Transposition of Great Vessels: A congenital cardiovascular malformation in which the AORTA arises entirely from the RIGHT VENTRICLE, and the PULMONARY ARTERY arises from the LEFT VENTRICLE. Consequently, the pulmonary and the systemic circulations are parallel and not sequential, so that the venous return from the peripheral circulation is re-circulated by the right ventricle via aorta to the systemic circulation without being oxygenated in the lungs. This is a potentially lethal form of heart disease in newborns and infants.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Venae Cavae: The inferior and superior venae cavae.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Echocardiography, Four-Dimensional: Dynamic three-dimensional echocardiography using the added dimension of time to impart the cinematic perception of motion. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Ebstein Anomaly: A congenital heart defect characterized by downward or apical displacement of the TRICUSPID VALVE, usually with the septal and posterior leaflets being attached to the wall of the RIGHT VENTRICLE. It is characterized by a huge RIGHT ATRIUM and a small and less effective right ventricle.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Branchial Region: A region, of SOMITE development period, that contains a number of paired arches, each with a mesodermal core lined by ectoderm and endoderm on the two sides. In lower aquatic vertebrates, branchial arches develop into GILLS. In higher vertebrates, the arches forms outpouchings and develop into structures of the head and neck. Separating the arches are the branchial clefts or grooves.Situs Inversus: A congenital abnormality in which organs in the THORAX and the ABDOMEN are opposite to their normal positions (situs solitus) due to lateral transposition. Normally the STOMACH and SPLEEN are on the left, LIVER on the right, the three-lobed right lung is on the right, and the two-lobed left lung on the left. Situs inversus has a familial pattern and has been associated with a number of genes related to microtubule-associated proteins.Vascular Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Heart Septal Defects: Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Ductus Arteriosus: A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Arterio-Arterial Fistula: Abnormal communication between two ARTERIES that may result from injury or occur as a congenital abnormality.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.Arterioles: The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A: The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.Lymphangiogenesis: The formation of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Venules: The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.Pericytes: Unique slender cells with multiple processes extending along the capillary vessel axis and encircling the vascular wall, also called mural cells. Pericytes are imbedded in the BASEMENT MEMBRANE shared with the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessel. Pericytes are important in maintaining vessel integrity, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Retinal Artery: Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Antigens, CD31: Cell adhesion molecules present on virtually all monocytes, platelets, and granulocytes. CD31 is highly expressed on endothelial cells and concentrated at the junctions between them.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Retinal Vein: Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Corrosion Casting: A tissue preparation technique that involves the injecting of plastic (acrylates) into blood vessels or other hollow viscera and treating the tissue with a caustic substance. This results in a negative copy or a solid replica of the enclosed space of the tissue that is ready for viewing under a scanning electron microscope.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Endothelium, Lymphatic: Unbroken cellular lining (intima) of the lymph vessels (e.g., the high endothelial lymphatic venules). It is more permeable than vascular endothelium, lacking selective absorption and functioning mainly to remove plasma proteins that have filtered through the capillaries into the tissue spaces.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Mice, Inbred C57BLRabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3: A vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor whose expression is restricted primarily to adult lymphatic endothelium. VEGFR-3 preferentially binds the vascular endothelial growth factor C and vascular endothelial growth factor D and may be involved in the control of lymphangiogenesis.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
for transposition of great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular defect ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Notice how the back of the patient's left atrium and great vessels are left in place. ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ...
for transposition of great vessels Jatene procedure. Mustard procedure. for univentricular defect Norwood procedure. Kawashima ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... shunt from heart chamber to blood vessel. atrium to pulmonary artery Fontan procedure. left ventricle to aorta Rastelli ...
conditions affect the great vessels or other vessels in close proximity to the heart, but not the heart itself, but are often ... Transposition of the great vessels *dextro-Transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) ... A failure may result in some blood flowing into the wrong vessel (e.g.overriding aorta). The four-chambered heart and the great ... It is also involved in the development of the ventricular wall and the connection of the outflow tract to the great vessels. ...
