Great BritainHistory, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.IrelandHistory, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Famous PersonsHistoryTuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Medicine in ArtHistory of MedicineNaval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.EnglandPaintingsScrapie: A fatal disease of the nervous system in sheep and goats, characterized by pruritus, debility, and locomotor incoordination. It is caused by proteinaceous infectious particles called PRIONS.Persia: An ancient civilization, known as early as 2000 B.C. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus the Great (550-529 B.C.) and for 200 years, from 550 to 331 B.C., the Persians ruled the ancient world from India to Egypt. The territory west of India was called Persis by the Greeks who later called the entire empire Persia. In 331 B.C. the Persian wars against the Greeks ended disastrously under the counterattacks by Alexander the Great. The name Persia in modern times for the modern country was changed to Iran in 1935. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p546 & Asimov, Words on the Map, 1962, p176)EuropeGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.WalesLeper Colonies: Residential treatment centers for individuals with leprosy.Ceratopogonidae: A family of biting midges, in the order DIPTERA. It includes the genus Culicoides which transmits filarial parasites pathogenic to man and other primates.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseCivilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Vinyl Chloride: A gas that has been used as an aerosol propellant and is the starting material for polyvinyl resins. Toxicity studies have shown various adverse effects, particularly the occurrence of liver neoplasms.Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding: Hemorrhage caused by vitamin K deficiency.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Northern IrelandNobel PrizeSocieties, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.ScotlandEmbryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Hemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.United StatesNuclear Medicine Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of nuclear medicine services.History of NursingMouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Pharmacy Administration: The business and managerial aspects of pharmacy in its broadest sense.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Refuse Disposal: The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Scurvy: An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Incineration: High temperature destruction of waste by burning with subsequent reduction to ashes or conversion to an inert mass.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Books, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Literature, MedievalSculpturePublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.BooksMummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.beta-N-Acetyl-Galactosaminidase: A hexosiminidase that specifically hydrolyzes terminal non-reducing N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues in N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminides.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)ArtEcosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Manuscripts, MedicalMagic: Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Philosophy, MedicalRegistries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Prions: Small proteinaceous infectious particles which resist inactivation by procedures that modify NUCLEIC ACIDS and contain an abnormal isoform of a cellular protein which is a major and necessary component. The abnormal (scrapie) isoform is PrPSc (PRPSC PROTEINS) and the cellular isoform PrPC (PRPC PROTEINS). The primary amino acid sequence of the two isoforms is identical. Human diseases caused by prions include CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME; GERSTMANN-STRAUSSLER SYNDROME; and INSOMNIA, FATAL FAMILIAL.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Engraving and EngravingsModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.LondonIndustry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Codon: A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.ItalyPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Communicable DiseasesCarpal Joints: The articulations between the various CARPAL BONES. This does not include the WRIST JOINT which consists of the articulations between the RADIUS; ULNA; and proximal CARPAL BONES.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)GermanySocieties, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Periostitis: Inflammation of the periosteum. The condition is generally chronic, and is marked by tenderness and swelling of the bone and an aching pain. Acute periostitis is due to infection, is characterized by diffuse suppuration, severe pain, and constitutional symptoms, and usually results in necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Colonialism: The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Th1-Th2 Balance: Homeostatic control of the immune system by secretion of different cytokines by the Th1 and Th2 cells. The concentration dependent binding of the various cytokines to specific receptors determines the balance (or imbalance leading to disease).Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)
London: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. 1856. p. 176. Cranidge, John (1818). A Mirror for the Burgesses and ... Tompson, Richard S. (1971). Classics Or Charity?: The Dilemma of the 18th Century Grammar School. Manchester: Manchester ... Chilcott, John (1840). Chilcott's descriptive history of Bristol. Bristol: J Chilcott. p. 211. Accounts and Papers of the House ... The Great western, Cheltenham and Great western, and Bristol and Exeter railway guides. Bristol: Great western railway. 1939. p ...
The 18th century was the "golden age" for Madeira. The wine's popularity extended from the American colonies and Brazil in the ... Madeira was an important wine in the history of the United States of America. No wine-quality grapes could be grown among the ... New World to Great Britain, Russia, and Northern Africa. The American colonies, in particular, were enthusiastic customers, ... However, it is also known that Portugal had a big egg production, mainly between the 18th and 19th centuries, and that most of ...
The 18th century was the "golden age" for Madeira. The wine's popularity extended from the American colonies and Brazil in the ... Madeira was an important wine in the history of the United States of America. No wine-quality grapes could be grown among the ... New World to Great Britain, Russia, and Northern Africa. The American colonies, in particular, were enthusiastic customers, ... Thus, wines from before the late 19th century (pre-phylloxera) and after the late 20th century conform to this rule. Many " ...
The Royal Navy, A History. p. 340. Grocott (1997), p.83. Campbell, John (1818). Naval History of Great Britain: Including the ... List of ships captured in the 18th century Glossary of nautical terms Winfield. British Warships of the Age of Sail. p. 328. ... Naval History of Great Britain. p. 279. Colledge. Ships of the Royal Navy. p. 251. http://www.smuggling.co.uk/gazetteer_s_13. ... Charnock, John (1798). Biographia Navalis; or, Impartial Memoirs of the Lives ... of Officers of the Navy of Great Britain from ...
