Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.PhenazinesStaining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Vaginosis, Bacterial: Polymicrobial, nonspecific vaginitis associated with positive cultures of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobic organisms and a decrease in lactobacilli. It remains unclear whether the initial pathogenic event is caused by the growth of anaerobes or a primary decrease in lactobacilli.Gardnerella vaginalis: A species in the genus GARDNERELLA previously classified as Haemophilus vaginalis. This bacterium, also isolated from the female genital tract of healthy women, is implicated in the cause of bacterial vaginosis (VAGINOSIS, BACTERIAL).Mobiluncus: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are found in the human vagina, particularly in association with Gardnerella vaginalis in cases of bacterial vaginosis.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Vagina: The genital canal in the female, extending from the UTERUS to the VULVA. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pyuria: The presence of white blood cells (LEUKOCYTES) in the urine. It is often associated with bacterial infections of the urinary tract. Pyuria without BACTERIURIA can be caused by TUBERCULOSIS, stones, or cancer.Microbiological Techniques: Techniques used in microbiology.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Port-Wine Stain: A vascular malformation of developmental origin characterized pathologically by ectasia of superficial dermal capillaries, and clinically by persistent macular erythema. In the past, port wine stains have frequently been termed capillary hemangiomas, which they are not; unfortunately this confusing practice persists: HEMANGIOMA, CAPILLARY is neoplastic, a port-wine stain is non-neoplastic. Port-wine stains vary in color from fairly pale pink to deep red or purple and in size from a few millimeters to many centimeters in diameter. The face is the most frequently affected site and they are most often unilateral. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 5th ed, p483)Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Gardnerella: A genus of bacteria found in the human genital and urinary tract. It is considered to be a major cause of bacterial vaginosis (VAGINOSIS, BACTERIAL).Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Vaginal Discharge: A common gynecologic disorder characterized by an abnormal, nonbloody discharge from the genital tract.Vaginitis: Inflammation of the vagina characterized by pain and a purulent discharge.Gonorrhea: Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Blood Stains: Antigenic characteristics and DNA fingerprint patterns identified from blood stains. Their primary value is in criminal cases.Lactobacillus: A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Potassium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain potassium as an integral part of the molecule.Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Bacteriuria: The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Vaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.Vaginal Diseases: Pathological processes of the VAGINA.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Vaginal Douching: The washing of the VAGINA cavity or surface with a solution. Agents or drugs can be added to the irrigation solution.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Urethritis: Inflammation involving the URETHRA. Similar to CYSTITIS, clinical symptoms range from vague discomfort to painful urination (DYSURIA), urethral discharge, or both.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria primarily found in purulent venereal discharges. It is the causative agent of GONORRHEA.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Trichomonas Vaginitis: Inflammation of the vagina, marked by a purulent discharge. This disease is caused by the protozoan TRICHOMONAS VAGINALIS.Eye Infections, Fungal: Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.Corynebacterium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CORYNEBACTERIUM.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Trichomonas vaginalis: A species of TRICHOMONAS that produces a refractory vaginal discharge in females, as well as bladder and urethral infections in males.Limulus Test: Sensitive method for detection of bacterial endotoxins and endotoxin-like substances that depends on the in vitro gelation of Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), prepared from the circulating blood (amebocytes) of the horseshoe crab, by the endotoxin or related compound. Used for detection of endotoxin in body fluids and parenteral pharmaceuticals.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Arthritis, Infectious: Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.Pneumonia, Pneumococcal: A febrile disease caused by STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Bacteria, AnaerobicYeasts: A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated: Serious INFLAMMATION of the LUNG in patients who required the use of PULMONARY VENTILATOR. It is usually caused by cross bacterial infections in hospitals (NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS).OhioFungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Haemophilus influenzae: A species of HAEMOPHILUS found on the mucous membranes of humans and a variety of animals. The species is further divided into biotypes I through VIII.Chlamydia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Streptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).Eosine Yellowish-(YS): A versatile red dye used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, textiles, etc., and as tissue stain, vital stain, and counterstain with HEMATOXYLIN. It is also used in special culture media.