for transposition of great vessels Jatene procedure. Mustard procedure. for univentricular defect Norwood procedure. Kawashima ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Surgery in great vessels (aortic coarctation repair, Blalock-Taussig shunt creation, closure of patent ductus arteriosus) ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ...
for transposition of great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular defect ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... shunt from heart chamber to blood vessel. atrium to pulmonary artery Fontan procedure. left ventricle to aorta Rastelli ...
for transposition of great vessels Jatene procedure. Mustard procedure. for univentricular defect Norwood procedure. Kawashima ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) can produce 3D and 4D images of blood vessels and the flow of blood through the vessels. ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ...
for transposition of great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular defect ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... dextro-Transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA), or overriding aorta, or double outlet right ventricle (DORV); and ...
Surgery of the organs of the thoracic cavity: the heart, lungs, and great vessels. ... The operation of heart and major blood vessels of the chest. Clinical laboratory sciences Diagnostic *Transfusion medicine is ... Some of this article's listed sources may not be reliable. Please help this article by looking for better, more reliable ... The peripheral blood vessels - those outside the chest (usually operated on by cardiovascular surgeons) and outside the central ...
The defect is called transposition of the great vessels, or transposition of the great arteries (TGV or TGA). Until the late ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... for transposition of the great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular ... The Mustard Procedure allows total correction of transposition of the great vessels. The procedure employs a baffle to redirect ...
for transposition of the great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... Zimmerman, Leo M.; Veith, Ilza (1993). Great Ideas in the History of Surgery. Norman Publishing. pp. 82-83. ISBN 978-0-930405- ...
for transposition of the great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... Nursing homes, Denmark, best case, 30 days (witnessed, bystander CPR, AED before hospital). 8%. 23%. 0.3. 135. 2001-14[64] ...
Without blood vessel wall invasion there is a better prognosis.[11] Dogs with noninvasive adenocarcinomas have an average ... The tumors can be large and occur anywhere on the trunk.[28] There is a good prognosis with surgery.[29] Spayed rats have a ... A recent study showed a better prognosis in dogs that are spayed at the time of surgery or that had been recently spayed.[12] ... There is a better prognosis with bilateral radical surgery (removing both mammary chains) than with more conservative surgery.[ ...
"Great Lakes Vessel History: Windsolite". Great Lake Vessel History. Retrieved 6 September 2013. James Edward Blake Graham (2005 ... Her service was on the North American Great Lakes. She was operated by Imperial Oil. In his memoirs Sow's Ear to Silk Purse ... According to Graham the vessel required a crew of approximately thirty seamen to staff two watches. He wrote that the crew ... After she was sold in 1973, while traveling light in the Pelee passage, the vessel, which had recently been renamed Cardinal ...
"Great Lakes Fleet Page Vessel Feature - Baie St. Paul". Boatnerd.com. Archived from the original on 2 May 2013. Retrieved 23 ... Paul and her sister vessels represent the beginning of a new era for CSL and for bulk shipping in the Great Lakes," said Louis ... CSL asserted that the new vessels would be more efficient than existing vessels, and would leave less pollution. CSL operated ... The vessel is 225.5 metres (739 ft 10 in) long overall with a beam of 23.76 metres (77 ft 11 in). The ship has a depth of 14.75 ...
"Mather, William G. 1". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 8 January 2018. ... The SS William G. Mather was a 533-foot (162 m) long Great Lakes freighter that was built in 1905, by the Great Lakes ... She is notable for being the first Great Lakes freighter with a 60-foot (18 m) beam. She entered service in January, 1905. In ... Steamship William G. Mather Maritime Museum Great Lakes Engineering Works "SS William G. Mather". Travel Sygic. Retrieved 22 ...
"Sylvania". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 4 January 2018. "Sylvania". Bowling State Green University. Retrieved 20 ... Great Lakes freighter that had a long 78-year career on the Great Lakes. Sylvania was built by the West Bay City Ship Building ...