James Brown (2001). ''Crossing the Strait: Morocco, Gibraltar and Great Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries''. Milton, Giles ... Khnata bent Bakkar Alaouite History of North Africa History of Morocco Anglo-Moroccan alliance List of people with the most ... During the half century of Ismail's rule, it is estimated he killed 30,000. During Moulay Ismaïl's reign, Morocco's capital ... It is claimed Moulay Ismaïl had excellent relations with Louis XIV of France, the enemy of Spain, to whom he sent ambassador ...
Thomson, Thomas (1812). History of the Royal Society, from Its Institution to the End of the 18Th Century. London: Baldwin. p. ... Great Britain: Clarendon press. 1869. p. 166. ... "A short history". "House of Commons Journal Volume 10: 3 August ... Birch, Thomas (1756). the History of the Royal Society of London for Improving of Natural Knowledge from Its First Rise ... As ... In the novel Quicksilver, Neal Stephenson quotes from The History of the Royal Society of London, in which "the president ...
Sir Bernard Burke (1871). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain & Ireland. Harrison. p. 334 ... from Its Institution to the End of the 18th Century. Baldwin. p. lvii. ... Henry was the great-great-great-grandfather of the famous biologist Professor Richard Dawkins. In 2010 Richard Dawkins wrote an ... In 1760 he entered the Parliament of Great Britain as member for Southampton, holding the seat to 1768. He then was member for ...
Great Britain[edit]. Hypocrisy became a major topic in English political history in the early 18th century. The Toleration Act ... In Athens during the 4th century BC, for example, the great orator Demosthenes ridiculed his rival Aeschines, who had been a ... History[edit]. The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve ... In the Enlightenment of the 18th century, discussions of hypocrisy were common in the works of Voltaire, Rousseau, and ...
All Habsburg territories again united in 1655. History of Austria History of Slovenia Prothero, GW; Great Britain. Foreign ... Inner Austrian stadtholders went on to rule until the days of Empress Maria Theresa in the 18th century. Duchy of Styria Lower ... was a term used from the late 14th to the early 17th century for the Habsburg hereditary lands south of the Semmering Pass, ... carried out by the Jesuits with great determination. The cadet branch prevailed again, when Charles' son and successor as ...
The Hondo River was a settlement owned by the Kingdom of Great Britain since the early 18th century. In 1779, the Spanish ... Belize History Coordinates: 18°29′16″N 88°19′06″W / 18.48778°N 88.31833°W / 18.48778; -88.31833. ...
In mid-18th century Britain there was assistance available for women who were not able to raise their children. The Foundling ... Bastardy and its Comparative History. Arnold. p. 75. Rose, Lionel (1986). Massacre of the Innocents: Infanticide in Great ... The result of the lack of basic social care in Britain in the 18th and 19th century is the numerous accounts in court records ... Instances of infanticide in Britain in 18th and 19th century is often attributed to the economic position of the women, with ...
... dating from the 17th and 18th centuries. Proprietary (brand name) medicines dating from the 18th century to the present day. ... The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain had a museum collection since 1842, which continues to be managed by the RPS ... "Pharmacy History and Lambeth". Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Retrieved 25 November 2016. "Royal Pharmaceutical Society - Museum ... Its predecessor the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain was founded on 15 April 1841. The headquarters of the society are ...
The current pub was largely built in the late 18th or early 19th century, although some parts date from 1680. A short book ... Britain's best real heritage pubs. St. Albans: CAMRA. p. 33. ISBN 9781852493042. What are Historic Pub Interiors?, Heritage ... describing the pub's history was published in 2011. Historic England, "Malt Shovel, Spondon (1228930)", National Heritage List ... Malt Shovel, The Good Pub Guide, retrieved 21 August 2014 Derby Telegraph: Remembering the good times - and bad - that make old ...
Lee, Rawdon Briggs (1897). A History and Description of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain and Ireland, Sporting Dogs. II. London ... In the 18th century, spaniels were split into three categories: land spaniels, water spaniels and toy spaniels. The land ... was proposed by Rawdon Briggs Lee in volume two of his 1897 work A History and Description of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain ... The Kennel Club (UK) designated all medium legged spaniels which were not Clumber nor Sussex Spaniels as English Springer ...
... and the oldest Catholic school in the United States. August 13 - History of the Moravian Church: The 18th century renewal: The ... Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of King George II of Great Britain, arrives in Britain for the first time, aged 21. March 23 ( ... May 12 - History of the Moravian Church: The 18th century renewal: The Brotherly Agreement is adopted by the Moravian Church ... "The history of payments in the UK". BBC News. 2009-02-16. Retrieved 2016-02-25. Delambre, J. B. (1827). Histoire de ...
... and the oldest Catholic school in the United States. August 13 - History of the Moravian Church: The 18th century renewal: The ... June 11 - George, Prince of Wales, becomes King George II of Great Britain, on the death of his father. June 27 - Uxbridge, ... May 12 - History of the Moravian Church: The 18th century renewal: The Brotherly Agreement is adopted by the Moravian Church ... "Dornoch in the 18th century". Historylinks Museum. Retrieved 2010-08-27. K. M. Sheard (8 December 2011). Llewellyn's Complete ...
