, rump, back and wings dark greyish brown; mantle pale greyish brown; hindneck collar white; crown black with ... Immature above with cream edges to feathers, forecrown white and white streaking on hindcrown, nape black; below greyish white ... Immature above with cream edges to feathers, forecrown white and white streaking on hindcrown, nape black; below greyish white ...
Length 5 inches. The female has the upper parts brownish, spotted and streaked with black ; the yellow on the crown, rump, and ... The bill is black, and stout ; crown and hind head black, the feathers edged with grayish-plumbeous ; a line from the lower ... Length 5 inches. Extent 7 inches. The female difl^ers from the male in having the yellow of the crown and cheeks less bright, ... Bill slender, black; upper parts light plumbeous; crown, throat, rump, and sides under the wings, gamboge yellow ; lores, and a ...
The upper parts of the Pigeons body were greyish-black with iridescence except on wing and tail. Crown has a green-purple ... They averaged a length of 45 cm. This pigeon died out late in the 19th century as a result of deforestation, hunting, and ... iridescence, mantle to rump iridescent reflecting violet, amethyst and turquoise. Scapulars and remaining mantle glossed golden ... The Bonin Wood Pigeon was a medium-sized pigeon, with an average length of 45 cm. ...
... length of the molars; BM1, breadth of M1; ZB, zygomatic breadth; ZL, zygomatic length; LN, length of nasals; LIB, least ... There is a molt line on the pelage covering the right rib-cage, the hair on the rump and left side presumably a replacement for ... Anterior edge of the crowns of m2-3- almost straight, at right angles to tooth axis (1); curved with radius like part of a ... The muzzle is distinctly grayish (Pale Neutral Gray), except where pink and violet where vascularized. There is no trace of ...
It has a length of 18 - 19 cm (7 - 7 ½ in.) and weighs approximately 63 g (2.22 oz.). The male is mainly black above with ... It has a yellow frontlet, red crown and a large white spot behind the eye rendering the appearance of a mask. The flight ... Starting below the beak it has a whitish throat blending to an olive grayish breast and belly. The stomach area is barred with ... feathers contain white spots and its rump is white as well. ...
Male ruddy ducks have brilliant rusty-brown backs, rumps, necks, scapulars, chests, sides and flanks. The crown, rear ear ... Average length: M 17″, F 16.6″. Average weight: M 1.6 lbs., F 1.5 lbs. ... Female ruddy ducks have grayish-brown neck and body plumage. The sides of the head and neck are dull buff-brown with a single ... The breast and sides are tan with dark brown speckles and there is a white spot on the side of the rump. Most of the upper wing ...
All have a grayish brown upper body with a bluish green chest, with green under-parts and blue on the topside of the rump. ... This is a small and stocky African parrot, averaging 8 - 10 inches (21 - 25 cm) in length. Their wing length is about 5.5 to 6 ... There are six subspecies of Meyers with varying degrees of yellow coloration on the crown and wings, with some types even ... especially the chest and rump which have a lovely iridescence. Eyes in the mature birds are orange-red, with a grayish black ...
The relation of tail to crown-rump length establishes the distinction between A. swainsonii and A. minimus; in the former ... The back is often greyish. This species can be distinguished from the pademelon (Thylogale billardierii) by the foot length: ... The ears of nanus are broader and larger, and lepida is the smaller in body length, the snout-rump length being less than three ... The snout-rump length is known to be as great as six inches in A. swainsonii.. Eight or nine young are born in July or August ...
Review bird s pale brown rump and dorsal surface of tail contrasted strongly with blackish wings and upper back; CHSW s rump ... Head: Crown/eye area appeared darker (dusky blackish-brown) and contrasted with dusky-whitish cheek/throat/upper breast. Wings ... Very narrow wings at base, appeared long relative to body length, thin and pointed. Body appeared stubby due to short tail and ... Review bird was whitish-dusky on portions of face, throat, upper breast; CHSW likely to be darker, perhaps grayish. ...