The Hackett is recognized as the first Great Lakes freighter, a vessel type that has dominated Great Lakes shipping for over ... Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Jon Paul Van Harpen. "The First Bulk Freighter on the Great Lakes". ... The Hackett's design combined the best aspects of steam and sailing ships into a new class of vessel. The R. J. Hackett was ... For this vessel, Peck took on an investing partner, Captain Robert J. Hackett of Detroit. They designed and built the R. J. ...
"Stone, Amasa". Great Lakes Vessel History. "Historical Perspectives-Amasa Stone". BoatNerd.com. ... The Amasa Stone was a 545 ft (166 m) Great Lakes freighter that was sunk as a breakwater in 1965, Charlevoix, Michigan. She was ...
"Jones, B.F. 1". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 28 January 2018. "America". Bowling State Green University. Retrieved 28 ... "AMERICA; 1897; Tug (Towboat); US107302". Great Lakes Maritime Database. Retrieved 28 January 2018. "Shipwrecks on the Great ... The B.F. Jones was a steel hulled Great Lakes freighter that was named after one of the founders of the Jones and Laughlin ... On October 26, 1924 the Jones rammed the steamer E.A.S. Clarke in heavy fog in the Detroit River near the Great Lakes ...
The Morgan played an important role in Great Lakes shipping industry, because she was the first 600-foot vessel on the lakes. ... "Morgan, J. Pierpont". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 11 January 2018. ... The J. Pierpont Morgan was a 601-foot (183 m) long American steel hulled propeller driven Great Lakes freighter that was a ... She was primarily used to haul bulk cargoes across the Great Lakes of Canada and North America. She was the first of three ...
"Lafayette". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 7 January 2018. "LAFAYETTE". Bowling State Green University. Retrieved 7 ... Lafayette was a 454-foot (138 m) long Great Lakes bulk freighter that broke in two in the Mataafa Storm of 1905 near Encampment ... She was part of the "College Line" of ships; a group of five completely identical vessels named after the colleges attended by ...
That is when she acquired the name she was best known by -- Dalwarnic. The vessel was designed with her bridge amidships, not ... "Dalwarnic". Great Lakes Vessel History. Retrieved 2015-08-17. Skip Gillham (April 2015). "Shipwreck: Nisbet Grammer" (PDF). ... The vessel went down fifteen minutes after a collision with the Dalwarnic of the Canadian National Railway Line. "Dalwarnic ( ... The academic site Maritime History of the Great Lakes collection has an old, faded, newspaper clipping, that asserts she was ...
"The Great Lakes Vessel Extracts". Maritime History of the Great Lakes. Retrieved August 18, 2007. "Remember the Whaleback ... At 362 feet (110 m), the ship was the longest whaleback ever built, and reportedly also the largest vessel on the Great Lakes ... Columbus is said to have carried more passengers during her career than any other vessel on the Great Lakes. After a career ... "Christopher Columbus page of Vessel Index". Historical Collections of the Great Lakes. Bowling Green State University. ...
And what is the great vessel? The great vessel, doubtless, is this world. Who was the smooth one? The smooth one, doubtless, ... to better crops. For example, May my rice plants and my barley, and my beans and my sesame, and my kidney-beans and my vetches ...
MV Roger Blough, an iron ore bulk carrier vessel built for U.S. Steel in 1968-72 and used starting in 1972 in Great Lakes ... "Great Lakes Fleet Page Vessel Feature". Boatnerd.com. Retrieved 2012-07-24. "Roger Blough Arrived Duluth 04/02/2016". ... As of 2016 this vessel remained in service. List of people on the cover of Time magazine (1950s) - 20 July 1959 Cuff, Daniel F ... In this position, he is best known for serving as the American steel industry's principal spokesman when the industry clashed ...
SHEPPARD, Suzanne (January 30, 2005). "Vessel good for 25 more years". Trinidad and Tobago Newsday. Archived from the original ... Seawind Crown Sonia Sun Fiesta The Big Red Boat II FleetPro's fleet consists of mid- to small-size passenger vessels: Bahamas ... ISP helped bring the vessel out of layup in 2010, to be used in providing accommodations for World Food Programme staff engaged ... in relief efforts in earthquake-stricken Haiti Warrior Spirit FleetPro also operate over forty inland waterways cruise vessels ...