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Hematoxylin: A dye obtained from the heartwood of logwood (Haematoxylon campechianum Linn., Leguminosae) used as a stain in microscopy and in the manufacture of ink.Chlamydia trachomatis: Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Methyl Green: A tri-benzene-ammonium usually compounded with zinc chloride. It is used as a biological stain and for the dyeing and printing of textiles.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Periodic Acid-Schiff Reaction: A histochemical technique for staining carbohydrates. It is based on PERIODIC ACID oxidation of a substance containing adjacent hydroxyl groups. The resulting aldehydes react with Schiff reagent to form a colored product.Silver Staining: The use of silver, usually silver nitrate, as a reagent for producing contrast or coloration in tissue specimens.Lasers, Dye: Tunable liquid lasers with organic compounds (i.e., dye) which have a strong absorption band, used as the active medium. During emission, the dye has to be optically excited by another light source (e.g., another laser or flash lamp). The range of the emission wavelength may be anywhere from the ultraviolet to the near infrared (i.e., from 180 to 1100nm). These lasers are operated in continuous wave and pulsed modes. (UMDNS, 2005)
Gram stain[edit]. An alternative is to use a Gram-stained vaginal smear, with the Hay/Ison[35] criteria or the Nugent[23] ... DNA hybridization testing with Affirm VPIII was compared to the Gram stain using the Nugent criteria.[36] The Affirm VPIII test ... "Validation of a simplified grading of Gram stained vaginal smears for use in genitourinary medicine clinics". Sex Transm Infect ... "Reliability of diagnosing bacterial vaginosis is improved by a standardized method of gram stain interpretation". J. Clin. ...
Gram stain of a Bacillus species. Bacillus is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria and a member of the phylum ... Bacillus was later amended by Ferdinand Cohn to further describe them as spore-forming, Gram-positive, aerobic or facultatively ...
Mollicutes (gram variable, e.g. Mycoplasma). *Mendocutes (uneven gram stain, "methanogenic bacteria", now known as the Archaea) ... Informal groups based on Gram stainingEdit. Despite there being little agreement on the major subgroups of the Bacteria, Gram ... Morphology: There are many structural differences between bacteria, such as cell shape, Gram stain (number of lipid bilayers) ... a monophyletic Gram positive clade, and a polyphyletic Archeota derived from Gram positives.[65][66][67] Hori and Osawa's ...
The Gram Stain. The Microbiology Network. PMF Newsletter. Ellis JB, Everhart BM. 1886. Synopsis of the North American ... The Gram Stain. The Microbiology Network. PMF Newsletter. Wieland, T. 1968. Poisonous Principles of the Genus Amanita. Science ... KOH string testing, which can be used to determine the gram status of an organism, is used to determine the gram classification ... gram positive, of H. hyalinus. In addition to this, various forms of microscopy including bright-field microscopy, fluorescence ...
During Gram staining, cells lysej; they also lyse in hypotonic solutions. M. burtonii are motile with a single flagellum, and ...
Gram negative, with bipolar staining. The presumptive identification of the pathogen is based on standard biochemical tests. In ... piscicida (previously known as Pasteurella piscicida) is a gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium that causes disease in fish. ...
A major milestone in medical microbiology is the Gram stain. In 1884 Hans Christian Gram developed the method of staining ... can be performed immediately after the sample is taken from the patient and is used in conjunction with biochemical staining ...
... non-motile and stain Gram-negative. Strictly anaerobic. Chemo-organotrophic. Mucolytic in pure culture.[3]:1474 ...
C. tetani is a rod-shaped, obligate anaerobe which stains Gram positive in fresh cultures; established cultures may stain Gram ... Like other Clostridium genus species, it is Gram-positive, and its appearance on a gram stain resembles tennis rackets or ...
... are negative by Gram stain. The order Anaeroplasmatales was created in 1987 to encompass the family ...
There is no connection between the shape of a bacterium and its colors in the gram staining. In other words, some of them are ... gram negative and some are gram positive. References[change , change source]. *↑ S. Srivastava; Prem S. Srivastava, ...
A Gram stain may give a rough indication of the causative organism. A Ziehl-Neelsen stain may identify tuberculosis or other ... Cultures and stains[edit]. If the effusion is caused by infection, microbiological culture may yield the infectious organism ...
... has a gram negative gram stain. When P. nigrescens microflora colonize they trigger an over-aggressive ...
As a mordant when performing a Gram stain. It is applied for 1 minute after staining with crystal violet, but before ethanol to ... Normal vaginal tissue stains brown due to its high glycogen content, while tissue suspicious for cancer does not stain, and ... ensure that gram positive organisms' peptidoglycan remains stained, easily identifying it as a gram positive in microscopy. ... It can be used as a cell stain, making the cell nuclei more visible and for preserving phytoplankton samples. Lugol's solution ...