Letters of the 18th Century Lee Family in London and Jamaica. Lulu.com. pp. 315-317. ISBN 978-1-105-80974-3. Great Britain ( ... Dr Hazel Conway (21 August 2006). Design History: A Students' Handbook. Routledge. pp. 22-23. ISBN 978-1-134-88715-6. marriage ... She was painted by a family friend Joseph Wright of Derby not in contemporary dress but in a 17th-century costume. This ...
Open competitions were held in the late 18th century in several countries including the United States, Great Britain, Ireland, ... Architecture competitions have a more than 2,500-year-old history. The Acropolis in Athens was a result of an architectural ... In 19th century England and Ireland there have been over 2,500 competitions in five decades, with 362 in London alone. The ... Histories and Practice. Stockholm: The Royal Institute of Technology and Rio Kulturkooperativ, 2013. ISBN 978-91-85249-16-9 ...
It was largely demolished at the end of the 18th century. The site was excavated in 1890 and demonstrated the foundations of a ... Castles in Great Britain and Ireland List of castles in England "Monument No. 200127". Pastscape National Monuments Record. ... Some of the stonework of the castle can be seen in the buildings of the town, and a display about its history is available in ... The Lovels later achieved the return of the castle and their descendents were lords of the manor until the 14th century. By ...
... and the reach of this additional material stretches thinly through the 18th century history of Japan. This became the first ... Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland.--Two copies of this rare book have now been made available ... The Hayashi and the Shōheikō links to the work's circulation are part of the explanation for this work's 18th and 19th century ... Paris: Royal Asiatic Society, Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. OCLC 5850691 Yamashita, Samuel Hideo. " ...
accessed March 30, 2011) Thomas Maxwell Potts, Historical collections relating to the Potts family in Great Britain and America ... The house has been restored and is now an 18th-century historic house museum owned by Montgomery County. http://freepages. ... ISBN 0-8018-5986-7. History of Pottstown Pottsgrove Manor About Pottsgrove Manor About Pottsgrove Manor at about.com. ... www.city.pottsville.pa.us/html/history.htm Kornwolf, James D.; Kornwolf, Georgiana Wallis (2002). Architecture and town ...
The ferry belonged to the Daunay family in the 14th Century, in 1450 it passed to the Carew family, and by the end of the 18th ... In the summer of 2009 the Saltash postcode area was judged as the most desirable place to live in Great Britain in a survey ... "Saltash History - Ann Glanville". Kernoweb.myby.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 November 2008. Retrieved 30 September ... The entrance side was altered in the 18th century. The town expanded in the 1990s with the addition of the large new estate ...
"Library History - 18th century". Inner Temple. Archived from the original on 19 December 2000. Retrieved 4 November 2009. ... "Library History". Inner Temple. Archived from the original on 2 January 2009. Retrieved 25 November 2009. Great Britain Royal ... "Library History - 19th century". Inner Temple. Archived from the original on 2 January 2009. Retrieved 11 November 2009. "The ... The history of the Library is discussed in some detail in the introduction to J. Conway Davies's Catalogue of Manuscripts in ...
... was largely bypassed by written history until the middle of the 19th century, in good part because the bare, waterless ... On many British and French maps of the 17th and 18th century the island is called Babelmandel, as the Straits are. Some early ... The island was occupied by Great Britain from 1857 to 1967. Perim is called the island of Diodorus (Diodori insula) by Pliny ... C. R. Low, History of the Indian Navy (1613-1863), Volume 2, p. 385-386. Gavin, pp. 94-95. Peter Pickering & Ingleby Jefferson ...
The Manchester Herbarium contains upwards of 950,000 specimens collected during the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and most ... "BBC - Manchester - Features - Stan the T. rex - facts". bbc.co.uk. 2004-11-03. Retrieved 7 September 2016. Revealing Histories ... endowed a trust to conserve and develop the collection which includes artefacts from Great Britain, Brazil, Europe, India, ... 18th and 19th centuries); in 1925 William Smith Ogden's collection of antiquities, including Greek and Roman coins; in 1939 ...
The origins of trade unions can be traced back to 18th century Britain, where the rapid expansion of industrial society then ... United Kingdom[edit]. Main articles: Trade unions in the United Kingdom and History of trade unions in the United Kingdom ... Originating in Great Britain, trade unions became popular in many countries during the Industrial Revolution. Trade unions may ... United States[edit]. Main articles: Labor unions in the United States and Labor history of the United States ...
Womens rights -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century. Filed under: Great Britain -- History -- 18th century*. The Savage ... Feminism -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century. *Gothic revival (Literature) -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century ... Books and reading -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century. *Booksellers and bookselling -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th ... Literature and science -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century. *Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th ...
Your search - Great Britain Colonies America History 18th century. Bibliography. - did not match any resources. Skip to ... Your search - Great Britain Colonies America History 18th century. Bibliography. - did not match any resources. ... Removing quotes may allow a broader search: Great Britain Colonies America History 18th century. Bibliography.. ...
18th Century 1 Burke, Edmund, 1729-1797 1 Causes 1 France Great Britain 1 History more ... 1 Politics and Government 1 ... Showing 1 - 1 results of 1 for search Great Britain Politics and government 18th century Skip to content Great Britain Politics and government 18th century, query time: 0.07s ... Author: MasterFILE Premier Author: Foner, Eric Genre: Electronic books Institution: Adler University Format: Book Topic: Great ...
