Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Stroke, Lacunar: Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Brain Infarction: Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Intracranial Hemorrhages: Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Heat Stroke: A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.Intracranial Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports and conducts research, both basic and clinical, on the normal and diseases nervous system. It was established in 1950.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis: Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.Warfarin: An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Intracranial Arteriosclerosis: Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Upper Extremity: The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Neuroprotective Agents: Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.United StatesOutcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Intracranial Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions involving ARTERIES in the skull, such as arteries supplying the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, the BRAIN STEM, and associated structures. They include atherosclerotic, congenital, traumatic, infectious, inflammatory, and other pathological processes.Secondary Prevention: The prevention of recurrences or exacerbations of a disease or complications of its therapy.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.JapanMotor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Southeastern United States: The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Cerebral Revascularization: Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Occupational Therapy: Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY system, including branches such as Heubner's artery. These arteries supply blood to the medial and superior parts of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, Infarction in the anterior cerebral artery usually results in sensory and motor impairment in the lower body.SwedenCausality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS induced by ISCHEMIA in the POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which supplies portions of the BRAIN STEM; the THALAMUS; TEMPORAL LOBE, and OCCIPITAL LOBE. Depending on the size and location of infarction, clinical features include OLFACTION DISORDERS and visual problems (AGNOSIA; ALEXIA; HEMIANOPSIA).Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Brain Damage, Chronic: A condition characterized by long-standing brain dysfunction or damage, usually of three months duration or longer. Potential etiologies include BRAIN INFARCTION; certain NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ANOXIA, BRAIN; ENCEPHALITIS; certain NEUROTOXICITY SYNDROMES; metabolic disorders (see BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC); and other conditions.Brain Edema: Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)Time: The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Gait: Manner or style of walking.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.BerlinStents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Muscle Spasticity: A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Multicenter Studies as Topic: Works about controlled studies which are planned and carried out by several cooperating institutions to assess certain variables and outcomes in specific patient populations, for example, a multicenter study of congenital anomalies in children.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.TaiwanChronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Patients' Rooms: Rooms occupied by one or more individuals during a stay in a health facility. The concept includes aspects of environment, design, care, or economics.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Hospitals, Community: Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Brain Stem Infarctions: Infarctions that occur in the BRAIN STEM which is comprised of the MIDBRAIN; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.Blood-Brain Barrier: Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.
Old Tom's 13-stroke margin was achieved over just 36 holes. Lowest round: 62, Branden Grace, 3rd round, 2017; a record for all ... Greatest victory margin: 13 strokes, Old Tom Morris, 1862. This remained a record for all majors until 2000, when Woods won the ... Lowest round in relation to par: −9, Paul Broadhurst, 3rd round, 1990; Rory McIlroy, 1st round, 2010. Wire-to-wire winners ( ... "All four rounds of British Open shown live on ESPN beginning in '10". ESPN. Retrieved 26 July 2016. Ourand, John; Lombardo, ...
Those around them will suffer 100 strokes of the cane. Informers will be rewarded with 30 strings of cash." The south enjoyed ... A great variety of coinage, including large and base metal coins, was issued in this area. Kai Ping tong bao (Chinese: 開平通寶; ... To distinguish this coin from the Bu Quan of Wang Mang-the stroke in the middle of quan is continuous. They were withdrawn in ... Round foot spades: Round handle, round shoulders, and round feet. A rare type, this type is represented by the coins of five ...
Stroke play Style of scoring in which the player with the fewest strokes wins. Most professional tournaments are stroke play. ... Cut (i) The reduction in the size of the field during a multiple round stroke play tournament. The cut is usually set so that a ... The Masters is top 50 or those within ten strokes, whichever is greater). Tournaments may have more than one cut (PGA Tour ... by the first stroke on a par 3, the second stroke on a par 4, or the third stroke on a par 5). Greens in regulation percentage ...
Sixty players took part in four rounds of stroke play. Justin Rose of Great Britain won the gold medal by two strokes over ... "Men's Individual Stroke Play - Round 4". rio2016.com. Archived from the original on 14 August 2016. Retrieved 14 August 2016. ... "Men's Individual Stroke Play - Round 1". rio2016.com. Archived from the original on 8 August 2016. Retrieved 11 August 2016. ... "Men's Individual Stroke Play - Round 2". rio2016.com. Archived from the original on 27 August 2016. Retrieved 12 August 2016. ...
Duncan, the 1920 champion, shot an 81 in the third round and fell six strokes back into a tie for tenth, then rebounded with a ... The third member, James Braid, missed qualifying on Tuesday by a stroke. Source: Did not advance past qualifying rounds (Monday ... For the final time, two members of the Great Triumvirate finished in the top-10 at the Open Championship; Taylor, age 51, ... In the third round on Friday morning, defending champion Jock Hutchison shot 73 and moved to the lead, one shot ahead of Taylor ...