... the vessel was rechristened the T/V Kings Pointer, the fifth vessel of the academy to carry that name. The rechristening ... Be of good moral character.. *Be at least 17 years of age and must not have passed his or her 25th birthday before July 1 in ... research vessels, and other types of vessels.[citation needed] ... "USMMA Rechristens Training Vessel Kings Pointer".. *^ "Maybe We ... In 1992, the academy acquired its largest campus-based training vessel, the T/V Kings Pointer. After 20 years at the academy, ...
"great trading vessels"). This probably included most of the remaining treasure ships according to Dreyer (2007). The treasure ... He placed great trust in Zheng He, even giving him blank scrolls with the imperial seal so the admiral could issue imperial ... So that at this day there is great memory of them . . . in the kingdom of Calicut, where be so many trees and fruits . . . were ... Fei Xin described Calicut as the "great harbor" of the Western Ocean countries. Fei Xin wrote that the people of Mogadishu were ...
Using a rib retractor, the sternum was fully elevated providing excellent exposure to the heart, lungs, great vessels, and both ... Survival was best for those with pericardial and coronary vessel wounds and dropped to 46% for those with left ventricular ... Survival was 87% among 54 patients with great vessel wounds. Life salvage in 726 (36%) patients was documented to result from ... In contrast, computed tomography (CT) scanning was better able to identify both the number of projectiles and their location. ...
Congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels: a case of very late presentation at old age and survival till 9th ...
Pregnancy Outcomes After Atrial Repair for Transposition of the Great Arteries. Mary M. Canobbio, Cynthia D. Morris, Thomas P. ... Pregnancy Outcomes After Atrial Repair for Transposition of the Great Arteries. / Canobbio, Mary M.; Morris, Cynthia D.; Graham ... Pregnancy Outcomes After Atrial Repair for Transposition of the Great Arteries. American Journal of Cardiology. 2006 Sep 1;98(5 ... This study reports on pregnancy outcomes after the atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries. Record review and ...
Transposition of the great vessels.. Investigations. *CXR: may be normal or demonstrate cardiomegaly, decreased pulmonary ... with good survival and excellent functional status.[4]. In patients over 50 years of age with Ebsteins anomaly, surgery is ... Making life better. Patient aims to help the world proactively manage its healthcare, supplying evidence-based information on a ... People who survive into adulthood usually have milder forms of the anomaly with a better prognosis. Fewer than 5% of patients ...
Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is a group of congenital heart defects involving an abnormal spatial arrangement of ... On chest X-ray, transposition of the great vessels typically shows a cardio-mediastinal silhouette appearing as an "egg on a ... Echocardiogram in transposition of the great arteries. This subcostal view shows the left ventricle giving rise to a vessel ... X-ray showing characteristic finding in case of Transposition of the great vessels which is called egg on side sign ...
Transposition of the great vessels is a congenital heart defect in which the position of the two major vessels that carry blood ... Transposition of the great vessels is a congenital heart defect in which the position of the two major vessels that carry blood ...
Transposition of the Great Vessels. Pathophysiologic Considerations Based upon a Study of the Lungs. CHARLOTTE FERENCZ ... A microscopic study of the lungs of 106 patients with transposition of the great vessels has revealed early and severe ... when the circulatory characteristics of a single ventricle are reached in which the anatomic position of the great vessels ... malignant nature of the hypertensive alterations in the pulmonary arteries of patients with transposition of the great vessels ...
3D Printers Are Getting Better At Printing Blood Vessels. 09.14.2012. LifeLeave a Comment ... Previous efforts in building blood vessels took a long time as the device first had to print out a sugar-based cast and the ... Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have been playing around with the idea of printing blood vessels with 3D ... The speed at which DOPsL can create blood vessels is a major improvement upon any other medical technology. For now, the ...
Q: My fathers doctor wants him to have an ultrasound of his carotid artery. What is the carotid artery? What will the doctor be looking for?