Great Britain -- History -- 18th century. *Great Britain -- History -- 19th century. *Great Britain -- History -- 20th century ... Great Britain -- History -- 18th century*. The Savage Visit: New World People and Popular Imperial Culture in Britain, 1701- ... Filed under: Great Britain -- History -- 13th century*. The History of England, From the Accession of Henry III to the Death of ... Filed under: Great Britain -- History -- 14th century*. The History of England, From the Accession of Henry III to the Death of ...
Alliance of Ottoman Empire - Great Britain - Russia against France. 1799: Defeat of the French expeditionary force from Egypt ... By the end of this century, global Muslim population was estimated at 115 million. Timeline of Muslim history. ...
"Dornoch in the 18th century". Historylinks Museum. Retrieved 2010-08-27. Neill, W. N. (1923). "the Last Execution for ... Cassells Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 301. ISBN 0-304-35730-8. Everett, Jason M., ed. (2006 ... His son, George, Prince of Wales, becomes King George II of Great Britain. 30 August - Anne, eldest daughter of George II, is ... Events from the year 1727 in Great Britain. Monarch - George I (until 11 June), George II Prime Minister - Robert Walpole (Whig ...
Loved the history of the 18th century hotel. Best bedside lighting in the last month. ... The 10 Best Design Hotels in Bristol, UK. Check out our selection of great boutique hotels in Bristol. Show map ... What are the best boutique hotels in Bristol near Cabot Circus? Some of the best boutique hotels in Bristol near Cabot Circus ... 8.6 Excellent 669 reviews Good location. Rooms comfortable and clean. Odd interior design - trendy modern but small things odd ...
17th Century-European settlers bring smallpox to North America.. *18th Century-Explorers from Great Britain bring smallpox to ... Highlights from History:. *6th Century-Increased trade with China and Korea brings smallpox to Japan. ... 11th Century-Crusades further spread smallpox in Europe.. *15th Century-Portugal occupies part of western Africa, bringing ... Early written descriptions also appeared in India in the 7th century and in Asia Minor in the 10th century. ...
Great Britain[edit]. Hypocrisy became a major topic in English political history in the early 18th century. The Toleration Act ... In Athens during the 4th century BC, for example, the great orator Demosthenes ridiculed his rival Aeschines, who had been a ... History[edit]. The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve ... In the Enlightenment of the 18th century, discussions of hypocrisy were common in the works of Voltaire, Rousseau, and ...
Altorfer, Stefan (2004) The canton of Berne as an investor on the London capital market in the 18th century. Economic History ... Best, Antony (2012) We are virtually at war with Russia: Britain and the Cold War in East Asia, 1923-40. Cold War History, 12 ... Best, Antony, ed. (2016) Britains retreat from Empire in East Asia, 1905-1980. Routledge studies in the modern history of Asia ... Best, Antony (2006) Diagnosis and autopsy: Britain and the outbreak of the Pacific war. Nids Military History Studies Annual, 9 ...
... Scheuchzer JG (1729). An account of the success of inoculating the small-pox in Great Britain, for the years 1727 and 1728: ... Essays in the economic and social history of England in the 18th century. London: Methuen (reprinted in 2006 by Routledge). ... The application of numerical approaches to documenting diseases and assessing medical interventions in 18th century Britain. ...
Valerie Steeles latest book Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Colour. ... Ambassador Francesca Scantlebury traces the history of the colour pink in fashion in the run up to Dr. ... Great Britain: Michael OMara Books Ltd, 2017. Pastoureau, Michel. Red: The History of a Color. Princeton: Princeton University ... Before the late 17th century the colour pink, as we now define the shade, was often ignored in favour of darker shades of red ...
... many people in Great Britain became skeptical of the supernatural. The authorities stopped taking s ... With the rise of the Enlightenment in the 18th century, ... is lost to history. ... With the rise of the Enlightenment in the 18th century, many people in Great Britain became skeptical of the supernatural. The ... 10 Weird Supernatural Stories From 18th-Century Great Britain. Tristan Shaw March 7, 2017. ...
Digital History ID 104 Author: John Woolman Date:1757. Annotation: During the 18th century Great Britain dominated the Atlantic ... During the eighteenth century, the slave trade become one of Britains largest and most profitable industries. By mid-century, ... and nineteenth centuries. These slave-grown products stimulated a consumer revolution, enticing the masses of Britain and then ... This he did not deny, but said the life of the Negroes were so wretched in their own country that many of them lived better ...
18th-century political works including memoirs and pamphlets are present in quantity ... The Journals of Parliament in Ireland and Great Britain provide a formal record of political business ... You are here Library Departments , Early Printed Books & Special Collections , Subject Strengths , Political History ... Political History. Titlepage of A Discoverie of the State of Ireland... by Sir John Davies, [London], 1613. Y.i.41 ...
Provides digital editions of nearly all books published in Great Britain in the 18th century... [more info]. Location: Campus/ ... Provides digital editions of nearly all books published in Great Britain in the 18th century... [more info]. Location: Campus/ ... Provides digital editions of nearly all books published in Great Britain in the 18th century... [more info]. Location: Campus/ ... Provides digital editions of nearly all books published in Great Britain in the 18th century... [more info]. Location: Campus/ ...