... removing a great pumping loss, giving the engine a further degree of freedom. The combustion can be two-stroke engine or four- ... It can be designed as round tube, a cylinder or even flat plate in order to reduce the center of gravity, and/or improve the ... Hence the reason why most of the current research focuses on the two-strokes cycle. Several variations are possible for ... stroke engine. However, a four-stroke requires a much higher intermediate storage of energy, the rotational inertia of the ...
... and stroke volume is influenced by blood volume. In the short-term, the greater the blood volume, the higher the cardiac output ... Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysms, and is the ... A simple view of the hemodynamics of systemic arterial pressure is based around mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure ... Fluctuations in pressure that are significantly greater than the norm are associated with greater white matter hyperintensity, ...
After a 76 in the third round, Littler fell three strokes back of Furgol, who shot a 71 to take a one-stroke lead over Dick ... In the final round on Saturday afternoon, Littler rebounded with a 70, but it was not enough. Furgol was helped by a great ... This U.S. Open was the first to be nationally televised, one hour of the final round, carried by NBC. It was also the first in ... On the Lower Course, Ed Furgol won his only major title, one stroke ahead of runner-up Gene Littler. Littler owned the 36-hole ...
The great round moved them from 10th place to 2nd place and they are 1 stroke behind the Americans. Raphaël Jacquelin made five ... Both teams shot rounds of 68. The South African team is in 4th, 2 strokes behind the Americans. The host country China shot a ... Scores After Round 1 Omega Mission Hills World Cup - Scores After Round 2 Omega Mission Hills World Cup - Scores After Round 3 ... They have held a stroke lead after the first three days of the event. The best round of the day was the 10-under-par 62 shot by ...
The victor by two strokes was a 22-year-old rookie from Ohio named Jack Nicklaus. It was his second tour win and first non- ... Dave Marr won in a sudden-death playoff, over Bob Rosburg and Jacky Cupit; Marr shot a final round 63 (-7) and birdied the ... The last event in 1966, the Greater Seattle-Everett Classic, was held at the Everett Golf & Country Club. It was won by Homero ... Blancas, one stroke ahead of Cupit, a two-time runner-up. Inglewood later hosted the GTE Northwest Classic on the Senior PGA ...
Day played consistently during the final round, never allowing Spieth an opportunity to get closer than 3 strokes, while ... 9-12 July: U.S. Women's Open - Chun In-gee won by one stroke over Amy Yang, for her first major victory. 30 July - 2 August: ... 12-13 September: Walker Cup - Great Britain and Ireland defeated the United States by a score of 16½ to 9½. 1-4 October: Asia- ... Pacific Amateur Championship - Chinese golfer Jin Cheng won by one stroke; before the start of the fourth round, it was decided ...
... but lost the 36-hole Saturday playoff by four strokes. At Muirfield in 1966, he again finished as runner-up, one stroke behind ... Thomas represented Great Britain in the Ryder Cup on four occasions, in 1959, 1963, 1965 and 1967, only being defeated once in ... He later played tournament golf, and won more than a dozen titles in Britain and around Europe. He also tried his hand in the ... Top 10 Did not play CUT = missed the half-way cut (3rd round cut in 1969 Open Championship) "T" indicates a tie for a place ...
Faldo overcame a six-stroke deficit going into the final day as Norman, leader after each of the first three rounds, faltered ... Bonk, Thomas (April 12, 1996). "Norman's opening 63 'one of great rounds'". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Los Angeles Times ... Nick Faldo won his third Masters and his sixth and final major title, five strokes ahead of runner-up Greg Norman. ... In the first round, Norman shot the second-ever 63 at the Masters (Nick Price had the first 63, in the third round in 1986). ...
In his 1979 autobiography Jack Kramer, who had a great forehand himself, devotes a page to the best tennis strokes he had ever ... Players with great forehands often build their main strategy around it. They set up a point until they have a good chance of ... For a right-handed player, the forehand is a stroke that begins on the right side of the body, continues across the body as ... Roger Federer has been noted to have the one of the greatest forehands in history, described as a "great liquid whip" by David ...
Billy Casper, the 1959 champion, staged one of the greatest comebacks in history by erasing a seven-stroke deficit on the final ... Source: Saturday, June 18, 1966 Source: Sunday, June 19, 1966 Palmer began the final round with a three-stroke lead over Casper ... Palmer shot 32 (−3) on the front nine and with Casper's 36, the lead was seven strokes at the turn. With his eye on Hogan's U.S ... Source: Grimsley, Will (June 17, 1966). "Mengert takes Open lead with great first round 67". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press ...