T. brockii stains Gram-positive. While originally thought to be non-sporeforming bacteria, it was later discovered that the ...
Gram stain of Bordetella pertussis. A physician's overall impression is most effective in initially making the diagnosis.[34] ...
Traditionally, gonorrhea was diagnosed with gram stain and culture; however, newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based ...
... (ALU) is a gram stain positive bacteria. A. luteus is a species of facultatively anaerobic, pleomorphic, ...
... is a genus of Gram-negative staining bacteria. It includes the hydrocarbon-degrading strain Lutibacterium ...
H. ducreyi gram stain appears as "school of fish." H. ducreyi is an opportunistic microorganism that infects its host by way of ... Haemophilus ducreyi is a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus bacteria, which causes the sexually transmitted disease ...
They are ovoid in shape and stain Gram-negative. Historically it was believed that all Chlamydiae species had a peptidoglycan- ... Gupta RS (2011). "Origin of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria: antibiotic selection pressure rather than endosymbiosis likely led ...
Like all Proteobacteria the two species stain Gram-negative.(,cf.) They were isolated from coastal, surface waters of the north ...
are quite large in size (3 to 4 μm long), they may grow in long chains, and they stain Gram-positive. To confirm the organism ... Firstly, specimens may be Gram stained. Bacillus spp. ... Only a few grams of material were used in these attacks and in ... Gram-positive anthrax bacteria (purple rods) in cerebrospinal fluid: If present, a Gram-negative bacterial species would appear ... Bacillus anthracis is a rod-shaped, Gram-positive, aerobic bacterium about 1 by 9 μm in size. It was shown to cause disease by ...
It has a positive gram stain and a spirochete spine. Mycobacteria are aerobic and nonmotile bacteria (except for the species ... Stains used in evaluation of tissue specimens or microbiological specimens include Fite's stain, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, and ... The organisms are hardy due to their cell wall, which is neither truly Gram negative nor positive. In addition, they are ... Kinyoun stain. Mycobacteria appear phenotypically most closely related to members of Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Corynebacterium ...
The cells are motile, strictly anaerobic and stain Gram positive. They can grow at temperatures as high as 97ºC. Strain V24ST ...
Gram-positive, coccoid bacteria have a distinctive morphology on Gram stain, lancet-shaped diplococci. They have a ... The organism was termed Diplococcus pneumoniae from 1920[10] because of its characteristic appearance in Gram-stained sputum. ... Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus, is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic (under aerobic conditions) or beta-hemolytic ( ... Claverys JP, Prudhomme M, Martin B (2006). "Induction of competence regulons as a general response to stress in gram-positive ...
Gram stain or Gram staining, also called Grams method, is a method of staining used to distinguish and classify bacterial ... Gram variable and gram-indeterminate bacteria[edit]. Some bacteria, after staining with the Gram stain, yield a gram-variable ... See also: Gram-negative bacterial infection and Gram-positive bacterial infection. Gram stains are performed on body fluid or ... The term Gram staining is derived from the surname of Hans Christian Gram, the eponym (Gram) is therefore capitalized but not ...
The Gram stain, named after its developer, Danish bacteriologist Christian Gram, has become an ... laboratory staining technique that distinguishes between two groups of bacteria by the identification of differences in the ... Grams stain, laboratory staining technique that distinguishes between two groups of bacteria by the identification of ... The Gram stain, named after its developer, Danish bacteriologist Christian Gram, has become an important tool in bacterial ...
A Gram stain is a test used to identify bacteria. It is one of the most common ways to quickly diagnose bacterial infection in ... Gram stain; Feces - Gram stain; Stool - Gram stain; Joint fluid - Gram stain; Pericardial fluid - Gram stain; Gram stain of ... Gram stain of the cervix; Pleural fluid - Gram stain; Sputum - Gram stain; Skin lesion - Gram stain; Gram stain of skin lesion ... A Gram stain is a test used to identify bacteria. It is one of the most common ways to quickly diagnose bacterial infection in ...