... great vessel explanation free. What is great vessel? Meaning of great vessel medical term. What does great vessel mean? ... Looking for online definition of great vessel in the Medical Dictionary? ... Great vessel , definition of great vessel by Medical dictionary https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/great+vessel ... great vessel. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia. great vessel. one of the large arteries and ...
Defining best practice for thoracic aortic disease Gavin J Murphy, Mark Field, Aung Oo ...
... have found a novel way to normalize the dysfunctional blood vessels that are typical for tumors. Those vessels play a pivotal ... By manipulating blood vessel cells sugar metabolism, the scientists were able to cool down their overheated engines and ... create a healthy and structured blood vessel network. ... Restoring flawed tumor vessels could lead to better cancer ... Great clinical importance Apart from reducing the chances of cancer cells spreading throughout the body, a future vessel ...
All Photos/bath/floors : light hardwood/sinks : vessel. 6 Bathroom Light Hardwood Floors Vessel Sinks Design Photos And Ideas. ...
Mediastinum and great vessels. To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that ... Mediastinum and Great Vessels. These lectures discus the Mediastinum. Recall the mediastinum is that region of the chest cavity ... We hope these videos will help you better understand the human form, make time that you may have in the laboratory more ... Learning the form of people is of great interest to us - physicians, nurses, physician assistants, emergency medical services ...
... enabling blood vessels to be ,a href=http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2011/august/gurtner.html,reconnected without puncturing them ... New Phase-Changing Gel Method Repairs Severed Blood Vessels Better than Stitches ... or the inner part of the vessel, so the blood can flow through. Gluing a vessel together instead would require keeping the ... Then they used an existing bioadhesive to glue the blood vessels back together, a Stanford news release explains. The work was ...
... would I use Procedure code 33322 Suture repair of aorta or great vessels w/ cardiopulmonary bypass, only... ... When I am billing for more than one vessel repair, ... For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your ... When I am billing for more than one vessel repair, would I use Procedure code 33322 Suture repair of aorta or great vessels w/ ...
Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is a form of congenital heart disease, in which the aorta arises from the right ...
"Its great to be back - I see some tremendous opportunities for the discipline and I hope to consolidate our strengths and ... these tracers would bind to certain areas of the body then show up on a scanner to detect anomalies in blood vessels which may ... could help block the formation of new blood vessels, which is important in cancer medicine, and could also help reduce cell ... an essential molecule which controls blood vessel function, growth and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients across organs and ...
A biopsy of the affected tissue shows inflammation and granulomas (giant cells) around blood vessels. A blood test, ANCA, ... We don t really understand why the body attacks the cells around blood vessels. ...
... ... Less well known is that β-amyloid deposits are also found in small blood vessels of the brain, the condition known as CAA, ... Transgenic rats mimic many of the characteristics of human pathology, including amyloid deposits in small blood vessels in the ... "The transgenic rats, known as rTg-DI, develop progressive accumulation of brain blood vessel amyloid-associated inflammation, ...
Great vessels are the large vessels that bring blood to and from the heart. These are: Superior vena cava Inferior vena cava ... the great vessels is a group of congenital heart defects involving an abnormal spatial arrangement of any of the great vessels. ...
Building Better Blood Vessels. Permalink No Comments Yet Add a Comment Posted by Reason ... Literally, its as easy as a simple injection and over a few days, they spontaneously form new vessels and the animals own ... Today, biomedical researchers are taking two main approaches to growing new capillaries, the smallest blood vessels and those ... One group of researchers is developing drug compounds that would signal existing vessels to branch into new tributaries. These ...
2006;23:270-8. This reference provides an excellent description of the changing role of IR in trauma CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Endovascular repair of vessel injuries and embolization of solid organ injuries have continued to evolve into first line ... 2012;29(2):147-9. Excellent overview of splenic embolization CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Ramirez J, Velmajos GC, Best CR, Chan LS, Demetriades D. Male sexual function after bilateral internal iliac artery ...