He also won the Cape Coral Inter-Collegiate Tournament by eight strokes and the Miami Invitational by five strokes, among ... Player had a 1-shot lead over Green, who hit a good drive and then a great approach to within three feet of the cup. Green had ... At the 1977 U.S. Open, as Green walked to the 15th tee of the final round, he was notified of a caller anonymously phoning in a ... When Green took the stroke, he pushed it a little to the right and the putt slid by. Green never blamed Kelly, however, telling ...
Nicklaus held the record for the greatest winning margin in the stroke play era from 1958 to 2011. He won by 7 strokes in 1980 ... Nicklaus holds the record for most rounds in the 60s at 29. Nicklaus holds the record for most sub-par rounds at 37. Nicklaus ... Nicklaus holds the record for lowest scoring average of players with over 75 rounds at 71.37 for 128 rounds. Nicklaus holds the ... Nicklaus holds the record for lowest scoring average of players with over 100 rounds at 71.98 for 163 rounds. Nicklaus competed ...
... for the best single round. Vardon led after the first round with a 72, a stroke ahead of Braid and Massy. Vardon and Gassiat ... The main event was a stroke-play contest over 36 holes, won by Harry Vardon, four strokes ahead of Arnaud Massy. An invitation ... The afternoon was taken up with a contest between the three French professionals and the Great Triumvirate. All three matches ... Vardon's total of 143 was 4 ahead of Massy and a further stroke ahead of Braid and Gassiat who tied for third place. The next ...
... "the greatest test of golf I have ever played and the toughest course." Clayton Heafner who had a final round of 69, the only ... other sub-par of the tournament, finished second two strokes back. There was some comment after the last round of the ... While millions watched on television, Chen blew a four stroke lead with a quadruple bogey on the fifth hole primarily by ... Ben Hogan won with a total of 287 by shooting a final round 67 after which he was quoted as saying "I am glad I brought this ...
Around this same time competitors started to release new four-stroke multi-cylinder bikes with larger engines and greater ... Until the early 1970s Yamaha focused on two-stroke bikes, but concerns about pollution had begun to make two-strokes increasing ... Yamaha added four-stroke engines to their line-up when they released the XS650 XS1 in 1970. This bike was powered by a Hosk- ... 3 The 4-stroke Challenge: Perfecting the "Big-Twin" (Part 2)". global.yamaha-motor.com. "Testbericht: Yamaha TX750". Das ...
As the duration of follow-up increases, the stroke rate rises to nearly 50 strokes per 1000 cases of HF by 5 years. In 2015 ... Overall around 2% of adults have heart failure and in those over the age of 65, this increases to 6-10%. Rates are predicted to ... allowing for greater activity. Heart failure can result from a variety of conditions. In considering therapeutic options, it is ... Overall around 2% of adults have heart failure and in those over the age of 65, this increases to 6-10%. Above 75 years old ...
Most competitive swimmers know how many strokes they need for a lane, or at least how many strokes after the signal flags or ... The leg stroke alternates, with one leg sinking down straight to about 30 degrees. From this position, the leg makes a fast ... For the takeoff, the swimmer pushes his or her hands away from the block and swings his or her arms around sideways to the ... A great example of this is Olympic gold medallist Natalie Coughlin. Breaststroke kicks are most comfortable if the arms are ...
Both of the leaders' strokes were long and slow while Cornell stuck to its stroke. At the half mile mark, Yale edged in front ... Plaisted dropped out around the 2-mile (3.2 km) mark due to cramps. Courtney did not give up the lead and won by five boat ... These victories created great enthusiasm for the rowing program at Cornell. The Courtney-coached crews over the next few years ... This style of rowing would become known as the Courtney Stroke. The most evident trait of the stroke is the positioning of the ...
His ten stroke lead was the largest 54-hole lead of a U.S. Open. Ernie Els shot the low round of the day with a 68, the only ... At twelve strokes under par, he was the only player to finish at even par or better and became the first player in the 106-year ... When he's on, we don't have much of a chance." - Ernie Els, on Tiger Woods "Records are great, but you don't really pay ... "A round at Pebble". Deseret News. June 15, 2000. p. D6. "Final-round scorecards". ESPN. Retrieved June 17, 2016. "Woods Falls ...
He led by a record ten strokes going into the final round, and Sports Illustrated called it "the greatest performance in golf ... He remained leader or co-leader through the second and third rounds. Going into the final round, Woods had a 2-stroke lead at 8 ... After shooting an opening round 66, Woods led or shared the lead in every round and won by two strokes over Steve Stricker with ... A third-round 65 put him atop the leaderboard and he coasted to victory with a final-round 69 for a 20-under 268 four-round ...
Women seem to be at a greater risk as do certain ethnic groups,[10][126] such as South Asians, Pacific Islanders, Latinos, and ... Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, diabetic ketoacidosis, heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy, kidney failure, ... Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or honey urine noting that the ... including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower limb amputations, and increased rates of ...