This is Queen Anne, who took her nation into the 18th century as Scotland joined England in union and it became Great Britain. ... If history were fair, her legacy should rank with that of the woman who by far outshines her, Elizabeth I. ... The Whig and Tory political parties that caused her much annoyance in the 18th century are long gone, but her aesthetic gifts ... eyeliners to go with the silk wrappings of the 18th-century aristocratic dandy, replete with cod pieces and tight leggings to ...
II, c.6; E. Pawson, Transport and Economy: the turpike roaqds of 18th century England (Academic Press, London 1977), 77. ... Toll roads in Great Britain. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from History of toll roads in the United ... Toll roads in Great Britain, used to raise fees for the management of roads in the United Kingdom, were common in the era of ... "Toll roads in Great Britain" - news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (December 2007) (Learn how and when to remove this ...
The state rooms display most of their original 18th and 19th century furniture and... more ... Explore the fascinating history of Erddig Erddig is one of the most fascinating houses in Britain. Part of this is due to the ... Tatton Park was rebuilt in the late 18th century by Samuel Wyatt. The collections include family portraits, paintings, books, ... Discover the Downton of the north at Gawthorpe Hall Gawthorpe Hall was built in the early 17th century for Sir Richard ...
Brief history of Malaysia. During the late 18th and 19th centuries, Great Britain established colonies and protectorates in the ... Hi guys, great blog. Hope you dont mind if I link to this on my website Im building. I also have a link to it on our computer ... good job. Hye Mat and Trace!! Im Noami..from Miri, Sarawak...Im still studying now Im 19th....Anyway, I was going through the ... Changed for good. About the only Orang Ulu who are doing anything about the logging are the Penan people. The Penans are ...
Methodism was introduced to England in the 18th Century and today, has around 290,000 members throughout Great Britain, but ... Largest Ethnic Groups In The United Kingdom (Great Britain). * Most Important Battles In The History Of Great Britain (United ... Irreligion in Great Britain. Irreligion is the lack of a religious belief, and includes such subcategories as atheism and ... Catholicism has a long history in the United Kingdom. For nearly 200 years, however, from the 1500s until the 1700s, the ...
Making history : antiquaries in Britain, 1707-2007 by Royal Academy of Arts (Great Britain)( Book ). 4 editions published in ... in the early 18th century to 2007. Archaeologia by Society of Antiquaries of London( ). in English and Undetermined and held by ... Great Britain Great Britain.--Record Commission Historiography Home economics Homes Intellectual life Kelmscott Manor (Kelmscot ... Queries proposed to gentlemen in the several parts of Great Britain, in hope of obtaining, from their answers, a better ...
Frankland in Great Britain. This discovery had a great impact on the chemical thinking of the time, mainly because it was the ... The birth of organometallic chemistry can be traced to the 18th century, but the first organometallic compound proper was ... It is necessary to look back in the history of chemistry to be able to appreciate their contributions. ... Professor Geoffrey Wilkinson, Imperial College, London, Great Britain. for their pioneering work performed independently on the ...
History. During the late 18th and 19th centuries, Great Britain established colonies and protectorates in the area of current ... SIM Kui Hian] United Malays National Organization or UMNO [NAJIB bin Abdul Razak] United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut ... 31 August 1957 (from the UK) National holiday:. Independence Day 31 August (1957) (independence of Malaya); Malaysia Day 16 ... general assessment: modern system featuring good intercity service on Peninsular Malaysia provided mainly by microwave radio ...
Books › Sitemap › History › Europe › Great Britain › T. The 1630s by Ian Atherton, Julie Sanders - 2006 - 218 pages. ... The 18th century Baptist church and burial ground at West Butts Street, Poole, Dorset by Jacqueline I. McKinley - 2008 - 168 ... The Ancient History of Wiltshire by Sir Richard Colt Hoare - 1975 The ancient history of Wiltshire by Sir Richard Colt Hoare - ... The age of transition: Britain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by Donald Farquhar Macdonald - 1967 - 249 pages. ...
