Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Vaccinium myrtillus: A plant species of the family VACCINIUM.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Proanthocyanidins: Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.Blueberry Plant: Several plant species of the genus VACCINIUM known for the edible blueberry fruit.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.GlucosidesWine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Ipomoea batatas: A plant species of the genus IPOMOEA, family CONVOLVULACEAE. Some cultivars are sweet and edible whereas bitter varieties are a source of SAPONINS. This sweet potato is sometimes referred to as a yam (DIOSCOREA).Photinia: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE. The common names of chokeberry or chokecherry are also used for some species of PRUNUS.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Flavonols: A group of 3-hydroxy-4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.Ribes: A plant genus of the family GROSSULARIACEAE. GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID is obtained from the black currant oil of the seeds.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Fragaria: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Polyphenols: A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Rosales: An order of the ANGIOSPERMS, subclass Rosidae. Its members include some of the most known ornamental and edible plants of temperate zones including roses, apples, cherries, and peaches.Malus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Sambucus: A plant genus in the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE known for elderberries.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Vaccinium macrocarpon: A plant species of the family VACCINIUM known for the sour fruit which is sometimes used for urinary tract infections.Solanaceae: A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.Dahlia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that contains antifungal plant defensin.Cistus: A plant genus of the family CISTACEAE. The common name of rock rose is also sometimes used with the closely related Helianthemum genus (CISTACEAE).Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Gentiana: A plant genus of the family Gentianaceae whose members contain SECOIRIDOIDS and have been used in TRADITIONAL MEDICINE for suppressing INFLAMMATION.Biosynthetic Pathways: Sets of enzymatic reactions occurring in organisms and that form biochemicals by making new covalent bonds.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Petunia: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain steroidal glycosides.Melastomataceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida composed of tropical plants with parallel-nerved leaves.Viburnum: A plant genus in the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE. The common name derives from its traditional use for menstrual cramps. It is a source of viburnine, valerianic acid, vibsanin, and ursolic acid. Note that true cranberry is VACCINIUM MACROCARPON.Cornus: A plant genus of the family CORNACEAE. It is widely cultivated for the attractive flowers.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Litchi: A plant genus of the family SAPINDACEAE that bears sweet fruits. Unusual fatty acids such as cyclopropanoic fatty acids have been identified in the seeds.Dianthus: A plant genus of the family CARYOPHYLLACEAE. Members contain dianthins, which are ribosome inactivating proteins.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Tannins: Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.Plant Epidermis: A thin layer of cells forming the outer integument of seed plants and ferns. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Pharmacognosy: The science of drugs prepared from natural-sources including preparations from PLANTS, animals, and other organisms as well as MINERALS and other substances included in MATERIA MEDICA. The therapeutic usage of plants is PHYTOTHERAPY.Vaccinium: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE known for species with edible fruits.Rosa: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE and order Rosales. This should not be confused with the genus RHODIOLA which is sometimes called roseroot.Mimulus: A plant genus of the family Phrymaceae. Members contain 6-geranylflavanones and mimulone.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Delphinium: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain ACONITINE and other diterpenoid alkaloids.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
  • Taking grape seed extract by mouth seems to reduce symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency such as tired or heavy legs, tension, and tingling and pain. (webmd.com)
  • Research suggests that taking a specific grape leaf extract (AS 195, Antistax, Boehringer Ingelheim) by mouth decreases leg swelling after 6 weeks. (webmd.com)