Francesco Molinari, who won the Quicken Loans National two weeks ago, was among a group of players three strokes back.Zach ... Johnson Wagner, Nick Taylor, Andres Romero and Joel Dahmen shot opening-round 64s. ... "No, I dont know if Ive ever done that to finish a round. It was great. Yeah, I would just try to keep doing what Im doing." ... "I tried to keep the round going. I asked if we could just go to the first tee and start round two," Wheatcroft said. " ...
If either curvature is greater than 2/(stroke width), fallback to round. Extend the stroke edges using these circles (or a line ... 13.5.3. Stroke width: the stroke-width property. *13.5.4. Drawing caps at the ends of strokes: the stroke-linecap property ... stroke-width="5" stroke-dasharray="0 20" stroke-linecap="round"> ,use xlink:href="#p" stroke="#eee" stroke-dashoffset="10"/> , ... 13.5. Stroke properties. *13.5.1. Specifying stroke paint: the stroke property. *13.5.2. Stroke paint opacity: the stroke- ...
The med works great. I was even getting tiny clots in my fingers. Like tiny peas you could slightly move around. They hurt to ... APS is an autoimmune disease that basically causes sticky blood which then causes strokes.. I had my first TIA at 17. I had the ... Stroke Message Board HealthBoards , Heart & Vascular , Stroke > So I had a TIA (Loss of vision) ... ... APS is an autoimmune disease that basically causes sticky blood which then causes strokes.. I had my first TIA at 17. I had the ...
Of great AEneas, and alike in arms:. Around the form, of Trojans and of Greeks,. Loud was the din of battle; fierce the strokes ... The stroke of death his father turnd aside.. Sarpedon from the field his comrades bore,. Weighd down and tortured by the ... Around the corpse he stalkd, this way and that,. His spear and buckler round before him held,. To all who dard approach him ... Around her son she threw her snowy arms,. And with a veil, thick-folded, wrapt him round,. From hostile spears to guard him, ...
... took a positive turn on Thursday when the Australian shot a 6-under 66 to sit two strokes off the lead after the opening round ... "Overall, its a great start," Day said. "Im excited for the rest of the week." ... Byeong Hun An took the lead with a 64 with Joaquin Niemann a stroke behind in second. Day was alone in third place. ... took a positive turn on Thursday when the Australian shot a 6-under 66 to sit two strokes off the lead after the opening round ...
... could become a target for anticoagulation in secondary stroke prevention, subgroup analysis of NAVIGATE ESUS suggests. ... "There continues to be a great need to improve stroke prevention for the roughly 20% of ischemic strokes that are classified as ... For such patients, the rate of stroke recurrence is around 5% per year, he said. ... "Great Need" to Improve Stroke Prevention in ESUS " ... Ischemic Stroke May Hint at Underlying Cancer. * Topol: US ...
She had great rounds of 69-67-65 for a wire-to-wire victory. It was the lowest 54-hole score of the Korea LPGA Tour. "I feel ... Kim made the turn at nine-under, two strokes shy of Choi. On the ninth, she hit a great approach near the hole, setting up a ... Entering the final round, Choi at eight-under was sharing the lead with Jang and Lee Jung-min. Choi had a single stroke ... With her second birdie of the day on the eighth, she started to trail behind Choi by four strokes. Collecting her back-to-back ...
... appears to be impeding their use for stroke prevention, although that fear is over ... Cardiology > Strokes Stroke Rounds: Can Antidotes Increase NOAC Use?. by Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today April ... Warfarin has a half life of several days, which creates a greater need for reversal agents, Kowey said. ... "If you could get it to 80%, youre still saving hundreds and hundreds of strokes every year," he said. "So its a big public ...
... carving in the round, and chip carving. Choose the style you prefer and learn about it in greater detail. *Whittling is an old ... Your hand position will change with almost every stroke of the blade, whether that be a knife blade, chisel, gouge, or other ... The knife leaves behind sharp, angular strokes, and the finished pieces are usually small and three-dimensional. ... Carving in the round is probably the most life-like technique. Youll use a variety of tools to create this type of carved ...
Signs of a dog stroke?. My dog had hip surgery a few yrs ago & seems to be ok. However, yesterday she was running around with ... Great Dane has developed lupus-like sores on one paw. Our adult Great Dane (male) has symptoms similar to Lupus, per recent vet ... Strokes in dogs question. Can this happen?. Out of nowhere, my dog woke up unable to walk. Took her to an animal hospital ... My dog is around 14 yrs old and has the black lining under her nose and around her mouth but lately it is losing its color and ...
It makes little sense to see a cardiologist for a heart attack and a neurologist for a stroke. They are caused by the same ... Great ideas for improving the health care system. Pitches for healthcare-focused startups and business.Write ups of original ... It is arranged around catastrophes, organ systems, and hospitals. These concepts are 100 years old. Chronic disease begins ... These patients were chosen because they have a very high risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other expensive diabetic ...