  • At the turn of the 18th century, debates about the rise of public debt and the new class of speculators in public funds, or stock-jobbers, were the way in which capitalism "imparted its first shock and became involved in its first major controversy in the history of English-language political theory" (Pocock 1975, 460). (p2pfoundation.net)
  • Eric Hobsbawm , who died on 1 October 2012 at the age of 95, was one of the foremost historians of the 20th century. (lrb.co.uk)
  • His many books include a three-part study of the 'long 19th century' ( The Age of Revolution , The Age of Capital and The Age of Empire ), Age of Extremes: The Short 20th Century and a memoir, Interesting Times . (lrb.co.uk)
  • Since then the number of institutions and works devoted to 'heritage' and historical memory - notably about the great 20th-century wars - has grown explosively. (lrb.co.uk)
  • There is nothing specifically British or 20th-century about such a mood. (lrb.co.uk)
  • Though the assumptions surrounding this species' origins were not yet the same as modern ones, by the 20th century, it was believed among naturalists that the brown rat did not originate in Norway, rather the species came from central Asia and (likely) China. (wikipedia.org)
  • His heroes in the appreciation and application of plants range from Amazonian shamans and swidden "forest farmers" to architects and the eccentric 20th-century plant painter Margaret Mee, better known in the Amazon than in her native Chiltern Hills in the UK. (newscientist.com)
  • Northern European men had lost an average 2.5 inches of height by the 1700s, a loss that was not fully recovered until the first half of the 20th century. (scienceblog.com)
  • But then with Alan Leo, and more recently people like Dane Rudhyar, and on another level people like the Hamburg School and Cosmobiology of Ebertin, a rather new kind of astrology began coming into existence, which it might be appropriate simply to call 20th century astrology, but I would like to call modern astrology. (astro.com)
  • Electrification is believed to be the most important engineering achievement of the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the 20th century, the term was uncommon in English, and it was used either to refer to the description or study of the useful arts or to allude to technical education, as in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (chartered in 1861). (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "technology" rose to prominence in the 20th century in connection with the Second Industrial Revolution . (wikipedia.org)
  • The term's meanings changed in the early 20th century when American social scientists, beginning with Thorstein Veblen , translated ideas from the German concept of Technik into "technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • And those are living in the West: "The world's population quadrupled to six billion people during the 20th century. (green-blog.org)
  • Chilling by name and chilling by nature, this 13th-century castle in Northumberland was the scene of bloody battles and eerie intrigue for centuries. (visitbritain.com)
  • By the 13th Century, the monasteries controlled larger estates than previously noted, and gradually the impetus for the making of gardens shifted form the monasteries to the King and his noble subjects, and in the 56 year reign of Henry III , a new taste for luxurious living developed and gardens flourished. (everything2.com)
  • Despite their best efforts, smallpox was still widespread in 1966, causing regular outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia. (cdc.gov)
  • Individual colonies began collaborating at the Albany Congress of 1754 to demand more rights and set up a Continental Congress in 1774 that declared independence from Great Britain in 1776 and formed a new nation, the United States of America. (majortests.com)
  • CArey American Revolution During the 18th century thirteen colonies united in their resistance to Britain an went to war to declare freedom from the British empire.Few years later American's aim was achieved and America gained independece from Britain forming a new nation, United States of America. (majortests.com)
  • As with the world's other great museums, including the Louvre in Paris and the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, the British Museum is the result of the surge in interest in ancient cultures and civilizations that took place during the Renaissance era. (referenceforbusiness.com)
  • In this vivid account of over 4,000 years of British history, Simon Schama takes us on an epic journey which encompasses the very beginnings of the nation's identity, when the first settlers landed on Orkney. (audible.com)
  • books.google.com - Buccaneers, Explorers and Settlers studies how during 'the long 18th century' British incursions into the Pacific transformed Europe's knowledge of that great ocean. (google.com)
  • In more ancient history, it emerged as an issue during the 'Industrial Revolution' (18th Century) in Great Britain when children were compelled to work in hazardous conditions for up to 12 hours a day. (ipl.org)
  • Men living during the early Middle Ages (the ninth to 11th centuries) were several centimeters taller than men who lived hundreds of years later, on the eve of the Industrial Revolution," said Richard Steckel, a professor of economics at Ohio State University and the author of a new study that looks at changes in average heights during the last millennium. (scienceblog.com)
  • Discover the complex culture and trading economy of the Hidatsa and Mandan tribes in North Dakota during the 18th century, as seen by anthropologists and artists. (nps.gov)
  • Re-enactors come from every era of British history from before the Roman invasion through to the Second World War and beyond. (express.co.uk)
  • Her story of Marcus the Roman and Esca the noble British slave and their search for the lost Eagle through the wild lands of Britain, full of horned-god priests and strange, mystical rites was magical and wild and wonderful. (express.co.uk)
  • When I first started writing the Boudica series and was doing all the research (I used to be a veterinary anaesthetist: I discovered quite early that the textbooks on Roman military history outnumber the ones on veterinary anaesthesia by about 50 to one), there were four or five of us writing books that touched on Rome. (express.co.uk)
  • The museum also boasts a prominent collection of artifacts from the time of the Roman occupation of Britain. (referenceforbusiness.com)
  • Thought in the 18th century to be a Roman site, it excited the interest of Sir Richard Colt Hoare of Stourhead, who, after a visit in1808, noted sadly: 'It is only the relict of a moated mansion house. (countrylife.co.uk)