  • Taking grape seed extract by mouth might help decrease stress on the eyes from glare. (webmd.com)
  • Taking grape seed extract for 8 weeks before ragweed pollen season does not seem to decrease seasonal allergy symptoms or the need to use allergy medications. (webmd.com)
  • Research shows that taking proanthocyanidin, a chemical found in grape seed extract, three times daily for 6 months does not reduce breast tissue hardness, pain, or tenderness in people treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer. (webmd.com)
  • Taking grape seed extract or proanthocyanidin, a chemical in grape seeds, by mouth seems to reduce symptoms of CVI such as tired or heavy legs, tension, and tingling and pain. (webmd.com)
  • Research suggests that taking a specific grape leaf extract by mouth decreases leg swelling after 6 weeks. (webmd.com)
  • Drinking Concord grape juice or taking grape seed extract or grape pomace does not seem to reduce weight in overweight people. (webmd.com)
  • Early research shows that taking a specific combination product containing grape skin extract, marine collagen peptides, coenzyme Q10, luteolin, and selenium for 2 months might improve some markers of aging skin such as elasticity. (webmd.com)
  • Early research shows that taking 400 mg of grape extract daily for one month might increase an athlete's overall power when jumping, but not the initial power or maintaining power. (webmd.com)
  • Also taking a grape fruit extract for 12 weeks seems to improve attention, language, and memory in older people without age-related memory problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Because it is often difficult for patients with diastolic heart failure to maintain a low salt diet, the investigators are researching the effects of the antioxidant properties of grape seed extract, a natural supplement made from grape seeds. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The investigators hypothesize that supplementing the diet with grape seed extract (GSE) can decrease the levels of harmful chemicals and improve heart and blood vessel function in patients with diastolic heart failure and a history of high blood pressure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Drug: grape seed extract (MegaNatural BP, Polyphenolics, Inc. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Subjects will be randomized in double-blind fashion to either grape seed extract (GSE) or maltodextrin placebo capsules for for 6 weeks. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Early evidence suggests that taking a specific grape seed extract product (Endotelon) can slow the progression of eye damage caused by diabetes. (rxlist.com)
  • Some research shows that taking 100 mg of grape seed extract twice daily for up to 2 months does not lower cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol. (rxlist.com)
  • However, other research shows that grape seed extract might lower cholesterol when taken in combination with other ingredients, including chromium or policosanol , tomato extract, and evening primrose oil . (rxlist.com)
  • Research suggests that grape seed extract does not reduce blood pressure in healthy people or people with high blood pressure. (rxlist.com)
  • Early research suggests that taking grape seed extract by mouth for 6-11 months reduces dark skin discolorations in Japanese women. (rxlist.com)
  • Grape skin extract is rich in Oligomers Procyanidin Complexes (OPC) , Anthocyanin, Resveratrols, which is a powerful antioxidant. (alibaba.com)
  • In addition to the ultra rich potence of over 20 times higher than Vitamin C. Grape skin extract is also 50 times better than Vitamin E. Grape skin p.e helps to strengthen the immune system, and also slowdown the aging process, which is of very high market value. (alibaba.com)
  • In Europe, OPC from grape skin extract proanthocyanidins has been adopted and used for several decades as a safe and effective compound. (alibaba.com)
  • In this study, induction of phase II enzymes via Nrf2/ARE activation in the cytoprotective effect of crude polyphenol extract (CPE), oligomeric procyanidin fraction (OPF), and polymeric procyanidin fraction (PPF) from defatted grape seeds in HepG2 cells was evaluated. (springer.com)
  • Other conditions where grape seed extract may is suggested are Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, night blindness, haemorrhoids, prevention of damaging effects of oxidation due to free radicals. (hubpages.com)
  • Compounds of malvidine, delphinidine and petunidine were identified as main anthocyanins present in grape products demonstrating antioxidant activity. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Deprotonated anthocyanin species were assigned in capulin ([Cyanidin-3-glucosidedeprotonated]K + and [Cyanidin-3-rutinoside-deprotonated]K + ), dueto these compounds also can be ionized in form of potassium adducts combined with a deprotonation. (scielo.org.mx)