Gram stain, a widely used microbiological staining technique that greatly aids in the identification and characterization of ... bacteria: The Gram stain. …for bacteria is called the Gram stain, developed in 1884 by the Danish physician Hans Christian Gram ... More About Gram stain. 4 references found in Britannica articles. Assorted References. *bacterial staining technique* In ... Gram stain, a widely used microbiological staining technique that greatly aids in the identification and characterization of ...
A stool Gram stain is a laboratory test that uses different stains to detect and identify bacteria in a stool sample. ... A stool Gram stain is a laboratory test that uses different stains to detect and identify bacteria in a stool sample. ... The Gram stain method is sometimes used to quickly diagnose bacterial infections. ... A series of special stains are added to the sample. The lab team member looks at the stained smear under the microscope to ...
... it was developed by Hans Christian Gram (a Danish scientist) in 1884. The bacteria are placed as a sm... ... This is an important method for staining bacteria; ... How to do a Gram Stain. Gram negative bacteria. Azotobacter. ... Gram positive bacteria. bacterial endospore. Red ink stains one red, black ink stains one black. Italo disco. July 20. ... The bacteria are placed as a smear on a slide, then air-dried, then stained first with crystal violet dye and then with Grams ...
The sputum Grams stain is a laboratory test that your doctor can use to diagnose a bacterial infection in your respiratory ... What is a sputum Grams stain?. A sputum Grams stain is a laboratory test that allows your doctor to diagnose a bacterial ... After adding the staining agent, the laboratory technician will examine the slide under a microscope. The Grams stain doesnt ... The test is sometimes called a Grams stain of sputum. Its named after its inventor, Hans Christian Gram. ...
Gram staining (or Grams method) is an empirical method of differentiating bacterial species into two large groups (Gram- ... Media in category "Gram stains". The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. ... Deutsch: Gram-Färbung ist eine empirische Methode zur Unterscheidung von Bakterienarten in zwei große Gruppen (Gram-positive ... The method is named after its inventor, the Danish scientist Hans Christian Gram (1853 - 1938), who developed the technique in ...
Stool sample submitted for Gram stain will be screened for the presence of PMNs only. ...
Has anyone else seen this particular gram stain artefact? When gram staining Bacillus cultures i see strange light pink ... Microbiology] gram stain artefact. brook.clinton from csiro.au via microbio%40net.bio.net (by brook.clinton from csiro.au). Mon ... The smears also show the characteristic gram variable reaction of bacillus, in that the aging, endospore cells are pink, not ...
The Gram Stain. The Gram stain is the most important and universally used staining technique in the bacteriology laboratory. It ... In the Gram stain, the cells are first heat fixed and then stained with a basic dye, crystal violet, which is taken up in ... Gram-positive organisms retain the initial violet stain, while gram-negative organisms are decolorized by the organic solvent ... The difference between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria lies in the ability of the cell wall of the organism to retain ...
Includes Gram Stain 0060101),ARUP Laboratories is a national reference laboratory and a worldwide leader in innovative ... Anaerobe Culture (Includes Gram Stain 0060101). Company. ARUP Laboratories. Item. Anaerobe Culture (Includes Gram Stain 0060101 ...
Gram-positive rod)Branhamella catarrhalis (Gram-negative coccus)Micrococcus luteus (Gram-positive coccus)Rhodosp... ... A selection of 5 bacterial tube cultures representing the cell wall makeup determined by the Gram-stain method, which is used ... Gram Stain Comparison Set, Living. Item # 154615 Gram Stain Comparison Set, Living is rated 4.0 out of 5 by 2. ... A selection of 5 bacterial tube cultures representing the cell wall makeup determined by the Gram-stain method, which is used ...
... also Grams stain nounA staining technique used to classify bacteria in which a bacterial specimen is first stained with ... gram-positive bacteria retain the violet stain whereas gram-negative bacteria do not. Also called Grams method ... gram-positive bacteria retain the violet stain whereas gram-negative bacteria do not. Also called Grams method . ... "Gram stain." YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 06 December 2018. ,https://www.yourdictionary.com/gram-stain,. ...
Students perform a Gram stain on prepared bacterial slides, make the slides permanent, and observe them. Each slide has a ... mixture of bacterial forms (coccus, bacillus, and spirillum). Some are Gram positive, others are Gram negative. ... Gram Staining Readi-Stain® BioKit®. Item # 319570 *bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-4.0.0 ... Students perform a Gram stain on prepared bacterial slides, make the slides permanent, and observe them. Each slide has a ...