  • Although we can trace back centuries of Western gardens and designs, it was initially the Roman s who first introduced gardens similar to those we know today into Britain . (everything2.com)
  • However, with the collapse of the Roman Empire , Britain was divided into small territories. (everything2.com)
  • With the rise of the Enlightenment in the 18th century, many people in Great Britain became skeptical of the supernatural. (listverse.com)
  • The various Gold Rushes of the 19th century gave people prime opportunity to gamble, even though it was seen as an immoral act that would be punishable by law. (history1700s.com)
  • The events of the Revolutionary War may seem like ye olde news to today's history students, but they were breaking news to people on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and newspapers were the main source of information. (fosters.com)
  • whatever the apparent divide may be, they are always used to declare that my people are better off without working together with yours . (eugeneweekly.com)
  • Even though New Zealand became an independent member of the British Commonwealth almost a century ago, all government functions reflect the strong British influence, and many people say "Kiwis," as New Zealanders are nicknamed, speak with a British accent. (polynesia.com)
  • In recent weeks, I've read a Napoleonic spy story that left me guessing to the last minute, a blood soaked, passionate tale of William Wallace and Robert the Bruce, a glorious 18th century romance, and two crime novels set in the Second World War when what happened during the blackout was anybody's guess and people could - and did - get away with murder. (express.co.uk)
  • advances in nutrition and health mean that people are getting taller (the average height for British men having increased by four inches over the last century). (spectator.co.uk)
  • Chris Harman describes the shape and course of human history as a narrative of ordinary people forming and re-forming complex societies in pursuit of common human goals. (audible.com)
  • The history of taxation is the history of people concocting ingenious schemes to avoid their taxes. (sltrib.com)
  • The thing is, we already have an excellent tool for taxing rich people who own stock or manage companies: the personal income tax. (sltrib.com)
  • yet a most necessary, useful, industrious Creature: she has some Qualification so peculiar, and is so very nice in her Conduct, that a World of good People lose her Favour, before they well know her Name. (p2pfoundation.net)
  • It was a supposedly Berber Jewish woman Dahiyah, or Damia (mistaken identity), better known as Kahina, who aroused her people in the Aures, the eastern spurs of the Atlas Mountains in Algeria, to a last although fruitless resistance to the Arab general Hasan ibn an-Nu'man. (sud-aventures-tours.com)
  • And just a single power plant in West Yorkshire in Great Britain will produce more CO2 every year than all the 139 million people combined living in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique. (green-blog.org)
  • The pervasive use in Great Britain (and North American colonies) significantly reduced the impact of the virus in the upper classes, but not in the population as a whole. (news-medical.net)
  • American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. (majortests.com)
  • Later in the 18th century the hopes of speculative geographers that unknown continents and sea-passages existed in the Pacific prompted a series of expeditions by Cook and his contemporaries. (google.com)
  • 18th Century charm, 21st Century convenience. (bestwestern.co.uk)
  • At many paradors, 21st-century culture blends effortlessly into the historical settings, with tapestries and suits of armour set alongside contemporary artworks and designer furniture. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • It's also the inspiration of the Occupy movement, of economics bestsellers from The Spirit Level to Capital in the 21st Century , of David Willetts's The Pinch: How The Baby Boomers Took Their Children's Future , and of dozens of impassioned articles by journalists on both left and right lamenting the fate of today's Doomed Youth. (spectator.co.uk)
  • A location was found in the Montagu House, a mansion in the Bloomsbury section of London, which was to remain the museum's site into the 21st century. (referenceforbusiness.com)
  • Discover the site of a 16th-century Spanish town that was founded before Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth, and learn how archeology uncovered the story of Santa Elena. (nps.gov)
  • Shakespeare's Birthplace is a refurbished 16th century half-timbered house. (irishtourism.com)
  • Catholicism has a long history in the United Kingdom. (worldatlas.com)
  • contribution not only to old age and gender studies but also to the literary history of the long 18th century. (jhu.edu)
  • In the 18th century, not long after American colonists broke from Britain partly over "taxation without representation," Swiss banks offered anonymity - for a price - to French nobles looking to hide their wealth from the revolutionary authorities. (sltrib.com)
  • Then, in the 18th century we had a very long break. (astro.com)
  • But what I refer to instead is a very real historical phenomenon in astrology, which is this: we have astrology up until about 1700, which had certain consistent patterns, ideas and principles and which had a more or less a continuous tradition from something like - this date is extremely flexible - the fifth century B.C.E. Then, in the 18th century we had a very long break. (astro.com)
  • Improvements to everyday life, the time of the Enlightenment, and advancements in chemical colorants all contributed to the emergence of pink, with the colour characterising this new flourishing and affluent century. (costumesociety.org.uk)
  • Lawman's narrative poem, probably written in the first quarter of the thirteenth-century, is a compound of chronicle, romance, saint's life and sermon. (worldcat.org)
  • The name of this unique venue means 'great melody of life' or 'big song' in Gaelic. (hitched.co.uk)
  • Buzzing with life and character, it's an excellent venue for a wedding. (hitched.co.uk)
  • standards and controls on the best way to carry on with a decent life. (ipl.org)
  • Another 128 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible. (houseofnames.com)
  • Another 245 words (18 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible. (houseofnames.com)
  • His personal life was a complicated one but he had great love for his family. (facts-about.org.uk)
  • The following short biography and fact sheet provides interesting facts about the life, times and history of Horatio Nelson. (facts-about.org.uk)
  • On his paternal side, Horatio Nelson was related to 1st Earl of Orford, Robert Walpole who became the first de facto Prime Minister of Great Britain *** Early life and childhood: Horatio Nelson grew up with seven siblings. (facts-about.org.uk)