Scientists go to great lengths to defend the idea that they know what the world is like. It should come as no surprise then ... It makes little sense to see a cardiologist for a heart attack and a neurologist for a stroke. They are caused by the same ... It is arranged around catastrophes, organ systems, and hospitals. These concepts are 100 years old. Chronic disease begins ... The same biochemistry that causes accelerated aging also causes heart attack and strokes. ...
Old Toms 13-stroke margin was achieved over just 36 holes. Lowest round: 62, Branden Grace, 3rd round, 2017; a record for all ... Greatest victory margin: 13 strokes, Old Tom Morris, 1862. This remained a record for all majors until 2000, when Woods won the ... Lowest round in relation to par: −9, Paul Broadhurst, 3rd round, 1990; Rory McIlroy, 1st round, 2010. Wire-to-wire winners ( ... "All four rounds of British Open shown live on ESPN beginning in 10". ESPN. Retrieved 26 July 2016. Ourand, John; Lombardo, ...
My father-in-law has since passed away and my mother-in-law had a massive stroke, forcing her to be in round-the clock care. ... Its Great! Another tip... Even if your elderly loved one is healthy, if the elderly can use a toilet, never leave them alone ... Many elderly people suffer strokes using the bathroom or bad falls. If your loved is longer than usual, you need, You Must Stop ... One day they are communicating and walking around and as time goes on, they dont walk around so much. They sit for long ...
... may be at higher risk of heart attack and stroke. ... around 735,000 people in the US have a heart attack and around ... Heart attack risk 85% greater for people with low executive function. During follow-up, 375 heart attacks and 155 strokes ... Poor thinking skills linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke. Written by Honor Whiteman on August 6, 2015 ... greater risk of stroke than subjects with high executive function scores.. In detail, of the 1,309 subjects with low executive ...
"Hes been great. He saw the light a little bit. Hes taking it very seriously. He wants to be around for his kids, and he wants ... The condition prevents its sufferers from restful sleep and has been closely linked to strokes. ... For Wedge, the typical business day for a 7 p.m. game starts around noon. To pass time before the first pitch, Kate drove back ... Doctors told them it was a "perfect storm" of factors that led to the stroke, from cholesterol to blood pressure to stress to, ...
A strike against stroke: how to keep your brain in working order.(Cover story) by Nutrition Action Healthletter; Food/cooking ... Hemorrhagic strokes--which occur when a blood vessel in or around the brain bursts--account for 13 percent of strokes in the ... "You dont want to have the stroke and then be treated. A TIA is a great opportunity to prevent a stroke. It shouldnt be ... "Around 60 to 70 percent of clinical strokes are caused by increased blood pressure," explains Campbell. "Half of those strokes ...
"I think 7-under would be a great score around here," Leishman said. ... Leaders Jake McLeod and fellow Australian Matt Jager shot 66s had a one-stroke lead over South Korean Jae-woong Eom and ... Leishman 2 strokes behind after Round 1 of Australian PGA. 2018-11-29 10:09 ... victory on home soil got off to a strong start on Thursday with a 4-under 68 to sit two strokes behind the first round ...
... and stroke volume is influenced by blood volume. In the short-term, the greater the blood volume, the higher the cardiac output ... Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysms, and is the ... A simple view of the hemodynamics of systemic arterial pressure is based around mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure ... Fluctuations in pressure that are significantly greater than the norm are associated with greater white matter hyperintensity, ...
Heres what parents whose children experienced a pediatric stroke want you to know. ... this type of stroke actually occurs in about 1 in 4,000 babies and misdiagnosis or delay in diagnosis in children is still very ... While pediatric stroke might not be something many people are familiar with, ... While theres a great deal of awareness around adult strokes, this isnt necessarily the case for pediatric strokes. ...
Then came the turn, both for the round and in the fortunes of the two players. Coming off a third-place tie last week in the U. ... AP) - Chez Reavie was plodding along during the third round of the Travelers Championship, watching playing partner Zack Sucher ... It took just a half-hour for Sucher to go from five strokes ahead of Bradley to four strokes behind Reavie. ... it was a great day." ... He closed his round of 73 with about a 25-foot putt for birdie ...
Talk to any anesthesiologist and he/she will tell you that if you want your ego to be stroked, anesthesiology is the wrong ... Im pretty sure that anesthesia has some of the worst malpractice around, second only to OB-GYN. I vaguely remember from one of ... It also can be a bit boring and repetitive to some people (just as can any specialty; different strokes for different folks). ... He has kids and says that the great thing is that you can get into a group and work as much or as little as you want. He says ...