Joint fluid Gram stain is a laboratory test to identify bacteria in a sample of joint fluid using a special series of stains ( ... Joint fluid Gram stain is a laboratory test to identify bacteria in a sample of joint fluid using a special series of stains ( ... Gram stain of joint fluid. How the Test is Performed. A sample of joint fluid is needed. This may be done in a health care ... Gram stain method. is one of the most commonly used methods to rapidly identify the cause of bacterial infections. ...
Make research projects and school reports about Grams stain easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... and pictures about Grams stain at Encyclopedia.com. ... Grams stain The staining procedure used to determine the Gram ... Grams stain A staining method used to differentiate bacteria. The bacterial sample is smeared on a microscope slide, stained ... Gram-negative bacteria lose the initial stain but take up the counterstain, so that they appear red microscopically. Gram- ...
... and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. The sensitivity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 90% ... The specificity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 62% and 76%, respectively. Most of the ... but some of anaerobic Gram-negative rods were resistant to penicillin. Conclusion. When Gram staining shows only Gram-positive ... and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Phagocytosis of bacteria on Gram staining was observed in 9 cases. The bacteria cultured from ...
GRAM STAIN:. The gram stain shows gram negative bacilli.. CULTURES:. The organism was isolated on 5% sheep blood (SB) agar and ...
Gram stain or Gram staining, also called Grams method, is a method of staining used to distinguish and classify bacterial ... In addition, in all bacteria stained using the Gram stain, the age of the culture may influence the results of the stain. Gram- ... "Definition of Gram-positive". Collins. "Gram stain". Oxford Dictionary. "Definition of Gram-positive". Medicinenet. "Gram ... The term Gram staining is derived from the surname of Hans Christian Gram, the eponym (Gram) is therefore capitalized but not ...
Gram. gram. gram atom. gram calorie. Gram method. gram molecule. Gram stain. grama. grama grass. gram-atomic weight. gramercy. ... Noun: Gram stain. *A staining technique used to classify bacteria; bacteria are stained with gentian violet and then treated ... those that retain the gentian violet are Gram-positive and those that do not retain it are Gram-negative. - Grams method, Gram ... with Grams solution; after being decolourized with alcohol and treated with safranine and washed in water, ...
Comparing the diagnostic yield between Wood lamp examination and Gram stain, it was found that 9% of patients were positive on ... Using both Wood lamp examination and Gram staining concurrently resulted in a higher yield of 22.1% for positive patients. [25 ... Comparing the diagnostic yield between Wood lamp examination and Gram stain, it was found that 9% of patients were positive on ... How accurate are Wood lamp and gram staining for the identification of erythrasma?. Updated: Sep 10, 2018 ...
This stain is taken up by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, but does not alter the colour of Gram-positive ... A basic dye, crystal violet or gentian violet, is used to stain the slide. This dye is taken up by both Gram-positive and Gram- ... Gram staining, or Grams method, is an empirical method of differentiating bacterial species into two large groups based on the ... This washes away all the unbound basic dye, (usually crystal violet) and leaves Gram-positive organisms stained purple and Gram ...
... Microbiology Laboratory ... Gram developed a staining procedure which divided almost all bacteria into two large groups: Gram + and Gram - (although some ... Gram Stain and Enumeration of Culturable Bacteria. Description. In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor working in Berlin ... While examining lung tissue from patients who had died of pneumonia, he discovered that certain stains were preferentially ...
Direct Gram staining of the specimen is also very useful because it allows rapid diagnosis of an infection caused by gram- ... Direct Gram staining of the specimen is also very useful because it allows rapid diagnosis of an infection caused by gram- ... What is the role of direct gram staining in the diagnosis of Enterobacter infections?) and What is the role of direct gram ... What is the role of direct gram staining in the diagnosis of Enterobacter infections?. Updated: Jun 18, 2019 ...
  • Hans Christian Joachim Gram (September 13, 1853 - November 14, 1938) was a Danish bacteriologist noted for his development of the Gram stain. (wikipedia.org)
  • When gram staining Bacillus cultures i see strange light pink filaments, too narrow to be cells, closely associated with the actual cells. (bio.net)
  • L. monocytogenes is a gram positive cocco-bacillus, but may appear as coccoid. (blogspot.fi)
  • Because of the flammable alcohol, this staining set only ships to destinations within the 48 contiguous US states and Canada using Standard Ground. (sciencecompany.com)