  • The effect of leaf removal treatment on the qualitative and quantitative composition of the polyphenol compounds in the grapes, with reference to the basic weather conditions of the vineyard area, located in Szczecin in the North-Western part of Poland, was assessed. (mdpi.com)
  • The phenolic compounds in Syrah grapes contribute to the taste, color and mouthfeel of the wine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process of maceration or extended skin contact allows the extraction of phenolic compounds (including those that form a wine's color) from the skins of the grape into the wine. (wikipedia.org)
  • We continue to investigate and increase our understanding of the role these compounds perform in foods (grape, grape product, elderberry, blueberry, basil, black raspberry, etc.) by analytical method development, compositional analysis, altered processing methods, etc. for maximum retention of these compounds. (usda.gov)
  • Tannins - these are the dry, astringent tasting compounds that are usually extracted from the grape skins at the same time as the colour. (decanter.com)
  • Flavour - Many of the natural flavouring compounds occur in the grape skin or just below it. (decanter.com)
  • Two anthocyanin compounds were detected by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) only in the peel of the purple kohlrabi cultivar. (springer.com)
  • The most efficacious solvent system was 50% aqueous methanol, which had the advantage of incorporating both high anthocyanin and flavonol extractability and subsequent stability prior to HPLC analysis. (ajevonline.org)
  • Sometimes bred purposely for high anthocyanin quantities, ornamental plants such as sweet peppers may have unusual culinary and aesthetic appeal. (wikipedia.org)
  • A simple and fast method was developed to identify anthocyanins in red grapes, plums and capulins by MALDI-ToF MS. Three different matrices were used: α-CHCA (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid), THA (2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone) and DHBA (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid). (scielo.org.mx)
  • Furthermore, an increasing number of human clinical trials has demonstrated that the consumption of grapes and their products, such as grape juice or wine, exerts many health-promoting effects particularly the reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes, and other chronic complications [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • Taking 4 ounces of chilled Concord grape juice 30 minutes before meals for a week following each cycle of chemotherapy does not seem to reduce nausea or vomiting caused by chemotherapy. (webmd.com)
  • Other early research shows that drinking juice prepared from whole grape powder does not improve how well the body uses oxygen or running ability. (webmd.com)
  • There is some early evidence that drinking grape juice or red wine might reduce risk factors linked with heart disease, such as inflammation, clot formation, and oxidative damage to blood fats. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Early research shows that drinking Concord grape juice helps middle-aged women focus while driving. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Evidence suggests that drinking Concord grape juice for 12 weeks does not reduce weight in overweight people. (rxlist.com)
  • There is some early evidence that drinking grape juice or red wine might help to prevent heart disease by reducing cholesterol levels, reducing inflammation , and preventing clot formations. (rxlist.com)
  • however, other research shows that grape juice does not have this effect. (rxlist.com)
  • Early research shows that drinking Concord grape juice daily for 12 weeks can improve verbal learning, but does not improve memory , in older people with age-related mental decline. (rxlist.com)
  • Wine grapes also tend to be very sweet: they are harvested at the time when their juice is approximately 24% sugar by weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • By comparison, commercially produced "100% grape juice", made from table grapes, is usually around 15% sugar by weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fruit from the world's ∼8 million ha of vineyard is mostly processed into wine, but some is destined for fresh consumption as table grapes, dried into raisins, processed into nonalcoholic juice, and distilled into spirits ( http://faostat.fao.org/ ). (pnas.org)
  • In 2013, about 78.03 million liters of grape juice (92% of the whole type) were sold in Brazil, with an increase of 101.46% in relation to the average (38.73 million liters) of the previous years (2008 to 2012) ( CONAB, 2013 ). (scielo.br)
  • RNA blot expression of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding for CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS and UFTG carried out in the tissues where the IbMADS10 gene was expressed revealed similar transcript levels in all tissues where the IbMADS10 gene is highly expressed, indicating that the IbMADS10 gene is highly correlated with the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. (springer.com)