New trials showing large benefits of late endovascular intervention are taking the stroke world by storm. But translating the ... Its a great time to be in stroke at the moment. Twenty years ago we couldnt really do anything. Now we can save many of the ... They both showed a rate of functional independence of around 45%. Thats amazing for patients with a large stroke presenting ... for about one third to half of the burden of stroke disability as these are the patients having very large disabling strokes." ...
Johnson Wagner, Nick Taylor, Andres Romero and Joel Dahmen shot opening-round 64s. Defending champion Bryson DeChambeau ... Johnson Wagner, Nick Taylor, Andres Romero and Joel Dahmen shot opening-round 64s. Defending champion Bryson DeChambeau ... "No, I dont know if Ive ever done that to finish a round. It was great. Yeah, I would just try to keep doing what Im doing." ... Francesco Molinari, who won the Quicken Loans National two weeks ago, was among a group of players three strokes back. ...
She is a great female player. But I think Carlos would say that she needs to wait and develop her game better. Again, this is ... Her family owns a bar around the corner from my house. Shes a Delray Beach resident as am I. This analysis on her forehand is ... I always think the intention to follow through earlier on in the stroke effects what happens on contact and helps the shot flow ... Coco is a great kid. Shes just 15. What you see today on Gauffs forehand wont be the finished product. Her family owns a bar ...
  • The current analysis aimed to assess the effect of rivaroxaban 15 mg daily vs aspirin 100 mg daily on the rate of recurrent ischemic stroke in the subset of ESUS patients who had risk factors for AF or an enlarged left atrium. (medscape.com)
  • In the EMBRACE trial, a high frequency of PACs "was the strongest predictor of AF," and that has been shown to be a predictor of ischemic stroke independently of AF, Gladstone explained. (medscape.com)
  • Six months after having an ischemic stroke, a fifth of survivors aged 65 or older have trouble speaking, a third can't walk without assistance, and a quarter are in a nursing home. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Two new clinical trials - DAWN and DEFUSE 3 - showing large benefits of removing the clot with endovascular intervention in selected patients with ischemic stroke presenting after 6 hours look set to revolutionize the field, substantially expanding the pool of patients eligible for thrombectomy and allowing many more patients experiencing large strokes to achieve good outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • Bottom Line: A typical stroke, called an ischemic stroke, is basically a heart attack in the brain. (pritikin.com)
  • A study of Nationwide Implementation of Mechanical Thrombectomy in Germany will be presented by Dr. Christian Weimar (8:35 am, Hall H). The study found that a wide range of both IVT and MT rates in German ischemic stroke patients indicates the need for further improvement of access to acute recanalization therapies in many, mainly rural, regions. (news-medical.net)
  • One of four survivors of strokes has another one within five years. (pritikin.com)
  • In a novel collaboration between researchers at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Maryland Health Care System and the Howard County Department of Aging, Veterans and members of the community are benefiting from a VA-funded research project focused on chronic stroke survivors. (prweb.com)
  • It aims to work with chronic stroke survivors at community gyms on exercise training in an effort to improve gait and balance, cardiovascular health, and decrease the risk for falls. (prweb.com)
  • It also addresses depression and social isolation suffered by chronic stroke survivors, and seeks to improve the survivor's overall physical health. (prweb.com)
  • Two-thirds of stroke survivors are left with persistent neurological deficits, chiefly the hemiparetic gait that limits mobility and increases the risk of falls. (prweb.com)
  • Despite the potential health benefits to chronic stroke survivors offered by increased exercise, there is limited experience translating this research into community-based exercise alternatives adapted specifically for the needs of stroke survivors. (prweb.com)
  • There are no reasons that chronic stroke survivors can't exercise for fun and all around physical health," Stuart said. (prweb.com)
  • The study addresses social isolation and depression that plagues chronic stroke survivors because participants attend three, hour-long sessions per week, which help to foster social interaction that can lift depression. (prweb.com)
  • VA researchers want to explore if fitness exercise activities specifically adapted to the needs of stroke survivors and that takes place in a community setting (rather than in a hospital or rehabilitation center) provide the optimal management strategy to prevent the progression and disability that chronic stroke survivors currently undergo. (prweb.com)
  • Congress is attended by stroke professionals, researchers, policy makers, survivors and caregivers from around the world. (news-medical.net)
  • This analysis of more than 26,000 young stroke survivors using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) showed that, although absolute rates of adverse events including recurrent stroke, heart attack, death and institutionalization were low among young clinically stable stroke patients, these patients still showed 7 times the risk of having an adverse complication one year after their initial stroke compared to only twice the risk among older patients. (news-medical.net)
  • People with heart disease, stroke survivors, caregivers and others who may face increased health risks during the COVID-19 pandemic can rely on our science-based information. (heart.org)