A congenital vascular abnormality that affects the great vessels and/or aortic arch. Representative examples include double ... Great Vessels Abnormality. Known as: Great Vessel Abnormality A congenital vascular abnormality that affects the great vessels ... Congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels (CTGV) is a rare congenital cardiac and great vessel abnormality. The ... The absence of one of the pulmonary artery with associated hypoplasia of lung and great vessel abnormality is a rare finding. ...
... the major blood vessels attached to the heart-the aorta and the pulmonary artery-are reversed. This reversal results in the ... In transposition of the great vessels, the major blood vessels attached to the heart-the aorta and the pulmonary artery-are ... There are several types of transposition of the great vessels. Each has slightly different placement of the vessels and ... Certain other heart defects must be present to allow a child with transposition of the great vessels to live. Other defects ...
  • Cardiovascular stents are special implants used to widen blood vessels that have become constricted as a result of calcium deposits. (mpo-mag.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of MRI and CT assessment of great vessel stents in an in vitro model.MATERIALS AND METHODS. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Defined MRI sequences are feasible to assess nitinol, platinum-iridium, and stainless steel great vessel stents with diagnostic performance comparable with CT. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Our study suggests that blood vessels adapt during the aging process to regulate ROS and minimize cell death when subjected to an abrupt increase in oxidative stress. (reliawire.com)
  • A biopsy of the affected tissue shows inflammation and granulomas (giant cells) around blood vessels. (dispatch.com)
  • One of the major hurdles in tissue engineering is populating tissue with blood vessels sufficient to support it. (fightaging.org)
  • When it comes to building tissue from scratch, researchers are still working on techniques to create the necessary blood vessel networks. (fightaging.org)
  • A notable exception is endothelin-1 antagonists that reduce excessive pressure and tissue buildup inside the blood vessels of patients with pulmonary hypertension. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The great vessel space is the fourth retroperitoneal space along with the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces , and the perirenal space 1,2 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Unlike other retroperitoneal spaces, it is not well-defined by fascial planes and thus disease processes affecting other retroperitoneal spaces can also affect the great vessel space 4 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • We also hope to develop similar molecules that act as tracers - these tracers would bind to certain areas of the body then show up on a scanner to detect anomalies in blood vessels which may signal a more serious condition such as cancer," he said. (healthcanal.com)
  • The pulsation of great vessels may lead to misdiagnosis about the exact location of these types of congenital anomalies. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • They detail surgical approaches to the heart, the normal surgical anatomy of the cardiac chambers, the valves and systems for circulation and conduction within the heart, congenitally malformed hearts, lesions, abnormalities of the great vessels , and positional abnormalities of the heart. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Surgical Treatment for Abnormalities of the Heart and Great Vessels. (annals.org)
  • 0.05) associations between (i) valproate exposure and spina bifida, malformations of the heart and great vessels, digits, skull bones, and brain, but not hypospadias, cleft palate/lip and mouth abnormalities, (ii) topiramate exposure and hypospadias and brain maldevelopments, and (iii) carbamazepine (CBZ) exposure and renal tract abnormalities. (wiley.com)
  • The effects may range from a change in blood pressure to an interruption in circulation , depending on the nature and degree of the misplacement and which vessels are involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors of View7, Torres Strait Islander and classical overdots are adjusted that this download Vascular Embolotherapy A Comprehensive ApproachVolume 1 General Principles, Chest, Abdomen, and Great is sales and skills of electromagnetic symptoms. (gwr3pca.org)
  • One of the first major medical uses for 3D printers came around a few months ago when researchers discovered that they could print working blood vessels . (webpronews.com)
  • Researchers led by Peter Carmeliet (VIB-KU Leuven) have found a novel way to normalize the dysfunctional blood vessels that are typical for tumors. (eurekalert.org)
  • One of the major obstacles to growing new organs - replacement hearts, lungs and kidneys - is the difficulty researchers face in building blood vessels that keep the tissues alive. (fightaging.org)