  • Abstract Four regulated deficit irrigation RDI regimes were applied to Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, which were analyzed for phenolics and also made into wine over three consecutive growing seasons. (duhnnae.com)
  • Relative to IS, skin anthocyanin concentration fresh weight basis was 18% and 24% higher in ED and FD, respectively, whereas no effect was seen in LD. (duhnnae.com)
  • Grape seeds are by-products of the manufacturing of wine. (webmd.com)
  • These phenols, mainly derived from the stems, seeds and skins are often leached out of the grape during the maceration period of winemaking. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the second part the seeds were separated from the grape pomace and served as a new source of oil that was to be transformed into biodiesel. (grin.com)
  • Be sure to remove any seeds before cooking, and although I prefer my grapes seedless, even a dyed in the wool grape seed hater like me has to admit that the seeded varieties taste better! (hubpages.com)
  • Seedless grapes have a lower health value due to the absence of seeds which are rich in phytochemicals. (hubpages.com)
  • S. L. Nixdorf and I. Hermosin-Gutierrez, "Brazilian Red Wines Made from the Hybrid Grape Cultivar Isabel: Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant Capacity," Analytical Chimica Acta, Vol. 659, No. 1-2, 2010, pp. 208215. (scirp.org)
  • C. R. Pace-Asciak, O. Rounova, S. E. Hahn, E. P. Diamandis and D. M. Goldberg, "Wines and Grape Juices as Modulators of Platelet Aggregation in Healthy Human Subjects," Clinica Chimica Acta, Vol. 246, No. 1-2, 1996, pp. 163-182. (scirp.org)
  • Phenolic characterisation of red wines from different grape varieties cultivated in Mendoza province (Argentina). (nih.gov)
  • Brazilian red wines made from the hybrid grape cultivar Isabel: phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity. (nih.gov)
  • Phenolic concentrations and antioxidant properties of wines made from north american grapes grown in china. (nih.gov)
  • Anthocyanins and other pigment chemicals of the larger family of polyphenols in purple grapes are responsible for the varying shades of purple in red wines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IVAS symposium series are established under the auspices of the European Association of Chemical and Molecular Sciences Divisions of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry with the general theme of moving from traditional fermentations, distillations and titrations to modern instrumental analytics, including metabolomics, chemometrics and sensory evaluation for grapes, wines and spirits. (elsevier.com)
  • The anthocyanins need to be extracted from the skins to get the colour in red wines. (decanter.com)
  • Most modern varieties of blood orange have been derived from old Italian varieties, such as Doppio Sanguigno, and include more recently derived varieties, such as Tarocco and Moro, which generally have higher levels of anthocyanin pigmentation of their fruit ( Figure 1 ). (plantcell.org)
  • Tissue printing result further strengthens the hypothesis that the IbMADS10 gene is indeed involved in anthocyanin pigmentation in sweet potato. (springer.com)
  • Other anthocyanins appeared to have less effect upon wine colour. (geoscience.net)
  • The Force A sensor is an optical sensor based on plant fluorescence: it measures on the go in real time the quality of the harvested grapes based on the anthocyanins content, responsible for the grape and wine red color. (newholland.com)
  • Yeast, one of the earliest domesticated microorganisms, occurs naturally on the skins of grapes, leading to the discovery of alcoholic drinks such as wine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus it has been proposed that Syrah red wine is named after Shiraz, a city in Persia where the grape was used to make Shirazi wine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics record the cultivation of purple grapes, and history attests to the ancient Greeks, Phoenicians, and Romans growing purple grapes for both eating and wine production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately 71% of world grape production is used for wine, 27% as fresh fruit, and 2% as dried fruit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Commercially cultivated grapes can usually be classified as either table or wine grapes, based on their intended method of consumption: eaten raw (table grapes) or used to make wine (wine grapes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Wine grapes are smaller, usually seeded, and have relatively thick skins (a desirable characteristic in winemaking, since much of the aroma in wine comes from the skin). (wikipedia.org)
  • And my own, personal personal favorites take presctiption there - dark wine and red grapes add a little luxury. (smore.com)