... dark eyeline and crown, and grayish, slightly decurved bill. It is shorter-tailed and shorter-billed than similar Marsh Wren; ... Adult has clean pale buffy underparts, finely barred wings and tail, orange rump, streaked back, whitish throat, pale ... also has fine streaking on its crown. Length: 11 (cm) Wingspan: 14 (cm) ...
Legs: Black, medium length for a sandpiper. Plumage: Crown finely streaked with dark markings against a rusty background, ... Generally white below, mottled black, grayish-brown and rusty above, rusty crown, black streaks on breast and flanks. ... Neither Sanderling nor Bairds Sandpiper have a white rump. Records show this to be one of the most likely peeps in early ... giving an overall rusty apearance to the crown. A whitish supercilium separates the crown from a darkish line in front of the ...
... greyish ventral parts; long blackish tail. Crown hairs directed backward. Pinkish brown face. Head-body length 35-65 cm; tail ... Facial skin bare, light pinkish or reddish; upper back olive; loins, rump and base of tail orange red; underparts paler. Hind ... Pig-tailed Macaque (M. nemestrina) The species has back greyish olive to russet, crown dark and under-parts greyish white. Pig- ... Head-body length 43-60 cm; tail length 13-25 cm. Adult weight 4-15 kg. Group living; group size varies from 3-25. Usually ...
It is grayish-olive above, with two white wing bars. The male flashes its red crown patch when upset.. ... Small bird about 14 cm in length. Male is rosy pink on throat and rump, while female is gray-streaked brown. They eat seeds ... Golden-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla). White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys). Family Fringillidae. House ... Golden-crowned Sparrow Zonotrichia atricapilla. Medium sized bird with a long tail and a yellow crown. Feeds on seeds, nuts, ...
It has a reddish crown, black face and belly, reddish rump and brownish back.. Munias (Family Estrildidae). The White-headed ... It has a black head (hence the common name), white rump, and a largely greyish brown plumage. The vent may be red, orange or ... This species reaches lengths of about 13 cm. It feeds mostly on nectar. The Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis) is a ... It has a reddish brown crown, greyish brown upperparts, a reddish brown tail and white underparts. This small bird feeds on ...
Upperparts: Forehead, crown, nape, mantle, rump and uppertail-coverts all uniform greyish-green.. Side of Head: Supercilium ... Primary-projection rather short, about half the length of the exposed tertials. Tail: Grey-brown, darker than rump, with fairly ... Mantle, scapulars, back and rump as crown but tinged greener. Primaries and secondaries dark grey-brown but with bright olive- ... Upperparts greyish-green, inclining to greenish-brown when in the shade; underparts very pale greyish-white with faint yellow ...
The male s crown and chest are both red and so is its rump. The female, on the other hand, is mostly grayish brown all over ... This little bird is about the size of a sparrow, with a length of anywhere from 5 inches to 6 inches (13 15 cm). The male and ...
In summer, entire forehead, crown and nape appear glossy jet black in color. In winter, it is greyish white flecked and ... It reaches a length of 16-18 cm, including the two elongated central tail feathers. These elongated tail feathers are absent in ... The rump and tail are black. The underparts are white with dark chevron markings. The black throat immediately separates it ... Thus, southeast Asian birds have rufous crown and face, and green underparts, whereas Arabian breeders have a green crown, blue ...
The rump and uppertail covers are pale grey. The mantle has dusky blotches and no shaft streaks. The three outer tail feathers ... The head is whitish with a black nape and throat, and there is a greyish eye patch. Unlike the Greater Flameback it has no dark ... The adult male has a red crown and crest. Females have a black forecrown spotted with white, with red only on the rear crest. ... The Black-rumped Flameback is a large species at 26-29 cm in length. It has a typical woodpecker shape, and the golden yellow ...
They can be identified by their chestnut-and-white necks; white heads with pale yellow crowns; brown-streaked back, rump, and ... rump, and tail; blackish-brown belly; grayish bill and pouch; and black legs and feet. Behavior, Diet, and Nesting Habits ... Length 2 p. Transcript January 1998 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis "A wonderful bird is the ... They can be identified by their chestnut-and-white necks; white heads with pale yellow crowns; brown-streaked back, ...