  • Today, biomedical researchers are taking two main approaches to growing new capillaries , the smallest blood vessels and those responsible for exchanging oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients between blood and muscles or organs. (fightaging.org)
  • One group of researchers is developing drug compounds that would signal existing vessels to branch into new tributaries. (fightaging.org)
  • For the first time in decades, researchers have identified a new 'micro-organ' within the immune system - and they say it's an important step towards understanding how to make better vaccines. (news-medical.net)
  • For the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study. (news-medical.net)
  • Professor Mangoni, who returns to Flinders after three years at the University of Aberdeen, will continue to work collaboratively with his former workplace to test drugs developed by one of his PhD students to regulate the way the body handles nitric oxide - an essential molecule which controls blood vessel function, growth and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients across organs and tissues. (healthcanal.com)
  • My main research focus here at Flinders is to drive the development of new drugs to regulate nitric oxide, which is a very important molecule that modulates the tone and the growth of blood vessels," Professor Mangoni said. (healthcanal.com)
  • Endothelin-1 receptors are known to interact: one way blood vessels keep a healthy tone, for example, is that a and b receptors on smooth muscle cells prompt constriction while b receptors on the lining of blood vessels work with nitric oxide to promote relaxation. (rxpgnews.com)
  • In this case, as in that of aneurismal and other tumours which give rise to pulsation, there are two distinct seats of systolic impulse, which correspond respectively with the apex of the heart and the pulsation produced by the vessel or the tumour. (google.pt)
  • What's more, it's difficult to suture blood vessels less than 1 millimeter wide, the Stanford team said. (popsci.com)
  • Other defects ultimately compensate for the transposition of the great vessels by allowing oxygen-rich blood to mix with oxygen-poor blood so that some oxygen can get to the tissues of the body. (wellspan.org)
  • But even the most tailored artificial blood vessels often have to be removed once new cells and tissues grow. (umd.edu)
  • This facilitates the movement of antibodies and white blood cells into infected tissues, which is normally a good thing, but too much leakage causes excessive amounts of water and proteins to leave the circulation and enter the tissues. (mednorthwest.com)
  • Pedicle anastomosis to vessel branches has excellent result. (wjps.ir)
  • In some situations which there is a possibility of flap failure like shortage of vessel branches, possibility of pedicle kinking or need to vein graft, anastomosis to great vessels is justified. (wjps.ir)
  • Khoshnevis J, Dashti T, Ebrahimi M, Azargashb E, kalantarmotamedi M. Anastomosis of Free Flap Pedicle to Great Vessels. (wjps.ir)
  • Stenosis , or other defects, of valves and/or vessels may also be present. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain other heart defects must be present to allow a child with transposition of the great vessels to live. (wellspan.org)
  • Great care should be made to determine the complete cardiac anatomy of the patient, as there is considerable variation in the associated defects seen with TGV, all of which are important factors in deciding on the proper treatment strategy. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The dose that best protected against heart defects in mice was considerably higher than the current dietary recommendation of 400 micrograms (0.4 milligrams) daily for women of child-bearing age.hile more research is needed, the study has implications for re-evaluating folate supplementation levels during early pregnancy, said principal investigator Dr. Kersti Linask. (medindia.net)
  • Choosing great vessels as one side of anastomosis is safe and can be done as a primary approach due to technical demand or as a final resort when there is shortage of side branches. (wjps.ir)
  • BACKGROUND The management of penetrating great vessel (PGV) injury is challenging. (semanticscholar.org)
  • But the blade used for incision in open laparoscopy has also been known to cause great vessel injury. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • As the patient is moved into the Trendelenburg position, the great vessels are more in line with the 45-degree angle that most surgeons use when placing their Veress needle and primary trocar, which can lead to an increased risk of injury. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Endovascular repair of vessel injuries and embolization of solid organ injuries have continued to evolve into first line treatments in the acutely ill patient. (springer.com)
  • We use a combination of IPL and Long Pulse Nd:Yag to treat these blood vessels, and multiple treatments are often needed. (retiefskincenter.com)
  • Structural changes were seen in cerebral capillaries as the amyloid accumulated, including vessel fragmentation and increased tortuosity (twisting). (elsevier.com)