  • It is generally accepted that about 60% of patients who should be on oral anticoagulation actually are, a figure that has not changed much with the addition of the NOACs -- dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis) -- to warfarin as options for preventing stroke, according to Peter Kowey, MD , a cardiologist at Main Line Health and the Lankenau Heart Institute. (medpagetoday.com)
  • It makes little sense to see a cardiologist for a heart attack and a neurologist for a stroke. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Dr. John Fontaine, professor of medicine in the Cardiology Division at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, once knew a fellow cardiologist who suffered a stroke. (bms.com)
  • Ironically, that cardiologist turned out to have a previously undetected heart condition that he may have helped manage in other patients: atrial fibrillation (AFib), a type of heart arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) that increases the risk of stroke. (bms.com)
  • Jason Day's attempt to impress International team captain Ernie Els for a spot at the Presidents Cup took a positive turn on Thursday when the Australian shot a 6-under 66 to sit two strokes off the lead after the opening round of the CJ Cup at Nine Bridges. (tsn.ca)
  • In the first event of a three-tournament PGA Tour swing through Asia, Byeong Hun An took the lead with a 64 with Joaquin Niemann a stroke behind in second. (tsn.ca)
  • Entering the final round, Choi at eight-under was sharing the lead with Jang and Lee Jung-min. (koreatimes.co.kr)
  • Leaders Jake McLeod and fellow Australian Matt Jager shot 66s had a one-stroke lead over South Korean Jae-woong Eom and Dimitrios Papadatos. (sport24.co.za)
  • CROMWELL, Conn. (AP) - Chez Reavie was plodding along during the third round of the Travelers Championship, watching playing partner Zack Sucher extend his lead. (wlns.com)
  • He took advantage of Sucher's problems and turned a six-stroke deficit into a six-stroke lead heading into Sunday. (wlns.com)
  • Romo lead by five strokes heading into the final round, which was contested at Meadowbrook Country Club, Romo's home course (haters will be keen to point to this fact). (golfwrx.com)
  • What many people do not realize is that the same lifestyle risks that lead to heart attacks also lead to strokes. (pritikin.com)
  • AFib can present as anything from occasional shortness of breath to dizziness to heart palpitations (though in some cases, patients can also be asymptomatic), and can lead to blood clots, strokes, and more. (bms.com)
  • This study shows us that even young stroke and TIA patients who are clinically stable after their stroke remain at a significant risk of adverse events, like another stroke, death or requiring long- term care,' said lead study author Dr. Jodi Edwards of the Brain and Heart Nexus Research Program at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. (news-medical.net)
  • Tuten made four birdie putts ranging from 25 to 60 feet for a 66 and a one-stroke lead over Verplank after the first round. (niagara-gazette.com)
  • The findings, he said, "support the atrial myopathy hypothesis that suggests that some embolic strokes of unknown cause may arise from atrial embolism from an enlarged or dysfunctional left atrium, in the absence of atrial fibrillation [AF]. (medscape.com)
  • Dr. David Gladstone of the University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Research Institute will present the results of a study evaluating the use of the drug rivaroxaban versus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) to prevent strokes in patients with an enlarged left atrium of the heart. (news-medical.net)
  • Choi had a single stroke advantage over Kim Hyo-joo and two others. (koreatimes.co.kr)
  • The Atkinson-cycle engine is a type of single stroke internal combustion engine invented by James Atkinson in 1882. (wikipedia.org)
  • While I have mentioned the shaft many times in this piece, that really is just one part of the penis and it's important to remember that other areas can be just as, if not more, enjoyable, than just stroking the shaft. (adultmatchmaker.com.au)
  • The head of the penis, and the frenulum (the seam bit that attaches the shaft to the head) are usually the most sensitive part, so making sure you don't ignore them is a huge part of giving a great hand-job. (adultmatchmaker.com.au)
  • Having one hand stroking the shaft and the other tickling the head or the balls is a fantastic way to change up the sensations all at the same time. (adultmatchmaker.com.au)
  • Subjects were then placed in one of three groups depending on whether they received "low," "medium" or "high" scores on the tests, and they were monitored for incidence of stroke or heart attack over the following 3 years. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Kowey said the situation is unique in that a group of agents -- the antidotes -- that would be used in relatively few patients could have a very big public health impact if their introduction broke down the walls standing in the way of greater adoption the NOACs. (medpagetoday.com)
  • DAWN was conducted in what might be considered the ideal patients - those with a very small infarct core and a high stroke severity," he said. (medscape.com)
  • DAWN was also stricter in stroke severity scores, with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 10 or more, "whereas we stipulated 6 or more. (medscape.com)
  • But Wheatcroft caught fire on the back nine, finishing with six straight birdies - including a 13-foot putt on the par-4 18th - for just his third round in the 60s this season. (fosters.com)
  • I asked if we could just go to the first tee and start round two," Wheatcroft said. (fosters.com)