Crown of the head and shoulder, greyish brown; back, light brown, tinged with reddish brown on the rump, and with a stripe of ... and brown for the remainder of their length, margined all round with greyish olive; lateral tail feathers brownish black, ... Crown of the head grey; lores and ear-coverts dark brown; back and sides of the neck rufous; upper part of the back and rump ... Head and all the upper surface brown; the primaries margined with greyish brown; stripe over and behind the eye greyish white; ...
The crown of the head is black; the cheeks and neck are adorned with black and white lines. Male and female Downy Woodpeckers ... Thats the length of a transport truck and twice the weight! Females tend to be a bit larger than males - measuring, on average ... This woodpecker is black and white with a broad white stripe down the back from the shoulders to the rump. Its wings are ... The change to the greyish-brown fall-winter plumage usually starts on the breeding grounds and is completed after arrival on ...
The crown of the head is black; the cheeks and neck are adorned with black and white lines. Male and female Downy Woodpeckers ... Thats the length of a transport truck and twice the weight! Females tend to be a bit larger than males - measuring, on average ... This woodpecker is black and white with a broad white stripe down the back from the shoulders to the rump. Its wings are ... The change to the greyish-brown fall-winter plumage usually starts on the breeding grounds and is completed after arrival on ...
Carpodacus mexicanus has less extensive red coloration that is concentrated on the crown, throat, breast and rump. It is often ... The brown streaks on the breast and flanks are blurry and grayish on C. mexicanus versus clear, brown streaks against a white ... Carpodacus purpureus is a medium-sized finch that measures 15.2 cm in length, weighs 25 g, and features a 25.4 cm wingspan. Its ... Their crowns are brown and are bordered by thick, white supercillia. A brown patch extends from their eye down to cover their ...
  • It is one of the largest species of owl , and females can grow to a total length of 75 cm (30 in), with a wingspan of 188 cm (6 ft 2 in), males being slightly smaller. (wikipedia.org)
  • The males are usually red on the face, breast and rump, but a few have yellow instead of red. (blogspot.com)
  • Weight can range from 2 to 6 g (0.071 to 0.212 oz), with males averaging 3.4 g (0.12 oz) against the slightly larger female which averages 3.8 g (0.13 oz). Adults are metallic green above and greyish white below, with near-black wings. (allaboutbirds.info)
  • In length measured from bill to the tail, emus range from 139-164 cm (55-65 in), with males averaging 148.5 cm (58.5 in) and females averaging 156.8 cm (61.7 in). (blogspot.co.uk)
  • Females are usually larger than males by a small amount, and are substantially wider across the rump. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • In Indian rhinoceroses such teeth, or tusks, can reach 13 cm (5 inches) in length among dominant males and inflict lethal wounds on other males competing for access to breeding females. (mathisfunforum.com)
  • A whitish supercilium separates the crown from a darkish line in front of the eye and rusty auriculars behind the eye. (utahbirds.org)
  • In certain positions, for example when the head is sunk in to the shoulders, the supercilium and eye-stripe may appear remarkably long and turned up towards the rear crown. (irbc.ie)
  • Birds in this family range in length from the 5 in (12.5 cm) goldenface to the 11 in (28.0 cm) rusty pitohui (Pitohui fer-rugineus). (ormedmedical.us)
  • The upper parts of the Pigeon's body were greyish-black with iridescence except on wing and tail. (kiwifoto.com)
  • Wings comparatively short, primary-projection being about half the length of the exposed tertials with more or less equally spaced primary tips - thus, the wing structure is very similar to Chiffchaffs, even when examined in the hand (see Svennsson 1984). (irbc.ie)
  • Wing length 60.0-72.0 (65.8) mm. (birds.kz)
  • Wing length 60.0-70.0 (64.4) mm. (birds.kz)