  • They've been a favorite for so long, in fact, according to the Old Testament Noah planted grapes almost immediately after the ark landed (but that's likely because he'd been without a good drink of wine for 40 days and 40 nights. (hubpages.com)
  • Wine grapes are a high-value crop and investments that improve production efficiency and enhance quality can be well rewarded [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • The grape is one of the earliest domesticated fruit crops and, since antiquity, it has been widely cultivated and prized for its fruit and wine. (pnas.org)
  • We show that first-degree relationships are rare between wine and table grapes and among grapes from geographically distant regions. (pnas.org)
  • The grape currently faces severe pathogen pressures, and the long-term sustainability of the grape and wine industries will rely on the exploitation of the grape's tremendous natural genetic diversity. (pnas.org)
  • Wine and table grapes currently receive intense chemical applications to combat severe pathogen pressures. (pnas.org)
  • The symposium was preceded by a satellite workshop on the metabolomics applications to the grapevine and vine knowledge, directed at PhD students, post-doctoral fellows and young researchers, who were seeking to improve their knowledge and skills in grape and wine metabolomics. (elsevier.com)
  • Studies have consistently found that taking grapes regularly, particularly in the form of red wine, can reduce cardiac risk. (nutritionexpress.com)
  • Crimson Pearl` is a late-budding grape variety notable for its winter hardiness, late bud break in springtime, and suitability as a red wine grape. (patents.com)
  • Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry: "Blueberry Supplementation Improves Memory in Older Adults," "Anthocyanins in purple-orange carrots (Daucus carota L.) do not influence the bioavailability of beta-carotene in young women. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • If you spend a lot of time in the sun, blueberry anthocyanins may be particularly helpful, since research shows that they can protect your retina against damage from UV light exposure. (aarp.org)
  • This vector is a DNA vehicle, which transfers the DFR gene fragment (called transgene) into muscadine grape cells following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. (intechopen.com)
  • This effect is not unique to tt19 and extends to at least one other anthocyanin pathway gene mutant. (scoop.it)
  • Anthocyanins from black soybean seed coats inhibit UVB-induced inflammatory cylooxygenase-2 gene expression and PGE2 production through regulation of the nuclear factor- κ B and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway," Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , vol. 56, no. 19, pp. 8969-8974, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • We show that Sicilian blood orange arose by insertion of a Copia-like retrotransposon adjacent to a gene encoding Ruby, a MYB transcriptional activator of anthocyanin production. (plantcell.org)
  • Just a single gene tells a cauliflower to gather more anthocyanins into its tissues, turning this normally white vegetable purple. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The gene is specifically expressed in the pigmented tissues such as in the flower bud, in the pink and in red roots, and hence, it was speculated that the IbMADS10 gene might be correlated with anthocyanin biosynthesis in sweet potato. (springer.com)
  • Our work provided evidence of the vulnerability of grape berry to heat waves and exposure during heat wave events and possible protection methods to mitigate these effects in situ in context of climate change. (frontiersin.org)
  • Essential for pigment accumulation is TRANSPARENT TESTA19 (TT19), a glutathione S-transferase proposed to bind and stabilize anthocyanins, participating in their vacuolar sequestration, a function conserved across the flowering plants. (scoop.it)
  • Results indicate that both anthocyanins and flavonol glycosides are unstable in even mildly acidic extraction solvents and highly labile in 1% hydrochloric acid in methanol, the most commonly used extraction solvent. (ajevonline.org)
  • While lability of anthocyanins has previously been reported, this is the first report of flavonol glycoside stability in these solvents. (ajevonline.org)
  • The aim of this work is utilization of the grape pomace piled up as a waste after winemaking and its application in producing biodiesel. (grin.com)
  • The aronia sample was the one containing the highest phenolic content (431 mg/L), while Zupjanka had the lowest content of polyphenols (67.9 mg/L). The grape pomace presenting best results was Prokupec (246 mg/L). All yoghurt samples containing polyphenolics applied before the fermentation, presented higher pH value compared to the control and samples with polyphenolics applied after fermentation. (grin.com)