  • Bladud ended his life as the victim of the first recorded flying accident in Britain. (literaryreview.co.uk)
  • 1. Great Britain - Intellectual life - 18th century. (holypet.ru)
  • 2. Great Britain - Intellectual life - 19th century. (holypet.ru)
  • Life became increasingly insecure, and gardens could survive and develop only where security could be assured - in the monasteries and castle s of Medieval Britain . (everything2.com)
  • The city-state began its life in the 8th or 9th century B. It is already hard enough to read about great African 3 Jan 2019 If you can't recall a single African warrior you learned about in school, Yaa Asantewaa was a Ghanaian brave warrior queen born circa 1840 into RELATED: #SayTheirNames: List Of 19 Assassinated Black Activists And The African Queens Project. (columbustubi.com)
  • American historian Martin Jay in The Virtues of Mendacity: On Lying in Politics (2012) explores how writers over the centuries have treated hypocrisy, deception, flattery, lying and cheating, slander, false pretenses, living on borrowed glory, masquerading, conventions of concealment, playacting before others and the arts of dissimulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like a latter-day Isaac D'Israeli, Looser explores many byways of 18th- and early-19th century authorship and publication. (jhu.edu)
  • One Scottish periodical provided its own analysis of the document, including a snarky response to what became one of the Declaration of Independence's best-known lines: "In what are they created equal? (fosters.com)
  • Add in fantastic travel connections and you'll struggle to find a better Scottish city to tie the knot. (hitched.co.uk)
  • The pro-independence movement has appealed to Scottish nationalism and regional pride, using history to stir patriotic feelings. (eugeneweekly.com)
  • It puts things in perspective for those who recall Scottish history and tradition. (eugeneweekly.com)
  • Nigel Tranter offered a view on Scottish history that made me feel proud to be a Scot, CS Forester's Hornblower series took me out on the rolling ocean (I still feel seasick when I read one of his books) and Mary Stewart's outstanding Arthurian series that started with The Crystal Cave, lured me into the magic of the past. (express.co.uk)
  • Keynes looked forward to a rise in government remuneration and lesser taxes to provoke demand and take the nation's economy out of the great depression. (thefreemanonline.org)
  • WALK into any good bookshop these days and you'll find the tables and shelves crowded with historical novels, biographies, accounts of wars recent and distant, and romances firmly lodged in a historical setting. (express.co.uk)
  • So now that festival season is in full swing - with the likes of Download Festival and Glastonbury having set the bar high for 2019, we thought we'd give you a round-up of some of the best (and most bizarre! (holidayhypermarket.co.uk)
  • Letters of Marque and Reprisal were the official documents by which 18th-century governments commissioned private commercial ships, known as privateers, to act on their behalf, attacking ships carrying the flags of enemy nations. (history.com)
  • There's a reason that you are forever reading about companies settling tax disputes: Governments spend a great deal of time scrutinizing companies' returns, looking for places where they ought to have paid more tax than they did. (sltrib.com)
  • Marston enjoys a remarkable setting surrounded by a superbly designed 18th-century landscape. (countrylife.co.uk)
  • The immediate foreground of carefully disposed specimen trees, plantations and a large lake is scarcely less distinguished, the park at Marston having been planted in the early 18th century by Stephen Switzer and modified in about 1820 by William Gilpin, archpriest of the Picturesque. (countrylife.co.uk)
  • Beautifully restored B&B, efficiently designed, clean and very comfortable beds with good linen. (booking.com)
  • New Britain is the seat of Central Connecticut State University (established as a state normal [teacher-training] school, 1849) and the New Britain Museum of American Art (founded 1903), noted for its collection of American paintings. (britannica.com)
  • Explore a group of 18th-century missions in modern San Antonio to learn about Spanish influence on native peoples and the patterns of Texas culture. (nps.gov)
  • There is plenty of time to further explore on you own, perhaps visit the National Railway Museum housing over 300 years of history, or continue wandering the well-preserved city walls? (insightvacations.com)
  • Yet it's only a few years since I first wanted to write the four-book Boudica series to explore who we were in the druidic era before the Romans destroyed the amazing, brilliantly creative culture that was ancient Britain. (express.co.uk)
  • Its rooms and gardens are lovely places to explore but to properly experience one of the most haunted castles in Britain, head into its Torture Chamber and join an evening Ghost Tour for a more unnerving encounter. (visitbritain.com)
  • Buccaneers devastated Spanish settlements and shipping in the South Sea, and the accounts by Dampier and his companions of their exploits became best-sellers. (google.com)
  • From emigration lists and surname histories to church registers and census records--each accompanied with important background information--he very cleverly lays out the whole of Irish genealogical research, providing what is arguably the best four pages ever written on the subject. (globalgenealogy.com)
  • The story of Britain from the earliest settlements in 3000BC to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. (audible.com)
  • Before the end of the century there were British settlements in New South Wales, Nootka Sound had become a centre of international dispute, and across the Pacific traders, whalers and missionaries were following the tracks of the explorers. (google.com)
  • Nearly half (49%) of the population of the UK identifies as irreligious. (worldatlas.com)
  • After the European discovery of the continent by Dutch explorers in 1606, who named it New Holland, Australia's eastern half was claimed by Great Britain in 1770 and initially settled through penal transportation to the colony of New South Wales from 26 January 1788, a date which became Australia's national day. (familysearch.org)
  • When Rosemary Sutcliffe wrote Eagle Of The Ninth half a century ago she transformed history for many in ways that the drab graphs and line drawings of our history text books never could. (express.co.uk)
  • But by the second half of the 18th century, due to assimilation, many Huguenots worshipped in their C. of E. parish churches, meaning you'll also need to check those records to trace your family. (exploregenealogy.co.uk)