  • I visited my GP the next day, although she was incredibly negligent (long story) and after phoning the Australian stroke foundation they suggested that I check myself into emergency. (healthboards.com)
  • Gold Coast - Marc Leishman's quest for a first professional victory on home soil got off to a strong start on Thursday with a 4-under 68 to sit two strokes behind the first round Australian PGA Championships leaders. (sport24.co.za)
  • It can help to be on the lookout for delays , which may make you aware of stroke and other conditions that may be helped with earlier diagnosis. (healthline.com)
  • Wedge was quickly taken off to Harborview via ambulance, where doctors eventually determined he had suffered a mild stroke . (seattletimes.com)
  • Even in relatively mild winters, there are around 8,000 extra deaths for every one degree drop in average temperature. (ageuk.org.uk)
  • Been struggling with the putter a little bit, but (I) got a good mental note from the morning warmup (Thursday) and rolled it great," said Kim, who holed three putts of at least 20 feet, including a 41-footer on No. 18. (fosters.com)
  • Reavie needed just 23 putts in the round, consistently putting his approaches near the pin, despite a strong wind. (wlns.com)
  • Niagara Falls Country Club champion Fred Silver watches a shot during the final round of the 1983 Porter Cup. (niagara-gazette.com)
  • But making a brush today worthy of that heritage requires generations of skill, an understanding of which hairs provide the greatest expressive control, an uncompromising eye in selecting the finest raw materials, and the experience that shows that - while some things can be better achieved with machines and technology - there are some that can still be done only with the human hand and eye. (jerrysartarama.com)
  • Is there enough capacity within the 'belly' of the brush to lay down flowing, gestural strokes of colour? (jerrysartarama.com)
  • Defending champion Cameron Smith shot 70, as did England's Andrew "Beef" Johnston, who recovered from being 3-over after three holes and had to be talked out of quitting his round. (sport24.co.za)
  • Other than those three holes, it was a great day. (wlns.com)
  • In 1892 the event was doubled in length from 36 to 72 holes, four rounds of what was by then the standard complement of 18 holes. (wikipedia.org)
  • She didn't notice her cell phone was blowing up around 4 o'clock, until she finally spied a missed call from Mariners pitching coach Carl Willis, one of Eric's closest friends. (seattletimes.com)
  • The FDA's approval is for three hours, but our national guidelines allow us to go out to 4 1/2 hours in selected patients," says Larry Goldstein, director of the Stroke Center at Duke University Medical Center in North Carolina. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Until recently, endovascular removal of the clot in stroke patients was recommended only for those with a large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation in whom the procedure could be performed within 6 hours of symptom onset. (medscape.com)
  • That's amazing for patients with a large stroke presenting after 6 hours. (medscape.com)
  • It will mean great benefits for patients, but big questions remain on how it is going to be delivered. (medscape.com)
  • Both trials aimed to include patients with a "target mismatch," that is, a large area of brain tissue threatened by the stroke (the penumbra) but with only a small area that has actually died (the infarct core) at the time of presentation, but they had different entry criteria. (medscape.com)
  • A Canadian study by senior author Dr. Richard Swartz and his team sought to determine what the future might hold for these young patients who show no early complications from their initial stroke. (news-medical.net)
  • Your support is urgently needed to raise $5 million and help protect our most vulnerable heart and stroke patients. (heart.org)
  • It is "a clinical scale that is predictive of AF in a cryptogenic stroke population," said Gladstone. (medscape.com)
  • The collaboration with the Howard County Department of Aging seeks to test the study's long-term objective of disseminating a U.S. model by developing a network of accessible community exercise programs for Veterans with chronic stroke that can help them better reintegrate into the social mainstream. (prweb.com)
  • If you listen to stereotypical "jokes" about men and sex you may be under the impression that "hey, as long as they touch it the job's almost done" but, in the great scheme of things that's not only absolutely untrue, it's also completely insulting to the penis owners of this world. (adultmatchmaker.com.au)
  • When you intend to hit a shot and you don't hit it it's one stroke, that's the way it goes. (sport24.co.za)
  • I always think the intention to follow through earlier on in the stroke effects what happens on contact and helps the shot flow. (tennisplayer.net)
  • The "Adaptive Physical Activity for Chronic Stroke Study" that is now being conducted in partnership between the VA Maryland Health Care System and the Howard County Department of Aging has three main goals. (prweb.com)
  • Macko, who worked in collaboration with the Italian Health Authority to develop the study's first round that took place in Florence, Italy, further developed the model to include treadmill work to test short-term objectives. (prweb.com)
  • This reiteration of the study, which took place at the Baltimore VA Medical Center, a division of the VA Maryland Health Care System, was conducted to test if the exercise model would demonstrate greater improvements in walking speed, free ambulatory profiles and quality of life. (prweb.com)
  • Your donation will help us continue our lifesaving work in your community and around the world, including research into COVID-19's impact on heart and brain health. (heart.org)